Sample records for midlatitude continental convective

  1. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  2. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  3. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  5. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  7. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill University; Giangrande, Scott

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  10. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  17. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  18. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  19. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  20. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices ERIC P manifestations of mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs) that traversed Oklahoma during the periods May­August 2002 Profiler Network data. Forty-five MCVs that developed from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been

  2. A Climatology of Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices in the Rapid Update Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    A Climatology of Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices in the Rapid Update Cycle ERIC P. JAMES of mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs) occurring in the state of Oklahoma during the late spring and summer, true MCVs represent only about 20% of the mesoscale relative vorticity maxima detected by the algorithm

  3. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meteorological phenomenon of particular interest to forecasters is the mesoscale convective system (MCS). Chappell (1986) defines an MCS as "any multicellular storm or group of interacting storms that suggests some organization in its forcing". An MCS...VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer(MC3E):

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARMMeasurementsMethane Gas Outreach Home Room

  7. Convective variability associated with a mesoscale vortex in a midlatitude squall line system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the kinematic structure of the convective line and the mesoscale stortn-relative flow associated with an embedded mesovortex in the trailing stratiform region of the 28 May 1985 squall line system is examined using Doppler...

  8. DOE/SC-ARM-14-012 The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is62 The

  9. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  10. An analysis of modified convective available potential energy and Richardson number in mid-latitude squall line environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stricherz, James Nicholas

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modified convective available potential energy (MCAPE) and Richardson number (MRI) were computed for each upper air sounding in a synoptic ? scale data network. The resulting fields were contoured and compared to the development, growth and decay of mid... ? latitude squall lines in several cases studies. The results indicate that, though the squall lines remained in the vicinity of MCAPE maxima and MRI minima there was no quantitative association. The squall lines also appeared to avoid these regions...

  11. Convection?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's ElectronicnewConvection What

  12. Interactions between Cumulus Convection and Its Environment as Revealed by the MC3E Sounding Array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Jensen, Michael P.; Zhang, Yunyan; Giangrande, Scott E.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Minghua

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during themore »morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. Sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.« less

  13. Interactions between Cumulus Convection and Its Environment as Revealed by the MC3E Sounding Array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jensen, Michael P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, Yunyan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Giangrande, Scott E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McCoy, Renata [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Minghua [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during the morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. Sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.

  14. Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    1 Lecture 17 Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Importance of midlatitude ozone · Covers most of the world's populated areas · Provides protection from UV #12;3 Ozone loss picture, c. 1988 #12;4 Lower vs. Upper stratosphere #12;5 Ozone loss, post 1988 · Discovery of ozone hole

  15. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimes to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too little heavy rain events. With longer timescales one can improve the distribution, particularly for the extreme rain rates. Ultimately, without changing other aspects of the physics, one must choose between accurate diurnal timing and rain amount when choosing an appropriate convective timescale.

  16. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  17. 3, 10811107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 3, 1081­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page-dimensional model study of long-term mid-high latitude lower stratosphere ozone changes M. P. Chipperfield School­1107, 2003 Mid-latitude ozone changes in a 3D CTM M. P. Chipperfield Title Page Abstract Introduction

  18. On the formation of continental silicic melts in thermo-chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Thienen, Peter

    Chapter 7 On the formation of continental silicic melts in thermo-chemical mantle convection models-consistently produced by numerical thermo- chemical mantle convection models, presented in this paper, including partial

  19. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  20. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  1. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  2. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  3. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Toomre, Juri [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  4. Continental magmatism abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains abstracts on continental magmatism prepared by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior. Abstracts are listed alphabetically by senior author, followed by late arrivals and an index. (KJD)

  5. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  6. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Storer, R. L.; Griffin, B. M.; Höft, J.; Weber, J. K.; Raut, E.; Larson, V. E.; Wang, M.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF) parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method.The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and midlatitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak.more »The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.« less

  7. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  8. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  9. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  10. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  11. Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow Lin-Lin Pan Æ Tim Li Abstract In this study, we investigate the interaction between the tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO study the role of the syn- optic eddy feedback in the midlatitude response to the tropical ISO forcing

  12. SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

  13. Parameterization of Infrared Absorption in Midlatitude Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Wang, Zhien; Platt, C.M.R.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a new approach based on combined Raman lidar and millimeter-wave radar measurements and a parameterization of the infrared absorption coefficient {sigma}{sub a}(km{sup -1}) in terms of retrieved cloud microphysics, we derive a statistical relation between {sigma}{sub a} and cirrus cloud temperature. The relations {sigma}{sub a} = 0.3949 + 5.3886 x 10{sup -3} T + 1.526 x 10{sup -5} T{sup 2} for ambient temperature (T,{sup o}C), and {sigma}{sub a} = 0.2896 + 3.409 x 10{sup -3} T{sub m} for midcloud temperature (T{sub m}, {sup o}C), are found using a second order polynomial fit. Comparison with two {sigma}{sub a} versus T{sub m} relations obtained primarily from midlatitude cirrus using the combined lidar/infrared radiometer (LIRAD) approach reveals significant differences. However, we show that this reflects both the previous convention used in curve fitting (i. e., {sigma}{sub a} {yields} 0 at {approx} 80 C), and the types of clouds included in the datasets. Without such constraints, convergence is found in the three independent remote sensing datasets within the range of conditions considered valid for cirrus (i.e., cloud optical depth {approx} 3.0 and T{sub m} < {approx}20 C). Hence for completeness we also provide reanalyzed parameterizations for a visible extinction coefficient {sigma}{sub a} versus T{sub m} relation for midlatitude cirrus, and a data sample involving cirrus that evolved into midlevel altostratus clouds with higher optical depths.

  14. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility. Part II: Cloud Fraction and Surface Radiative Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility and for single-layered low (0­3 km), middle (3­6 km), and high clouds ( 6 km) using ARM SCF ground-based paired-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements with uncertainties

  15. A Study of Frontal-Scale Air-Sea Interaction in Midlatitude Western Boundary Current Regimes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaohui

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontal-scale air-sea interactions during boreal winter season in midlatitude western boundary current (WBC) regimes, including the Kuroshio Extension Region (KER) and Gulf Stream Region (GSR), are investigated using both observational (reanalysis...

  16. The convective structures associated with cloud-to-ground lightning in TOGA COARE Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restivo, Michael Edward

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    suggested that the threshold of about 40 dBZ at the -10 C level for rapid cloud electrification found in New Mexico by Dye et al. (1989) could be valid for tropical convection as well. Orville and Henderson (1986), and Goodman and Christian (1993), have... along with small ice and supercooled liquid water for cloud electrification and lightning to occur. Since most oceanic VPRR drop off rapidly above the freezing level compared to continental VPRR, this would provide evidence that the updraft velocities...

  17. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

  18. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Michael

    ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

  19. An analysis of modified convective available potential energy and Richardson number in mid-latitude squall line environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stricherz, James Nicholas

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 April is indicated by heavy solid line, position at 0135 UTC 11 April by heavy dotted line. 45 N 40 N 35 N 30 N 35 N tgF '. . OQN "". . ?, , . . . ~ p" -- PIA . ". : . '/ / / DEN r - '. "" ' TOP:: 1 A r/. Q ? 3P ' DDC ? 80-- 'I... UTC 09 May 1979 F' . 10. Surface chart for tg. Fig. 11. Radar summaries fur 0235 UTC, 09 May 1979 (a), aud 0435 UTC& 09 May 1979 (b). was the shortest squall line of the cases studied, averaging less than 400 km. At about 0735 UTC 10 May...

  20. LOCATION AND MAGNETOSPHERIC MAPPING OF SATURN'S MID-LATITUDE INFRARED AURORAL OVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallard, Tom; Melin, Henrik; Cowley, Stanley W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Miller, Steve [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lystrup, Makenzie B., E-mail: tss@ion.le.ac.u [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, CO 80303-7814 (United States)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous observations of Saturn's infrared aurorae have shown that a mid-latitude aurora exists significantly equatorward of the main auroral oval. Here, we present new results using data from four separate observing runs in 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2010. When combined, these provide a view of the mid-latitude aurora under a considerable range of viewing conditions, allowing the first calculation of the latitudinal position of this aurora to be made. This has shown that the mid-latitude aurora is located at the magnetic footprint of the region within the magnetosphere where the initial breakdown in corotation occurs, between 3 R {sub S} and the orbit of Enceladus ({approx}3.95 R {sub S}). We also confirm that this aurora is a continuous stable feature over a period of more than a decade and that an oval morphology is likely. When combined, these results indicate that the mid-latitude auroral oval is formed by currents driven by the breakdown process within the magnetosphere, in turn caused by mass loading from the torus of Enceladus, analogous with the volcanic moon Io's dominant role in the formation of Jupiter's main auroral oval.

  1. Tropospheric SF6: Age of air from the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Tropospheric SF6: Age of air from the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude surface D. W. Waugh,1 A. M 2013. [1] Observations of SF6 are used to quantify the mean time since air was in ("mean age" from. Comparisons of simulated SF6 and an idealized clock tracer confirm that the time lag between the SF6 mixing

  2. Friction in Mid-latitude Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Friction in Mid-latitude Cyclones Ian Boutle Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown #12;Motivation · Many studies have shown the significance of friction in formation and dissipation of cyclones Dt = + × . F . Diabatic Term: · Surface heat fluxes · Latent heat fluxes Frictional Term

  3. Moist synoptic transport of CO2 along the midlatitude storm track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    into the polar vortex, while cold dry air, low in CO2, that had been transported into the polar vortex earlier by equatorward transport by sinking cold dry air following a "dry air intrusion (DI)" behind cold fronts [CooperMoist synoptic transport of CO2 along the midlatitude storm track N. C. Parazoo,1 A. S. Denning,1 J

  4. The WRF nested within the CESM: Simulations of a midlatitude cyclone over the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and Forecasting (WRF) model is nested within the global Community Earth System Model (CESM). Since both models System Model (CESM). This system is validated for the simulation of a midlatitude cyclongesis event over system in which the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is nested within the Community Earth

  5. Influence of Midlatitude Winds on the Stratification of the Equatorial Thermocline* MASAMI NONAKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    , Ekman pumping, and entrainment in the subpolar ocean are examined. The effects of a "sponge layer" adjacent to the northern boundary of the basin are also assessed. Solutions are forced by idealized zonal winds with strong or weak midlatitude westerlies, and they are found in rectangular basins that extend

  6. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  7. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  8. An analysis on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth using transionospheric VHF signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juang, Zhen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was perfonned on the mid-latitude scintillation and coherence frequency bandwidth (Fcoh) using transionospheric VHF signal data. The data include 1062 events spanning from November 1997 to June 2002. Each event records FORTE satellite received VHF signals from LAPP located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fcohs were derived to study scintillation characteristics on diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as changes due to solar and geomagnetic activities. Comparisons to the VHFIUHF coherence frequency bandwidth studies previously reported at equatorial and mid-latitude regions are made using a 4th power frequency dependence relationship. Furthennore, a wideband ionospheric scintillation model, WBMOD, was used to estimate Fcohs and compared with our VHF Fcoh values. Our analysis indicates mid-latitude scintillation characteristics that are not previously revealed. At the VHF bottom frequency range (3035 MHz), distinguished smaller Fcohs are found in time period from sunset to midnight, in wann season from May to August, and in low solar activity years. The effects of geomagnetic storm activity on Fcoh are characterized by a sudden transition at a Kp index of 50-60. Comparisons with median Fcohs estimated from other studies validated our VHF Fcohs for daytime while an order of magnitude larger Fcohs are found for nighttime, implying a time-dependent issue in applying the 4th order power relationship. Furthermore, comparisons with WBMOD-estimated Fcohs indicated generally matched median scintillation level estimates while differences do exist for those events undergoing high geomagnetic stonn activity which may imply underestimates of scintillation level by the WBMOD in the mid-latitude regions.

  9. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from...

  10. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  11. RESEARCH Open Access Inference of human continental origin and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, Kenneth

    the seven continental regions Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Central/ South Asia, East Asia, the Americas

  12. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  13. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  14. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  15. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others. Natural convection can also be used to reduce the number of auxiliary heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures are predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Experimental results are summarized based on the monitoring of 15 passive solar buildings which employ a wide variety of geometrical configurations including natural convective loops.

  16. Solar dynamo models with alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local 3D convection calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; I. Tuominen

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) Results from kinematic solar dynamo models employing alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local convection calculations are presented. We estimate the magnitude of these effects to be around 2-3 m/s. The rotation profile of the Sun as obtained from helioseismology is applied. We obtain an estimate of the ratio of the two induction effects, C_alpha/C_Omega \\approx 10^-3, which we keep fixed in all models. We also include a one-cell meridional circulation pattern having a magnitude of 10-20 m/s near the surface and 1-2 m/s at the bottom of the convection zone. The model essentially represents a distributed turbulent dynamo, as the alpha-effect is nonzero throughout the convection zone, although it concentrates near the bottom of the convection zone obtaining a maximum around 30 degrees of latitude. Turbulent pumping of the mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that, when all these effects are included in the model, it is possible to correctly reproduce many features of the solar activity cycle, namely the correct equatorward migration at low latitudes and the polar branch at high latitudes, and the observed negative sign of B_r B_phi. Although the activity clearly shifts towards the equator in comparison to previous models due to the combined action of the alpha-effect peaking at midlatitudes, meridional circulation and latitudinal pumping, most of the activity still occurs at too high latitudes (between 5-60 degrees). Other problems include the relatively narrow parameter space within which the preferred solution is dipolar (A0), and the somewhat too short cycle lengths of the solar-type solutions. The role of the surface shear layer is found to be important only in the case where the alpha-effect has an appreciable magnitude near the surface.

  17. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  18. Comparison of atmospheric hydrology over convective continental regions using water vapor isotope measurements from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Correlation analysis shows that mixing with boundary layer air, enhanced isotopic fractionation during precipitation, and subsiding air parcels contribute to intraseasonal isotopic variability. These local controls distillation in a Lagrangrian framework underestimates the observed isotopic depletion during the monsoons

  19. What is this MCMS? MCMS stands for the MAP Climatology of Mid-latitude Storminess dataset (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arguments. Cyclone tracking is treated as a separate process and product (not shown here for brevity) depression around a mid-latitude baroclinic cyclone (or just cyclone). MCMS rests on two operations: 1) finding and tracking cyclones and 2) objectively delineating the area under each cyclones influence

  20. Boundary Layer Convergence Induced by Strong Winds across a Midlatitude THOMAS KILPATRICK, NIKLAS SCHNEIDER, AND BO QIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Boundary Layer Convergence Induced by Strong Winds across a Midlatitude SST Front* THOMAS in an idealized, dry, two- dimensional configuration, for winds crossing from cold to warm SST and from warm to cold SST. For strong cross-front winds, O(10 m s21 ), changes in the turbulent mixing and MABL depth

  1. A method for interpreting continental and analytic epistemology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Sarah Ruth

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this thesis is to investigate the feasibility and profitability of communication between analytic and continental philosophy in epistemology. Wittgenstein's concept of language games will be used to frame the issue', continental and analytic philosophers play...

  2. MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Robert A. Houze Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Robert A. Houze Jr. Department of Atmospheric Sciences University; published 31 December 2004. [1] Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have regions of both convective and stratiform precipitation, and they develop mesoscale circulations as they mature. The upward motion takes

  3. NATURAL CONVECTION IN ROOM GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, R.; Ruberg, K.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in room geometries in two and three dimensions. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment reported here. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single thermal zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. The results indicate that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may be in error by as much as 50% as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure. It is also found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface.

  4. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  5. Seismic Constraints on Interior Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, S M; DeRosa, M L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the velocity spectral distribution of global-scale solar convective cells at depth using techniques of local helioseismology. We calibrate the sensitivity of helioseismic waves to large-scale convective cells in the interior by analyzing simulations of waves propagating through a velocity snapshot of global solar convection via methods of time-distance helioseismology. Applying identical analysis techniques to observations of the Sun, we are able to bound from above the magnitudes of solar convective cells as a function of spatial convective scale. We find that convection at a depth of $r/R_\\odot = 0.95$ with spatial extent $\\ell <20$, where $\\ell$ is the spherical harmonic degree, comprise weak flow systems, on the order of 15 m/s or less. Convective features deeper than $r/R_\\odot = 0.95$ are more difficult to image due to the rapidly decreasing sensitivity of helioseismic waves.

  6. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Continentality: its estimation and physical significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee Fong, Juan Manuel

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CI cC & (3 ) 3BNHH dW3l 1UnNNU Cll IC tj I- Cl 27 NORTH AMERICA 10 5 4 5 Fig. S. Regression line residuals for 128 North American stations Nap of North America adapted from Leppard (1937). 28 NORTH AMERICA 3 / / 20 N //I // / / L... explanations for the lag patterns. 43 REFERENCES Berg, H. , 1944: Zum Begriff der Kontinentalitat. Meteorol. Zeit. , 61, 283-284. Brunt, D. . 1924: Climatic continentality and oceanicity. ~Geo r. J. , 64, 43-56. Bryson, R. A. , and F. K. Hare, 1974...

  8. Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentratingEnergy Information Hallein,Continental Biofuels

  9. Continental Components Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentratingEnergy Information Hallein,Continental

  10. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  11. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  12. NISTIR 6095 Horizontal Convective Condensation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NISTIR 6095 Horizontal Convective Condensation of Alternative Refrigerants within a Micro-Fin Tube Horizontal Convective Condensation of Alternative Refrigerants Within a Micro-Fin Tube Mark A. Kedzierski J for flow boiling pressure drop in a smooth tube. Correlation of the pressure drop measurements suggested

  13. Collective phase description of oscillatory convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, Yoji, E-mail: ykawamura@jamstec.go.jp [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan)] [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); Nakao, Hiroya [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)] [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a theory for the collective phase description of oscillatory convection in Hele-Shaw cells. It enables us to describe the dynamics of the oscillatory convection by a single degree of freedom which we call the collective phase. The theory can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, stable time-periodic solutions to partial differential equations, representing the oscillatory convection. We derive the phase sensitivity function, which quantifies the phase response of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point, and analyze the phase synchronization between two weakly coupled Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection on the basis of the derived phase equations.

  14. arabian-eurasian continental collision: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sun, Youshun 2 Numerical Geodynamic Experiments of Continental Collision: Past and Present. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Research explores deep continental...

  15. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  16. Structure and evolution of a convective band MCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdes-Manzanilla, Arturo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Mesoscale Convective Complex apparently aided in the formation of new lines of convection behind the primary convective line of the system. This process was repeated twice in the storm life cycle and led to multiple bands of convection...

  17. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  18. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building which play a major role in energy transfer are discussed. Two situations are investigated: Convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway sizing equation is given for the single door case. Data from airflow monitoring in one two-story house and summary data for five others are presented. The nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  19. Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Proposition de 2015 Rémunération : 800 par mois (montant brut mensuel) Lieu: Continental Automotive France, 1 avenue.daurenjou@continental-corporation.com #12;Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 2 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Internship

  20. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes VC-1 and VC-2A, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  1. Geotechnical characterization of sediments from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Brian B. (Brian Bautista), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight whole core sediment samples were obtained from ODP Site 1244, Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin with the goal of understanding the stress history, consolidation behavior and strength characteristics of the ...

  2. Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Våge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

  3. Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Vikas

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  4. Stochastic and mesoscopic models for tropical convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences, New York penetrative convection to heights of 5­10 km with associated anvil towers of clouds. Observational data

  5. Marangoni convection in droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel

    We consider a small droplet of water sitting on top of a heated superhydrophobic surface. A toroidal convection pattern develops in which fluid is observed to rise along the surface of the spherical droplet and to accelerate ...

  6. Northern mid-latitude glaciation in the Late Amazonian period of Mars: Criteria for the recognition of debris-covered glacier and valley glacier landsystem deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    in talus pile pore space caused lubrication and flow during an earlier climatic regime. A number of factors have remained uncertain, however, including the detailed structure and texture of LDA analogs, to assess the characteristics of LDA/LVF in the northern mid-latitudes of Mars. We find evidence

  7. Origins of convective activity over Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strager, Christopher Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORIGINS OF CONVECTIVE ACTIVITY OVER PANAMA A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN STRAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Meteorology ORIGINS OF CONVECTIVE ACTIVITY OVER PANAMA A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN STRAGER Approved as to style and content by: Steven W. ons (Chair of Committee) Kenneth C. Brundidge (Member) Rud lf J. Freund ( ember...

  8. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kritsuk; T. Plewa; E. Mueller

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-like structures. Unlike in the case of a cooling inflow, the X-ray surface brightness of an (on average) isentropic convective core does not display a sharp maximum at the centre. A hybrid model, which combines a subsonic peripheral cooling inflow with an inner convective core, appears to be stable. We also discuss observational implications of these results.

  9. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our Sun, primarily composed of ionized hydrogen and helium, has a surface temperature of 5777~K and a radius $R_\\odot \\approx 696,000$ km. In the outer $R_\\odot/3$, energy transport is accomplished primarily by convection. Using typical convective velocities $u\\sim100\\,\\rm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ and kinematic viscosities of order $10^{-4}$ m$^{2}$s$^{-1}$, we obtain a Reynolds number $Re \\sim 10^{14}$. Convection is thus turbulent, causing a vast range of scales to be excited. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, of the convecting fluid is very low, of order $10^{-7}$\\,--\\,$10^{-4}$, so that the Rayleigh number ($\\sim Re^2 Pr$) is on the order of $10^{21}\\,-\\,10^{24}$. Solar convection thus lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters, highly untypical of fluid flows on Earth. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers ("solar activity") and, more broadly, the heliosphere ("space weather"). The precise determination of the depth of sola...

