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1

Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is our richest source of cosmological information; the standard cosmological model was largely established thanks to study of the temperature anisotropies. By the end of the decade, the Planck satellite will close this important chapter and move us deeper into the new frontier of polarization measurements. Numerous ground--based and balloon--borne experiments are already forging into this new territory. Besides providing new and independent information on the primordial density perturbations and cosmological parameters, polarization measurements offer the potential to detect primordial gravity waves, constrain dark energy and measure the neutrino mass scale. A vigorous experimental program is underway worldwide and heading towards a new satellite mission dedicated to CMB polarization.

James G. Bartlett

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gauging the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a new derivation of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and find an exact expression that can be readily expanded perturbatively. Close attention is paid to gauge issues, with the motivation to examine the effect of super-Hubble modes on the CMB. We calculate a transfer function that encodes the behaviour of the dipole, and examine its long-wavelength behaviour. We show that contributions to the dipole from adiabatic super-Hubble modes are strongly suppressed, even in the presence of a cosmological constant, contrary to claims in the literature. We also introduce a naturally defined CMB monopole, which exhibits closely analogous long-wavelength behaviour. We discuss the geometrical origin of this super-Hubble suppression, pointing out that it is a simple reflection of adiabaticity, and hence argue that it will occur regardless of the matter content.

J. P. Zibin; Douglas Scott

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Cosmic Microwave Background and Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In forthcoming years, connections between cosmology and particle physics will be made increasingly important with the advent of a new generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Here, we review a number of these links. Our primary focus is on new CMB tests of inflation. We explain how the inflationary predictions for the geometry of the Universe and primordial density perturbations will be tested by CMB temperature fluctuations, and how the gravitational waves predicted by inflation can be pursued with the CMB polarization. The CMB signatures of topological defects and primordial magnetic fields from cosmological phase transitions are also discussed. Furthermore, we review current and future CMB constraints on various types of dark matter (e.g. massive neutrinos, weakly interacting massive particles, axions, vacuum energy), decaying particles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, exotic cosmological topologies, and other new physics.

Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Cosmic Microwave Background Tests of Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inflation provides a unified paradigm for understanding the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the flatness problem, and the origin of large-scale structure. Although the physics responsible for inflation is not yet well understood, slow-roll inflation generically makes several predictions: a flat Universe, primordial adiabatic density perturbations, and a stochastic gravity-wave background. Inflation further predicts specific relations between the amplitudes and shapes of the spectrum of density perturbations and gravity waves. There are now excellent prospects for testing precisely these predictions with forthcoming CMB temperature and polarization maps. Here I discuss these new CMB tests of inflation.

Marc Kamionkowski

1998-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cosmic Microwave Background: Past, Future, and Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I explain the origin and evolution of anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and argue that upcoming experiments will measure cosmological and fundamental parameters very accurately. Most of the paper focuses on present data, which strongly suggest that the universe is flat. Several arguments are given to prove that present data sets are not contaminated by systematics. New techniques to compare different experiments visually are introduced. These are illustrated for two years of the MSAM and Python experiments.

Scott Dodelson

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Cosmic Microwave Background: Beyond the Power Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Much recent work on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has focussed on the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropies and particularly on the recovery of cosmological parameters from acoustic peaks in the power spectrum. However, there is more that can conceivably be done with CMB measurements. Here I briefly survey a few such ideas: cross-correlation with other cosmic backgrounds as a probe of the density of the Universe; CMB polarization as a gravitational-wave detector; secondary anisotropies and the ionization history of the Universe; tests of alternative-gravity theories; polarization, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and cosmic variance; and tests for a neutrino mass.

Marc Kamionkowski

1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

New physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the present status of the Cosmic Microwave Background, with some emphasis on the current and future implications for particle physics. Conclusions are: gravitational instability in a dark matter dominated universe grew today's structure; the Universe remained neutral until z<~50; the CMB power spectrum peaks at 150<~l<~350; the large-scale structure of spacetime appears to be simple; something like inflation is something like proven; we will learn a great deal about cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics from MAP and Planck.

Douglas Scott

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Determining cosmic microwave background anisotropies in the presence of foregrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Separating foregrounds from the signal is one of the big challenges in cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. A simple way to estimate the CMB temperature in a given pixel is to fit for the amplitudes of the CMB and the various foreground components. The variance squared of this estimator is shown to be equal to $[(FDF)^2\\ \\sigzt + \\sigsh^2]$, where $\\sigz$ is the variance in the absence of foregrounds; $\\sigsh$ is the variance due to the uncertainty in the shapes of the foreground components; and FDF is the {\\it foreground degradation factor}. This one number, the FDF, gives a good indication of the ability of a given experiment to disentangle the CMB from foreground sources. A variety of applications relating to the planning and analyzing of experiments is presented.

Scott Dodelson

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background: Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I ouline some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The specturm of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

Scott Dodelson

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Window Functions Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary results of most observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are estimates of the angular power spectrum averaged through some broad band, called band-powers. These estimates are in turn what are used to produce constraints on cosmological parameters due to all CMB observations. Essential to this estimation of cosmological parameters is the calculation of the expected band-power for a given experiment, given a theoretical power spectrum. Here we derive the "band power" window function which should be used for this calculation, and point out that it is not equivalent to the window function used to calculate the variance. This important distinction has been absent from much of the literature: the variance window function is often used as the band-power window function. We discuss the validity of this assumed equivalence, the role of window functions for experiments that constrain the power in {\\it multiple} bands, and summarize a prescription for reporting experimental results. The analysis methods detailed here are applied in a companion paper to three years of data from the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement.

Lloyd Knox

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be identified and removed using a multi frequency approach, provided that a sufficiently deep all sky X-ray survey will be available. We further show that Blazars are a major constituent of all high-E extragalactic backgrounds. Their contribution is 11-12% at X-ray frequencies and possibly 100% in the 0.5-50 MeV band. At E>100 MeV, the Blazar collective emission, obtained extrapolating their integrated micro-wave flux to the gamma-ray band using the SED of EGRET detected sources, over-predicts the extragalactic background by a large factor, implying that Blazars not only dominate the gamma-ray sky but also that their average duty cycle at these frequencies must be rather low. We also find that Blazars of the HBL type may produce a significant amount of flux at TeV energies.

P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco; E. Cavazzuti; M. Perri; C. Pittori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be ...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Perri, M; Pittori, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis technique for blind component separation to polarised astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarised signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foregrounds and instrumental noise. We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated accordingly to the nominal performances of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite; the sky signal is modeled as a superposition of CMB, generated by a Gaussian, nearly scale invariant cosmological perturbation spectrum, and the existing simulated polarisation templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$ modes can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while $B$ modes can be detected, up to their turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$ if cosmological tensor amplitude...

Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G; Smoot, G F; Burigana, C; Maino, D; Bedini, L; Salerno, E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Weighing the Universe with the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variations in $\\Omega$, the total density of the Universe, leave a clear and distinctive imprint on the power spectrum of temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This signature is virtually independent of other cosmological parameters or details of particular cosmological models. We evaluate the precision with which $\\Omega$ can be determined by a CMB map as a function of sky coverage, pixel noise, and beam size. For example, assuming only that the primordial density perturbations were adiabatic and with no prior information on the values of any other cosmological parameters, a full-sky CMB map at $0.5^\\circ$ angular resolution and a noise level of $15\\,\\mu{\\rm K}$ per pixel can determine $\\Omega$ with a variance of 5\\%. If all other cosmological parameters are fixed, $\\Omega$ can be measured to better than 1\\%.

Gerard Jungman; Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky; David N. Spergel

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Delensing the CMB with the Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As confusion with lensing B-modes begins to limit experiments that search for primordial B-mode polarization, robust methods for delensing the CMB polarization sky are becoming increasingly important. We investigate in detail the possibility of delensing the CMB with the cosmic infrared background (CIB), emission from dusty star-forming galaxies that is an excellent tracer of the CMB lensing signal, in order to improve constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. We find that the maps of the CIB, such as current Planck satellite maps at 545 GHz, can be used to remove more than half of the lensing B-mode power. Calculating optimal combinations of different large-scale-structure tracers for delensing, we find that co-adding CIB data and external arcminute-resolution CMB lensing reconstruction can lead to significant additional improvements in delensing performance. We investigate whether measurement uncertainty in the CIB spectra will degrade the delensing performance if no model of the CIB spectra is assumed...

Sherwin, Blake D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis ({\\ica}) technique for blind component separation to polarized astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarized signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foreground emission and instrumental noise. {We implement Monte Carlo chains varying the CMB and noise realizations in order to asses the average capabilities of the algorithm and their variance.} We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated according to the {\\sc Planck} satellite capabilities, modelling the sky signal as a superposition of the CMB and of the existing simulated polarization templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$-mode can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while the $B$-mode power spectrum can be detected, up to its turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$, if the ratio of tensor to scalar contributions to the temperature quadrupole exceeds 30%. The power spectrum of the cross correlation between total intensity and polarization, $TE$, can be recovered up to $\\ell\\simeq 1200$, corresponding to the seventh $TE$ acoustic oscillation.