  10. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.8: Relationship among mesoscale convective complex (MCC)C. J. Anderson, 2008: Idealized mesoscale convective system205. Houze, R. , 2004: Mesoscale convective systems. Reviews

  11. Convection automated logic oven control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, M.A.; Eke, K.I. [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)] [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few years, there has been a greater push to bring more automation to the cooling process. There have been attempts at automated cooking using a wide range of sensors and procedures, but with limited success. The authors have the answer to the automated cooking process; this patented technology is called Convection AutoLogic (CAL). The beauty of the technology is that it requires no extra hardware for the existing oven system. They use the existing temperature probe, whether it is an RTD, thermocouple, or thermistor. This means that the manufacturer does not have to be burdened with extra costs associated with automated cooking in comparison to standard ovens. The only change to the oven is the program in the central processing unit (CPU) on the board. As for its operation, when the user places the food into the oven, he or she is required to select a category (e.g., beef, poultry, or casseroles) and then simply press the start button. The CAL program then begins its cooking program. It first looks at the ambient oven temperature to see if it is a cold, warm, or hot start. CAL stores this data and then begins to look at the food`s thermal footprint. After CAL has properly detected this thermal footprint, it can calculate the time and temperature at which the food needs to be cooked. CAL then sets up these factors for the cooking stage of the program and, when the food has finished cooking, the oven is turned off automatically. The total time for this entire process is the same as the standard cooking time the user would normally set. The CAL program can also compensate for varying line voltages and detect when the oven door is opened. With all of these varying factors being monitored, CAL can produce a perfectly cooked item with minimal user input.

  12. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

  13. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, H-Y; Mechoso, CR; Xue, Y; Xiao, H; Neelin, JD; Ji, X

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the remote response to the convective heating in Africa, weand remote regions. The convective heating anomalies

  14. A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH ATTACHED WALL JETS By WEIXIU KONGQuest Information and Learning Company. #12;II A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS

  15. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF NATURAL AND MIXED CONVECTION AIRFLOW INDOORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    coordinate Greek symbols : Thermal expansion coefficient t : Time step : Filter size : Kinematic viscocity convection, such as winter heating by a baseboard heater; forced convection, such as free cooling in shoulder

  16. Fluidized bed boiler convective zone tube replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A major problem with the Georgetown University Atomspheric-Pressure, Fluidized-Bed Combustor-Boiler (GU AFBC) experienced during the first six years of operation was tube erosion. Previous corrective measures for in-bed tube erosion appeared to be effective, but excessive wear of the convective zone tubes was still occurring, and the entire heat transfer tube bundle in the boiler required replacement. In the planned project,the eroded tubes would be replaced, and the convective zone modified to eliminate the problem. Progress is discussed.

  17. Convection and dynamo action in B stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustson, Kyle C; Toomre, Juri

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Main-sequence massive stars possess convective cores that likely harbor strong dynamo action. To assess the role of core convection in building magnetic fields within these stars, we employ the 3-D anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to model turbulent dynamics within a 10 solar mass main-sequence (MS) B-type star rotating at 4 times the solar rate. We find that strong (900 kG) magnetic fields arise within the turbulence of the core and penetrate into the stably stratified radiative zone. These fields exhibit complex, time-dependent behavior including reversals in magnetic polarity and shifts between which hemisphere dominates the total magnetic energy.

  18. Local models of stellar convection: Reynolds stresses and turbulent heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; I. Tuominen

    2004-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study stellar convection using a local three-dimensional MHD model, with which we investigate the influence of rotation and large-scale magnetic fields on the turbulent momentum and heat transport. The former is studied by computing the Reynolds stresses, the latter by calculating the correlation of velocity and temperature fluctuations, both as functions of rotation and latitude. We find that the horisontal correlation, Q_(theta phi), capable of generating horisontal differential rotation, is mostly negative in the southern hemisphere for Coriolis numbers exceeding unity, corresponding to equatorward flux of angular momentum in accordance with solar observations. The radial component Q_(r phi) is negative for slow and intermediate rotation indicating inward transport of angular momentum, while for rapid rotation, the transport occurs outwards. Parametrisation in terms of the mean-field Lambda-effect shows qualitative agreement with the turbulence model of Kichatinov & R\\"udiger (1993) for the horisontal part H \\propto Q_(theta phi)/cos(theta), whereas for the vertical part, V \\propto Q_(r phi)/sin(theta), agreement only for intermediate rotation exists. The Lambda-coefficients become suppressed in the limit of rapid rotation, this rotational quenching being stronger for the V component than for H. We find that the stresses are enhanced by the presence of the magnetic field for field strengths up to and above the equipartition value, without significant quenching. Concerning the turbulent heat transport, our calculations show that the transport in the radial direction is most efficient at the equatorial regions, obtains a minimum at midlatitudes, and shows a slight increase towards the poles. The latitudinal heat transport does not show a systematic trend as function of latitude or rotation.

  19. Convection and convective overshooting in stars more massive than 10 $M_\\odot$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie, Jin; Lv, Guoliang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, four sets of evolutionary models are computed with different values of the mixing length parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ and the overshooting parameter $\\delta_{\\rm ov}$. The properties of the convective cores and the convective envelopes are studied in the massive stars. We get three conclusions: First, the larger $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ leads to enhancing the convective mixing, removing the chemical gradient, and increasing the convective heat transfer efficiency. Second, core potential $\\phi_{\\rm c} = M_{\\rm c} / R_{\\rm c}$ describes sufficiently the evolution of a star, whether it is a red or blue supergiant at central helium ignition. Third, the discontinuity of hydrogen profile above the hydrogen burning shell seriously affect the occurrence of blue loops in the Hertzsprung--Russell diagram.

  20. Seismic stratigraphy and quaternary evolution of the New York Bight Inner Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotto, Linda L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the New York Bight Apex on the U. S. Atlantic inner continental shelf were analyzed to develop a better understanding of the Quaternary evolution of this inner continental shelf environment. Interpretation of the subbottom data reveals several...

  1. Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise ANDY RIDGWELL,1 MARK of the continental shelves that were exposed and vegetated during the glacial sea-level low stand and that can help

  2. Solar Dynamics, Rotation, Convection and Overshoot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, S; Roth, M; Schou, J; Schuessler, M; Thompson, M J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent observational, theoretical and modeling progress made in understanding the Sun's internal dynamics, including its rotation, meridional flow, convection and overshoot. Over the past few decades, substantial theoretical and observational effort has gone into appreciating these aspects of solar dynamics. A review of these observations, related helioseismic methodology and inference and computational results in relation to these problems is undertaken here.

  3. The effect of convection on pulsational stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Houdek

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review on the current state of mode physics in classical pulsators is presented. Two, currently in use, time-dependent convection models are compared and their applications on mode stability are discussed with particular emphasis on the location of the Delta Scuti instability strip.

  4. Convective Instability of a Boundary Layer with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    proportional to the integral over the depth of the lithosphere of the 19 #12;ratio of thermal buoyancy. Such instabilities are driven by the negative thermal buoyancy of the cold lithosphere and retarded largely for driving convective downwelling. For non-Newtonian viscosity with power law exponent n and temperature

  5. Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides et d and absolute instabilities in Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow Benoît PIER Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides flow type often disrupt oil-well drilling By implementing a detailed instability analysis, the dynamics

  6. The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of gas hydrate, a frozen form of nat-seafloor geology. Increasing use of marine multicomponent seismic technol- ogy by oil and gas companies now allows seafloor strata over distances of several kilometers across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico

  7. CALCIUM CARBONATE BUDGET OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CONTINENTAL BORDERLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    CALCIUM CARBONATE BUDGET OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CONTINENTAL BORDERLAND A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED. I. Murphy K. J. Roy E.· D..·· Stroup A. H. Woodcock #12;iv ABSTRACT Calcium carbonate sedimentation is the change in amount of calcium carbonate in the Borderland with time. Transfer can be divided

  8. CONVECTION THEORY AND SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, David; Meakin, Casey; Young, Patrick A., E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.ed, E-mail: casey.meakin@gmail.co, E-mail: patrick.young.1@asu.ed [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As a preliminary step toward a complete theoretical integration of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic simulations into stellar evolution, convection at the surface and sub-surface layers of the Sun is re-examined, from a restricted point of view, in the language of mixing-length theory (MLT). Requiring that MLT use a hydrodynamically realistic dissipation length gives a new constraint on solar models. While the stellar structure which results is similar to that obtained by Yale Rotational Evolution Code (Guenther et al.; Bahcall and Pinsonneault) and Garching models (Schlattl et al.), the theoretical picture differs. A new quantitative connection is made between macro-turbulence, micro-turbulence, and the convective velocity scale at the photosphere, which has finite values. The 'geometric parameter' in MLT is found to correspond more reasonably with the thickness of the superadiabatic region (SAR), as it must for consistency in MLT, and its integrated effect may correspond to that of the strong downward plumes which drive convection (Stein and Nordlund), and thus has a physical interpretation even in MLT. If we crudely require the thickness of the SAR to be consistent with the 'geometric factor' used in MLT, there is no longer a free parameter, at least in principle. Use of three-dimensional simulations of both adiabatic convection and stellar atmospheres will allow the determination of the dissipation length and the geometric parameter (i.e., the entropy jump) more realistically, and with no astronomical calibration. A physically realistic treatment of convection in stellar evolution will require substantial additional modifications beyond MLT, including nonlocal effects of kinetic energy flux, entrainment (the most dramatic difference from MLT found by Meakin and Arnett), rotation, and magnetic fields.

  9. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  10. Laser induced natural convection and thermophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.Y.; Cipolla, J.; Morse, T.F.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of axial laser volumetric heating and forced convection on the motion of aerosol particles in a vertical tube has been studied. The asymptotic case of constant wall temperature provides simple temperature and velocity profiles that determine the convection and thermophoretic motion of small aerosol particles. For the case in which the flow (in the absence of laser heating) is downward, the laser heating induces upward buoyant motion near the tube center. When the laser heating is taken to be constant (a small absorption limit), a velocity profile may be found that will minimize the distance over which particles are deposited on the wall. Such an observation may have some bearing on the manufacture of preforms from which optical fibers are drawn.

  11. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  12. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  13. Magneto-convection in a sunspot umbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schuessler; A. Voegler

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a realistic simulation of 3D radiative magneto-convection in a strong background magnetic field corresponding to the conditions in sunspot umbrae are shown. The convective energy transport is dominated by narrow upflow plumes with adjacent downflows, which become almost field-free near the surface layers. The strong external magnetic field forces the plumes to assume a cusp-like shape in their top parts, where the upflowing plasma loses its buoyancy. The resulting bright features in intensity images correspond well (in terms of brightness, size, and lifetime) to the observed umbral dots in the central parts of sunspot umbrae. Most of the simulated umbral dots have a horizontally elongated form with a central dark lane. Above the cusp, most plumes show narrow upflow jets, which are driven by the pressure of the piled-up plasma below. The large velocities and low field strengths in the plumes are effectively screened from spectroscopic observation because the surfaces of equal optical depth are locally elevated, so that spectral lines are largely formed above the cusp. Our simulations demonstrate that nearly field-free upflow plumes and umbral dots are a natural result of convection in a strong, initially monolithic magnetic field.

  14. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  15. Application of the 85 GHz ice scattering signature to a global study of mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devlin, Karen Irene

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been observed that tropical convection tends to cluster, organizing into multicellular mesoscale convective systems (MCS), In convective towers, updrafts on the order of 10 m s-I favor the formation of large, precipitation-sized ice...

  16. Air convection noise of pencil-beam interferometer for long trace profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Convection Noise of Pencil-beam Interferometer for Longwe investigate the effect of air convection on laser-beamshown that the NPD spectra due to air convection have a very

  17. The QBO's influence on lightning production and deep convection in the tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Celina Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) flash densities and ten years (1998-2007) of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deep convective and stratiform rainfall and convective echo top heights are analyzed. The QBO can be linked to deep convection through two hypothesized mechanisms: 1) modulation...

  18. Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK AND WILLIAM R. COTTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK (Manuscript received 30 December 2005, in final form 4 October 2006) ABSTRACT Mesoscale convective systems of usefulness in operational forecasting. 1. Introduction Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) frequently de

  19. About convective heat transfer in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashkevich, R.I. [Kamchatsky Complex Department of NIPIgeotherm Institute, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The interphase fluid-rock heat exchange in convective beat transfer in geothermal systems is investigated Nonlinear model of interphase heat exchange is suggested. Calculation for one dimension case and comparison with known Anzelius-Schumann solution is presented Generalized type block heat transfer model is formulated. The model is adequate for case of geothermal systems and reservoir when a rock block size is comparable with filtration path length. Criterion equations for nonstationary coefficients of interphase heat exchange we presented these equations were obtained in laboratory experiments with diorites.

  20. Natural convection airflow measurement and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, G.F.; Yamaguchi, Kenjiro

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is a major mechanism for heat distribution in many passive solar buildings, especially those with sunspaces. To better understand this mechanism, observations of air velocities and temperatures have been made in 13 different houses that encompass a wide variety of one- and two-story geometries. This paper extends previous reports. Results from one house are described in detail, and some generalizations are drawn from the large additional mass of data taken. A simple mathematical model is presented that describes the general nature of airflow and energy flow through an aperture.

  1. Improving Convective Parameterization Using ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenITLaboratory inImproving Convective

  2. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF THE THESIS Convective Heating Analysis of an IFE Targetto reduce the convective heating to the LEH windows and fuelpoint for more forceful heating simulations, placing less

  3. A numerical simulation of slantwise convection: its structure and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overpeck, Scott Allen

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    convection), and could be a possible explanation for frontal rainbands. This study uses the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a diagnostic tool to simulate a slantwise convective case from the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE, Dirks et al...

  4. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  5. UNCORRECTED Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlbrodt, Till

    UNCORRECTED PROOF Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models: a conceptual study is the 12 improvement of convection parameterization schemes, but the question of grid geometry also plays to an at- 14 mosphere model. Such ocean climate models have mostly structured, coarsely resolved grids. 15

  6. FLUCTUATIONS NEAR THE CONVECTIVE INSTABILITY IN A CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . For sufficiently strong heating, it is pos- sible for the buoyancy force to overcome the vis- cous shear forces convective pour une certaine valeur critique. A cause du couplage de modes induit par la force extérieure, la, drives the system into convective instability. It is found that, because of the mode coupling induced

  7. Drainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Simon

    , where soap solution is added to the foam at constant flow rate, the irregular motion in the beer glass results for convection in quasi two-dimensional foams (monolayers of bubbles between two glass platesDrainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version) S. Hutzler, S.J. Cox*, E. Janiaud

  8. Convection, granulation and period jitter in classical Cepheids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neilson, Hilding R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of recent observations of the sole classical Cepheid in the Kepler field, V1154 Cygni, found random changes of about 30 minutes in the pulsation period. These period changes challenge standard theories of pulsation and evolution because the period change is non-secular, and explaining this period jitter is necessary for understanding stellar evolution and the role of Cepheids as precise standard candles. We suggest that convection and convective hot spots can explain the observed period jitter. Convective hot spots alter the timing of flux maximum and minimum in the Cepheid light curve, hence change the measured pulsation period. We present a model of random hot spots that generate a localized flux excess that perturbs the Cepheid light curve and consequently the pulsation period which is consistent with the observed jitter. This result demonstrates how important understanding convection is for modeling Cepheid stellar structure and evolution, how convection determines the red edge of the instability...

  9. The development of convective instability in relation to convective activity and synoptic systems in AVE IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, James Gregory

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    700 mb 500 mb 300 mb 100 mb 1. 8 2 54 3. 1' 6. 2 3. 8 5 64 7 5 15. 0 RMS Direction Error RNS ~Seed Error -1 -1 0. 5ms l. oms -1 -1 0. 8 m s 2. 0 m s -1 -1 10ms 3. 8ms -1 -1 2. 0 m s 5. 7 m s The rawinsonde data were supplemented by hourly... of Co ttee) 4' (Member) N. I (Member) (Head of Department) August 1979 ABSTRACT Tha Development of Convective Instability in Relation to ConVectiVe Activity and Synoptic Systems in AVE 1V, (August 1979$ James Gregory Davis, B. S. , Texas A&M...

  10. Convective effects in a regulatory and proposed fire model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hohnstreiter, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation System Development Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer in large fires. However, convection can be as much as 10 to 20 percent of the total heat transfer to an object in a large fire. The current radioactive material transportation packaging regulations include convection as a mode of heat transfer in the accident condition scenario. The current International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Series 6 packaging regulation states ``the convection coefficient shall be that value which the designer can justify if the package were exposed to the specified fire``. The current Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) packaging regulation states ``when significant, convection heat input must be included on the basis of still, ambient air at 800{degrees}C (1475{degrees}F)``. Two questions that can arise in an analysts mind from an examination of the packaging regulations is whether convection is significant and whether convection should be included in the design analysis of a radioactive materials transportation container. The objective of this study is to examine the convective effects on an actual radioactive materials transportation package using a regulatory and a proposed thermal boundary condition.

  11. Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above. The theory predicts that parameter regimes exist for which increased continental insulation has no effect

  12. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  13. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  14. Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up Sascha Brune; accepted 5 June 2012; published 2 August 2012. [1] In many cases the initial stage of continental break-up was and is associated with oblique rifting. That includes break-up in the Southern and Equatorial Atlantic, separation

  15. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from in revised form 6 July 2004 Abstract The lithium concentration and isotopic composition of two saprolites the behavior of lithium isotopes during continental weathering. Both saprolites show a general trend

  16. Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

  17. Numerical and Experimental Modeling of Natural Convection for a Cryogenic Prototype of a Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonius, Tim

    in Sutherland's law D = diameter g = gravitation acceleration h = convection coefficient k = thermal

  18. Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure Keywords: Supercritical pressure Aviation kerosene Convective heat transfer Numerical study a b s t r a c convective in kerosene pipe flow is complicated. Here the convective heat transfer characteristics of China

  19. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 044105 (2013) Onset of buoyancy-driven convection in Cartesian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the onset of buoyancy-driven convection relevant to subsurface carbon dioxide sequestration in confined

  20. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  1. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  2. VARIATION OF STELLAR ENVELOPE CONVECTION AND OVERSHOOT WITH METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine how metallicity affects convection and overshoot in the superadiabatic layer of main sequence stars. We present results from a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations with four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), and spanning a range in effective temperature (4950 < T{sub eff} < 6230). We show that changing the metallicity alters properties of the convective gas dynamics, and the structure of the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Our grid of simulations shows that the amount of superadiabaticity, which tracks the transition from efficient to inefficient convection, is sensitive to changes in metallicity. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region. We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well.

  3. Overshooting Convection from High-resolution NEXRAD Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, David

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Rocky Mountains. Overshooting convection is most common over the high plains, and there is a pronounced seasonal and diurnal cycle present. The majority of overshooting systems occur during the warm season, and a diurnal maximum of overshooting occurs...

  4. Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge P. Helander1 , D.D. Ryutov2 , and R National Laboratory, Livermore, USA By biasing alternate divertor plates in a tokamak, one can create

  5. atmospheric convective boundary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    convective conditions is found to be primarily due to variations in mixed layer wind speed. Low-level winds thus play the major role in regulating the ability of thermals to...

  6. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

  7. Identification of Robust Terminal-Area Routes in Convective Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System, especially during summer. Traffic flow management algorithms require reliable forecasts of route blockage ...

  8. Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jiwen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed...

  9. Identification of Robust Routes using Convective Weather Forcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Diana

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), especially during summer months when travel demand is high. This has been the motivation for Air ...

  10. Survey and evaluation of techniques to augment convective heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a survey and evaluation of the numerous techniques which have been shown to augment convective heat transfer. These techniques are: surface promoters, including roughness and treatment; displaced ...

  11. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, Ronald

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect of the adjacent conditioned zones was properly accounted for by the BLASTeffects of this observation on the accuracy of results from the programs, the convection code was used iteratively with BLAST

  12. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cold fluid constitute most of the heat transport andevent cold air descends to the ground, heat transport fromcold air during sweep events. The convective boundary layer has a great influence on moisture transport,

  13. Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

  14. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

  15. Vertical convection in neutrino-dominated accretion flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tong; Kawanaka, Norita; Li, Ang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the effects of the vertical convection on the structure and luminosity of the neutrino-dominated accretion flow (NDAF) around a stellar-mass black hole in spherical coordinates. We found that the convective energy transfer can suppress the radial advection in the NDAF, and that the density, temperature and opening angle are slightly changed. As a result, the neutrino luminosity and annihilation luminosity are increased, which is conducive to achieve the energy requirement of gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Possible solar cycle variations in the convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) that covers the period from 1995 to 1998 we study the change in frequencies of solar oscillations with solar activity. From these frequencies we attempt to determine any possible variation in solar structure with solar activity. We do not find any evidence of a change in the convection zone depth or extent of overshoot below the convection zone during the solar cycle.

  17. A numerical study of orographic effects on moist convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert Doyle

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on a typical synoptic situation across the mountain range of northern Honshu, Japan. Wind shear, stability~ and moisture were varied from the basic situation to observe the effects of induced vertical motion on the different clouds which formed... forecaster in Japan. Convective systems were noted as they crossed the Sea oi' Japan and changes to these systems ovserved as they crossed the mountain ranges of Japan. Some convective systems would move across the Sea of Japan caus1ng consecutive reports...

  18. Natural convection airflow and heat transport in buildings: experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, G.F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of natural convection airflow in passive solar buildings are described. Particular results are given for two buildings supplementing other data already published. A number of generalizations based on the monitoring of the 15 buildings are presented. It is concluded that energy can be reasonably well distributed throughout a building by natural convection provided suitable openings are present and that the direction of heat transport is either horizontally across or upward.

  19. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  20. Thermal effects of Kohout convection in the Bahamas and Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kohout convection is a low-temperature groundwater thermal convection process in carbonate platform margins. It was first conceived of and postulated to occur in the subsurface of Florida by Francis Kohout in the 1960's. The flow is driven by buoyancy arising from subsurface differences in salinity and in temperature. Cold, dense seawater surrounding a platform at depth migrates inward, displacing warmer pore waters at the same elevation. This inflowing density current is in turn warmed within the platform and is buoyed upward to discharge on the platform shelf or margin resulting in a giant convective half-cell. In isolated platforms, such as the Bahamas, temperature differences alone drive Kohout convection. In Florida, the regional meteoric flow of the Floridan Aquifer mixes by dispersion with the convecting seawater resulting in an enhanced flow rate. Approximate analytical and numerical solutions of the governing differential equations allow the interactions of the flow and temperature fields to be determined. Permeability characteristics and platform margin geometry are the principal controls of the thermal structure and groundwater flow pattern in isolated platforms. In Florida, regional flow strength is also a control. High horizontal permeabilities (100 md to 1 darcy and higher) and tall, steep margins (1 km height, 30/sup 0/ slope) allow Kohout convection to penetrate 30 to 50 km inland causing substantial cooling. It may thus be a control of thermal evolution of the Florida-Bahamas Basin as well as parts of other sedimentary basins.

  1. Evolution of vertical drafts and cloud-to-ground lightning within the convective region of a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Scott Henry

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the area-averaged vertical velocity within the objectively defined convective region of the 4 June 1985 PRE-STORM (Preliminary Regional Experiment for Stormscale Operational and Research Meteorology-Central Phase) mesoscale...

  2. Direct numerical simulations of convective heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pointel, G.; Acharya, S.; Sharma, C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the development of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation using higher order finite difference schemes. The time dependent Navier Stokes equation has been discretized using semi-implicit second order time splitting scheme, which requires the solution of pressure Poisson equation. For this purpose a Galerkin Fourier transform in the spanwise direction and a matrix diagonalization technique is used. The convection terms are formulated in non-conservative form on a collocated grid. A fifth order upwind biased scheme is used for this purpose. Diffusion terms are differenced using a sixth order central difference scheme. The algorithm is implemented on the MasPar MP-1, a Single Instruction Multiple Data computer where efficient data parallelization is used to get DNS results. The code has been used to get results for smooth channel flow at Re{sub {tau}} = 180. Results are now being obtained for the energy equation and for flow in a periodic ribbed channel.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR CONVECTION IN SUNSPOT PENUMBRAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharti, L.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J., E-mail: bharti@mps.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institute fuer sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of twisting motions in penumbral filaments in sunspots located at heliocentric angles from 30{sup 0} to 48{sup 0} using three time series of blue continuum images obtained by the Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) on board Hinode. The relations of the twisting motions to the filament brightness and the position within the filament and within the penumbra, respectively, are investigated. Only certain portions of the filaments show twisting motions. In a statistical sense, the part of the twisting portion of a filament located closest to the umbra is brightest and possesses the fastest twisting motion, with a mean twisting velocity of 2.1 km s{sup -1}. The middle and outer sections of the twisting portion of the filament (lying increasingly further from the umbra), which are less bright, have mean velocities of 1.7 km s{sup -1} and 1.35 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The observed reduction of brightness and twisting velocity toward the outer section of the filaments may be due to reducing upflow along the filament's long axis. No significant variation of twisting velocity as a function of viewing angles was found. The obtained correlation of brightness and velocity suggests that overturning convection causes the twisting motions observed in penumbral filament and may be the source of the energy needed to maintain the brightness of the filaments.

  4. Dynamic Transitions of Surface Tension Driven Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henk Dijkstra; Taylan Sengul; Shouhong Wang

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the well-posedness and dynamic transitions of the surface tension driven convection in a three-dimensional (3D) rectangular box with non-deformable upper surface and with free-slip boundary conditions. It is shown that as the Marangoni number crosses the critical threshold, the system always undergoes a dynamic transition. In particular, two different scenarios are studied. In the first scenario, a single mode losing its stability at the critical parameter gives rise to either a Type-I (continuous) or a Type-II (jump) transition. The type of transitions is dictated by the sign of a computable non-dimensional parameter, and the numerical computation of this parameter suggests that a Type-I transition is favorable. The second scenario deals with the case where the geometry of the domain allows two critical modes which possibly characterize a hexagonal pattern. In this case we show that the transition can only be either a Type-II or a Type-III (mixed) transition depending on another computable non-dimensional parameter. We only encountered Type-III transition in our numerical calculations. The second part of the paper deals with the well-posedness and existence of global attractors for the problem.

  5. A Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Compressible Convection: Differential Rotation in the Solar Convection Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. Robinson; Kwing L. Chan

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of two simulations of the convection zone, obtained by solving the full hydrodynamic equations in a section of a spherical shell. The first simulation has cylindrical rotation contours (parallel to the rotation axis) and a strong meridional circulation, which traverses the entire depth. The second simulation has isorotation contours about mid-way between cylinders and cones, and a weak meridional circulation, concentrated in the uppermost part of the shell. We show that the solar differential rotation is directly related to a latitudinal entropy gradient, which pervades into the deep layers of the convection zone. We also offer an explanation of the angular velocity shear found at low latitudes near the top. A non-zero correlation between radial and zonal velocity fluctuations produces a significant Reynolds stress in that region. This constitutes a net transport of angular momentum inwards, which causes a slight modification of the overall structure of the differential rotation near the top. In essence, the {\\it thermodynamics controls the dynamics through the Taylor-Proudman momentum balance}. The Reynolds stresses only become significant in the surface layers, where they generate a weak meridional circulation and an angular velocity `bump'.

  6. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  7. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the clay fraction while...

  8. Z .Lithos 48 1999 153170 The evolution of continental roots in numerical thermo-chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Z .Lithos 48 1999 153­170 The evolution of continental roots in numerical thermo-chemical mantle by a thick depleted root. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Thermo

  9. The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental Europena natural gas markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Philipp

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasification capacity, on this long-term relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest...

  10. Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

  11. Seismic investigation of the transition from continental to oceanic subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick Douglas

    The western Hellenic subduction zone (WHSZ) exhibits well-documented along-strike variations in lithosphere density (i.e., oceanic versus continental), subduction rates, and overriding plate extension. Differences in slab ...

  12. Interpretation of side-scan sonar images from hydrocarbon seep areas of the Louisiana continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Rusheng

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Side-scan sonar images from the Louisiana continental slope were examined to study hydrocarbon seepage and related surficial geologic seafloor features. Three study areas are located in the Green Canyon area and the Garden Bank area. Hydrocarbon...

  13. Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense G. C. Chang physical and optical measurements have captured sediment resuspension associated with two hurricanes. Sediment resuspension associated with Hurricane Edouard was forced by combined current and wave processes

  14. Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 18871895 Morphological modelling of intertidal mudflats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 1887­1895 Morphological modelling of intertidal mudflats currents on an intertidal mudflat. The model is integrated numerically to determine the long mudflats; Intertidal sedimentation; Mathematical models; Morphodynamics 1. Introduction The systematic

  15. Remote sensing of submerged objects and geomorphology in continental shelf waters with acoustic waveguide scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratilal, Purnima, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long range imaging of submerged objects, seafloor and sub-seafloor geomorphology in continental shelf waters using an active sonar system is explored experimentally and theoretically. A unified model for 3-D object ...

  16. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  17. Surface sediment analysis of five carbonate banks on the Texas continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Susanne E

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF A Thesis by Susanne E. Cunningham Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AcM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... Member Member December 1977 ABSTRACT SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF (December 1977) Susanne E. Cunningham, B, S. , Indiana University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Bryant The five...

  18. Analysis of 11 june 2003 mesoscale convective vortex genesis using weather surveillance radar ??88 doppler (wsr-88d) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Amber Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), which typically form within the stratiform rain of some mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), may persist for days, often regenerating convection daily. Long-lived MCVs can produce as much precipitation as a...

  19. Analysis of 11 june 2003 mesoscale convective vortex genesis using weather surveillance radar ??88 doppler (wsr-88d)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Amber Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), which typically form within the stratiform rain of some mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), may persist for days, often regenerating convection daily. Long-lived MCVs can produce as much precipitation as a...

  20. Efficient small-scale dynamo in solar convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate small-scale dynamo action in the solar convection zone through a series of high resolution MHD simulations in a local Cartesian domain with 1$R_\\odot$ (solar radius) of horizontal extent and a radial extent from 0.715 to 0.96$R_\\odot$. The dependence of the solution on resolution and diffusivity is studied. For a grid spacing of less than 350 km, the root mean square magnetic field strength near the base of the convection zone reaches 95% of the equipartition field strength (i.e. magnetic and kinetic energy are comparable). For these solutions the Lorentz force feedback on the convection velocity is found to be significant. The velocity near the base of the convection zone is reduced to 50% of the hydrodynamic one. In spite of a significant decrease of the convection velocity, the reduction in the enthalpy flux is relatively small, since the magnetic field also suppresses the horizontal mixing of the entropy between up- and downflow regions. This effect increases the amplitude of the entropy pe...

  1. Eects of thermo-chemical mantle convection on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    E¡ects of thermo-chemical mantle convection on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core Takashi in the core with a fully dynamic thermo-chemical mantle convection model is developed to investigate

  2. Hydration of the lower stratosphere by ice crystal geysers over land convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaykin, S.

    The possible impact of deep convective overshooting over land has been explored by six simultaneous soundings of water vapour, particles and ozone in the lower stratosphere next to Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) during ...

  3. Forced-convection surface-boiling heat transfer and burnout in tubes of small diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic heat-transfer apparatus was designed and constructed for the study of forced-convection boiling in small channels. The various regions of forced-convection surface boiling were studied experimentally and analytically. ...

  4. The influence of convective activity on the vorticity budget 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Tamara L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Continued. ~E' i~ QE I ~ tt Jtm a tt NE v~ l / tmt ta' NE ~~f IIIY G NE~~ NE a/+ NE NE NE NE 1st NE Fig. 13. Radar summary for 1435 GNT 10 Apri. l 1979. NE I l. c I E j~7 ~ NE NE MP- Qo+ Fig. 14. Radar summary for 2235 GMT 10 April 1979... experiment. 15 3 Average values of terms in the vorticity equation for a convective (Area 1) and a nonconvective (Area 2) area during AVE VII. Units of 10 s 145 4 Average values of terms in the vorticity equation for a convective (Area 1) and a...

  5. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  6. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  7. Submitted to Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics Shear and Mixing in Oscillatory Doubly Di usive Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    convection are found in the Earth's oceans, most notably, below the polar ice caps. There melting ice

  8. The ionospheric signature of transient dayside reconnection and the associated pulsed convection return ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of convection. Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection) á Magne- tospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, 1996, and references therein) and the excitation of dayside convection is the focus of the present of magnetosheath plasma into the magneto- sphere, and the ionospheric plasma ¯ow at the footprint of the cusp

  9. THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND ANVIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS in the Simulation of Mesoscale Convective Systems and Anvil Clouds in the Tropical Western Pacific K. Van Weverberg1 cloud microphysics in the simulation of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropical western

  10. Practical and Intrinsic Predictability of Severe and Convective Weather at the Mesoscales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practical and Intrinsic Predictability of Severe and Convective Weather at the Mesoscales at the mesoscales using convection-permitting ensemble simulations of a squall line and bow echo event during the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) Experiment (BAMEX) on 9­10 June 2003. Although most

  11. weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    · weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective WeatherTraffic Management Decision Support During Convective Weather Mark E. Weber, James E. Evans, William R. Moser algorithm. #12;· weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective

  12. Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system William W. Hager,1 is analyzed for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) situated in north Texas and east New Mexico on 15 July. Lapierre (2012), Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system, J. Geophys

  13. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H and the sheet metal: This is ventilation by natural convection. The remaining conductive heat from the sheet or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers

  14. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  15. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

  16. Sparse grid collocation schemes for stochastic natural convection problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    stochastic methods and Monte-Carlo based sam- pling methods are two approaches that have been used to analyzeSparse grid collocation schemes for stochastic natural convection problems Baskar on the Smolyak algorithm offers a viable alternate method for solving high-dimensional stochastic partial

  17. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  18. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  19. EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING M.L. Lin, T.W. Eagar Materials of the weld pool which are changed by these fact ors . It is shown that, at current s in excess of 300 amperes in a different heat distribution on the weld pool surface . ALTHOUGH THE GAS tungsten arc (GTA) welding process

  20. Estimation of Convection Loss from Paraboloidal Dish Cavity Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In general, cavity receivers employed in the sun-tracking paraboloidal dish concentrator are subjected the numerical investigation of natural and combined convection loss from cavity receivers employed in solar is a significant source of energy loss from thermal receivers used with dish solar concentrators. This paper

  1. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  2. Total lightning observations of severe convection over North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Christopher Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Density GSD Gridded Source Density LDAR Lightning Detection and Ranging MCS Mesoscale Convective System MSI Mesocyclone Strength Index MxFED Maximum Flash Extent Density MxFIDT Maximum Flash Initiation Density Total MxGSD Maximum Gridded Source.......................................................................................... 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................... 4 1.3 Thesis Objectives and Hypothesis...................................................... 19 2. DATA AND METHODOLOGY...

  3. The CHUVA Project how does convection vary across the Brazil?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    1 The CHUVA Project ­ how does convection vary across the Brazil? Luiz A. T. Machado1 , Maria A. F de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), Brazil. 2. Universidade de São Paulo. Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Brazil. 3. Departamento de Ciências e Tecnologia Espacial

  4. Symmetrybreaking instabilities of convection By A.M. Rucklidge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    fluid layer is often modelled by considering a finite box with periodic boundary conditions in the two­dimensional convection in a plane layer of unit depth with periodic boundary conditions with equal wave numbers k oscillatory solutions are cre­ ated in a Hopf bifurcation. One of the three oscillations, alternating

  5. 'Butterfly effect' in porous Bénard convection heated from below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siri, Z.; Liew, K. Y. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ibrahim, R. I. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, 71800 Bandar Baru Nilai, Negeri Sembilan Darul Khusus (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition from steady to chaos for the onset of Bénard convection in porous medium was analyzed. The governing equation is reduced to ordinary differential equation and solved using built in MATLAB ODE45. The transition from steady to chaos take over from a limit cycle followed by homoclinic explosion.

  6. Preparation, Biodistribution and Neurotoxicity of Liposomal Cisplatin following Convection Enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Preparation, Biodistribution and Neurotoxicity of Liposomal Cisplatin following Convection Enhanced delivery (CED) to F98 glioma bearing rats. Neurotoxicologic studies were carried out in non-tumor bearing. Unexpectedly, LipoplatinTM was highly neurotoxic when given i.c. by CED and resulted in death immediately

  7. Stellar Surface Convection, Line Asymmetries, and Wavelength Shifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Box 43, SE­22100 Lund, Sweden Abstract. Wavelength positions of photospheric absorption lines may the sinking and cooler (darker) gas. For the Sun, the effect is around 300 m s \\Gamma1 , expected to increase), and intergranular lanes with local redshifts (sinking motion), as naturally expected in convective energy transfer

  8. Predicting flow reversals in chaotic natural convection using data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Chris

    . The thermosyphon, a type of natural convection loop or non-mechanical heat pump, can be likened to a toy model of climate. Thermosyphons are used in solar water heaters (Belessiotis and Mathiou- lakis, 2002), cooling) and other industrial applications. In these heat pumps, buoyant forces move fluid through a closed loop

  9. Nonequilibrium pattern formation and spatiotemporal chaos in fluid convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cross

    2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report for grant number DE-FG03-98ER14891 summarizes the application of the unique simulation capabilities developed under DOE support to investigations of important issues in pattern formation and spatiotemporal chaos in Rayleigh-Benard convection, particularly emphasizing quantitative contact with the active experimental programs.

  10. OSCILLATORY FLOW FORCED CONVECTION IN MICRO HEAT SPREADERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskok, Ali

    transfer devices, micro heat pipes, based on capillary pumping of a multiphase ¯uid in microchannels, have-phase forced convection heat transfer and ¯ow characteristics of water in microchannels, both in the laminar) concept for ef cient transport of large, concentrated heat loads is introduced. The MHS is a single

  11. Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

  12. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  13. Transport of Magnetic Fields in Convective, Accreting Supernova Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson; Norman Murray

    2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the amplification and transport of a magnetic field in the collapsed core of a massive star, including both the region between the neutrinosphere and the shock, and the central, opaque core. An analytical argument explains why rapid convective overturns persist within a newly formed neutron star for roughly 10 seconds ($> 10^3$ overturns), consistent with recent numerical models. A dynamical balance between turbulent and magnetic stresses within this convective layer corresponds to flux densities in excess of $10^{15}$G. Material accreting onto the core is heated by neutrinos and also becomes strongly convective. We compare the expected magnetic stresses in this convective `gain layer' with those deep inside the neutron core. Buoyant motions of magnetized fluid are greatly aided by the intense neutrino flux. We calculate the transport rate through a medium containing free neutrons protons, and electrons, in the limiting cases of degenerate or non-degenerate nucleons. Fields stronger than $\\sim 10^{13}$ G are able to rise through the outer degenerate layers of the neutron core during the last stages of Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling (up to 10 seconds post-collapse), even though these layers have become stable to convection. We also find the equilibrium shape of a thin magnetic flux rope in the dense hydrostatic atmosphere of the neutron star, along with the critical separation of the footpoints above which the rope undergoes unlimited expansion against gravity. The implications of these results for pulsar magnetism are summarized, and applied to the case of late fallback over the first 1,000-10,000 s of the life of a neutron star

  14. The continental margin is a key source of iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.J.; Bishop, J.K.B

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show that labile particulate iron and manganese concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region, have prominent subsurface maxima between 100-200 m, reaching 3 nM and 600 pM, respectively. The subsurface concentration maxima in particulate Fe are characterized by a more reduced oxidation state, suggesting a source from primary volcagenic minerals such as from the Kuril/Kamchatka margin. The systematics of these profiles suggest a consistently strong lateral advection of labile Mn and Fe from redox-mobilized labile sources at the continental shelf supplemented by a more variable source of Fe from the upper continental slope. This subsurface supply of iron from the continental margin is shallow enough to be accessible to the surface through winter upwelling and vertical mixing, and is likely a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific.

  15. Non-local topographic influences on deep convection: An idealized model for the Nordic Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the inner Norwegian Atlantic Current (iNwAC), which follows the continental slope along the west coast of Norway, and the outer Norwegian Atlanti

  16. On the transfer of atmospheric energy from the Gulf of Mexico to the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Richard William

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE TRANSFER OF ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY FROM THE GULP OF MEXICO TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES A Thesis RICHARD WILLIAM KNIGHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Deoember 1972 Ma)or Sub)ect: Meteorology ON THE TRANSFER OF ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES A Thesis RICHARD WILLIAM KNIGHT Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of ommittee...

  17. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 90, 2, pp. 425449, April 2000 Earthquake Locations in the Inner Continental Borderland,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Peter

    Borderland is an offshore geomorphic region extending from Point Conception in southern Cali- fornia Locations in the Inner Continental Borderland, Offshore Southern California by Luciana Astiz and Peter M. Shearer Abstract The inner Continental Borderland region, offshore southern California, is tectonically

  18. Caged Gammarus fossarum (crustacea) as a robust tool for the characterization of bioavailable contamination levels in continental waters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    contamination levels in continental waters. Toward the determination of threshold values Authors BESSE Jean contamination in continental waters. Gammarids were translocated into cages at 27 sites, in the Rhône of the bioavailable contamination levels. Overall, our results show the interest and robustness of the proposed

  19. Larviculture of native white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, and exotic white shrimp, P. vannanmei at Continental Fisheries, Limited, Panama City, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranyakananda, Porcham

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARVICULTURE OF NATIVE WHITE SHRIMP, Penaeus setiferus, AND EXOTIC WHITE SHRIMP, P. vannamei, AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES. LIMITED. PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Submitted to the Department of Wildlife..., AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES, LIMITED, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Approved as to style and content by ( Chairman of Committee ) ( Member ) ( Member ) ABSTRACT Larviculture of native wnite snrimp, penaeus setiferus...

  20. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  1. COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

  2. Convection in multiphase flows using Lattice Boltzmann methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; P. Perlekar; M. Sbragaglia; F. Toschi

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high resolution numerical simulations of convection in multiphase flows (boiling) using a novel algorithm based on a Lattice Boltzmann method. We first validate the thermodynamical and kinematical properties of the algorithm. Then, we perform a series of 3d numerical simulations at changing the mean properties in the phase diagram and compare convection with and without phase coexistence at $Ra \\sim 10^7$. We show that in presence of nucleating bubbles non-Oberbeck Boussinesq effects develops, mean temperature profile becomes asymmetric, heat-transfer and heat-transfer fluctuations are enhanced. We also show that small-scale properties of velocity and temperature fields are strongly affected by the presence of buoyant bubble leading to high non-Gaussian profiles in the bulk.