C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; G. De Zotti; G. F. Smoot; C. Burigana; D. Maino; L. Bedini; E. Salerno

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarization from satelliteastrophysical maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the application of the fast independent component analysis (FASTICA) technique for blind component separation to polarized astrophysical emission. We study how the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarized signal, consisting of E and B modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foreground emission and instrumental noise. We implement Monte Carlo chains varying the CMB and noise realizations in order to assess the average capabilities of the algorithm and their variance. We perform the analysis of all-sky maps simulated according to the Planck satellite capabilities, modeling the sky signal as a superposition of the CMB and of the existing simulated polarization templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB E mode can be recovered on all scales up to lsimilar or equal to 1000, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while the B-mode power spectrum can be detected, up to its turnover at lsimilar or equal to 100, if the ratio of tensor to scalar contributions to the temperature quadrupole exceeds 30 per cent. The power spectrum of the cross-correlation between total intensity and polarization, TE, can be recovered up to lsimilar or equal to 1200, corresponding to the seventh TE acoustic oscillation.

Baccigalpi, C.; Perrotta, F.; Zotti, G.D.; Smoot, G.F.; Burigana,C.; Maino, D.; Bedini, L.; Salerno, E.

2004-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cosmological-Parameter Determination with Microwave Background Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) contains information on virtually all cosmological parameters of interest, including the geometry of the Universe ($\\Omega$), the baryon density, the Hubble constant ($h$), the cosmological constant ($\\Lambda$), the number of light neutrinos, the ionization history, and the amplitudes and spectral indices of the primordial scalar and tensor perturbation spectra. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB. Assuming only that the primordial perturbations were adiabatic, we use a covariance-matrix approach to estimate the precision with which these parameters can be determined by a CMB temperature map as a function of the fraction of sky mapped, the level of pixel noise, and the angular resolution. For example, with no prior information about any of the cosmological parameters, a full-sky CMB map with $0.5^\\circ$ angular resolution and a noise level of 15 $\\mu$K per pixel can determine $\\Omega$, $h$, and $\\Lambda$ with standard errors of $\\pm0.1$ or better, and provide determinations of other parameters which are inaccessible with traditional observations. Smaller beam sizes or prior information on some of the other parameters from other observations improves the sensitivity. The dependence on the the underlying cosmological model is discussed.

Gerard Jungman; Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky; David N. Spergel

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Global, exact cosmic microwave background data analysis using Gibbs sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe an efficient and exact method that enables global Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. The method reveals the joint posterior density (or likelihood for flat priors) of the power spectrum C{sub l} and the CMB signal. Foregrounds and instrumental parameters can be simultaneously inferred from the data. The method allows the specification of a wide range of foreground priors. We explicitly show how to propagate the non-Gaussian dependency structure of the C{sub l} posterior through to the posterior density of the parameters. If desired, the analysis can be coupled to theoretical (cosmological) priors and can yield the posterior density of cosmological parameter estimates directly from the time-ordered data. The method does not hinge on special assumptions about the survey geometry or noise properties, etc., It is based on a Monte Carlo approach and hence parallelizes trivially. No trace or determinant evaluations are necessary. The feasibility of this approach rests on the ability to solve the systems of linear equations which arise. These are of the same size and computational complexity as the map-making equations. We describe a preconditioned conjugate gradient technique that solves this problem and demonstrate in a numerical example that the computational time required for each Monte Carlo sample scales as n{sub p}{sup 3/2} with the number of pixels n{sub p}. We use our method to analyze the data from the Differential Microwave Radiometer on the Cosmic Background Explorer and explore the non-Gaussian joint posterior density of the C{sub l} from the Differential Microwave Radiometer on the Cosmic Background Explorer in several projections.

Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, UIUC, 1110 W Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Astronomy, UIUC, 1002 W Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Larson, David L.; Lakshminarayanan, Arun [Department of Physics, UIUC, 1110 W Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Testing gaussianity, homogeneity and isotropy with the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the basic hypotheses which motivate the statistical framework used to analyze the cosmic microwave background, and how that framework can be enlarged as we relax those hypotheses. In particular, we try to separate as much as possible the questions of gaussianity, homogeneity and isotropy from each other. We focus both on isotropic estimators of non-gaussianity as well as statistically anisotropic estimators of gaussianity, giving particular emphasis on their signatures and the enhanced "cosmic variances" that become increasingly important as our putative Universe becomes less symmetric. After reviewing the formalism behind some simple model-independent tests, we discuss how these tests can be applied to CMB data when searching for large scale "anomalies"

L. Raul Abramo; Thiago S. Pereira

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

TACMB-1: The Theory of Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (Bibliographic Resource Letter)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the theory of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. Journal articles, web pages, and books are cited for the following topics: discovery, cosmological origin, early work, recombination, general CMB anisotropy references, primary CMB anisotropies (numerical, analytical work), secondary effects, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect(s), lensing, reionization, polarization, gravity waves, defects, topology, origin of fluctuations, development of fluctuations, inflation and other ties to particle physics, parameter estimation, recent constraints, web resources, foregrounds, observations and observational issues, and gaussianity.

Martin White; J. D. Cohn

2002-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

B2FH, the Cosmic Microwave Background and Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I shall start by describing how we set about and carried out the work which led to the publication of B2FH in 1957. I then shall try and relate this work and the circumstances that surrounded it to the larger problem of the origin and formation of the universe. Here it is necessary to look back at the way that ideas developed and how in many situations astronomers went astray. Of course this is a personal view, though I very strongly believe that if he were still here, it is the approach that Fred Hoyle would take. I start by describing the problems originally encountered by Gamow and his associates in trying to decide where the helium was made. This leads me to a modern discussion of the origin of 2D, 3He, 4He and 7Li, originally described by B2FH as due to the x-process. While it is generally argued, following Gamow, Alpher, and Herman, that these isotopes were synthesized in a big bang I shall show that it is equally likely that these isotopes were made in active galactic nuclei, as was the cosmic microwave background (CMB), in a cyclic universe model. The key piece of observational evidence is that the amount of energy carried by the CMB, namely about 4.5 x 10-13 erg cm-3

G. Burbidge

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

A New Upper Limit on the Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) is an invaluable probe of the conditions of the early universe. Recent measurements of its spatial anisotropy have allowed accurate determinations of several fundamental cosmological parameters, such as the curvature of the universe, the shape of the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations, and the contribution of baryons, dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being spatially non-uniform, the CMB is theorized to be slightly polarized. Measurements of this polarization, particularly at large angular scales, have the potential to provide information on primordial gravitational waves, theories of inflation, and the ionization history of the universe, as well as help further constrain cosmological parameters. Polarization has not yet been detected in the CMB. This thesis describes a recent search for CMB polarization at large angular scales, conducted in the spring of 2000 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After a general introduction on both CMB polarization and general microwave polarimetry, details of the experiment itself are given, as well as a full description of the data selection and analysis techniques. Using these techniques, our data lead to a new upper limit on CMB polarization at large angular scales of 10 $\\mu$K in both E- and B-type polarization at 95% confidence. If B-polarization is assumed to be zero, the limit for E-type polarization is lowered to 8 $\\mu$K. This experiment is the first of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.

Christopher O'Dell

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cosmic Microwave Background Mini-Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact overview of the status of CMB anisotropy results and their cosmological interpretation up until the end of 2005. Sections headings: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

Douglas Scott; George Smoot

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Neural networks and separation of Cosmic Microwave Background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\sc Planck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each signal, with precision going from 10% for the Galactic components to percent for CMB; radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to $0.7\\sigma_{CMB}$, where $\\sigma_{CMB}$ is the rms level of CMB fluctuations. The signal recovering possesses equal quality on all the scales larger then the pixel size. In addition, we show that the frequency scalings of the input signals can be partially inferred from the ICA outputs, at the percent precision for the dominant components, radio sources and CMB.

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Viero, M. P.; Bock, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zahn, O. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H-M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); George, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Halverson, N. W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Possible Relics from New Physics in the Early Universe: Inflation, the Cosmic Microwave Background, and Particle Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review two different connections between particle theory and early-Universe cosmology: (1) Cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) tests of inflation and (2) particle dark matter. The inflationary predictions of a flat Universe and a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of primordial density perturbations will be tested precisely with forthcoming maps of the CMB temperature. A stochastic gravitational-wave background may be probed with a map of the CMB polarization. I also discuss some other uses of CMB maps. Particle theory has produced two very well-motivated candidates for the dark matter in the Universe: an axion and a supersymmetric particle. In both cases, there are a variety of experiments afoot to detect these particles. I review the properties of these dark-matter candidates and these detection techniques. Much of the material here has appeared before in astro-ph/9712215 and hep-ph/9710467, but the article here is updated and also expanded considerably.

Marc Kamionkowski

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

On the ultra high energy cosmic rays and the origin of the cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some inconsistencies to the assumption of a cosmological origin of the cosmic microwave background CMB, such as the absence of gravitational lensing in the WMAP data, open the doors to some speculations such as a local origin to the CMB. We argue here that this assumption agrees with the absence of the GZK cutoff (at least according to AGASA data) in the energy spectrum of the cosmic ray due to the cosmic interaction with the CMB at $6\\times 10^{19} eV$ or above. Within 50 Mpc from Earth, the matter and light distributions are close to an anisotropic distribution, where the local cluster and local super-clusters of galaxies can be identified. In contrast, the ultra high energy comic rays data is consistent to an almost isotropic distribution, and there is no correlation between their arrival direction and astronomical sources within our local cluster. This means that the events above the GZK cutoff come from distances above 50 Mpc, without an apparent energy loss. This scenario is plausible under the assumption of the CMB concentrated only within 3-4 Mpc from Earth. In other words, the CMB has a local origin linked only to the local super-cluster of galaxies. In addition, the galactic and extragalactic energy spectra index within the energy equipartition theorem strongly constrains the dark matter and dark energy hypothesis, essential in the Big Bang cosmology.

C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; K. H. Tsui

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nonlinear Evolution of Cosmic Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the effects of the primordial magnetic fields on cosmic microwave background anisotropies (CMB). Based on cosmological magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations we calculate the CMB anisotropy spectra and polarization induced by fluid fluctuations (Alfv\\'en modes) generated by primordial magnetic fields. The strongest effect on the CMB spectra comes from the transition epoch from a turbulent regime to a viscous regime. The balance between magnetic and kinetic energy until the onset of the viscous regime provides a one to one relation between the comoving coherence length $L$ and the comoving magnetic field strength $B$, such as $L \\sim 30 (B/10^{-9}{\\rm G})^3 \\rm pc$. The resulting CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies are somewhat different from the ones previously obtained by using linear perturbation theory. Our calculation gives a constraint on the magnetic field strength in the intermediate scale of CMB observations. Upper limits are set by WMAP and BOOMERANG results for comoving magnetic field strength of $B 0.7 \\rm Mpc$ for the most extreme case, or $B 0.8 \\rm Mpc$ for the most conservative case.

Hiroyuki Tashiro; Naoshi Sugiyama; Robi Banerjee

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Second Peak: The Dark-Energy Density and the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernova evidence for a negative-pressure dark energy (e.g., cosmological constant or quintessence) that contributes a fraction $\\Omega_\\Lambda\\simeq0.7$ of closure density has been bolstered by the discrepancy between the total density, $\\Omega_{\\rm tot}\\simeq1$, suggested by the location of the first peak in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum and the nonrelativistic-matter density $\\Omega_m\\simeq0.3$ obtained from dynamical measurements. Here we show that the impending identification of the location of the {\\it second} peak in the CMB power spectrum will provide an immediate and independent probe of the dark-energy density. As an aside, we show how the measured height of the first peak probably already points toward a low matter density and places upper limits to the reionization optical depth and gravitational-wave amplitude.

Marc Kamionkowski; Ari Buchalter

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a formalism for analyzing a full-sky temperature and polarization map of the cosmic microwave background. Temperature maps are analyzed by expanding over the set of spherical harmonics to give multipole moments of the two-point correlation function. Polarization, which is described by a second-rank tensor, can be treated analogously by expanding in the appropriate tensor spherical harmonics. We provide expressions for the complete set of temperature and polarization multipole moments for scalar and tensor metric perturbations. Four sets of multipole moments completely describe isotropic temperature and polarization correlations; for scalar metric perturbations one set is identically zero, giving the possibility of a clean determination of the vector and tensor contributions. The variance with which the multipole moments can be measured in idealized experiments is evaluated, including the effects of detector noise, sky coverage, and beam width. Finally, we construct coordinate-independent polarization two-point correlation functions, express them in terms of the multipole moments, and derive small-angle limits.

Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky; Albert Stebbins

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Harmonic polynomials for expanding the fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background: The Poincare and the 3-sphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background CMB are observed by the WMAP. When expanded into the harmonic eigenmodes of the space part of a cosmological model, they provide insight into the large-scale topology of space. All harmonic polynomials on the multiply connected dodecahedral Poincare space are constructed. Strong and specific selection rules are given by comparing the polynomials to those on the 3-sphere, its simply connected cover.

Peter Kramer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cosmic microwave background constraints on dark energy dynamics: analysis beyond the power spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the distribution of the non-Gaussian signal induced by weak lensing on the primary total intensity cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Our study focuses on the three point statistics exploiting an harmonic analysis based on the CMB bispectrum. By considering the three multipoles as independent variables, we reveal a complex structure of peaks and valleys determined by the re-projection of the primordial acoustic oscillations through the lensing mechanism. We study the dependence of this system on the expansion rate at the epoch in which the weak lensing power injection is relevant, probing the dark energy equation of state at redshift corresponding to the equivalence with matter or higher ($w_\\infty$). We evaluate the impact of the bispectrum observable on the CMB capability of constraining the dark energy dynamics. We perform a maximum likelihood analysis by varying the dark energy abundance, the present equation of state $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$. We show that the projection degeneracy affecting a pure power spectrum analysis in total intensity is broken if the bispectrum is taken into account. For a Planck-like experiment, assuming nominal performance, no foregrounds or systematics, and fixing all the parameters except $w_0$, $w_\\infty$ and the dark energy abundance, a percent and ten percent precision measure of $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$ is achievable from CMB data only. These results indicate that the detection of the weak lensing signal by the forthcoming CMB probes may be relevant to gain insight into the dark energy dynamics at the onset of cosmic acceleration.

Fabio Giovi; Carlo Baccigalupi; Francesca Perrotta

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

Bensadoun, M.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus_minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus_minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

Bensadoun, M.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore; Stompor, Radoslaw

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature and Polarization Anisotropy in Brans-Dicke Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a formalism for calculating cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies in cosmological models with Brans-Dicke gravity. We then modify publicly available Boltzmann codes to calculate numerically the temperature and polarization power spectra. Results are illustrated with a few representative models. Comparing with the general-relativistic model with the same cosmological parameters, both the amplitude and the width of the acoustic peaks are different in the Brans-Dicke models. We use a covariance-matrix calculation to investigate whether the effects of Brans-Dicke gravity are degenerate with those of variation in other cosmological parameters and to simultaneously determine whether forthcoming CMB maps might be able to distinguish Brans-Dicke and general-relativistic cosmology. Although the predicted power spectra for plausible Brans-Dicke models differ from those in general relativity only slightly, we find that MAP and/or the Planck Surveyor may in principle provide a test of Brans-Dicke theory that is competitive to solar-system tests. For example, if all other parameters except for the CMB normalization are fixed, a value of the Brans-Dicke parameter omega as large as 500 could be identified with MAP, and for Planck, values as large as omega \\simeq3000 could be identified; these sensitivities are decreased roughly by a factor of 3 if we marginalize over the baryon density, Hubble constant, spectral index, and reionization optical depth. In more general scalar-tensor theories, omega may evolve with time, and in this case, the CMB probe would be complementary to that from solar-system tests.

Xuelei Chen; Marc Kamionkowski

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

A Statistic for the Detection of Long Strings in Microwave Background Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze a new statistic designed to detect isolated step-like discontinuities which are coherent over large areas of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) pixel maps. Such coherent temperature discontinuities are predicted by the Kaiser-Stebbins effect to form due to long cosmic strings present in our present horizon. The background of the coherent step-like seed is assumed to be a scale invariant Gaussian random field which could have been produced by a superposition of seeds on smaller scales and/or by inflationary quantum fluctuations. The effects of uncorrelated Gaussian random noise are also studied. The statistical variable considered is the Sample Mean Difference (SMD) between large neighbouring sectors of CMB maps, separated by a straight line in two dimensional maps and a point in one dimensional maps. We find that including noise, the SMD statistics can detect at the $1 \\sigma$ to $2 \\sigma$ level the presense of a long string with $G\\mu (v_s \\gamma_s)= 1/(8\\pi) ((\\delta T)/T)_{rms} \\simeq 0.5 \\times 10^{-7}$ while more conventional statistics like the skewness or the kurtosis require a value of $G\\mu$ almost an order of magnitude larger for detectability at a comparable level.

Leandros Perivolaropoulos

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CMB-Cluster Lensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clusters of galaxies are powerful cosmological probes, particularly if their masses can be determined. One possibility for mass determination is to study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on small angular scales and observe deviations from a pure gradient due to lensing of massive clusters. I show that, neglecting contamination, this technique has the power to determine cluster masses very accurately, in agreement with estimates by Seljak and Zaldarriaga (1999). However, the intrinsic small scale structure of the CMB significantly degrades this power. The resulting mass constraints are useless unless one imposes a prior on the concentration parameter c. With even a modest prior on c, an ambitious CMB experiment (0.5' resolution and 1 microK per pixel) could determine masses of high redshift (z>0.5) clusters with ~ 30% accuracy.