  3. Dissipation Efficiency in Turbulent Convective Zones in Low Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaloyan Penev; Dimitar Sasselov; Frank Robinson; Pierre Demarque

    2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the analysis of Penev et al. (2007) to calculate effective viscosities for the surface convective zones of three main sequence stars of 0.775Msun, 0.85Msun and the present day Sun. In addition we also pay careful attention to all normalization factors and assumptions in order to derive actual numerical prescriptions for the effective viscosity as a function of the period and direction of the external shear. Our results are applicable for periods that are too long to correspond to eddies that fall within the inertial subrange of Kolmogorov scaling, but no larger than the convective turnover time, when the assumptions of the calculation break down. We find linear scaling of effective viscosity with period and magnitudes at least three times larger than the Zahn (1966, 1989) prescription.

  4. The Critical Rayleigh Number in Horizontal Convection for $\\Pran=1$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, L; Sun, De-Jun; Sun, Liang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the numerical simulations of the horizontal convection within a rectangle cavity tank at high Rayleigh numbers. The physical solution of horizontal convection depends the space resolution of the meshes. The mesh number $N$ is proportion to $Ra^{1/3}$. The unstable numerical solutions are obtained as $Npower law also implies that the space resolution is dominated by the viscosity and heat diffusion. It implies that the special resolution is dominated by viscosity and thermal diffusivity but the length of the tank. Moreover, there is a Hopf bifurcation from steady solutions to unsteady solutions and the critical Rayleigh number $Ra_c$ is obtained as $5.53\\times 10^8

  5. Diamagnetic pumping near the base of a stellar convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. L. Kitchatinov; G. Rüdiger

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The property of inhomogeneous turbulence in conducting fluids to expel large-scale magnetic fields in the direction of decreasing turbulence intensity is shown as important for the magnetic field dynamics near the base of a stellar convection zone. The downward diamagnetic pumping confines a fossil internal magnetic field in the radiative core so that the field geometry is appropriate for formation of the solar tachocline. For the stars of solar age, the diamagnetic confinement is efficient only if the ratio of turbulent magnetic diffusivity of the convection zone to the (microscopic or turbulent) diffusivity of the radiative interiour is larger than 10^5. Confinement in younger stars require still larger diffusivity ratio. The observation of persistent magnetic structures on young solar-type stars can thus provide evidences for the nonexistence of tachoclines in stellar interiors and on the level of turbulence in radiative cores.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  7. Influence of geometry on natural convection in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Winn, C.B.; Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong free convection airflows occur within passive solar buildings resulting from elevated temperatures of surfaces irradiated by solar energy compared with the cooler surfaces not receiving radiation. The geometry of a building has a large influence on the directions and magnitudes of natural airflows, and thus heat transfer between zones. This investigation has utilized a variety of reduced-scale building configurations to study the effects of geometry on natural convection heat transfer. Similarity between the reduced-scale model and a full-scale passive solar building is achieved by having similar geometries and by replacing air with Freon-12 gas as the model's working fluid. Filling the model with Freon-12 gas results in similarity in Prandtl numbers and Rayleigh numbers based on temperature differences in the range from 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 11/. Results from four geometries are described with an emphasis placed on the effects of heat loss on zone temperature stratification shifts.

  8. THE DOMINANCE OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam, E-mail: jmurphy@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jdolence@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-dimensional instabilities have become an important ingredient in core-collapse supernova (CCSN) theory. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the driving mechanism of the dominant instability. We compare our parameterized three-dimensional CCSN simulations with other buoyancy-driven simulations and propose scaling relations for neutrino-driven convection. Through these comparisons, we infer that buoyancy-driven convection dominates post-shock turbulence in our simulations. In support of this inference, we present four major results. First, the convective fluxes and kinetic energies in the neutrino-heated region are consistent with expectations of buoyancy-driven convection. Second, the convective flux is positive where buoyancy actively drives convection, and the radial and tangential components of the kinetic energy are in rough equipartition (i.e., K{sub r} {approx} K{sub {theta}} + K{sub {phi}}). Both results are natural consequences of buoyancy-driven convection, and are commonly observed in simulations of convection. Third, buoyant driving is balanced by turbulent dissipation. Fourth, the convective luminosity and turbulent dissipation scale with the driving neutrino power. In all, these four results suggest that in neutrino-driven explosions, the multi-dimensional motions are consistent with neutrino-driven convection.

  9. Evolution of moisture convergence in a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bercherer, John Phillip

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Keuneth C. Brundidge Two separate Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) were investigated to determine if a characteristic surface moisture convergence (MC) signature existed on the mesoscale during their lifecycle. The first storm (Case 1... convergence, a bandpass filtering technique was utilized. It was found that MC could identify the general area of initial thunderstorm activity 2 h prior to its development for both cases. During the initial development stage of Case 1, advection...

  10. ARM - MC3E Planning - Data Plots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummergovField CampaignsMidlatitude Continental Convective

  11. AERIAL MEASUREMENTS OF CONVECTION CELL ELEMENTS IN HEATED LAKES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa-Aleman, E; Saleem Salaymeh, S; Timothy Brown, T; Alfred Garrett, A; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Linda Nichols, L

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

  12. Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

  13. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Matthew Peek

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epibenthic megafauna of the continental slope and abyssal plain of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using multi-shot bottom photography. A total of 10,388 photographs were analyzed from 100 sites encompassing a total area...

  15. Grazing intensity impacts soil carbon and nitrogen storage of continental steppe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qiang

    100049 China Abstract. Recent studies have underscored the importance of grasslands as potential carbon in the grasslands of northern China. Key words: carbon; carbon sequestration; carbon storage; grassland; grazingGrazing intensity impacts soil carbon and nitrogen storage of continental steppe N. P. HE,1,2 Y. H

  16. Inversion tectonics during continental rifting: The Turkana Cenozoic rifted zone, northern Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    Inversion tectonics during continental rifting: The Turkana Cenozoic rifted zone, northern Kenya B of inverted deformation within Miocene-Recent basins of the Turkana rift (northern Kenya) in the eastern: The Turkana Cenozoic rifted zone, northern Kenya, Tectonics, 24, TC2002, doi:10.1029/2004TC001637. 1

  17. Predicting and testing continental vertical motion histories since the Paleozoic Nan Zhang a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Shijie

    topography continental vertical motion thermochronology Dynamic topography at the Earth's surface caused with the surface plate motion history, we compute dynamic topography and its his- tory for the last 400 Ma Dynamic topography is the surface deflection induced by mantle con- vection driven by sub

  18. 18512004 annual heat budget of the continental landmasses Shaopeng Huang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    to 2000 a total of 10.4 ZJ (Zetta-Joules or 1021 J) of thermal energy had been absorbed by Africa, Asia to 2004 for Asia, Europe, North America, Africa, Australia, and South America. 2. Method [3] The heat climate is accompanied by changing energy in various climate system components including the continental

  19. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  20. Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, �lafur

    Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud University of Bergen, Department of Geology, Allégt. 41, N-5007 Bergen, Norway Jan.Mangerud@geol.uib.no Introduction Ice sheets the author will briefly review present knowledge of the glacial history of Norway. The recon- struction

  1. Original article On the Late Miocene continentalization of the Guadix Basin: More evidence for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    connection existed through the Guadix-Baza, Fortuna and Lorca basins during the Messinian (Mu¨ ller and Hsu of the sedimentary fill of the Fortuna (Garce´s et al., 1998, 2001) and Lorca Basins (Krijgsman et al., 2000). These studies revealed that the marine-continental transition in the Fortuna and Lorca basins occurred

  2. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  3. Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a April 2008 Accepted 5 June 2008 Editor: B. Bourdon Keywords: Lithium Isotope fractionation Deep. Lithium concentrations of granulite xenoliths also vary widely (0.5 to 21 ppm) and are, on average, lower

  4. Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin Marga García a,*, Julian A. Dowdeswell a , Gemma Ercilla b , Martin Jakobsson c a Scott June 2012 Available online xxx Keywords: Greenland Basin Glacially influenced sedimentary processes

  5. Festival del Sur-Encuentro Teatral Tres Continentes: Un festival consolidado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Má rquez Montes, Carmen

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    latinoamericana por vocación, pues sus habitantes siempre han emparentado su destino al de Latinoamérica y su mirada ha ido dirigida al Oeste y nunca al continente europeo. Durante las siete ediciones del Festival del Sur casi doscientos grupos han pasado por...

  6. Statistical analysis of 4-year observations of aerosol sizes in a semi-rural continental environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    Statistical analysis of 4-year observations of aerosol sizes in a semi-rural continental. Introduction Formation of new aerosol particles via gas-to-particle conver- sion is an important process, which to understanding how new particle formation (NPF) processes lead to formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  7. Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 20292043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 2029­2043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment and Beardsley, 1995; Geyer et al., 1996), while its sediment is dispersed primarily by bottom bound- ary layer dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California Jonathan A. Warricka,Ã, Leal A.K. Mertesb , Libe

  8. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  9. SOUND-SPEED INVERSION OF THE SUN USING A NONLOCAL STATISTICAL CONVECTION THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Chunguang; Deng Licai [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiong Darun [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen, E-mail: cgzhang@nao.cas.cn [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helioseismic inversions reveal a major discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and the standard solar model just below the base of the solar convection zone. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is caused by the inherent shortcomings of the local mixing-length theory adopted in the standard solar model. Using a self-consistent nonlocal convection theory, we construct an envelope model of the Sun for sound-speed inversion. Our solar model has a very smooth transition from the convective envelope to the radiative interior, and the convective energy flux changes sign crossing the boundaries of the convection zone. It shows evident improvement over the standard solar model, with a significant reduction in the discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and local convection models.

  10. How might a statistical cloud scheme be coupled to a mass-flux convection scheme?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Hannay, Cecile; Xu, Kuan-man

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling of statistical cloud schemes with mass-flux convection schemes is addressed. Source terms representing the impact of convection are derived within the framework of prognostic equations for the width and asymmetry of the probability distribution function of total water mixing ratio. The accuracy of these source terms is quantified by examining output from a cloud resolving model simulation of deep convection. Practical suggestions for inclusion of these source terms in large-scale models are offered.

  11. Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

  12. Convection induced by radiative cooling of a layer of participating medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasanna, Swaminathan, E-mail: prasannaswam@gmail.com [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France)] [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Venkateshan, S. P., E-mail: spv@iitm.ac.in [HTTP Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering IIT Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the effect of radiative cooling on natural convection in a horizontal layer of a participating medium enclosed between isothermal opaque wall and radiatively transparent wall and exposed to a cold background. The study is of relevance to a nocturnal boundary layer under clear and calm conditions. The focus of the study is to capture the onset of convection caused by radiative cooling. The experiments have been designed to mimic the atmospheric radiative boundary conditions, and hence decoupling convection and radiation boundary conditions. Planck number Pl and optical thickness of the layer ?{sub H} are the two important parameters that govern the interaction between radiation and convection. The radiation-convection coupling is a strong function of length scale. Convection sets up within first few seconds for all the experiments. Strong plume like convection is observed for the experimental conditions used in the present study. Both simulations and experiments confirm that radiative cooling increases substantially with decrease in emissivity of the bottom wall. Radiative cooling is strongly influenced by the nongray nature of the participating medium, especially when strong emission from the medium escapes to space, in the window region of the atmosphere. Accurate representation of radiative properties is critical. Linear stability analysis of onset of convection indicates that radiation stabilizes convection as Pl decreases. The observations are similar to the case of Rayleigh Bénard convection in a radiating gas. However, for both experimental and numerical conditions, the observed Rayleigh numbers are much greater than the critical Rayleigh number. To conclude, the role of radiation is to drive and sustain convection in the unstable layer.

  13. Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

  14. Redistribution of trace chemical species by a small convective cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith, J.L.; Alkezweeny, A.J.; Pleim, J.E.; Ching, J.K.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a new experiment with a SF6 tracer to determine the mixing history of a small region of cloud-base air. In situ measurements of the SF6 are made to follow the region and simultaneous measurements of natural trace gases are used to determine the dilution of the tagged region as it is affected by the cloud. After describing the experimental method, the results from an experiment with a small cumulus, which was ideally suited for the experiment, are explained. The goal of the paper is to better understand how convective clouds redistribute trace constituents (e.g. moisture, trace gases) in the vertical.

  15. SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

  16. A numerical study of convection with an ambient wind field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Kit Garfield

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equations in ehe same order as in (8. 16)-(8. 19). ? TEB = TEB1 + TEB2 at ? TEC = TEC1 + TEC2 a at ? NEB = MEB1 + NEB2 a ae ? NEC = MEC1 + NEC2 + MEC3 + HECT a at TEB and TEC are the thermal energies for the basic and con- vective flows, respectively...; likewise, MZB and MEC are the mechanical energies for the basic and convective flows. The evaluation of ehese terms at each time step represents the total amount of energy presene in these forms. TEB1 represents a thermal energy transformation...

  17. Gradients of meteorological parameters in convective and nonconvective areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCown, Milton Samuel

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . SYNOPTIC CONDITIONS 4. STRATIFICATION OF DATA 5. COMPUTATIONAL PROCEDURES 21 25 a. Gridding of rawinsonde data 25 b. Gradients 26 5'' lp t* 27 RESULTS 29 a. Gradients 29 1) Convective areas 29 2) Nonconvective areas 31 3) Combined areas 33 vi... air turbulence. By using airplane data from over the western United States, Scoggins (1975) has shown that CAT at 300 mb occurred 71% of the time when the magnitude of the vector horizontal wind shear -5 -1 exceeded 4. 5 x 10 sec . The horizontal...

  18. Convection feedbacks in a super-parameterization GCM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's ElectronicnewConvection

  19. The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakey, Joshua C.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles ...

  20. Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goud, Margaret R

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an application of the Grant-Madsen-Glenn bottom boundary layer model (Grant and Madsen, 1979; Glenn and Grant, 1987) to predictions of sediment transport on the continental shelf. The analysis is a ...

  1. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. ...

  2. Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fewings, Melanie Rinn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

  3. Distribution of high molecular weight hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericano, Jose Luis

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program (SPR). This program plans to store one billion barrels of oil in solution-mined salt cavities near existing petroleum distribution facilities along the Gulf of Mexico coast. This study, conducted... of petroleum on the deep ocean benthos. The outer continental shelf and slope in many areas of the world include sites of potential oil and gas reserves which have not been previously developed due to technological constraints. However, new technology...

  4. Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Daniel Walker

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the record is offshore, to the southeast. On the 29th of March, in the wake of strong northeast winds, the current shifted to the west. In general, the westward direction was maintained throughout the deployment period. However, there was one occurrence... WIND INDUCED CIRCULATION ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OF TEXAS, SPRING 1982 A Thesis by DANIEL WALKER BEARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AE M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  5. Origin and distribution of sand types, northeastern U.S. Atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leschak, Pamela

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the northeastern U. S. Atlantic continental shelf during the maximum advance of the Laurentide ice sheet in the late Pleistocene. . . . . . 18 Summary map of surface tidal currents and bottom current flow on the northeastern U. S. Atlantic conti- nental shelf... is very irregular and consists of a series of large, northwest-trending tidal ridges separated by flat-floored troughs (Stewart and Jordan, 1964; Uchupi, 1968). The southern half of the bank's surface is a smooth, featureless plain that slopes gently...

  6. A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective System Mountain Initiation Location Clusters in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, Elisabeth F.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are the focus of this analysis since it is the convective weather category which is smallest in number but produces the highest amount of precipitation. Being able to forecast these MCSs ...

  7. THE MAGNETIC CONNECTION BETWEEN THE CONVECTION ZONE AND CORONA IN THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbett, Bill

    THE MAGNETIC CONNECTION BETWEEN THE CONVECTION ZONE AND CORONA IN THE QUIET SUN W. P. Abbett Space connection between the convectively unstable layers below the visible surface of the Sun and the overlying application of this numerical model, we present a series of simulations of the quiet Sun in a domain

  8. Linear control and estimation of nonlinear chaotic convection: Harnessing the butterfly effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bewley, Thomas

    Linear control and estimation of nonlinear chaotic convection: Harnessing the butterfly effect/robust control theory to a low-order nonlinear chaotic convection problem. Linear control feedback is found before control is applied. Linear estimator feedback is found to be fully effective only when

  9. The Sensitivity of Intraseasonal Variability in the NCAR CCM3 to Changes in Convective Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    The Sensitivity of Intraseasonal Variability in the NCAR CCM3 to Changes in Convective@atmos.washington.edu. #12;1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 simulation of tropical intraseasonal variability in zonal winds and pre- cipitation can be improved by implementing the McRAS convection scheme of Sud and Walker. The default CCM3

  10. Improving Simulations of Convective Systems from TRMM LBA: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    ) experiment in Brazil. These two events epitomized the type of convective systems that formed in two a sheared low-level easterly wind flow. On 23 February 1999, convection developed in weak low-level westerly-scale models. A central objective of the Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study

  11. Observations, dynamics and predictability of the mesoscale convective vortex event of 10-13 June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawblitzel, Daniel Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    with varying resolutions. It is determined that the ability of a forecast model to accurately predict this MCV event is directly related to its ability to simulate convection. It is also shown that the convective-resolving Weather Research and Forecast (WRF...

  12. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  13. Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

  14. Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    value energy conversions such as heat engine cycles or chemical process to be carried outModelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove, Canberra AUSTRALIA E-mail: u3370739@anu.edu.au The natural convective flow inside a concentrating solar

  15. Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating M. Sankar online 20 December 2010 Keywords: Natural convection Annulus Discrete heating Porous medium Radii ratio to discrete heating. The outer wall is maintained iso- thermally at a lower temperature, while the top

  16. Observations of prolific transient luminous event production above a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil F. T. São Sabbas,1 M. J. Taylor,2 P.D. Pautet,2 M. Bailey convective system (MCS) over Argentina, as part of the third sprite campaign in Brazil. GOES infrared (IR a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A

  17. Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective systems: Charge moment change analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective systems: Charge moment change analysis that were parents of transient luminous events (TLEs; mainly sprites) over two different storms: 9 May (20. A. Rutledge, and D. R. MacGorman (2011), Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective

  18. THE BASE OF THE CONVECTION ZONE AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE: SEISMIC DETECTION OF THEIR CONNECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    495 THE BASE OF THE CONVECTION ZONE AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE: SEISMIC DETECTION Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London El 4NS of the transition at the bot- tom of the solar convection zone, as determined from the periodic signal

  19. PARAMETERS OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE IN EVOLUTIONARY AND SEISMIC MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARAMETERS OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE IN EVOLUTIONARY AND SEISMIC MODELS VLADIMIR A. BATURIN Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK AND SERGEY V. AYUKOV Sternberg of the entropy of the adiabatic part of the solar convection zone are compared. Key words: solar physics

  20. Global Gevrey Regularity for the B'enard Convection in Porous Medium with Zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Gevrey Regularity for the B'enard Convection in Porous Medium with Zero Darcy­Prandtl Number for the three­dimensional B'enard convection model in porous medium with zero Darcy­Prandtl number using system for energy conservation, enhancing recovery of oil by thermal methods, assessing risks for nuclear

  1. Simulated Convective Invigoration Processes at Trade Wind Cumulus Cold Pool ZHUJUN LI AND PAQUITA ZUIDEMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    convection and cold pools using a nested­Weather Research and Fore- casting Model simulation of 19 January ratio drops in simulated cold pools fall within the envelope of observed cases, and the wind enhancement pools invigorating convection at their downwind boundary and suppressing thermals in- side the stable

  2. A Fourier-spectral element algorithm for thermal convection in rotating axisymmetric containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, Alexandre

    A Fourier-spectral element algorithm for thermal convection in rotating axisymmetric containers Abstract We present a Fourier-spectral element approach for modeling thermal convection in a rotating, Spectral Methods for Axisymmetric Domains, Gauthier-Villars, Paris, 1999], a Fourier expansion of the field

  3. Convective heat transfer as a function of wavelength: Implications for the cooling of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convective heat transfer as a function of wavelength: Implications for the cooling of the Earth C, in particular, on its variation with the wavelength of convection. The heat transfer strongly depends in Earth's mantle can significantly reduce the efficiency of heat transfer. The likely variations

  4. EulerianEulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection in a microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Eulerian­Eulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection August 2010 Accepted 5 August 2010 Keywords: Nanofluid Microchannel Two-phase Laminar Heat transfer a b s t r a c t In this paper, laminar forced convection heat transfer of a copper­water nanofluid inside

  5. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Benard convection under microgravity conditions H. N. Yoshikawa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    conditions. A thermo-electric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection

  6. Wintertime pytoplankton bloom in the Subarctic Pacific supportedby continental margin iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.; Henning, Cara C.; Marcus,Matthew A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Fung, Inez

    2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Heightened biological activity was observed in February 1996in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) subarctic North PacificOcean, a region that is thought to beiron-limited. Here we provideevidence supporting the hypothesis that Ocean Station Papa (OSP) in thesubarctic Pacific received a lateral supply of particulate iron from thecontinental margin off the Aleutian Islands in the winter, coincidentwith the observed biological bloom. Synchrotron X-ray analysis was usedto describe the physical form, chemistry, and depth distributions of ironin size fractionated particulate matter samples. The analysis revealsthat discrete micron-sized iron-rich hotspots are ubiquitous in the upper200m at OSP, more than 900km from the closest coast. The specifics of thechemistry and depth profiles of the Fe hot spots trace them to thecontinental margins. We thus hypothesize that iron hotspots are a markerfor the delivery of iron from the continental margin. We confirm thedelivery of continental margin iron to the open ocean using an oceangeneral circulation model with an iron-like tracer source at thecontinental margin. We suggest that iron from the continental marginstimulated a wintertime phytoplankton bloom, partially relieving the HNLCcondition.

  7. Kinetics of the clay roofing tile convection drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S. (Univ. of Osijek (Croatia). Faculty of Food Technology); Skansi, D. (Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology); Sokele, M. (Croatian Post and Telecommunications, Zagreb (Croatia). Telecommunications Center)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of the convection drying process of flat tile has been investigated experimentally in an industrial tunnel dryer. Several velocities of wet tile movement through the dryer were tested to obtain maximum allowable drying rate curve. As there are various models to describe the kinetics of convection drying, finding a model that would fairly well approximate the kinetics of the whole drying process was part of the research. Especially the polynomial and exponential models were tested. It was found that exponential model of the type: B(t) = (a[minus]B[sub e])[center dot]EXP([minus]bt[sup 2])+B[sub e], ([minus]dB(t)/dt) = 2bt(B(t)[minus]B[sub e]) significantly correlates the kinetics of the whole tile drying process. Applying the maximum allowable drying rate curve obtained for flat tile in the first period of drying, a grapho-analytic model for the optimal conducting of the process has been developed.

  8. A Multiscale Dynamo Model Driven by Quasi-geostrophic Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convection-driven multiscale dynamo model is developed for the plane layer geometry in the limit of low Rossby number. The small-scale fluctuating dynamics are described by a magnetically-modified quasi-geostrophic equation set, and the large-scale mean dynamics are governed by a diagnostic thermal wind balance. The model utilizes three timescales that respectively characterize the convective timescale, the large-scale magnetic diffusion timescale, and the large-scale thermal diffusion timescale. Distinct equations are derived for the cases of order one and low magnetic Prandtl number. It is shown that the low magnetic Prandtl number model is characterized by a magnetic to kinetic energy ratio that is asymptotically large, with ohmic dissipation dominating viscous dissipation on the large-scales. For the order one magnetic Prandtl number model the magnetic and kinetic energies are equipartitioned and both ohmic and viscous dissipation are weak on the large-scales; large-scale ohmic dissipation occurs in thi...

  9. Particle filter based on thermophoretic deposition from natural convection flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasse, A.G.B.M.; Nazaroff, W.W. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Gadgil, A.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of particle migration in a natural convection flow between parallel plates and within the annulus of concentric tubes. The flow channel is vertically oriented with one surface maintained at a higher temperature than the other. Particle migration is dominated by advection in the vertical direction and thermophoresis in the horizontal direction. From scale analysis it is demonstrated that particles are completely removed from air flowing through the channel if its length exceeds L[sub c] = (b[sup 4]g/24K[nu][sup 2]), where b is the width of the channel, g is the acceleration of gravity, K is a thermophoretic coefficient of order 0.5, and [nu] is the kinematic viscosity of air. Precise predictions of particle removal efficiency as a function of system parameters are obtained by numerical solution of the governing equations. Based on the model results, it appears feasible to develop a practical filter for removing smoke particles from a smoldering cigarette in an ashtray by using natural convection in combination with thermophoresis. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  11. Charge transfer and in-cloud structure of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    in a mesoscale convective system Gaopeng Lu,1 Steven A. Cummer,1 Jingbo Li,1 Feng Han,1 Richard J. Blakeslee,2 positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) strokes in a mesoscale convective system. Although no high altitude images of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36

  12. Magnetospheric Convection The large-scale flow of rarefied plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere "is quite analogous to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    quite analogous to thermal convection" (Gold, 1959); therefore, the term "convection" is commonly used of geomagnetic field lines in the crossed E and B fields. By analogy with the thermal convection in a non in the magnetosheath: a region between the bow shock and the magnetopause. A similar flow pattern is formed

  13. Wind reversals in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Fontenele Araujo; S. Grossmann; D. Lohse

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of irregular cessation and subsequent reversal of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is theoretically analysed. The force and thermal balance on a single plume detached from the thermal boundary layer yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations, whose dynamics is related to the Lorenz equations. For Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range $10^{-2} \\leq \\Pr \\leq 10^{3}$ and $10^{7} \\leq \\Ra \\leq 10^{12}$, the model has the following features: (i) chaotic reversals may be exhibited at Ra $\\geq 10^{7}$; (ii) the Reynolds number based on the root mean square velocity scales as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Ra^{[0.41 ... 0.47]}$ (depending on Pr), and as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Pr^{-[0.66 ... 0.76]}$ (depending on Ra); and (iii) the mean reversal frequency follows an effective scaling law $\\omega / (\

  14. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :0010:0011:0012:0013:0014:00 15:0016:0017:00 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 11/21 Solar radiant intensity[kW/m 2 ] Temperature[ ? ] Time Tr Tfu Twi Ta ------- I Fig. 2 Daily variation of Tr, Tfu, Twi , Ta , I and ? f... regarded that Gr~109 -3?Pr ?10 3? is the transition criterion as the natural convection flow from laminar to turbulent [12]. Experimental data from four sunny days (11.20, 11.21, 11.27, 11.28) with normal thermo-circulation (9:00-16:00) is utilized...

  15. Operating temperatures for a convectively cooled recessed incandescent light fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test results are given for the operation of a recessed incandescent light fixture intended for residential use. The fixture is labeled for use in direct contact with attic thermal insulation. Temperature control of the powered fixture is provided by convective heat transfer from the ceiling side of the fixture. The fixture was operated at power levels up to two times the rated power of 75 watts and under thermal insulations up to R-40. In all operating configurations tested the fixture surface in contact with attic insulation was found to be less than 175/sup 0/C. The observed surface temperatures are judged to be safe for operation in contact with loose-fill or batt-type insulations. It was observed that the power leads inside one fixture configuration are exposed to temperatures as high as 168/sup 0/C. The electrical insulation could, therefore, have a limited life. The properties of the internal fixture wiring were not, however, studied in detail.

  16. Apparatus for production of synthesis gas using convective reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karafian, M.; Tsang, I.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a system for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons into a hydrogen-rich gas. It comprises a convective reformer device having indirect heat exchange means for partially reforming a feed mixture of hydrocarbons and steam; a steam reforming furnace having a radiant section, reforming tubes in the radiant section, and means for producing radiant heat for the further reforming of the partially reformed effluent; an auto-thermal reformer for fully reforming the effluent; conduit means for passing the partially reformed effluent; conduit means for passing the effluent; and conduit means for passing the fully reformed effluent to supply the heat of reaction for the partial reformation of the hydrocarbon-steam feed mixture.

  17. Stability of sunspots to convective motions. I. Adiabatic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Spruit, H.C. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna (Spain); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For determining the adiabatic stability of a uniform vertical field in an arbitrary stratification it is sufficient to consider the limit of infinitesimal horizontal wavelength. It is shown how the behavior of the instability can be estimated qualitatively from the dependence of the equipartition field strength on depth. Modes are calculated numerically for analytic stratification models and for a detailed sunspot stratification, including the effects of partial ionization. It is concluded that for the observed field strengths of umbrae the stratification is indeed unstable, with a growth time of about 18 minutes. The unstable eigenfunctions have a maximum at about 2300 km below the surface of the umbra and are about 3900 km deep. Deeper layers may also be unstable depending on unknown details of the stratification. A connection between fluting instability and convective instability is noted. 37 refs.

  18. TURBULENT CONVECTION IN STELLAR INTERIORS. III. MEAN-FIELD ANALYSIS AND STRATIFICATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viallet, Maxime [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Meakin, Casey; Mocak, Miroslav [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arnett, David [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three-dimensional implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in the envelope of a 5 M{sub Sun} red giant star and in the oxygen-burning shell of a 23 M{sub Sun} supernova progenitor. The numerical models are analyzed in the framework of one-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The effects of pressure fluctuations are more important in the red giant model, owing to larger stratification of the convective zone. We show how this impacts different terms in the mean-field equations. We clarify the driving sources of kinetic energy, and show that the rate of turbulent dissipation is comparable to the convective luminosity. Although our flows have low Mach numbers and are nearly adiabatic, our analysis is general and can be applied to photospheric convection as well. The robustness of our analysis of turbulent convection is supported by the insensitivity of the mean-field balances to linear mesh resolution. We find robust results for the turbulent convection zone and the stable layers in the oxygen-burning shell model, and robust results everywhere in the red giant model, but the mean fields are not well converged in the narrow boundary regions (which contain steep gradients) in the oxygen-burning shell model. This last result illustrates the importance of unresolved physics at the convective boundary, which governs the mixing there.

  19. Effect of surfactant on evaporative heat transfer coefficients in vertical film forced convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Basit Husain

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and control of temperatures of chemical reactions. . Soi1ing may be considered as a special case of convect1on either free or forced. However, the phenomena of boiling heat transfer are considerably more complex than those of convection without phase...), Leppert and Pitts (4), and Rohsenow The two general situations under which bo111ng occurs are: (a) pool bo1ling and (b) forced convection boiling. When the bulk of the 11quid is at the saturation temperature corresponding to the presssure of the liquid...

  20. Mesoscale flows in large aspect ratio simulations of turbulent compressible convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a very large aspect ratio (42.6) numerical simulation of fully compressible turbulent convection in a polytropic atmosphere, and focus on the properties of large-scale flows. Mesoscale patterns dominate the turbulent energy spectrum. We show that these structures, which had already been observed in Boussinesq simulations by Cattaneo et al. (2001), have a genuine convective origin and do not result directly from collective interactions of the smaller scales of the flow, even though their growth is strongly affected by nonlinear transfers. If this result is relevant to the solar photosphere, it suggests that the dominant convective mode below the Sun's surface may be at mesoscales.

  1. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with convection is upward motion at all levels with a maximum value just prior to max1mum convect1ve intensity. Days without convection showed a cont1nual vertical turbulent m1xing of moisture from a shallow boundary layer to the 700 mb level. Lack... of 4 g kg 1 are observed. The moisture content increases at the 22 Post Big Spring Midland Robert Lee 4 500 mb cn 0 O m 8 L. cn 6 x 4 2 700 mb . . ~ ''. ~' . ~ / r 12 10 850 mb 15 18 21 00 03 Time (GNT hours) Fig. 9. Time profiles...

  2. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Victoria E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Christensen, John N.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining quantitative information about the timescales associated with sediment transport, storage, and deposition in continental settings is important but challenging. The uranium-series comminution age method potentially provides a universal approach for direct dating of Quaternary detrital sediments, and can also provide estimates of the sediment transport and storage timescales. (The word"comminution" means"to reduce to powder," reflecting the start of the comminution age clock as reduction of lithic parent material below a critical grain size threshold of ~;;50 mu m.) To test the comminution age method as a means to date continental sediments, we applied the method to drill-core samples of the glacially-derived Kings River Fan alluvial deposits in central California. Sediments from the 45 m core have independently-estimated depositional ages of up to ~;;800 ka, based on paleomagnetism and correlations to nearby dated sediments. We characterized sequentially-leached core samples (both bulk sediment and grain size separates) for U, Nd, and Sr isotopes, grain size, surface texture, and mineralogy. In accordance with the comminution age model, where 234U is partially lost from small sediment grains due to alpha recoil, we found that (234U/238U) activity ratios generally decrease with age, depth, and specific surface area, with depletions of up to 9percent relative to radioactive equilibrium. The resulting calculated comminution ages are reasonable, although they do not exactly match age estimates from previous studies and also depend on assumptions about 234U loss rates. The results indicate that the method may be a significant addition to the sparse set of available tools for dating detrital continental sediments, following further refinement. Improving the accuracy of the method requires more advanced models or measurements for both the recoil loss factor fa and weathering effects. We discuss several independent methods for obtaining fa on individual samples that may be useful for future studies.

  3. Stratigraphic evolution of Mesozoic continental margin and oceanic sequences northwest Australia and north Himalayas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gradstein, F.M. (Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada)); Von Rad, U. (Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (West Germany))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors are investigating continental margin to ocean sequences of the incipient Indian Ocean as it replaced central Tethys. Objectives of this study are the dynamic relation between sedimentation, tectonics, and paleogeography. Principal basins formation along the northern edge of eastern Gondwana started in the Late Permian to the Triassic. By the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, platform carbonates with thin, organic-rich lagoonal shales were laid down in a subtropical climate. This unit, which harbors some of the oldest known nannofossils, shows repeated shallowing-upward sequences. Subsequent southward drift of the Gondwana margin during the Middle Jurassic increased siliciclastic input in Nepal, when widespread sediment starvation or erosion during local uplift took place off parts of northwest Australia. A middle Callovian-early Oxfordian hiatus in Nepal is submarine and appears global in extent. The overlying 250-m-thick organic-rich black shales, correlative to the Oxford/Kimmeridge clays of circum-Atlantic petroleum basins, may be traced along the northern Himalayan Range, and probably represent an extensive continental slope deposit formed under an oxygen minimum layer in southern Tethys. The deposit's diverse foraminiferal microfauna was previously only known from boreal Laurasia. The Callovian breakup unconformity, off northwest Australia, precedes onset of sea-floor spreading at least 15-25 Ma. Sea-floor spreading, leading to the present Indian Ocean started in the Argo Abyssal Plain around 140 Ma, at the end of the Jurassic, was about 15 m.y. later than previously postulated. Australia and Greater India separated as early as the Late Valanginian, about 130 Ma. Mafic volcaniclastics in Nepalese deltaic sediments probably testify to concurrent continental margin volcanic activity, which may be a precursor to the slightly younger Rajmahal traps in eastern India.

  4. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  5. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  6. Epibenthic invertebrates and fishes of the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Jabr, Abdulrahman Mohammad

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provinces that are considered to be geologically distinct (Kennedy 1976): 1). The Gulf of Mexico Basin, 2). The northeast Gulf of Mexico, 3). The South Florida continental shelf and slope, 4). Campeche Bank, 5), The Style and format follow Contributions...V V Vill 9 15 15 19 70 72 74 APPENDIX 7. . APPENDIX 8. . APPENDIX 9. . APPENDIX 10. VITA Page 81 91 101 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Geological provinces in the Gulf of Mexico. . . Study area in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico...

  7. Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea Lynne D. Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    ventilation occurs in only a very few regions, generally in confined patches associated with local cyclonic (Figure 1) to these small groups of deep convection sites and regions withdeep``ventilation

  8. Simulation of Mixed Convection Flow in a Room with a Two-Layer Turbulence Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    ; displacement ventilation; office rooms. Nomenclature Ary local Archimedes number, 2 /UTyg n C Contaminant used to predict the mixed convection by displacement ventilation in an office. The computed results

  9. STUDY OF MHD MIXED CONVECTION IN THE DCLL BLANKET SMOLENTSEV Sergey1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , and ABDOU Mohamed3 1 University of California, Los Angeles, USA, sergey@fusion.ucla.edu 2 Laboratoire SIMAP, abdou@fusion.ucla.edu Abstract: Magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection associated with a non

  10. Study of formation and convective transport of aerosols using optical diagnostic technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Part II investigates the characteristics of convective transport behavior of solid particles in virtual impactor (VI). The objective of part I is to establish correlations which offer predictions on atomized particle size of HTFs which are widely...

  11. An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection Eric D, 80307­3000, maloney@ucar.edu #12; 1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 with microphysics of clouds with relaxed

  12. An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection Eric D, 80307-3000, maloney@ucar.edu #12;1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 with microphysics of clouds with relaxed

  13. Convective structure in rapidly intensifying tropical cyclones as depicted by passive microwave measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    include: mesovorticies [Nolan and Montgomery, 2002], convective asymmetries [Braun et al., 2006], and vortical hot towers (VHTs) under high wind shear [Molinari and Vollaro, 2010]. Conversely, RI has been

  14. A visualization comparison of convective flow boiling heat transfer augmentation devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundy, Brian Franklin

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The qualitative effects of inset-table heat transfer phics. augmentation devices on vertical in-tube convective flow boiling flow regimes, transition mechanisms, and heat transfer are presented in this study. Three twisted tapes with twist ratios...

  15. A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashem, Magda Sami

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985...

  16. TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY 1 Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy, accomplishments and thermo-chemical structure and evolution Paul J. Tackley Department of Earth

  17. Radar, satellite, and lightning characteristics of select mesoscale convective systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toracinta, Ernest Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the observation of high negative flash counts coincident with convective cores having small reflectivity lapse rates in the mixed phase region is consistent with the presence of large ice particles aloft. Positive CG flashes were mostly located in low reflectivity...

  18. Influence of Induced natural convection on laser propagation : analysis and interferometric visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhakta, Aditya (Aditya S.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the influence of a self-induced natural convection flow on the propagation of a high energy laser beam. The two configurations considered are of a vertical laser beam (propagation direction opposite ...

  19. Convective cloud and rainfall processes over the Maritime Continent : simulation and analysis of the diurnal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianotti, Rebecca L. (Rebecca Louise)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime Continent experiences strong moist convection, which produces significant rainfall and drives large fluxes of heat and moisture to the upper troposphere. Despite the importance of these processes to global ...

  20. Thermal perturbations caused by large impacts and consequences for mantle convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, W. A.

    We examine the effects of thermal perturbations on a convecting layer of incompressible fluid with uniform viscosity in the limit of infinite Prandtl number, for two upper boundary conditions (free- and no-slip) and heat ...

  1. A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois # University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research

  2. Passive microwave observations of mesoscale convective systems over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Gary Rae

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents high resolution passive microwave measurements obtained in the western Pacific warm pool region. These measurements represent the first comprehensive observations of convection over the tropical oceans, and were obtained from...

  3. Convective Heat Transfer Enhancement in Nanofluids: Real Anomaly or Analysis Artifact?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhat, Naveen

    The nanofluid literature contains many claims of anomalous convective heat transfer enhancement in both turbulent and laminar flow. To put such claims to the test, we have performed a critical detailed analysis of the ...

  4. Experimental Investigation of Forced Convection Heat Transfer of Nanofluids in a Microchannel using Temperature Nanosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jiwon 1982-

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were performed to study forced convective heat transfer of de-ionized water (DI water) and aqueous nanofluids flowing in a microchannel. An array of temperature nanosensors, called “Thin Film Thermocouples (TFT)”, was utilized...

  5. Patterns of convection in rotating spherical R Simitev and F H Busse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simitev, Radostin D

    Patterns of convection in rotating spherical shells R Simitev and F H Busse Institute of Physics of rotating spherical shells. For recent reviews we refer to the papers by Zhang and Busse [23] and Busse [6

  6. Thermal stability of a spherical shell heated by convection and cooled by boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qaim-Maqami, Hassan

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such high heat transfer rates by forced convection would require extremely high veloc- ities with subsequent high pressure dropsy With nuclee, boiling, however, such high heat transfe. rates an be obtained at much smaller velocities. Boiling heat...THERMAL STABILITY OF A. SPHERICAL SHELL HEATED BY CONVECTION AND COOLED BY BOILING A Thesis HASSAN @AIM-MAQAMI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  7. Pre-convective environmental conditions indicative of non-tornadic severe thunderstorm winds over Southeast Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey Michael

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRE-CONVECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS INDICATIVE OF NON-TORNADIC SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WINDS OVER SOUTHEAST FLORIDA A Thesis by JEFFREY MICHAEL WILHELM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Meteorology PRE-CONVECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS INDICATIVE OF NON-TORNADIC SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WINDS OVER SOUTHEAST FLORIDA A Thesis by JEFFREY MICHAEL WILHELM Approved...

  8. Nighttime atmospheric stability changes and their effects on the temporal intensity of a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jeffrey Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Meteorology NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Approved as to style...

  9. Experimental and numerical study of laminar forced convection heat transfer for a dimpled heat sink 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Do Seo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDY OF LAMINAR FORCED CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER FOR A DIMPLED HEAT SINK A Thesis by DO SEO PARK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2007 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDY OF LAMINAR FORCED CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER FOR A DIMPLED HEAT SINK A Thesis by DO SEO PARK...

  10. Respective roles of shallow convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulation of Madden-Julian Oscillation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Joshua Xiouhua [IPRC/SOEST/UH; Wang, Bin [IPRC& DM/SOEST/UH; Yeh, Hsi-Chyi

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Respective Roles of Shallow Convection and Stratiform Rainfall on the Simulation of Madden Julian Oscillation Joshua Xiouhua Fu IPRC, SOEST, University of Hawaii The IPRC/UH Hybrid-coupled GCM (HcGCM), which combined ECHAM-4 AGCM with UH intermediate ocean model, produces robust Tropical Intra-Seasonal Oscillations including the boreal-winter MJO and boreal-summer Monsoon Intra-Seasonal Oscillation. In this study, two sets of sensitivity experiments (i.e., short-term retrospective forecast of one MJO event observed during TOGA COARE and long-term free integrations) have been carried out to understand the respective roles of shallow-convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulations and predictions of the MJO. Major findings are summarized as following: Shallow-convection ahead of MJO deep convection moistens the lower-troposphere and preconditions the movement of the MJO. Present study shows that this process is very important to the eastward propagating speed of the MJO. A significant fraction of stratiform rainfall (~30%; stratiform part vs. total rainfall) is needed for ECHAM-4 to have a robust MJO. The above findings suggest that in addition to deep convection, shallow convection and stratiform rainfall needs to be well represented in conventional GCMs to ensure a robust model MJO.