Scott Dodelson

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Statistical Isotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Isotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Amir Hajian #3; I.U.C.A.A., Pune to be statistically isotropic, i.e., statistical expectation values of the temperature #29;uctuations are preserved under rotations of the sky. Only under statistical isotropy does the widely used angular power spectrum

Souradeep, Tarun

42

Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

Kunze, Kerstin E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

New Constraints on Cosmic Polarization Rotation from B-Mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STPpol, POLARBEAR and BICEP2 have recently measured the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization in various sky regions of several tens of square degrees and obtained BB power spectra in the multipole range 20-3000, detecting the components due to gravitational lensing and to inflationary gravitational waves. We analyze jointly the results of these three experiments and propose modifications of their analysis of the spectra to include in the model, in addition to the gravitational lensing and the inflationary gravitational waves components, also the effects induced by the cosmic polarization rotation (CPR), if it exists within current upper limits. Although in principle our analysis would lead also to new constraints on CPR, in practice these can only be given on its fluctuations , since constraints on its mean angle are inhibited by the de-rotation which is applied by current CMB polarization experiments, in order to cope with the insufficient calibration of the polarization angle. The combined data fits from all three experiments (with 29% CPR-SPTpol correlation, depending on theoretical model) gives constraint ^1/2 areas observed by SPTpol, POLARBEAR and BICEP2.

Sperello di Serego Alighieri; Wei-Tou Ni; Wei-Ping Pan

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

REIONIZATION ON LARGE SCALES. II. DETECTING PATCHY REIONIZATION THROUGH CROSS-CORRELATION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of patchy reionization on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature. An anisotropic optical depth ?( n-hat ) alters the TT power spectrum on small scales l > 2000. We make use of the correlation between the matter density and the reionization redshift fields to construct full sky maps of ?( n-hat ). Patchy reionization transfers CMB power from large scales to small scales, resulting in a non-zero cross correlation between large and small angular scales. We show that the patchy ? correlator is sensitive to small root mean square (rms) values ?{sub rms} ? 0.003 seen in our maps. We include frequency-independent secondaries such as CMB lensing and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) terms, and show that patchy ? may still be detected at high significance. Reionization models that predict different values of ?{sub rms} may be distinguished even for the same mean value (?). It is more difficult to detect patchy ? in the presence of larger secondaries such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich, radio background, and the cosmic infrared background. In this case, we show that patchy ? may be detected if these frequency-dependent secondaries are minimized to ?< 5 ?K (rms) by means of a multi-frequency analysis. We show that the patchy ? correlator provides information that is complementary to what may be obtained from the polarization and the kSZ power spectra.

Natarajan, A.; Battaglia, N.; Trac, H. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pen, U.-L. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Loeb, A. [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Overview of Secondary Anisotropies of the CMB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the major contribution to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies are the sought-after primordial fluctuations produced at the surface of last scattering, other effects produce secondary fluctuations at lower redshifts. These secondary fluctuations must be carefully accounted for, in order to isolate primordial fluctuations. In addition, they are interesting in their own right, since they provide a wealth of information on the geometry and local properties of the universe. Here, I survey the different sources of secondary anisotropies and extragalactic foregrounds of the CMB. I show their relative importance on the multipole-frequency plane. I discuss in particular their impact in the future CMB missions MAP and Planck Surveyor.

A. Refregier

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Translational invariance and the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primordial quantum fluctuations produced by inflation are conventionally assumed to be statistically homogeneous, a consequence of translational invariance. In this paper we quantify the potentially observable effects of a small violation of translational invariance during inflation, as characterized by the presence of a preferred point, line, or plane. We explore the imprint such a violation would leave on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, and provide explicit formulas for the expected amplitudes of the spherical-harmonic coefficients.

Carroll, Sean M.; Tseng, C.-Y.; Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of the primordial B-mode spectrum of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal may provide a probe of inflation. However, observation of such a faint signal requires excellent control of systematic errors. Interferometry proves to be a promising approach for overcoming such a challenge. In this paper we present a complete simulation pipeline of interferometric observations of CMB polarization, including systematic errors. We employ two different methods for obtaining the power spectra from mock data produced by simulated observations: the maximum likelihood method and the method of Gibbs sampling. We show that the results from both methods are consistent with each other as well as, within a factor of six, with analytical estimates. Several categories of systematic errors are considered: instrumental errors, consisting of antenna gain and antenna coupling errors; and beam errors, consisting of antenna pointing errors, beam cross-polarization, and beam shape (and size) errors. In order to recover the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, within a 10% tolerance level, which ensures the experiment is sensitive enough to detect the B-signal at r = 0.01 in the multipole range 28 < l < 384, we find that, for a QUBIC-like experiment, Gaussian-distributed systematic errors must be controlled with precisions of |g{sub rms}| = 0.1 for antenna gain, |{epsilon}{sub rms}| = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for antenna coupling, {delta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for pointing, {zeta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for beam shape, and {mu}{sub rms} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for beam cross-polarization. Although the combined systematic effects produce a tolerance level on r twice as large for an experiment with linear polarizers, the resulting bias in r for a circular experiment is 15% which is still on the level of desirable sensitivity.

Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Zhang Le; Timbie, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, 1110 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bunn, Emory F., E-mail: ata_karakci@brown.edu [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Detectability of Inflationary Gravitational Waves with Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inflation predicts specific relations between the amplitudes and spectral indices of the primordial spectrum of density (scalar metric) perturbations and gravitational waves (tensor metric perturbations). Detection of a stochastic gravitational-wave background is essential for identifying this unmistakable signature. Polarization of the cosmic microwave background can isolate these tensor modes in a model-independent way and thereby circumvent the cosmic-variance limit to detecting a small tensor signal with only a temperature map. Here we assess the detectability of a gravity-wave background with a temperature and polarization map. For detector sensitivities better than $10-20 \\mu K \\sqrt{sec}$, the sensitivity to a tensor signal is always dominated by the polarization map. With a detector sensitivity of order $1 \\mu K \\sqrt{sec}$, polarization could improve on a temperature-map sensitivity to tensor modes by two to three orders of magnitude. Even a small amount of reionization substantially enhances tensor-mode detectability. We also argue that the sensitivity of the Planck Surveyor to tensor modes is significantly improved with polarization, even taking into account the resulting degradation of the intensity determination in the high-frequency channels.

Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky

1997-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CMB Anisotropies from Outflows in Lyman Break Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomson scattering of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on moving electrons in the outflows of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at redshifts 2-8 contributes to the small-scale CMB anisotropies. The net effect produced by each outflow depends on its level of deviation from spherical symmetry, caused either by an anisotropic energy injection from the nuclear starburst or quasar activity, or by an inhomogeneous intergalactic environment. We find that for plausible outflow parameters consistent with spectroscopic observations of LBGs, the induced CMB anisotropies on arcminute scales reach up to $\\sim 1 \\mu$K, comparable to the level produced during the epoch of reionization.

Daniel Babich; Abraham Loeb

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sky maps without anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are a better fit to WMAP's uncalibrated time ordered data than the official sky maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this reanalysis of the WMAP uncalibrated time ordered data (TOD) was two fold. The first was to reassess the reliability of the detection of the anisotropies in the official WMAP sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The second was to assess the performance of a proposed criterion in avoiding systematic error in detecting a signal of interest. The criterion was implemented by testing the null hypothesis that the uncalibrated TOD was consistent with no anisotropies when WMAP's hourly calibration parameters were allowed to vary. It was shown independently for all 20 WMAP channels that sky maps with no anisotropies were a better fit to the TOD than those from the official analysis. The recently launched Planck satellite should help sort out this perplexing result.

Keith S. Cover

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Detectability of the 21 cm-CMB cross-correlation from the EoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 21-cm line fluctuations and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are powerful probes of the epoch of reionisation of the universe. We study the potential of the cross-correlation between 21-cm line fluctuations and CMB anisotropy to obtain further constraints on the reionisation history. We compute analytically the 21-cm cross-correlation with the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarisation, and we calculate the signal-to-noise (SN) ratio for its detection with Planck together with LOFAR, MWA and SKA. We find, on the one hand, that the 21-cm cross-correlation signal with CMB polarisation from the instant reionisation can be detected with an SN ratio of $\\sim 1$ for LOFAR and $\\sim 10$ for SKA. On the other hand, we confirm that the detection of the 21-cm cross-correlation with CMB polarisation is practically infeasible.

Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Langer, Mathieu; Douspis, Marian; Zaroubi, Saleem; Jelic, Vibor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fractal Structure of Isothermal Lines and Loops on the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal Structure of Isothermal Lines and Loops on the Cosmic Microwave Background Naoki KOBAYASHI and the fractal structure is confirmed in the radiation temperature fluctuation. We estimate the fractal exponents, such as the fractal dimension De of the entire pattern of isothermal lines, the fractal dimension Dc of a single

Chiang, Lung-Yih

54

Evidence for a non-zero Lambda and a low matter density from a combined analysis of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a joint likelihood analysis of the power spectra of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies under the assumptions that the initial fluctuations were adiabatic, Gaussian and well described by power laws with scalar and tensor indices of n_s and n_t. On its own, the 2dFGRS sets tight limits on the parameter combination Omega_m h, but relatively weak limits on the fraction of the cosmic matter density in baryons Omega_b/Omega_m. The CMB anisotropy data alone set poor constraints on the cosmological constant and Hubble constant because of a `geometrical degeneracy' among parameters. Furthermore, if tensor modes are allowed, the CMB data allow a wide range of values for the physical densities in baryons and cold dark matter. Combining the CMB and 2dFGRS data sets helps to break both the geometrical and tensor mode degeneracies. The values of the parameters derived here are consistent with the predictions of the simplest models of inflation, with the baryon density derived from primordial nucleosynthesis and with direct measurements of the Hubble parameter. In particular, we find strong evidence for a positive cosmological constant with a pm 2sigma range of 0.65 < Omega_Lambda < 0.85, completely independently of constraints on Omega_\\Lambda derived from Type Ia supernovae.