  11. Effects of Radiative Diffusion on Thin Flux Tubes in Turbulent Solar-like Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Maria A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the combined effects of convection and radiative diffusion on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior. Radiative diffusion is the primary supplier of heat to convective motions in the lower convection zone, and it results in a heat input per unit volume of magnetic flux tubes that has been ignored by many previous thin flux tube studies. We use a thin flux tube model subject to convection taken from a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convection as described by Weber, Fan, and Miesch (2011, Astrophys. J., 741, 11; 2013, Solar Phys., 287, 239), now taking into account the influence of radiative heating on flux tubes of large-scale active regions. Our simulations show that flux tubes of less than or equal to 60 kG subject to solar-like convective flows do not anchor in the overshoot region, but rather drift upward due to the increased buoyancy of the flux tube earlier in its evolution as a result of the inclusion of radiative diffusion. Flux tubes of magnetic fie...

  12. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barthold, W.P. [Barthold and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  13. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers. The Mesozoic red-bed fills of the Newark (NY for inferring the flow directions of the Quaternary continental glaciers. The most-recent glacier (Woodfordian that this glacier did not reach much of Long Island and thus did not deposit the Harbor Hill Moraine. The next

  14. Compactification of Patterns by a Singular Convection or Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenau, Philip [School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide variety of propagating disturbances in physical systems are described by equations whose solutions lack a sharp propagating front. We demonstrate that presence of particular nonlinearities may induce such fronts. To exemplify this idea, we study both dissipative u{sub t}+{partial_derivative}{sub x}f(u)=u{sub xx} and dispersive u{sub t}+{partial_derivative}{sub x}f(u)+u{sub xxx}=0 patterns, and show that a weakly singular convection f(u)=-u{sup {alpha}}+u{sup m}, 0<{alpha}<1

  15. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiesenberger, M., E-mail: Matthias.Wiesenberger@uibk.ac.at; Kendl, A. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, Association EURATOM-ÖAW, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Madsen, J. [Association EURATOM-DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures, we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross-field transport in comparison with local blob simulations.

  16. Fingering convection and cloudless models for cool brown dwarf atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremblin, P; Mourier, P; Baraffe, I; Chabrier, G; Drummond, B; Homeier, D; Venot, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral type T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g. other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional (1D) radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H2-H2, H2-He, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, NH3, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in e.g. J - H compared to cloudless mode...

  17. Natural convection heat transfer from two horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reymond, Olivier; Murray, Darina B. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); O'Donovan, Tadhg S. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Nasmyth Building, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection heat transfer from a single horizontal cylinder and a pair of vertically aligned horizontal cylinders is investigated. Surface heat transfer distributions around the circumference of the cylinders are presented for Rayleigh numbers of 2 x 10{sup 6}, 4 x 10{sup 6} and 6 x 10{sup 6} and a range of cylinder spacings of 1.5, 2 and 3 diameters. With a cylinder pairing the lower cylinder is unaffected by the presence of the second cylinder; the same is true of the upper cylinder if the lower one is not heated. However, when both cylinders are heated it has been found that a plume rising from the heated lower cylinder interacts with the upper cylinder and significantly affects the surface heat transfer distribution. Spectral analysis of surface heat transfer signals has established the influence of the plume oscillations on the heat transfer. Thus, when the plume from the lower cylinder oscillates out of phase with the flow around the upper cylinder it increases the mixing and results in enhanced heat transfer. (author)

  18. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of a group cooperative research projects on the southeastern continental shelf, this project is concerned with specific aspects of microbial processes and related phenomena that influence the fate of particulate organic materials naturally produced on the continental shelf. The projects of other grantees encompass the dynamics of the shelf from physical oceanography to biology. The integrated information as a whole will be useful in understanding the potential fate of a variety of energy related pollutants that may be released in continental shelf waters. With a focus on events on the southeastern continental shelf and their boundary conditions (Gulf Stream dynamics; river and estuarine processes), we form an interface between studies of oceanic processes such as GOFS and WOCE, and studies of processes at the land-sea boundary. During this grant year we completed two research cruises on the southeastern continental shelf on R/V Blue Fin, and processed data from previous cruises.

  19. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Continental constriction and oceanic ice-cover1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Continental constriction and oceanic of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. (Abbot Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. 3 Department of Solar

  20. NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program No.14,September2012 ScientificDrilling ISSN: 1816-8957 Exp. 333: Nankai Trough Subduction Input and Records of Slope Instability 4 Lake Drilling In Eastern Turkey 18 Exp. 326 and 332: Nan

  1. NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program No.11,March2011 ScientificDrilling ISSN: 1816-8957 Climate and Ocean Change in the Bering Sea 4 San Andreas Fault Zone Drilling 14 Climate History from Lake El'gygytgyn, Siberia 29 World

  2. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    within a thin boundary layer above the bottom surface. The resonant wave is unstable because of strong for the intense boundary flows on continental slopes. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.244504 PACS numbers: 47.35.Bb waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  3. Numerical Modeling of Salt Tectonics on Passive Continental Margins: Preliminary Assessment of the Effects of Sediment Loading,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaumont, Christopher

    Numerical Modeling of Salt Tectonics on Passive Continental Margins: Preliminary Assessment Sciences The University of Leeds LS2 9JT Leeds United Kingdom Abstract Salt tectonics in passive model of frictional-plastic sedimentary overburden overlying a linear viscous salt layer. We present

  4. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  5. Chlorine-36 in Water, Snow, and Mid-Latitude Glacial Ice of North America: Meteoric and Weapons-Tests Production in the Vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. DeWayne; J. R. Green (USGS); S. Vogt, P. Sharma (Purdue University); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo); S. N. Davis (University of Arizona); G. L. Cottrell (USGS)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of chlorine-36 (36Cl) were made for 64 water, snow, and glacial-ice and -runoff samples to determine the meteoric and weapons-tests-produced concentrations and fluxes of this radionuclide at mid-latitudes in North America. The results will facilitate the use of 36Cl as a hydrogeologic tracer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This information was used to estimate meteoric and weapons-tests contributions of this nuclide to environmental inventories at and near the INEEL. The data presented in this report suggest a meteoric source 36Cl for environmental samples collected in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming if the concentration is less than 1 x 10 7 atoms/L. Additionally, concentrations in water, snow, or glacial ice between 1 x 10 7 and 1 x 10 8 atoms/L may be indicative of a weapons-tests component from peak 36Cl production in the late 1950s. Chlorine-36 concentrations between 1 x 10 8 and 1 x 10 9 atoms/L may be representative of re-suspension of weapons-tests fallout airborne disposal of 36Cl from the INTEC, or evapotranspiration. It was concluded from the water, snow, and glacial data presented here that concentrations of 36Cl measured in environmental samples at the INEEL larger than 1 x 10 9 atoms/L can be attributed to waste-disposal practices.

  6. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  7. Multiscale eddy simulation for moist atmospheric convection: Preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechmann, Samuel N., E-mail: stechmann@wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiscale computational framework is designed for simulating atmospheric convection and clouds. In this multiscale framework, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to model the coarse scales of 100 m and larger, and a stochastic, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to represent the fine scales of 100 m and smaller. Coupled and evolving together, these two components provide a multiscale eddy simulation (MES). Through its fine-scale turbulence and moist thermodynamics, MES allows coarse grid cells to be partially cloudy and to encompass cloudy–clear air mixing on scales down to 1 m; in contrast, in typical LES such fine-scale processes are not represented or are parameterized using bulk deterministic closures. To illustrate MES and investigate its multiscale dynamics, a shallow cumulus cloud field is simulated. The fine-scale variability is seen to take a plausible form, with partially cloudy grid cells prominent near cloud edges and cloud top. From earlier theoretical work, this mixing of cloudy and clear air is believed to have an important impact on buoyancy. However, contrary to expectations based on earlier theoretical studies, the mean statistics of the bulk cloud field are essentially the same in MES and LES; possible reasons for this are discussed, including possible limitations in the present formulation of MES. One difference between LES and MES is seen in the coarse-scale turbulent kinetic energy, which appears to grow slowly in time due to incoherent stochastic fluctuations in the buoyancy. This and other considerations suggest the need for some type of spatial and/or temporal filtering to attenuate undersampling of the stochastic fine-scale processes.

  8. Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

  9. Structure and Evolution of Giant Cells in Global Models of Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Miesch; Allan Sacha Brun; Marc L. Derosa; Juri Toomre

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The global scales of solar convection are studied through three-dimensional simulations of compressible convection carried out in spherical shells of rotating fluid which extend from the base of the convection zone to within 15 Mm of the photosphere. Such modelling at the highest spatial resolution to date allows study of distinctly turbulent convection, revealing that coherent downflow structures associated with giant cells continue to play a significant role in maintaining the strong differential rotation that is achieved. These giant cells at lower latitudes exhibit prograde propagation relative to the mean zonal flow, or differential rotation, that they establish, and retrograde propagation of more isotropic structures with vortical character at mid and high latitudes. The interstices of the downflow networks often possess strong and compact cyclonic flows. The evolving giant-cell downflow systems can be partly masked by the intense smaller scales of convection driven closer to the surface, yet they are likely to be detectable with the helioseismic probing that is now becoming available. Indeed, the meandering streams and varying cellular subsurface flows revealed by helioseismology must be sampling contributions from the giant cells, yet it is difficult to separate out these signals from those attributed to the faster horizontal flows of supergranulation. To aid in such detection, we use our simulations to describe how the properties of giant cells may be expected to vary with depth, how their patterns evolve in time, and analyze the statistical features of correlations within these complex flow fields.

  10. Stellar models with mixing length and T(tau) relations calibrated on 3D convection simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaris, Maurizio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) The calculation of the thermal stratification in the superadiabatic layers of stellar models with convective envelopes is a long standing problem of stellar astrophysics, and has a major impact on predicted observational properties like radius and effective temperature. The Mixing Length Theory, almost universally used to model the superadiabatic convective layers, contains effectively one free parameter to be calibrated --alpha(ml)-- whose value controls the resulting effective temperature. Here we present the first self-consistent stellar evolution models calculated by employing the atmospheric temperature stratification, Rosseland opacities, and calibrated variable alpha(ml) (dependent on effective temperature and surface gravity) from a large suite of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of stellar convective envelopes and atmospheres for solar stellar composition (Trampedach et al. 2013). From our calculations (with the same composition of the radiation hydrodynamics simulatio...

  11. Large-scale weakly nonlinear perturbations of convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chertovskih, Roman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new mechanism for generation of large-scale magnetic field by thermal convection which does not involve the alpha-effect. We consider weakly nonlinear perturbations of space-periodic steady convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer that were identified in our previous work. The perturbations have a spatial scale in the horizontal direction that is much larger than the period of the perturbed convective magnetohydrodynamic state. Following the formalism of the multiscale stability theory, we have derived the system of amplitude equations governing the evolution of the leading terms in expansion of the perturbations in power series in the scale ratio. This asymptotic analysis is more involved than in the cases considered earlier, because the kernel of the operator of linearisation has zero-mean neutral modes whose origin lies in the spatial invariance of the perturbed regime, the operator reduced on the generalised kernel has two Jordan normal form blocks of size two, and simplifying symmetri...

  12. Development and evaluation of a convection scheme for use in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, K.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate; Zivkovic-Rothman, M. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cumulus convection is a key process in controlling the water vapor content of the atmosphere, which is in turn the largest feedback mechanism for climate change in global climate models. Yet scant attention has been paid to designing convective representations that attempt to handle water vapor with fidelity, and even less to evaluating their performance. Here the authors attempt to address this deficiency by designing a representation of cumulus convection with close attention paid to convective water fluxes and by subjecting the scheme to rigorous tests using sounding array data. The authors maintain that such tests, in which a single-column model is forced by large-scale processes measured by or inferred from the sounding data, must be carried out over a period at least as long as the radiative-subsidence timescale--about 30 days--governing the water vapor adjustment time. The authors also argue that the observed forcing must be preconditioned to guarantee integral enthalpy conservation, else errors in the single-column prediction may be falsely attributed to convective schemes. Optimization of the new scheme`s parameters is performed using one month of data from the intensive flux array operating during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment, with the aid of the adjoint of the linear tangent of the single-column model. Residual root-mean-square errors, after optimization, are about 15% in relative humidity and .8 K in temperature. It is difficult to reject the hypothesis that the residual errors are due to noise in the forcing. Evaluation of the convective scheme is performed using Global Atmospheric Research Program Atlantic Tropical Experiment data. The performance of the scheme is compared to that of a few other schemes used in current climate models. It is also shown that a vertical resolution better than 50 mb in pressure is necessary for accurate prediction of atmospheric water vapor.

  13. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  14. Chaotic flow in a 2D natural convection loop with heat flux boundaries William F. Louisos a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Chris

    . Examples of natural convection cells occurring in engineering devices include solar water heaters, nu into the system while the upper half is cooled by an equal-but- opposite heat flux out of the system. Water between landmass and an adjacent body of water; mantle convection of the Earth's asthenosphere which

  15. Scaling laws for convection and jet speeds in the giant planets Adam P. Showman a,b,,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaling laws for convection and jet speeds in the giant planets Adam P. Showman a,b,,1 , Yohai in these models, but no previous theories have been advanced to explain these trends. Here, we show using simple arguments that if convective release of potential energy pumps the jets and viscosity damps them, the mean

  16. A Fundamental Study of Convective Mixing of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geologic Media using Surrogate Fluids and Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of formation heterogeneity on convective mixing. Finite volume based numerical code was developed to capture of Canadian Petroleum Technology, 44(10). - Neufeld, J. A., Hesse M. A., Riaz, A., Hallworth M. A., Tchelepi, H. A., and Huppert H. E., 2010, Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers, Geophys

  17. Thermal anomaly near the Aigio fault, Gulf of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below the fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal anomaly near the Aigio fault, Gulf of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below intersecting the active Aigio fault, Corinth Rift, Greece. The heat flow is 53 mW/m2 , indicating of Corinth, Greece, maybe due to convection below the fault, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06314, doi:10

  18. Improvements to simulation of Madden Julian Oscillation due to deep1 convection parameterization modifications in the Community Climate2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    coherent structures, which are43 important features of observed MJOs. The conclusions are supported by two, and small-scale convection (e.g., Blade and Hartmann 1993; Hu and Randall 1995;53 Kemball-Cook and Weare. 1999). A key factor in improving MJO simulation is the convective58 parameterization. Many tests have

  19. October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale components of tropical mesoscale convective systems. It is found that while the apparent heat source Q1 of mesoscale downdrafts within the mesoscale convective systems. The warming and drying at low levels

  20. Using Digital Cloud Photogrammetry to Characterize the Onset and Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection Over Orography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the entrainment of dry air. Time series of convective development are compared with sounding and surface data of the environment. Surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, along with the transport of boundary layer air the effect of entrainment on the consumption of convective available potential energy (CAPE) is still

  1. Modeling the coupling between free and forced convection in a vertical permeable slot: implications for the heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling the coupling between free and forced convection in a vertical permeable slot numerical study of the coupling between forced and free convective flows has been performed by considering: implications for the heat production of an Enhanced Geothermal System Arnaud Batailléa , Pierre Genthona

  2. Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  3. A case study of the low-level jet during an episode of spring convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahoe, Christopher Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CASE STUDY OF THE LOW-LEVEL JET DURING AN EPISODE OF SPRING CONVECTION A Thesis CHRISTOPHER SCOTT DONAHOE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1996 Major Subject: Meteorology A CASE STUDY OF THE LOW-LEVEL JET DURING AN EPISODE OF SPRING CONVECTION A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER SCOTT DONAHOE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial ful6llment of the requirements...

  4. Advection, Moistening, and Shallow-to-deep Convection Transitions During the Initiation and Propagation of Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Landu, Kiranmayi; Long, Charles N.

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using observations from the 2011 AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign over the Indian Ocean and a high-resolution regional model simulation, the processes that lead to the rapid shallow-to-deep convection transitions associated with the initiation and eastward propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are examined. By tracking the evolution of the depth of several thousand individual model simulated precipitation features, the role of and the processes that control the observed midtropospheric moisture buildup ahead of the detection of deep convection are quantified at large and convection scales. The frequency of shallow-to-deep convection transitions is found to be sensitive to this midlevel moisture and large-scale uplift. This uplift along with the decline of large-scale drying by equator-ward advection causes the moisture buildup leading to the initiation of the MJO. Convection scale moisture variability and uplift, and large-scale zonal advection play secondary roles.

  5. Phylogeography of Rhinichthys cataractae (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): pre-glacial colonization across the Great Continental Divide and Pleistocene diversification within the Rio Grande drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Min

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The longnose dace, Rhinichthys cataractae, is a primary freshwater fish inhibiting riffle habitats in small headwater rivers and streams across the North American continent, including drainages east and west of the Continental Divide. Phylogenetic...

  6. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs ...

  7. A proposal for federal legislation for the protection and preservation of submerged cultural resources on the outer continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Richard Evans

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Outer Continental Shelf. (August 1978) Richard Evans Hamilton, B. S. , University of Michigan Chairman of Advisory Committee: John L. Seymour This thesis examines English and American court cases to determine the origin and applications of the so.... With these techniques, in 1968 and 1969, archaeo- logists raised and reconstructed an entire fourth-century B. C. merchant vessel sunk off the coast of Kyrenia, Cyprus. Borrowing 5 the technology of the offshore oil industry, in the form of magneto- meters, metal...

  8. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  9. A continental clastic depositional model for the Permian Unayzah formation, Hawtah field, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, C.J. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Unayzah Formation lies unconformably on the Silurian Qusaiba Member of the Qalibah Formation. The pre-Unayzah unconformity (PUU) represents a Hercynian tectonic event responsible for uplift and erosion representing 100-150 m.y. worth of missing section along the Hawtah Trend. Overlying the PUU, the Unayzah clastic sequence is comprised of locally sourced sediments from the adjacent paleotopography. Above the thin veneer of locally sourced sediments is a more regionally sourced, confined braided stream sequence, which completely backfills the existing paleotopography. Once the paleotopographic surface had been leveled, the depositional environment changed from a confined braided stream to a broad braided plain. Within this sequence of vertically stacked and laterally migrating braided plain sediments, the bulk of the reservoirs within the Hawtah field are contained. As the transgressive Khuff seas continue to encroach on the Unayzah depositional system, the upper-most sediments of the broad braided plan environment are reworked by transgressive coastal processes. The resulting reworked shoreface and shallow-marine facies are genetically related to the Khuff transgression and lie unconformably on the Unayzah continental clastics.

  10. Outside the Continental United States International Travel and Contagion Impact Quick Look Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Kunkel, Brenda M.; Muller, George; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This paper describes a tool that will allow public health analysts to estimate infectious disease risk at the country level as a function of different international transportation modes. The prototype focuses on a cholera epidemic originating within Latin America or the Caribbean, but it can be expanded to consider other pathogens as well. This effort leverages previous work in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop the International Travel to Community Impact (IT-CI) model, which analyzes and assesses potential international disease outbreaks then estimates the associated impacts to U.S. communities and the nation as a whole and orient it for use Outside the Continental United States (OCONUS). For brevity, we refer to this refined model as OIT-CI. First, we developed an operationalized meta-population spatial cholera model for Latin America and the Caribbean at the secondary administrative-level boundary. Secondly, we developed a robust function of human airline critical to approximating mixing patterns in the meta- population model. In the prototype version currently presented here, OIT-CI models a cholera epidemic originating in a Latin American or Caribbean country and spreading via airline transportation routes. Disease spread is modeled at the country level using a patch model with a connectivity function based on demographic, geospatial, and human transportation data. We have also identified data to estimate the water and health-related infrastructure capabilities of each country to include this potential impact on disease transmission.

  11. Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle: 1. Persistence of cusp proton aurora K. Throp, M. Lockwood,1 B. S. Lanchester, and S. K employ a numerical model of cusp ion precipitation and proton aurora emission to fit variations

  12. Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation Q.-G. Zong a,b,*, TT) at Earth. Cusp proton aurora was caused by the leading phase of the CME. Cusp proton aurora generally of the cusp proton aurora shifted about 30° from dawnside to duskside when IMF By changed from À10 to 5 n

  13. Convective Cell Formation in a Z-Pinch Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convective Cell Formation in a Z-Pinch J. Kesner Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 PSFC Report PSFC/JA-02-27 Abstract Closed field line confinement given by Eq. (1). These equations were then applied to a hard core z pinch which can be considered

  14. The Influence of Thermal Convection on Density Segregation in a Vibrated Binary Granular System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    of this work strongly imply the possibility that, for an adequately fluidised granular bed, the degree^ole of diffusive behaviour in the segregation of a gran- ular bed in the convective regime. The results on the fluctuation of particle velocities about a mean value [53]. For a granular bed excited by, for instance

  15. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  16. EQUILIBRIUM VS. ACTIVATION CONTROL OF LARGE-SCALE VARIATIONS OF TROPICAL DEEP CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapes, Brian

    convective cloud systems. This essay highlights the distinction between processes which supply moisture separations of the LSVDC problem are reviewed. Scale separation, though rigorous, is artificial, since net cloudiness, are exam- ined as examples. Lower boundary flux enhancements and deep lifting exert both

  17. A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacre, Helen

    A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes H. F. Dacre,1 S. L; published 12 September 2007. [1] It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May

  18. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  19. Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun Department] The climatological ozone profile in the tropics is shaped like an ``S,'' with a minimum at the surface, a maximum. These features can be reproduced by a very simple model whose only free parameter is the mean ozone mixing ratio

  20. Convectively Coupled Waves Propagating along an Equatorial ITCZ JULIANA DIAS AND OLIVIER PAULUIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    Convectively Coupled Waves Propagating along an Equatorial ITCZ JULIANA DIAS AND OLIVIER PAULUIS waves propagate at the moist gravity wave speed (about 15 m s21 ), whereas for a narrow ITCZ, the propagation speed is comparable to the dry gravity wave (about 50 m s21 ). It is also shown that a Kelvin wave

  1. Convective-Resolving Regional Climate Simulations for the Amazon Basin: Comparison with TRMM Rainfall Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Nichole 1987-

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are computed at 4-km grid spacing, which reasonably resolves most convective systems. Simulations are computed for both the DJF and MAM seasons as averaged over 2005-2008, with a model domain covering...