George Efstathiou; Stephen Moody; John A. Peacock; Will J. Percival; Carlton Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propis; Simon P. Driver; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve ? (?mv) = 16 meV and ? (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero ?m??m?, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.

Slosar, A.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Dore, O.; Dunkley, J.; Errard, J.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L.K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Kuo, C. -L.

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

A. T. Bajkova

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cosmological Rotation of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that rotational cosmological perturbations can be generated in the early Universe, similarly to gravitational waves. The generating mechanism is quantum-mechanical in its nature, and the created perturbations should now be placed in squeezed vacuum quantum states. The physical conditions under which the phenomenon can occur are formulated. The generated perturbations can contribute to the large-angular-scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature variations caused by the quantum-mechanically generated rotational perturbations. The multipole expansion begins from the dipole component. The comparison with the case of gravitational waves is made.

L. P. Grishchuk

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

REIONIZATION ON LARGE SCALES. III. PREDICTIONS FOR LOW-l COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND HIGH-l KINETIC SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH OBSERVABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new predictions for cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature (on small angular scales) and polarization (on large angular scales) anisotropies induced during the epoch of reionization (EoR). Using a novel method calibrated from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the EoR in large volumes (L ?> 2 Gpc h {sup –1}). We find that the EoR contribution to the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power spectrum (patchy kSZ) ranges between ?0.6-2.8 ?K{sup 2} at l = 3000 for the explored parameter space. For each model, the patchy kSZ power spectrum is calculated from three large 15° × 15° maps for better numerical convergence. Decreasing the size of these maps biases the overall patchy kSZ power to higher values. We find that the amplitude of the patchy kSZ power spectrum at l = 3000 follows simple scalings of D{sub l=3000}{sup kSZ}? z-bar and D{sub l=3000}{sup kSZ}??{sub z}{sup 0.51} for the mean redshift ( z-bar ) and duration (?{sub z}) of reionization. Using the constraints on z-bar from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven year results and the lower limit on ?{sub z} from EDGES, we find a lower limit of ?0.4 ?K{sup 2} at l = 3000. Planck will infer the mean redshift from the Thomson optical depth imprinted in the low-l polarization power spectrum. Future measurements of the high-l CMB power spectrum from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope should detect the patchy kSZ signal if the cross correlation between the thermal SZ effect and the cosmic infrared background is constrained. We show that the combination of temperature and polarization measurements constrains both z-bar and ?{sub z}. The patchy kSZ maps, power spectra templates, and the polarization power spectra will be publicly available.

Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Trac, H. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Wean Hall, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213 (United States); Cen, R. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Loeb, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Standard Cosmological Model and CMB Anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a course on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the standard cosmological model, designed for beginning graduate students and advanced undergraduates. ``Standard cosmological model'' in this context means a Universe dominated by some form of cold dark matter (CDM) with adiabatic perturbations generated at some initial epoch, e.g., Inflation, and left to evolve under gravity alone (which distinguishes it from defect models). The course is primarily theoretical and concerned with the physics of CMB anisotropies in this context and their relation to structure formation. Brief presentations of the uniform Big Bang model and of the observed large--scale structure of the Universe are given. The bulk of the course then focuses on the evolution of small perturbations to the uniform model and on the generation of temperature anisotropies in the CMB. The theoretical development is performed in the (pseudo--)Newtonian gauge because it aids intuitive understanding by providing a quick reference to classical (Newtonian) concepts. The fundamental goal of the course is not to arrive at a highly exact nor exhaustive calculation of the anisotropies, but rather to a good understanding of the basic physics that goes into such calculations.

James G. Bartlett

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Compensation for large tensor modes with iso-curvature perturbations in CMB anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, BICEP2 has reported the large tensor-to-scalar ratio $r=0.2^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ from the observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode at degree-scales. Since tensor modes induce not only CMB B-mode but also the temperature fluctuations on large scales, to realize the consistent temperature fluctuations with the Planck result we should consider suppression of scalar perturbations on corresponding large scales. To realize such a suppression, we consider anti-correlated iso-curvature perturbations which could be realized in the simple curvaton model.

Masahiro Kawasaki; Shuichiro Yokoyama

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Compensation for large tensor modes with iso-curvature perturbations in CMB anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, BICEP2 has reported the large tensor-to-scalar ratio $r=0.2^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ from the observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode at degree-scales. Since tensor modes induce not only CMB B-mode but also the temperature fluctuations on large scales, to realize the consistent temperature fluctuations with the Planck result we should consider suppression of scalar perturbations on corresponding large scales. To realize such a suppression, we consider anti-correlated iso-curvature perturbations which could be realized in the simple curvaton model.

Kawasaki, Masahiro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

LACK OF ANGULAR CORRELATION AND ODD-PARITY PREFERENCE IN COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the angular correlation in the recent cosmic microwave background data. In addition to the known large-angle correlation anomaly, we find the lack of correlation at small angles with high statistical significance. We have investigated various non-cosmological contamination as well as the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team's simulated data. However, we have not found a definite cause. In the angular power spectrum of WMAP data, there exists anomalous odd-parity preference at low multipoles. Noting the equivalence between the power spectrum and the correlation, we have investigated the association between the lack of large-angle correlation and the odd-parity preference. From our investigation, we find that the odd-parity preference at low multipoles is, in fact, a phenomenological origin of the lack of large-angle correlation. Further investigation is required to find out whether the origin of the anomaly is cosmological or due to unaccounted systematics. The data from the Planck surveyor, which has systematics distinct from WMAP, will greatly help us to resolve its origin.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Polarization Sensitive Bolometric Detector for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a bolometric detector that is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization which is optimized for making measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The receiver consists of a pair of co-located silicon nitride micromesh absorbers which couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~ 30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~ 60 to 600 GHz. Since both linear polarizations traverse identical optical paths from the sky to the point of detection, the susceptibility to systematic effects is minimized. The amount of uncorrelated noise between the two polarization senses is limited to the quantum limit of thermal and photon shot noise, while drifts in the relative responsivity to orthogonal polarizations are limited to the effect of non-uniformity in the thin film deposition of the leads and the intrinsic thermistor properties. Devices using NTD Ge thermistors have achieved NEPs of 2 x 10^{-17} W/sqrt{Hz} with a 1/f knee below 100 mHz at a base temperature of 270 mK. Numerical modelling of the structures has been used to optimize the bolometer geometry and coupling to optics. Comparisons of numerical results and experimental data are made. A description of how the quantities measured by the device can be interpreted in terms of the Stokes parameters is presented. The receiver developed for the Boomerang and Planck HFI focal planes is presented in detail.

W. C. Jones; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. E. Lange

2002-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

64

Are you sure that the anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are really cosmological rather than purely Galactic in origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New calculations of the Galactic contamination over microwave background radiation anisotropies are carried out. On one hand, when a frequency-dependent contrast of molecular clouds with respect to the Galactic background of the diffuse interstellar medium is taken into account, the anisotropic amplitude produced by Galactic dust is increased with respect to previous calculations and this is of the same order as that of the data from the observations. On the other hand, if we take into account rotational dust emission, for instance, a frequency independence of anisotropies in the microwave range may be obtained. This leads to the possibility that under some particular, but not impossible, conditions all the microwave background radiation anisotropies may be due to Galactic foregrounds rather than cosmological in origin. Moreover, a suspected coincidence between the typical angular sizes of the microwave background radiation anisotropies and those of nearby molecular clouds makes more plausible the hypothesis of a purely Galactic origin for these anisotropies. It is also argued that the correlation among structures at different frequencies, the comparison of the power spectrum at different frequencies and the galactic latitude dependence of the anisotropies are not yet proofs in favour of either a cosmological or Galactic origin.

M. Lopez-Corredoira

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Morphing the CMB: a technique for interpolating power spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confrontation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) theoretical angular power spectrum with available data often requires the calculation of large numbers of power spectra. The standard practice is to use a fast code to compute the CMB power spectra over some large parameter space, in order to estimate likelihoods and constrain these parameters. But as the dimensionality of the space under study increases, then even with relatively fast anisotropy codes, the computation can become prohibitive. This paper describes the employment of a "morphing" strategy to interpolate new power spectra based on previously calculated ones. We simply present the basic idea here, and illustrate with a few examples; optimization of interpolation schemes will depend on the specific application. In addition to facilitating the exploration of large parameter spaces, this morphing technique may be helpful for Fisher matrix calculations involving derivatives.

Kris Sigurdson; Douglas Scott

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

FIRST SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA AT 43 GHz IN THE MULTIPOLE RANGE 25 {<=} l {<=} 475  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43 GHz and 94 GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, over 10,000 hr of data were collected, first with the 19 element 43 GHz array (3458 hr) and then with the 90 element 94 GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering Almost-Equal-To 1000 deg{sup 2}. This paper reports initial results from the 43 GHz receiver, which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69 {mu}K{radical}s. The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until the null tests passed. Cross-correlating maps with different telescope pointings is used to eliminate a bias. This paper reports the EE, BB, and EB power spectra in the multipole range l = 25-475. With the exception of the lowest multipole bin for one of the fields, where a polarized foreground, consistent with Galactic synchrotron radiation, is detected with 3{sigma} significance, the E-mode spectrum is consistent with the {Lambda}CDM model, confirming the only previous detection of the first acoustic peak. The B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero, leading to a measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.35{sup +1.06}{sub -0.87}. The combination of a new time-stream 'double-demodulation' technique, side-fed Dragonian optics, natural sky rotation, and frequent boresight rotation leads to the lowest level of systematic contamination in the B-mode power so far reported, below the level of r = 0.1.

Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Smith, K. M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Zuntz, J. A. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C., E-mail: akito@kicp.uchicago.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Re-Ionization and its Imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early reionization changes the pattern of anisotropies expected in the cosmic microwave background. To explore these changes, we derive from first principles the equations governing anisotropies, focusing on the interactions of photons with electrons. Vishniac (1987) claimed that second order terms can be large in a re-ionized Universe, so we derive equations correct to second order in the perturbations. There are many more second order terms than were considered by Vishniac. To understand the basic physics involved, we present a simple analytic approximation to the first order equation. Then turning to the sec- ond order equation, we show that the Vishniac term is indeed the only important one. We also present numerical results for a variety of ionization histories [in a standard cold dark matter Universe] and show quantitatively how the sig- nal in several experiments depends on the ionization history. The most pronounced indication of a re-ionized Universe would be seen in very small scale experiments; the expected signal in the Owens Valley experiment is smaller by a factor of order ten if the last scattering surface is at a redshift $z\\simeq100$ as it would be if the Universe were re-ionized very early. On slightly larger scales, the expected signal in a re-ionized Universe {\\it is} smaller than it would be with standard recombination, but only by a factor of two or so.

Scott Dodelson; Jay Jubas

1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

CMB Observations and the Production of Chemical Elements at the End of the Dark Ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The metallicity evolution and ionization history of the universe must leave its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background through resonant scattering of CMB photons by atoms, ions and molecules. These transitions partially erase original temperature anisotropies of the CMB, and also generate new fluctuations. In this paper we propose a method to determine the abundance of these heavy species in low density (over-densities less than $10^4-10^5$) optically thin regions of the universe by using the unprecedented sensitivity of current and future CMB experiments. In particular, we focus our analysis on the sensitivity of the PLANCK HFI detectors in four spectral bands. We also present results for l=220 and 810 which are of interest for balloon and ground-based instruments, like ACT, APEX and SPT. We use the fine-structure transitions of atoms and ions as a source of frequency dependent optical depth ($\\tau_{\

K. Basu; C. Hernandez-Monteagudo; R. Sunyaev

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

69

CMB B-modes, spinorial space-time and Pre-Big Bang (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The BICEP2 collaboration reported recently a B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation inconsistent with the null hypothesis at a significance of > 5 {\\sigma}. This result has been often interpreted as a signature of primordial gravitational waves from cosmic inflation, even if actually polarized dust emission may be at the origin of such a signal. Even assuming that part of this CMB B-mode polarization really corresponds to the early Universe dynamics, its interpretation in terms of inflation and primordial gravitational waves is not the only possible one. Alternative cosmologies such as pre-Big Bang patterns and the spinorial space-time (SST) we introduced in 1996-97 can naturally account for such CMB B-modes. In particular, the SST automatically generates a privileged space direction (PSD) whose existence may have been confirmed by Planck data. If such a PSD exists, it seems normal to infer that vector perturbations have been present in the early Universe leading to CMB B-modes in suitable cosmological patterns. Inflation would not be required to explain the BICEP2 result assuming it really contains a primordial signal. More generally, pre-Big Bang cosmologies can also generate gravitational waves in the early Universe without any need for cosmic inflation. We further discuss here possible alternatives to the inflationary interpretation of a primordial B-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background radiation.

Luis Gonzalez-Mestres

2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

On the detection of point sources in Planck LFI 70 GHz CMB maps based on cleaned K-map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the Planck LFI 70GHz data to further probe point source detection technique in the sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The method developed by Tegmark et al. for foreground reduced maps and the Kolmogorov parameter as the descriptor are adopted for the analysis of Planck satellite CMB temperature data. Most of the detected points coincide with point sources already revealed by other methods. However, we have also found 9 source candidates for which still no counterparts are known.

Khachatryan, H G; Poghosyan, E; Yegoryan, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Weak Lensing Detection in CMB Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The weak lensing effects are known to change only weakly the shape of the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature fluctuations. I show here that they nonetheless induce specific non-Gaussian effects that can be detectable with the four-point correlation function of the CMB anisotropies. The magnitude and geometrical dependences of this correlation function are investigated in detail. It is thus found to scale as the square of the derivative of the two-point correlation function and as the angular correlation function of the gravitational displacement field. It also contains specific dependences on the shape of the quadrangle formed by the four directions. When averaged at a given scale, the four-point function, that identifies with the connected part of the fourth moment of the probability distribution function of the local filtered temperature, scales as the square of logarithmic slope of its second moment, and as the variance of the gravitational magnification at the same angular scale. All these effects have been computed for specific cosmological models. It is worth noting that, as the amplitude of the gravitational lens effects has a specific dependence on the cosmological parameters, the detection of the four-point correlation function could provide precious complementary constraints to those brought by the temperature power spectrum.

F. Bernardeau

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cosmological origin of anomalous radio background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARCADE 2 collaboration has reported a significant excess in the isotropic radio background, whose homogeneity cannot be reconciled with clustered sources. This suggests a cosmological origin prior to structure formation. We investigate several potential mechanisms and show that injection of relativistic electrons through late decays of a metastable particle can give rise to the observed excess radio spectrum through synchrotron emission. However, constraints from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, on injection of charged particles and on the primordial magnetic field, present a challenge. The simplest scenario is with a ?>9 GeV particle decaying into e{sup +}e{sup ?} at a redshift of z ? 5, in a magnetic field of ? 5?G, which exceeds the CMB B-field constraints, unless the field was generated after decoupling. Decays into exotic millicharged particles can alleviate this tension, if they emit synchroton radiation in conjunction with a sufficiently large background magnetic field of a dark U(1)' gauge field.

Cline, James M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2T8 Canada (Canada); Vincent, Aaron C., E-mail: jcline@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Universitat de València - CSIC, 46071, Valencia (Spain)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An IC/CMB interpretation for the large-scale jet X-ray emission of 3C 273  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present that the model of inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB) could well explain the large-scale jet X-ray radiation of 3C 273, and does not violate new Fermi observations. For the individual knots, the synchrotron spectrum of the low-energy electrons responsible for the IC/CMB X-ray emission may be different from the extrapolation of the 10GHz radio spectrum of knots. Based on the IC/CMB model for the 3C 273 large-scale jet, the Fermi observations may mainly come from the small-scale jet of 3C 273 (i.e., the core). Future observations could examine our interpretation on the spectral energy distributions (SED) of knots and large-scale jet in 3C 273.

Liu, Wen-Po

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background Solar panels are designed as a photovoltaic module. The energy producing aspect of the photovoltaic module has two primary steps. The first is a semiconducting material...

75

Spherical Shell Cosmological Model and Uniformity of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considered is spherical shell as a model for visible universe and parameters that such model must have to comply with the observable data. The topology of the model requires that motion of all galaxies and light must be confined inside a spherical shell. Consequently the observable universe cannot be defined as a sphere centered on the observer, rather it is an arc length within the volume of the spherical shell. The radius of the shell is 4.46 $\\pm$ 0.06 Gpc, which is for factor $\\pi$ smaller than radius of a corresponding 3-sphere. However the event horizon, defined as the arc length inside the shell, has the size of 14.0 $\\pm$ 0.2 Gpc, which is in agreement with the observable data. The model predicts, without inflation theory, the isotropy and uniformity of the CMB. It predicts the correct value for the Hubble constant $H_0$ = 67.26 $\\pm$ 0.90 km/s/Mpc, the cosmic expansion rate $H(z)$, and the speed of the event horizon in agreement with observations. The theoretical suport for shell model comes from general relativity, curvature of space by mass, and from holographic principle. The model explains the reason for the established discrepancy between the non-covariant version of the holographic principle and the calculated dimensionless entropy $(S/k)$ for the visible universe, which exceeds the entropy of a black hole. The model is in accordance with the distribution of radio sources in space, type Ia data, and data from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field optical and near-infrared survey.

Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Oxygen Pumping: Mapping the Reionization Epoch with the CMB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the pumping of the $63.2 \\mu$m fine structure line of neutral OI in the high--redshift intergalactic medium (IGM), in analogy with the Wouthuysen--Field effect for the 21cm line of cosmic HI. We show that the soft UV background at $\\sim 1300$\\AA can affect the population levels, and if a significant fraction of the IGM volume is filled with ``fossil HII regions'' containing neutral OI, then this can produce a non--negligible spectral distortion in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). OI from redshift $z$ is seen in emission at $(1+z)63.2\\mu$m, and between $7CMB with a $y$--parameter of $y=(10^{-9} - 3\\times10^{-8}) (Z/10^{-3}{\\rm Z_{\\odot}}) (I_{UV})$, where $Z$ is the mean metallicity of the IGM and $I_{UV}$ is the UV background at 1300\\AA in units of $10^{-20}$ erg/s/Hz/cm$^2$/sr. Because O is in charge exchange equilibrium with H, a measurement of this signature can trace the metallicity at the end of the dark ages, prior to the completion of cosmic reionization and is complementary to cosmological 21cm studies. While future CMB experiments, such as Planck could constrain the metallicity to the $10^{-2} Z_{\\odot}$ level, specifically designed experiments could potentially achieve a detection. Fluctuations of the distortion on small angular scale may also be detectable.

Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Zoltan Haiman; Raul Jimenez; Licia Verde

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Using Big Bang Nucleosynthesis to Extend CMB Probes of Neutrino Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present calculations showing that upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments will have the power to improve on current constraints on neutrino masses and provide new limits on neutrino degeneracy parameters. The latter could surpass those derived from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the observationally-inferred primordial helium abundance. These conclusions derive from our Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) simulations which incorporate a full BBN nuclear reaction network. This provides a self-consistent treatment of the helium abundance, the baryon number, the three individual neutrino degeneracy parameters and other cosmological parameters. Our analysis focuses on the effects of gravitational lensing on CMB constraints on neutrino rest mass and degeneracy parameter. We find for the PLANCK experiment that total (summed) neutrino mass $M_{\

M. Shimon; N. J. Miller; C. T. Kishimoto; C. J. Smith; G. M. Fuller; B. G. Keating

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Using Big Bang Nucleosynthesis to Extend CMB Probes of Neutrino Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present calculations showing that upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments will have the power to improve on current constraints on neutrino masses and provide new limits on neutrino degeneracy parameters. The latter could surpass those derived from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the observationally-inferred primordial helium abundance. These conclusions derive from our Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) simulations which incorporate a full BBN nuclear reaction network. This provides a self-consistent treatment of the helium abundance, the baryon number, the three individual neutrino degeneracy parameters and other cosmological parameters. Our analysis focuses on the effects of gravitational lensing on CMB constraints on neutrino rest mass and degeneracy parameter. We find for the PLANCK experiment that total (summed) neutrino mass $M_{\

Shimon, M; Kishimoto, C T; Smith, C J; Fuller, G M; Keating, B G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Prediction of the Virgo axis anisotropy: CMB radiation illuminates the nature of things  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent findings of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation are confusing for standard cosmology. Remarkably, this fact has been predicted several years ago in the framework of our model of the physical world. Moreover, in exact agreement with our prediction the CMB has a preferred direction towards the Virgo Cluster. The transpired structure of the CMB shows workings of the suggested model of the physical world. Comprising the information processes of Nature, this model presents a high-tech version of the previous low-tech developments for mechanical ether and quantum vacuum. In the current model, the phenomenon of Life turns up as a collective effect on the "Internet of the Physical Universe" using DNA structures for access codes. Most convincingly, this construction points to a harmful analogy with so-called "identity theft" - improper manipulations with DNA of individual organisms can destroy these organisms from a remote location without any physical contact. Appearing incredible, such a possibility creates a superlative Experimentum Crucis. In a broad sense, this surmised biological effect is intimately related to the cosmological prediction of the structurization of the CMB, but it is more compelling.

Simon Berkovich

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

BACKGROUND  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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81

Estimation of Inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass $m_{\\rm eff}$ for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation $\

Suvodip Mukherjee; Santanu Das; Minu Joy; Tarun Souradeep

2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estimation of Inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass $m_{\\rm eff}$ for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation $\

Mukherjee, Suvodip; Joy, Minu; Souradeep, Tarun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

SPIDER: A Balloon-borne Large-scale CMB Polarimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spider is a balloon-borne experiment that will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background over a large fraction of a sky at 1 degree resolution. Six monochromatic refracting millimeter-wave telescopes with large arrays of antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting bolometers will provide system sensitivities of 4.2 and 3.1 micro K_cmb rt s at 100 and 150 GHz, respectively. A rotating half-wave plate will modulate the polarization sensitivity of each telescope, controlling systematics. Bolometer arrays operating at 225 GHz and 275 GHz will allow removal of polarized galactic foregrounds. In a 2-6 day first flight from Alice Springs, Australia in 2010, Spider will map 50% of the sky to a depth necessary to improve our knowledge of the reionization optical depth by a large factor.

B. P. Crill; P. A. R. Ade; E. S. Battistelli; S. Benton; R. Bihary; J. J. Bock; J. R. Bond; J. Brevik; S. Bryan; C. R. Contaldi; O. Dore; M. Farhang; L. Fissel; S. R. Golwala; M. Halpern; G. Hilton; W. Holmes; V. V. Hristov; K. Irwin; W. C. Jones; C. L. Kuo; A. E. Lange; C. Lawrie; C. J. MacTavish; T. G. Martin; P. Mason; T. E. Montroy; C. B. Netterfield; E. Pascale; D. Riley; J. E. Ruhl; M. C. Runyan; A. Trangsrud; C. Tucker; A. Turner; M. Viero; D. Wiebe

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE OBSERVATIONS: SOURCE CATALOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the list of point sources found in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analyses now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the Galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR >4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.

Wright, E. L.; Chen, X. [UCLA Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S.; Weiland, J. L. [Adnet Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Larson, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, 2511 Speedway, RLM 15.306, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu (and others)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

An estimator for statistical anisotropy from the CMB bispectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various data analyses of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provide observational hints of statistical isotropy breaking. Some of these features can be studied within the framework of primordial vector fields in inflationary theories which generally display some level of statistical anisotropy both in the power spectrum and in higher-order correlation functions. Motivated by these observations and the recent theoretical developments in the study of primordial vector fields, we develop the formalism necessary to extract statistical anisotropy information from the three-point function of the CMB temperature anisotropy. We employ a simplified vector field model and parametrize the bispectrum of curvature fluctuations in such a way that all the information about statistical anisotropy is encoded in some parameters ?{sub LM} (which measure the anisotropic to the isotropic bispectrum amplitudes). For such a template bispectrum, we compute an optimal estimator for ?{sub LM} and the expected signal-to-noise ratio. We estimate that, for f{sub NL} ? 30, an experiment like Planck can be sensitive to a ratio of the anisotropic to the isotropic amplitudes of the bispectrum as small as 10%. Our results are complementary to the information coming from a power spectrum analysis and particularly relevant for those models where statistical anisotropy turns out to be suppressed in the power spectrum but not negligible in the bispectrum.

Bartolo, N.; Dimastrogiovanni, E.; Matarrese, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Liguori, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR-7095 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Riotto, A., E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: dimastro@pd.infn.it, E-mail: liguori@iap.fr, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: riotto@mail.cern.ch [INFN — Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Conformal invariance, dynamical dark energy and the CMB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Einstein's General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at cosmological distance scales. These effects arise from conformal scalar degrees of freedom in the extended Effective Field Theory (EFT) of gravity required by the trace anomaly of the quantum stress tensor in curved space. Scalar degrees of freedom in cosmology arise naturally from the effective action of the trace anomaly in the Standard Model, without the ad hoc introduction of an inflaton field. In the EFT including the trace anomaly terms, {Lambda}{sub eff} becomes dynamical and potentially dependent upon both space and time. The fluctuations of these anomaly scalars may also influence the spectrum and statistics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Under the hypothesis that scale invariance should be promoted to full conformal invariance, an hypothesis supported by the embedding of the conformal group of three dimensional flat sections in de Sitter space, the form of the CMB bi-spectrum can be fixed, and the tri-spectrum constrained. The angular spectra predicted by conformal invariance differ from those suggested by simple models of inflation.

Mottola, Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Joint Planck and WMAP Assessment of Low CMB Multipoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The remarkable progress in cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies over past decade has led to the era of precision cosmology in striking agreement with the $\\Lambda$CDM model. However, the lack of power in the CMB temperature anisotropies at large angular scales (low-$\\ell$), as has been confirmed by the recent Planck data also (up to $\\ell=40$), is still an open problem. One can avoid to seek an explanation for this problem by attributing the lack of power to cosmic variance or can look for explanations i.e., different inflationary potentials or initial conditions for inflation to begin with, non-trivial topology, ISW effect etc. Features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS) motivated by the early universe physics has been the most common solution to address this problem. In the present work we also follow this approach and consider a set of PPS which have features and constrain the parameters of those using WMAP 9 year and Planck data employing Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis. The prominent fe...