  2. Adaptive Thermal Management for Portable System Batteries by Forced Convection Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Adaptive Thermal Management for Portable System Batteries by Forced Convection Cooling Qing Xie}@elpl.snu.ac.kr Abstract-- Cycle life of a battery largely varies according to the battery operating conditions, especially the battery temperature. In particular, batteries age much faster at high temperature. Extensive experiments

  3. Vertical structure of tropical oceanic convective clouds and its relation to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    data are collocated with precipitation rates from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR high tops that are nearly two km deeper than moderately raining or non- raining high clouds. Rain rate.1029/2007GL032811. 1. Introduction [2] Tropical convection plays an important role in the energy and moisture

  4. Local helioseismology and correlation tracking analysis of surface structures in realistic simulations of solar convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dali Georgobiani; Junwei Zhao; Alexander Kosovichev; David Benson; Robert F. Stein; Åke Nordlund

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply time-distance helioseismology, local correlation tracking and Fourier spatial-temporal filtering methods to realistic supergranule scale simulations of solar convection and compare the results with high-resolution observations from the SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). Our objective is to investigate the surface and sub-surface convective structures and test helioseismic measurements. The size and grid of the computational domain are sufficient to resolve various convective scales from granulation to supergranulation. The spatial velocity spectrum is approximately a power law for scales larger than granules, with a continuous decrease in velocity amplitude with increasing size. Aside from granulation no special scales exist, although a small enhancement in power at supergranulation scales can be seen. We calculate the time-distance diagram for f- and p-modes and show that it is consistent with the SOHO/MDI observations. From the simulation data we calculate travel time maps for surface gravity waves (f-mode). We also apply correlation tracking to the simulated vertical velocity in the photosphere to calculate the corresponding horizontal flows. We compare both of these to the actual large-scale (filtered) simulation velocities. All three methods reveal similar large scale convective patterns and provide an initial test of time-distance methods.

  5. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

  6. The Ratio of Helium- to Hydrogen-Atmosphere White Dwarfs: Direct Evidence for Convective Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -E. Tremblay; P. Bergeron

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf stars as a function of effective temperature from a model atmosphere analysis of the infrared photometric data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey combined with available visual magnitudes. Our study surpasses any previous analysis of this kind both in terms of the accuracy of the Teff determinations as well as the size of the sample. We observe that the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs increases gradually from a constant value of ~0.25 between Teff = 15,000 K and 10,000 K to a value twice as large in the range 10,000 > Teff > 8000 K, suggesting that convective mixing, which occurs when the bottom of the hydrogen convection zone reaches the underlying convective helium envelope, is responsible for this gradual transition. The comparison of our results with an approximate model used to describe the outcome of this convective mixing process implies hydrogen mass layers in the range log M_H/M_tot = -10 to -8 for about 15% of the DA stars that survived the DA to DB transition near Teff ~ 30,000 K, the remainder having presumably more massive layers above log M_H/M_tot ~ -6.

  7. Effect of convective cooling on frictionally excited thermoelastic instability , A. Bendawi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Yun-Bo

    of temperature/pressure at a given sliding speed or the critical value of the speed above which the system critical sliding velocity. Two representative models for brake and clutch systems are studied. The computational results reveal that the effect of thermal convection on the critical sliding speed is significant

  8. The effect of shear on heat budgets in a simulated Mesoscale Convective System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Justin David

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the lowest 2.5 km varying from 10-25 m s?¹. A fourth simulation was conducted using the weak wind shear profile and incorporating ice microphysics. An analysis domain was produced every two hours for the northern and southern portions of the convective line...

  9. Homogenization of a Conductive, Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer Problem in a Heterogeneous Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -cooled reactor. It is typically made of many prismatic blocks of graphite in which are inserted the nuclear fuel in the homogenization of heat transfer in periodic porous media where the fluid part is made of long thin parallel in the solid part of the domain and by conduction, convection and radiative transfer in the fluid part (the

  10. 1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal] Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing 6 anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative 7 to the ambient groundwater

  11. Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative to the ambient groundwater. The buoyant plume

  12. LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    819 LOOKING FOR VARIATIONS WITH LATITUDE OF THE BASE OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE M Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London El 4 successfully in determining the basic characteristics of the base of the solar convec- tive region (e

  13. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Stressed horizontal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    in the Gullmarfjord on the west coast of Sweden. When the wind swept over the fjord, the water at the surface flowed to the suggestion of Munk & Wunsch (1998) that mechanical energy sources -- such as the wind stress observed by Sandstr¨om (1908) -- are necessary to sustain the ocean circulation. Recent work on horizontal convection

  14. Antisymmetric Polar Modes of Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Fluid Shells at High Taylor Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Francisco

    to the inner sphere at the equator (polar mode). The exponent of the power law determined from the asymptotic's magnetic field is generated in its interior by convection driven by thermal and compositional buoy- ancy good reviews of the state of the art on this subject. The theoretical paper [7] established

  15. 2 Geomagnetic dipole moment collapse by convective mixing in the core 3 Lijun Liu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    through 13 expulsion of mostly poloidal magnetic field by convective 14 upwellings. The dipole fieldkinematic dynamo waves [Gubbins, 1987]. Like resistive 58instabilities, dynamo wave mechanisms are limited on relatively long time scales 61in the outer core. 62[4] Numerical dynamos reveal there are fast, advection- 63

  16. GEVREY REGULARITY FOR THE ATTRACTOR OF A PARTIALLY DISSIPATIVE MODEL OF B'ENARD CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Marcel

    Abstract.Convective flow though a porous medium can be modeled by Darcy's law_a linear, weakly damped momentum equation_coupled with an advection-diffusion equation for the energy. The solution semigroup for * *this system is not smoothing, and the solution of the momentum equation does

  17. Magneto-convective models of red dwarfs: constraints imposed by the lithium abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fields impede the onset of convection, thereby altering the thermal structure of a convective envelope in a low mass star: this has an effect on the amount of lithium depletion in a magnetized star. In order to quantify this effect, we have applied a magneto-convective model to two low mass stars for which lithium abundances and precise structural parameters are known: YY Gem and CU Cnc. For both stars, we have obtained models which satisfy empirical constraints on the following parameters: R, L, surface magnetic field strength, and Li abundance. In the case of YY Gem, we have obtained a model which satisfies the empirical constraints with an internal magnetic field of several megagauss: such a field strength is within the range of a dynamo where the field energy is in equipartition with rotational energy deep inside the convection zone. However, in the case of CU Cnc, the Li requires an internal magnetic field which is probably too strong for a dynamo origin: we suggest possible alternatives which m...

  18. Deep convection in the Irminger Sea forced by the Greenland tip jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    Deep convection in the Irminger Sea forced by the Greenland tip jet Robert S. Pickart*, Michael A atmospheric jet known as the Greenland tip jet, which forms periodically in the lee of Cape Farewell, Greenland, and is associated with elevated heat flux and strong wind stress curl. Using a history of tip

  19. 3D convection simulations of the outer layers of the Sun using realistic physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Robinson; P. Demarque; L. H. Li; S. Sofia; Y. -C. Kim; K. L. Chan; D. B. Guenther

    2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a series of 3D simulations of shallow inefficient convection in the outer layers of the Sun. The computational domain is a closed box containing the convection-radiation transition layer, located at the top of the solar convection zone. The most salient features of the simulations are that: i)The position of the lower boundary can have a major effect on the characteristics of solar surface convection (thermal structure, kinetic energy and turbulent pressure). ii)The width of the box has only a minor effect on the thermal structure, but a more significant effect on the dynamics (rms velocities). iii)Between the surface and a depth of 1 Mm, even though the density and pressure increase by an order of magnitude, the vertical correlation length of vertical velocity is always close to 600 km. iv) In this region the vertical velocity cannot be scaled by the pressure or the density scale height. This casts doubt on the applicability of the mixing length theory, not only in the superadiabatic layer, but also in the adjacent underlying layers. v) The final statistically steady state is not strictly dependent on the initial atmospheric stratification.

  20. The effect of shear on heat budgets in a simulated Mesoscale Convective System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Justin David

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the lowest 2.5 km varying from 10-25 m s?¹. A fourth simulation was conducted using the weak wind shear profile and incorporating ice microphysics. An analysis domain was produced every two hours for the northern and southern portions of the convective line...

  1. Movement of oxygen from the atmosphere to the mitochondria occurs via several convective and diffusive steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    4111 Movement of oxygen from the atmosphere to the mitochondria occurs via several convective and diffusive steps (Weibel et al., 1981). In mammals, maximal rate of oxygen consumption (VOmax) is not limited by any one step of the oxygen cascade; rather limitations to VOmax are distributed across all steps

  2. Small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in a turbulent convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Rogachevskii; N. Kleeorin

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic field and nonlinear turbulent magnetic diffusion in a turbulent convection. We show that the nonlinear drift velocities are caused by the three kinds of the inhomogeneities, i.e., inhomogeneous turbulence; the nonuniform fluid density and the nonuniform turbulent heat flux. The inhomogeneous turbulence results in the well-known turbulent diamagnetic and paramagnetic velocities. The nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic field cause the small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in the turbulent convection. These phenomena are different from the large-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects which are due to the effect of the mean magnetic field on the large-scale density stratified fluid flow. The small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping can be stronger than these large-scale effects when the mean magnetic field is smaller than the equipartition field. We discuss the small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in the context of the solar and stellar turbulent convection. We demonstrate also that the nonlinear turbulent magnetic diffusion in the turbulent convection is anisotropic even for a weak mean magnetic field. In particular, it is enhanced in the radial direction. The magnetic fluctuations due to the small-scale dynamo increase the turbulent magnetic diffusion of the toroidal component of the mean magnetic field, while they do not affect the turbulent magnetic diffusion of the poloidal field.

  3. Dynamo Action in the Solar Convection Zone and Tachocline: Pumping and Organization of Toroidal Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Browning; Mark S. Miesch; Allan Sacha Brun; Juri Toomre

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results from three-dimensional spherical shell simulations of magnetic dynamo action realized by turbulent convection penetrating downward into a tachocline of rotational shear. This permits us to assess several dynamical elements believed to be crucial to the operation of the solar global dynamo, variously involving differential rotation resulting from convection, magnetic pumping, and amplification of fields by stretching within the tachocline. The simulations reveal that strong axisymmetric toroidal magnetic fields (about 3000 G in strength) are realized within the lower stable layer, unlike in the convection zone where fluctuating fields are predominant. The toroidal fields in the stable layer possess a striking persistent antisymmetric parity, with fields in the northern hemisphere largely of opposite polarity to those in the southern hemisphere. The associated mean poloidal magnetic fields there have a clear dipolar geometry, but we have not yet observed any distinctive reversals or latitudinal propagation. The presence of these deep magnetic fields appears to stabilize the sense of mean fields produced by vigorous dynamo action in the bulk of the convection zone.

  4. Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo-Carrión, Juan R.

    Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models using output from nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model, Meso-NH, simulations. The radiative for a systematic evaluation of the mesoscale cloud models. An overall good agreement is obtained for both

  5. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  6. Computational Modeling and Experiments of Natural Convection for a Titan Montgolfiere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    viscosity cp Specific heat k Conductivity h Heat transfer coefficient Q Total heat input s(x) Distribution-seventh that of Earth, requires a significantly reduced heat input for a given balloon mass, compared to Earth. The smaller heat input also implies that natural convection, rather than radiation, will dominate the heat

  7. Solutions for nonlinear convection in the presence of a lateral boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skeldon, Anne C.

    Solutions for nonlinear convection in the presence of a lateral boundary P.G. Daniels, D. Ho & A into account the effect of a lateral boundary and without the need for extensive numerical calculations crystals, in crystal growth and in the buckling of plates (see, for example, [1]). A key issue

  8. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 094105 (2013) Onset of convection with fluid compressibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013; published online 25 September 2013) The density increase from carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolution. The convection is important for both CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers and CO2 improved oil recovery from to interface movement may be much more pronounced in hydro- carbons than in water. This could have important

  9. Satellite retrieval of convective cloud base temperature based on the NPP/VIIRS Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    of Shaanxi Province, Xi'an, China, 2 Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem potential energy and thus improving the prediction of convection and precipitation, especially in remote weather prediction models can improve the weather forecast and especially the quantitative precipitation

  10. Quality of the Target Area for Metrics with Different Nonlinearities in a Mesoscale Convective System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Zhiyong

    , on the forecast error of strongly nonlinear rainfall and weakly nonlinear total energy around the initial vortex of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China (Manuscript received 31 area for forecast metrics with different nonlinearities in a mesoscale convective vortex

  11. Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to dominate flow tension forces. It is shown that the electromag- netic and surface tension forces domi- nate the flow by experimental measurements of segrega- tion in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven

  12. Marangoni convection induced by a nonlinear temperature-dependent surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    23 Marangoni convection induced by a nonlinear temperature-dependent surface tension A. Cloot and G'instabilité de Marangoni dans une mince lame horizontale de fluide lorsque la tension de surface est une fonction ofthe surface- tension with respect to the temperature is studied. This behaviour is typical of some

  13. Time-independent square patterns in surface-tension-driven Benard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Time-independent square patterns in surface-tension-driven Be´nard convection Michael F. Schatza The transition between hexagonal and square patterns is investigated in laboratory experiments on surface-tension, the transition from hexagons to other patterns was unexplored for the surface-tension-driven regime of Be

  14. Evaluation of mesoscale convective systems in South America using multiple satellite products and an objectbased approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    and an objectbased approach E. M. C. Demaria,1 D. A. Rodriguez,2 E. E. Ebert,3 P. Salio,4 F. Su,5 and J. B. Valdes1 to precipitation was mitigating the effect of the errors. Citation: Demaria, E. M. C., D. A. Rodriguez, E. E. Ebert, P. Salio, F. Su, and J. B. Valdes (2011), Evaluation of mesoscale convective systems in South

  15. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  16. Non-depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield: Nd-Sr isotopic and trace element evidence from Midcontinent Rift basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paces, J.B. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton (USA)); Bell, K. (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midcontinent Rift flood basalts represent a sample of the relatively shallow, sub-continental upper mantle beneath the Canadian Shield at 1.1 Ga. A thick sequence of olivine tholeiite lavas, including minor intermediate to rhyolitic lavas, from the Portage Lake Volcanics (PLV) in northern Michigan have initial Nd and Sr isotopic compositions which cluster near Bulk Earth values. The effects of assimilation of old LREE-enriched continental crust into mantle-derived fractionating liquids are isotopically discernible in evolved lavas as well as in olivine tholeiites from the lowest portion of the volcanic pile. However, the effects of crustal contamination decrease with stratigraphic height and are absent in more primitive lavas in the upper half of the section. The source for PLV tholeiites is substantially less depleted than previously reported mantle values from the Superior Province. An origin for the PLV source is compatible with either of several mantle evolution models. The PLV source may have been associated with upwelling of a LIL element-enriched, asthenospheric plume which emplaced non-depleted material from deeper sources into the shallow sub-continental mantle beneath the Midcontinent Rift during continental break-up. Alternatively, the PLV source may have originated by enrichment of refractory sub-continental lithospheric mantle which was previously depleted in incompatible trace elements during Archean-aged melt extraction and continental crust formation. Concurrent generation of carbonatite magmas in other areas beneath the Superior Province indicates the widespread presence of sub-continental mantle with substantially higher {epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) and lower {epsilon}{sub Sr}(T) than the PLV source.

  17. Low-level convergence and its role in convective intensity and frequency over the Houston lightning and rainfall anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNear, Veronica Ann

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . By using these images along with average lightning, rainfall, and reflectivity for a large Houston-centered domain, it was possible to discern a correlation between low-level convergence and convection. Also, past findings of enhancement in lightning...

  18. The sensitivity of tropical convective precipitation to the direct radiative forcings of black carbon aerosols emitted from major regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    Previous works have suggested that the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) aerosols are able to force a significant change in tropical convective precipitation ranging from the Pacific and Indian Ocean to ...

  19. Simulation of the North American Monsoon by the NCAR CCM3 and Its Sensitivity to Convection Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guang Jun

    Simulation of the North American Monsoon by the NCAR CCM3 and Its Sensitivity to Convection Two 9-yr runs of the NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) are compared in their simulations

  20. Tropical precipitation variability and convectively coupled equatorial waves1 on submonthly time-scales in reanalyses and TRMM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    convection plays a vital role in global climate by driving large-scale circulation,41 releasing latent heat, modulating radiative forcing, and most importantly redistributing water in42 the earth system. Due to complex

  1. Cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics of warm season Mesoscale Convection Systems in the Central United States: 1992-1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeth, Brian Richard

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a detailed analysis of cloud-to-aphics. ground (CG) lightning flashes within individual Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) that occurred in the Central United States during May-August of 1992 and 1993. Analysis of the CG...

  2. Non-PEGylated liposomes for convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan and gadodiamide in malignant glioma: initial experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel nano- liposomal CPT-11 infused by convection-enhancedregimen of topoCED co-infused with gadoCED greatly increasedconcentrations (1.6 mg/ ml) co-infused with gadoCED showed

  3. The evolution of total lightning and radar reflectivity characteristics of two mesoscale convective systems over Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodapp, Charles Lee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    originated in the convective or transition regions. Both in-situ charging mechanisms created by the development of the mesoscale updraft and charge advection by the front-to-rear flow likely contribute to the increased electrification and lightning...

  4. Segregation of Particulate Solids: Segregation via Convection S. Luding(*/**), J. Duran(*), E. Cl'ement(*), J. Rajchenbach(*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    they examine granular convection with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging methods. Eventually, detailed are discussed: Segregation in a powder bed, at the surface of a powder bed and in a fluidized powder bed

  5. Precipitation Hydrometeor Type Relative to the Mesoscale Airflow in Oceanic Deep Convection of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    1 Precipitation Hydrometeor Type Relative to the Mesoscale Airflow in Oceanic Deep located relative to mesoscale air motions Heavy rain and riming occur downstream of mesoscale Abstract Composite analysis of near-equatorial oceanic mesoscale convective systems (MCSs

  6. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  7. Properties of inflow and downdraft air of tropical mesoscale convective systems and the effect of downdrafts on the surface fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Jeane Margaret

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPERTIES OF INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE FLUXES A Thesis by JEANE MARGARET GRIFFITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MAS'IER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology PROPERTIES OF THE INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE...

  8. Two-dimensional segmentation of small convective patterns in radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmerer, B; Hanslmeier, A; Veronig, A; Thonhofer, S; Grimm-Strele, H; Kariyappa, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from high-resolution solar granulation observations indicate the existence of a population of small granular cells that are smaller than 600 km in diameter. These small convective cells strongly contribute to the total area of granules and are located in the intergranular lanes, where they form clusters and chains. We study high-resolution radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the upper convection zone and photosphere to detect small granular cells, define their spatial alignment, and analyze their physical properties. We developed an automated image-segmentation algorithm specifically adapted to high-resolution simulations to identify granules. The resulting segmentation masks were applied to physical quantities, such as intensity and vertical velocity profiles, provided by the simulation. A new clustering algorithm was developed to study the alignment of small granular cells. This study shows that small granules make a distinct contribution to the total area of granules and form clusters of ...

  9. Noise-Sustained Convective Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Liu

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  10. Angular momentum fluctuations in the convective helium shell of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find significant fluctuations of angular momentum within the convective helium shell of a pre-collapse massive star - a core-collapse supernova progenitor - which may facilitate the formation of accretion disks and jets that can explode the star. The convective flow in our model of an evolved M_ZAMS=15Msun star, computed with the sub-sonic hydrodynamic solver MAESTRO, contains entire shells with net angular momentum in different directions. Such a distribution of angular momentum may give rise to several episodes of accretion disks with varying axes around the newly formed neutron star or black hole. The accretion disks in turn might launch jets that can explode the star in the frame of the jittering-jets model.

  11. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  12. Noise-sustained convective instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  13. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  14. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  15. Influence of a coronal envelope as a free boundary to global convective dynamo simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of an outer stably stratified coronal envelope on rotating turbulent convection, differential rotation, and large-scale dynamo action in spherical wedge models of the Sun. We solve the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in a two-layer model with unstable stratification below the surface, representing the convection zone, and a stably stratified outer layer, the coronal envelope. The interface emulates essentially a free surface. We compare with models that have no coronal envelope. The presence of a coronal envelope is found to modify the Reynolds stress and the $\\Lambda$-effect resulting in a weaker and non-cylindrical differential rotation. This is related to the reduced latitudinal temperature variations, which are caused by and dependent on the Coriolis force. Some simulations develop a rudimentary near-surface shear layer, which we can relate to a sign change of the meridional Reynolds stress term in the thermal wind balance equation. Furthermore, the presence of a free sur...

  16. A Compressible High-Order Unstructured Spectral Difference Code for Stratified Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junfeng; Miesch, Mark S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code for simulating thermal convection and related fluid dynamics in the interiors of stars and planets. The computational geometries are treated as rotating spherical shells filled with stratified gas. The hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM) on unstructured meshes. The computational stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS demonstrates excellent parallel performance for all test cases reported in this paper, scaling up to 12,000 cores on the Yellowstone High-Performance Computing cluster at NCAR. The code is verified by defining two benchmark cases for global convection in Jupiter and the Sun. CHORUS results are compared with results from the ASH code and good agreement is found. The CHORUS code creates new opportunities for simulating such varied phenomena as multi-scale solar co...

  17. The First Second of a Type-II Supernova: Convection, Accretion, and Shock Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -Thomas Janka; Ewald Mueller

    1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    One- and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of neutrino-driven supernova explosions are discussed. The simulations cover the phase between the stagnation of the prompt shock and about one second after core bounce. Systematic variation of the neutrino fluxes from the neutrino sphere shows that the explosion energy, explosion time scale, initial mass of the protoneutron star, and explosive nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements depend sensitively on the strength of the neutrino heating during the first few 100 ms after shock formation. Convective overturn in the neutrino-heated region behind the shock is a crucial help for the explosion only in a narrow window of neutrino luminosities. Here powerful explosions can be obtained only in the multi-dimensional case. For higher core-neutrino fluxes also spherically symmetrical models yield energetic explosions, while for lower luminosities even with convection no strong explosions occur.

  18. Convection in nanofluids with a particle-concentration-dependent thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glässl, Martin; Zimmermann, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal convection in nanofluids is investigated by means of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures, with a thermal conductivity depending on the local concentration of colloidal particles. The applied temperature difference between the upper and the lower boundary leads via the Soret effect to a variation of the colloid concentration and therefore to a spatially varying heat conductivity. An increasing difference between the heat conductivity of the mixture near the colder and the warmer boundary results in a shift of the onset of convection to higher values of the Rayleigh number for positive values of the separation ratio $\\psi>0$ and to smaller values in the range $\\psi0$. This range can be extended by increasing the difference in the thermal conductivity and it is bounded by two codimension-2 bifurcations.

  19. Convection in nanofluids with a particle-concentration-dependent thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Glässl; Markus Hilt; Walter Zimmermann

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal convection in nanofluids is investigated by means of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures, with a thermal conductivity depending on the local concentration of colloidal particles. The applied temperature difference between the upper and the lower boundary leads via the Soret effect to a variation of the colloid concentration and therefore to a spatially varying heat conductivity. An increasing difference between the heat conductivity of the mixture near the colder and the warmer boundary results in a shift of the onset of convection to higher values of the Rayleigh number for positive values of the separation ratio psi>0 and to smaller values in the range psi0. This range can be extended by increasing the difference in the thermal conductivity and it is bounded by two codimension-2 bifurcations.

  20. Source-inherited shape characteristics of coarse quartz-silt on the northwest Gulf of Mexico continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haines, John Beverly

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the South Texas continental shelf (shaded). . . . . . . . . . Summary of the mean amplitude values for harmonics 2 through 6 for samples from the three source- terranes. . . , 15 Summary of the mean amplitude values for harmoni. cs 9, 14, 17, 19 and 24... for samples from the three source terraces. 17 Summary of the mean amplitude values for harmonics 2 through 6 for samples from the two sedimentary source terranes. 19 Summary of the mean amplitude values for harmonics 9, 14, 17, 19 and 24 from samples...

  1. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio [Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  2. Non-Darcian forced convection in porous media with anisotropic dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adnani, P.; Catton, I.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective heat transfer in a particle packed tube is modeled in this paper. Axial and radial dispersion are both included in the governing equations. Results are compared with experimental data, and with previously developed models that did not include axial dispersion. It is shown that heat transfer in the thermally developing region is affected by axial dispersion when Peclet number is smaller than 10. Graphic results are provided to show the importance of axial dispersion for various Peclet numbers. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Pre-convective environmental conditions indicative of non-tornadic severe thunderstorm winds over Southeast Florida 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey Michael

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thunderstorm wind events over Southeast Florida during the period of study. Upper-air data were obtained for several stations on and around the Florida peninsula. These stations include: Key West, Florida (EYW), West Palm Beach, Florida (PBI), Tampa Bay...PRE-CONVECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS INDICATIVE OF NON-TORNADIC SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WINDS OVER SOUTHEAST FLORIDA A Thesis by JEFFREY MICHAEL WILHELM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

  4. Electrodeposition of high Mo content Ni-Mo alloys under forced convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podlaha, E.J.; Matlosz, M.; Landolt, D. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanee (Switzerland). Dept. des materiaux)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright, compact, adherent, metallic Ni-Mo alloys, containing over 48 wt % Mo have been electrodeposited from an aqueous solution. The Mo content, which is the highest achieved so far in induced codeposition of Ni-Mo, was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The absence of oxygen was verified by Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrodeposition experiments were performed on rotating cylinder electrodes and demonstrate that the Mo content of the alloy is strongly influenced by convective transport.

  5. Natural convection heat transfer from a plate in a semicircular enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, G.A.; Hollands, K.G.T. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper is about characterizing the two-dimensional convective transfer across the air-filled region between a flat plate and a semicircular cylindrical enclosure. In the subject geometry, a long thin plate at uniform temperature is contained coaxially and symmetrically in a long semicircular trough closed at the top and having a uniform but different temperature. Heat flows across the air-filled region between the two by both natural convection and gaseous conduction. The problem of characterizing the free convective component of this heat transfer - that is, the component caused by bulk fluid motion - is treated experimentally by using a heat balance technique, with the measurements being repeated at different pressures, in order to cover a wide Rayleigh number range, from Ra {approximately} 10 to Ra {approximately} 10{sup 8}. Nusselt number versus Rayleigh number plots are presented for each of several combinations of plate-to-trough spacing and tilt angle, and the plots are correlated by equations. The problem of characterizing the conductive component is treated by numerically solving the steady diffusion equation in the air-filled region, and the results are correlated as a function of the spacing and the plate thickness.

  6. Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

  7. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  8. Frictional heating and convective cooling of polycrystalline diamond drag tools during rock cutting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical-analytical model is developed to predict temperatures in stud-mounted polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools during rock cutting. Experimental measurements of the convective heat transfer coefficient for PDC cutters are used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is shown that mean cutter wearflat temperatures can be maintained below the critical value of 750{sup 0}C only under conditions of low friction at the cutter/rock interface. This is true, regardless of the level of convective cooling. In fact, a cooling limit is established above which increases in convective cooling do not further reduce cutter temperatures. The ability of liquid drilling fluids to reduce interface friction is thus shown to be far more important in preventing excessive temperatures than their ability to provide cutter cooling. Due to the relatively high interface friction developed under typical air drilling conditions, it is doubtful that temperatures can be kept subcritical at high rotary speeds in some formations when air is employed as the drilling fluid, regardless of the level of cooling achieved.

  9. A convective-radiative heat transfer model for gas core reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Anghaie, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective-radiative heat transfer model is developed and used to predict the temperature distribution in gaseous fuel nuclear reactor cores. The axisymmetric, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with diffusive radiation source term are the basis for this modeling approach. An algebraic turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to model the radiative heat transfer. A hybrid implicit-explicit numerical scheme with Gauss-Seidel iterative process and a highly stretched grid system near wall is employed to solve the governing equations. Several cases with different internal heat generation rates are modeled and analyzed. Results of the temperature distribution, wall heat flux and the associated Nusselt number are presented. The influence of the internal heat generation rate and the wall temperature on the radiative and convective wall heat fluxes are discussed. At gas and wall temperatures close to 3,500 K and 1,600 K, respectively, the radiative and convective heat transfer rates have similar values.

  10. Large-scale weakly nonlinear perturbations of convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Chertovskih; Vladislav Zheligovsky

    2015-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new mechanism for generation of large-scale magnetic field by thermal convection which does not involve the alpha-effect. We consider weakly nonlinear perturbations of space-periodic steady convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer that were identified in our previous work. The perturbations have a spatial scale in the horizontal direction that is much larger than the period of the perturbed convective magnetohydrodynamic state. Following the formalism of the multiscale stability theory, we have derived the system of amplitude equations governing the evolution of the leading terms in expansion of the perturbations in power series in the scale ratio. This asymptotic analysis is more involved than in the cases considered earlier, because the kernel of the operator of linearisation has zero-mean neutral modes whose origin lies in the spatial invariance of the perturbed regime, the operator reduced on the generalised kernel has two Jordan normal form blocks of size two, and simplifying symmetries of the perturbed state are now missing. Numerical results for the amplitude equations show that a perturbation, periodic in slow horizontal variable, either decays in time, or blows up at a finite time with amplitudes turning into a periodically-replicated delta-function moving at a constant speed.

  11. Natural convection in vertical parallel plates with an unheated entry or unheated exit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.T. (Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the unheated entry or unheated exit section on the free convection heat transfer in air flow in vertical parallel plate channels resulting from the thermal boundary conditions of uniform heat flux (UHF) and uniform wall temperature (UWT). Results of average Nusselt number and dimensionless volume flow rate are presented in terms of the ratio of the length of heated section to the full channel length and a Rayleigh number, ranging from the limit for the fully developed flow to that for single-plate behavior. Analytical equations for dimensionless volume flow rate and average Nusselt number for both unheated restrictions and both thermal boundary conditions have been developed for the fully developed flow limit. The numerical solutions are shown to approach asymptotically the approximate solution for fully developed flow as the Rayleigh number approaches 1 or less. An important finding of the study is that an unheated exit characterizes greater total heat transfer and volume flow rate than an unheated entry does. The presence of the unheated entry or unheated exit severely affects the convection process, especially at low Rayleigh number. A notable effect of an unheated exit on convection characteristics was found for the case of UHF at high Rayleigh number.

  12. Seismic diagnostics of mixing beyond the convective core in intermediate mass main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Popielski; W. A. Dziembowski

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study prospects for seismic sounding the layer of a partial mixing above the convective core in main-sequence stars with masses in the 1.2 -- 1.9 solar mass range. There is an initial tendency to an increase of convective core mass in such stars and this leads to ambiguities in modeling. Solar-like oscillations are expected to be excited in such objects. Frequencies of such oscillations provide diagnostics, which are sensitive to the structure of the innermost part of the star and they are known as the small separations. We construct evolutionary models of stars in this mass range assuming various scenarios for element mixing, which includes formation of element abundance jumps, as well as semiconvective and overshooting layers. We find that the three point small separations employing frequencies of radial and dipole modes provide the best probe of the element distribution above the convective core. With expected accuracy of frequency measurement from the space experiments, a discrimination between various scenarios should be possible.

  13. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  14. Production and turnover of suspended organic matter in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixteen years of work on the microbial food web of the southeastern shelf and its relation to the production, movement, and fate of organic materials, have helped us understand the roles of microorganisms in that ecosystem. We found that microbial metabolism dominates the flow of energy and materials on the continental shelf, utilizing nearly all available organic matter, except in mid-winter. Bacteria strongly influence the cycle of carbon in continental shelf waters, both by rapidly utilizing organic materials and by promoting aggregation of particulate material. We demonstrated a strong interaction between microorganisms in the water and those in the nearshore bottom sediments. We showed that chelation of copper by dissolved organic ligands in the coastal water protects phytoplankton not only from existing amounts but from much larger amounts. Simulation modeling predicted that there is usually little transfer of energy from the microbial food web to macroorganisms (fishes), an observation that has since been validated by investigators. A complete list of publications, theses and dissertations resulting from this project is provided.

  15. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  16. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  17. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  18. A viscous-convective instability in laminar Keplerian thin discs. II. Anelastic approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakura, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the anelastic approximation of linearised hydrodynamic equations, we investigate the development of axially symmetric small perturbations in thin Keplerian discs. The sixth-order dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved for different values of relevant physical parameters (viscosity, heat conductivity, disc semi-thickness and vertical structure). The analysis reveals the appearance of two overstable modes which split out from the classical Rayleigh inertial modes in a wide range of the parameters in both ionized and neutral gases. These modes have a viscous-convective nature and can serve as a seed for turbulence in astrophysical discs even in the absence of magnetic fields.

  19. Atmospheric structure and variability in areas of convective storms determined from 3-h rawinsonde data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Gregory Sims

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1974) indicates RMS vector errors in wind speed for the AVE II data as follows: Level Elevation An le 700 mb 500 mb 300 Htb 40' 0. 5 m s 0. 8 m s " 1. 0ms 10' -1 2. 5ms -1 4. 5 ms 7. 8 m s 'ihese RNS errors agree closely with those.... , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James R. Scoggins The structure and variability of the atmosphere in areas of radar- observed convection is established by using the unique 3-h rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's second...

  20. Convection in X-ray Bursts Michael Zingale Stony Brook University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's ElectronicnewConvection

  1. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    affiliation: University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. Corresponding author address: Samuel M. Kelly, University of Western Australia, M015 SESE, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. EThe Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY

  2. The Mixed Layer over the Antarctic Continental Shelf 1. Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, Pearson Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    References Continental Shelf cold-saline water strong katabatic winds brine exclusion multi-year pack ice ice-shelf dmix Antarctic bottom water sea ice a) b) Weddell Ross Amundsen Bellinghausen Solar heating) hi TS-lead Ta Tmix Ta TS-ice Tmix (1-i )Ii (0)Fsw (1-i )Ii (0)e-hi Fsw E Entrainment is calculated

  3. Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

  4. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  5. Evaluation of Continental Precipitation in 20th-Century Climate Simulations: The Utility of Multi-Model Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, T J; Gleckler, P J

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), simulations of 20th-century climate have been performed recently with some 20 global coupled ocean-atmosphere models. In view of its central importance for biological and socio-economic systems, model-simulated continental precipitation is evaluated relative to three observational estimates at both global and regional scales. Many models are found to display systematic biases, deviating markedly from the observed spatial variability and amplitude/phase of the seasonal cycle. However, the point-wise ensemble mean of all the models usually shows better statistical agreement with the observations than does any single model. Deficiencies of current models that may be responsible for the simulated precipitation biases as well as possible reasons for the improved estimate afforded by the multi-model ensemble mean are discussed. Implications of these results for water-resource managers also are briefly addressed.

  6. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore »for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, ?, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  7. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  8. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. II. TURBULENT PUMPING AND THE COHESION OF -LOOPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbett, Bill

    THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. II of strong downdrafts, convective flows dominate the evolution, flux tubes of any shape rapidly lose cohesion for a horizontal magnetic flux tube or layer to be preferentially transported in one vertical direction over

  9. ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY SPECTRA AND FLUXES FOR STARS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY- tudinal tube waves in stellar convection zones and used it to compute the wave energy spectra and fluxes are important only for cool stars with Teff wave energy decreases

  10. Electron thermal effect on linear and nonlinear coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell modes in dust-contaminated magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masood, W. [TPPD, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and National Center for Physics (NCP), Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and nonlinear properties of coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell modes in the presence of electron thermal effects are studied in a nonuniform magnetoplasma composed of electrons, ions, and extremely massive and negatively charged immobile dust grains. In the linear case, the modified dispersion relation is given and, in the nonlinear case, stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations that govern the dynamics of coupled SV and convective cell modes are obtained. It is found that electrostatic dipolar and vortex street type solutions can appear in such a plasma. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to the Earth's mesosphere as well as in ionospheric plasmas is also pointed out.

  11. The effect of nuclear reaction rates and convective mixing on the evolution of a 6M{sub ?} star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halabi, Ghina M., E-mail: gfm01@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the evolution of a 6M{sub ?} star, of solar-like initial metallicity, and investigate the effects of key nuclear reaction rates, as well as the treatment of the convective mixing on its evolution along the Cepheid instability strip. In particular, we study the effect of recent estimates of the {sup 14}N(p,?){sup 15}O reaction on the formation and extension of the blue loop during core helium burning. We also investigate the effects induced on this blue loop by the adoption of non-standard convective mixing prescriptions, as well as the implications of modifying the Mixing Length Theory.

  12. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  13. CALIBRATING CONVECTIVE PROPERTIES OF SOLAR-LIKE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD OF VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaca, Ana; Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Chaplin, William J.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Garcia, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G.; Campante, Tiago L. [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, Jerome [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Bedding, Timothy R.; Corsaro, Enrico [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bonanno, Alfio [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S.Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Elsworth, Yvonne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bruntt, Hans; Karoff, Christoffer; Kjeldsen, Hans [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hekker, Saskia, E-mail: ana.bonaca@yale.edu, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu, E-mail: joel.tanner@yale.edu [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098-XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar models generally use simple parameterizations to treat convection. The most widely used parameterization is the so-called mixing-length theory where the convective eddy sizes are described using a single number, {alpha}, the mixing-length parameter. This is a free parameter, and the general practice is to calibrate {alpha} using the known properties of the Sun and apply that to all stars. Using data from NASA's Kepler mission we show that using the solar-calibrated {alpha} is not always appropriate, and that in many cases it would lead to estimates of initial helium abundances that are lower than the primordial helium abundance. Kepler data allow us to calibrate {alpha} for many other stars and we show that for the sample of stars we have studied, the mixing-length parameter is generally lower than the solar value. We studied the correlation between {alpha} and stellar properties, and we find that {alpha} increases with metallicity. We therefore conclude that results obtained by fitting stellar models or by using population-synthesis models constructed with solar values of {alpha} are likely to have large systematic errors. Our results also confirm theoretical expectations that the mixing-length parameter should vary with stellar properties.

  14. Natural convection in horizontal porous layers with localized heating from below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, V. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Kulacki, F.A. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark (United States))

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective flow of fluid through saturated porous media heated from below is of considerable interest, and has been extensively studied. Most of these studies are concerned with either infinite horizontal porous layers or rectangular (or cylindrical) porous cavities with adiabatic vertical walls. A related problem of practical importance occurs when only a portion of the bottom surface is heated and the rest of it is either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. This situation is encountered in several geothermal areas which consists of troughs of volcanic debris contained by walls of nonfragmented ignimbrite. Thus, the model region considered is a locally heated long trough of isotropic porous medium confined by impermeable and insulating surroundings. Also, the recent motivation to study this problem has come from the efforts to identify a geologic repository for nuclear waste disposal. The purpose of the present work is to consider the effects of aspect ratio and Rayleigh number on free convection heat transfer from an isothermal heat source centrally located on the bottom surface of a horizontal porous cavity.

  15. Scaling behavior in the convection-driven Brazil-nut effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakhyat Hejmady; Ranjini Bandyopadhyay; Sanjib Sabhapandit; Abhishek Dhar

    2012-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brazil-nut effect is the phenomenon in which a large intruder particle immersed in a vertically shaken bed of smaller particles rises to the top, even when it is much denser. The usual practice, while describing these experiments, has been to use the dimensionless acceleration \\Gamma=a \\omega^2/g, where a and \\omega are respectively the amplitude and the angular frequency of vibration and g is the acceleration due to gravity. Considering a vibrated quasi-two-dimensional bed of mustard seeds, we show here that the peak-to-peak velocity of shaking v= a\\omega, rather than \\Gamma, is the relevant parameter in the regime where boundary-driven granular convection is the main driving mechanism. We find that the rise-time \\tau of an intruder is described by the scaling law \\tau ~ (v-v_c)^{-\\alpha}, where v_c is identified as the critical vibration velocity for the onset of convective motion of the mustard seeds. This scaling form holds over a wide range of (a,\\omega), diameter and density of the intruder.

  16. Thermal convection with large viscosity variation in an enclosure with localized heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.Y.; Hickox, C.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study is undertaken in order to gain an understanding of convective transport in a magma chamber. We have chosen to represent the chamber by an enclosure with localized heating from below. Results of both laboratory experiments and computer modeling are reported. The experimental apparatus consists of a transparent enclosure with a square planform. An electrically heated strip, with a width equal to one-fourth of the length of a side of the enclosure, is centered on the lower inside surface of the enclosure. For the experiments reported here, the top of the fluid layer is maintained at a constant temperature and the depth of the layer is equal to the width of the heated strip. The large viscosity variation characteristic of magma convection is simulated by using corn syrup as the working fluid. Measured velocity and temperature distribution as well as overall heat transfer rates are presented. The experiment is numerically simulated through use of a finite element computer program. Numerically predicted streamlines, isotherms, and velocity distributions are presented for the transverse vertical midplane of the enclosure. Good agreement is demonstrated between predictions and measurements. 23 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

  18. Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Gustafson, William I.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Deng, Liping

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad-hoc trigger function used in the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization with a trigger function related to the distribution of temperature and humidity in the convective boundary layer via probability density functions (PDFs). An additional modification to the default version of WRF is the computation of a cumulus cloud fraction based on the time scales relevant for shallow cumuli. Results from three case studies over the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma are presented. These days were selected because of the presence of shallow cumuli over the ARM site. The modified version of WRF does a much better job predicting the cloud fraction and the downwelling shortwave irradiance thancontrol simulations utilizing the default Kain-Fritsch scheme. The modified scheme includes a number of additional free parameters, including the number and size of bins used to define the PDF, the minimum frequency of a bin within the PDF before that bin is considered for shallow clouds to form, and the critical cumulative frequency of bins required to trigger deep convection. A series of tests were undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters. Overall, the scheme was found to be relatively insensitive to each of the parameters.

  19. Convection Triggering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. I. UNIFORMLY BUOYANT HORIZONTAL TUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbett, Bill

    THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. I. UNIFORMLY BUOYANT HORIZONTAL TUBES Y. Fan High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamic evolution of uniformly buoyant, twisted horizontal magnetic flux tubes