Iqbal, Asif; Souradeep, Tarun; Malik, Manzoor A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

FOREGROUND PREDICTIONS FOR THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM FROM MEASUREMENTS OF FAINT INVERTED RADIO SOURCES AT 5 GHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of a population of matched radio sources at 1.4 and 5 GHz down to a flux limit of 1.5 mJy in 7 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Field South. We find a significant fraction of sources with inverted spectral indices that all have 1.4 GHz fluxes less than 10 mJy and are therefore too faint to have been detected and included in previous radio source count models that are matched at multiple frequencies. Combined with the matched source population at 1.4 and 5 GHz in 1 deg{sup -2} in the ATESP survey, we update models for the 5 GHz differential number counts and distributions of spectral indices in 5 GHz flux bins that can be used to estimate the unresolved point source contribution to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. We find a shallower logarithmic slope in the 5 GHz differential counts than in previously published models for fluxes {approx}< 100 mJy as well as larger fractions of inverted spectral indices at these fluxes. Because the Planck flux limit for resolved sources is larger than 100 mJy in all channels, our modified number counts yield at most a 10% change in the predicted Poisson contribution to the Planck temperature power spectrum. For a flux cut of 5 mJy with the South Pole Telescope and a flux cut of 20 mJy with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, we predict a {approx}30% and {approx}10% increase, respectively, in the radio source Poisson power in the lowest frequency channels of each experiment relative to that predicted by previous models.

Schneider, Michael D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 L-210, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Becker, Robert H. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 08991 (United States); De Vries, Willem [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 L-211, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); White, Richard L., E-mail: schneider42@llnl.gov [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

CMB Constraints On The Thermal WIMP Mass And Annihilation Cross Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermal relic, often referred to as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), is a particle produced during the early evolution of the Universe whose present (relic) abundance depends only on its mass and its thermally averaged annihilation cross section (annihilation rate factor) sigma*v_ann. Late time WIMP annihilation has the potential to affect the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum. Current observational constraints on the absence of such effects provide bounds on the mass and the annihilation cross section of relic particles that may, but need not be dark matter candidates. For a WIMP that is a dark matter candidate, the CMB constraint sets an upper bound to the annihilation cross section, leading to a lower bound to its mass that depends on whether or not the WIMP is its own antiparticle. For a self-conjugate WIMP, m_min = 50f GeV, where f is an electromagnetic energy efficiency factor. For a non self-conjugate WIMP, the minimum mass is a factor of two larger. For a WIMP that is a subdominant component of the dark matter density there is no bound on its mass and the upper bound to its annihilation cross section imposed by the CMB transforms into a lower bound to its annihilation cross section. These results are outlined and quantified here using the latest CMB constraints for a stable, symmetric (equal number of particles and antiparticles), WIMP whose annihilation is s-wave dominated, and for particles that are, or are not, their own antiparticle.

Gary Steigman

2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

90

Parameter constraints for flat cosmologies from CMB and 2dFGRS power spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain flat cosmological models with a joint likelihood analysis of a new compilation of data from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). Fitting the CMB alone yields a known degeneracy between the Hubble constant h and the matter density Omega_m, which arises mainly from preserving the location of the peaks in the angular power spectrum. This `horizon-angle degeneracy' is considered in some detail and shown to follow a simple relation Omega_m h^{3.4} = constant. Adding the 2dFGRS power spectrum constrains Omega_m h and breaks the degeneracy. If tensor anisotropies are assumed to be negligible, we obtain values for the Hubble constant h=0.665 +/- 0.047, the matter density Omega_m=0.313 +/- 0.055, and the physical CDM and baryon densities Omega_c h^2 = 0.115 +/- 0.009, Omega_b h^2 = 0.022 +/- 0.002 (standard rms errors). Including a possible tensor component causes very little change to these figures; we set a upper limit to the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r<0.7 at 95% confidence. We then show how these data can be used to constrain the equation of state of the vacuum, and find w<-0.52 at 95% confidence. The preferred cosmological model is thus very well specified, and we discuss the precision with which future CMB data can be predicted, given the model assumptions. The 2dFGRS power-spectrum data and covariance matrix, and the CMB data compilation used here, are available from http://www.roe.ac.uk/~wjp/

Will J. Percival; Will Sutherland; John A. Peacock; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Keith Taylor

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

91

Forecast constraints on cosmic strings from future CMB, pulsar timing and gravitational wave direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study future observational constraints on cosmic string parameters from various types of next-generation experiments: direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs), pulsar timing array, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We consider both GW burst and stochastic GW background searches by ground- and space-based interferometers as well as GW background detection in pulsar timing experiments. We also consider cosmic string contributions to the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies. These different types of observations offer independent probes of cosmic strings and may enable us to investigate cosmic string properties if the signature is detected. In this paper, we evaluate the power of future experiments to constrain cosmic string parameters, such as the string tension Gmu, the initial loop size alpha, and the reconnection probability p, by performing Fisher information matrix calculations. We find that combining the information from the different types of observations breaks parameter degeneracies and provides more stringent constraints on the parameters. We also find future space-borne interferometers independently provide a highly precise determination of the parameters.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Koichi Miyamoto; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Keitaro Takahashi; Joseph Silk

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oxygen pumping II: Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High Frequency CMB Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift inter-galactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 micron fine structure line of OI is pumped by the ~ 1300 AA soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen, assuming metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion, and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and on the cosmic epoch when the OI pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak \\delta y_{rms} ~ 10^{-7} (roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of few nK), it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to useful constraints on the heavy element enrichment history of the IGM.

Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Zoltan Haiman; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few ?K which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi, E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Non-parametric Analysis of the CMB Power Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature power spectra from the BOOMERANG, MAXIMA, and DASI experiments. We non-parametrically estimate the true power spectrum with no model assumptions. This is a significant departure from previous research which used either cosmological models or some other parameterized form (e.g. parabolic fits). Our non-parametric estimate is practically indistinguishable from the best fit cosmological model, thus lending independent support to the underlying physics that governs these models. We also generate a confidence set for the non-parametric fit and extract confidence intervals for the numbers, locations, and heights of peaks and the successive peak-to-peak height ratios. At the 95%, 68%, and 40% confidence levels, we find functions that fit the data with one, two, and three peaks respectively (0 8 sigma level. If we assume that there are three peaks in the data, we find their locations to be within l_1 = (118,300), l_2 = (377,650), and l_3 = (597,900). We find the ratio of the first peak-height to the second (Delta T_1)/(Delta T_2)^2= (1.06, 4.27) and the second to the third (Delta T_2)/(Delta T_3)^2= (0.41, 2.5). All measurements are for 95% confidence. If the standard errors on the temperature measurements were reduced to a third of what they are currently, as we expect to be achieved by the MAP and Planck CMB experiments, we could eliminate two-peak models at the 95% confidence limit. The non-parametric methodology discussed in this paper has many astrophysical applications.

Christopher J. Miller; Robert C. Nichol; Christopher Genovese; Larry Wasserman

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

CMB ANISOTROPIES: AN OVERVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief outline of the current status of CMB anisotropies and what they might mean, heavily biased towards the perspective of Berkeley theorists. Based on a talk presented at the 17th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics held in Munich, December 1994.

Douglas Scott

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Statistical isotropy violation of the CMB brightness fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain anomalies at large angular scales in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) measured by WMAP have been suggested as possible evidence of breakdown of statistical isotropy (SI). SI violation of cosmological perturbations is a generic feature of ultralarge scale structure of the cosmos and breakdown of global symmetries. Most CMB photons free-stream to the present from the surface of last scattering. It is thus reasonable to expect statistical isotropy violation in the CMB photon distribution observed now to have originated from SI violation in the baryon-photon fluid at last scattering, in addition to anisotropy of the primordial power spectrum studied earlier in the literature. We consider the generalized anisotropic brightness distribution fluctuations, {Delta}(k-vector, n-circumflex, {tau}) (at conformal time {tau}) in contrast to the SI case where it is simply a function of |k-vector| and k-circumflex{center_dot}n-circumflex. The brightness fluctuations expanded in bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) series can then be written as {Delta}{sub l{sub 1}}{sub l{sub 2}}{sup LM}(k,{tau}), where L>0 terms encode deviations from statistical isotropy. Violation of SI encoded in the present off-diagonal elements of the harmonic space correlation , equivalently, the BipoSH coefficients A{sub ll}{sup 'LM}, are then related to the generalized BipoSH brightness fluctuation terms at present. We study the evolution of {Delta}{sub l{sub 1}}{sub l{sub 2}}{sup LM}(k,{tau}) from nonzero terms {Delta}{sub l{sub 3}}{sub l{sub 4}}{sup LM}(k,{tau}{sub s}) at last scattering, in the free-streaming regime. We show that the terms with given BipoSH multipole LM evolve independently. Moreover, similar to the SI case, power at small spherical harmonic (SH) multipoles of {Delta}{sub l{sub 3}}{sub l{sub 4}}{sup LM}(k,{tau}{sub s}) at the last scattering is transferred to {Delta}{sub l{sub 1}}{sub l{sub 2}}{sup LM}(k,{tau}) at larger SH multipoles. The structural similarity is more apparent in the asymptotic expression for large values of the final SH multipoles. This formalism allows an elegant identification of any SI violation observed today to a possible origin in SI violating physics present in the baryon-photon fluid. This is illustrated for the known result of SI violating angular correlations due to the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field in the baryon-photon fluid.

Aich, Moumita; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ? 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ?CDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ?CDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through ?{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ?CDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to a counter-intuitive effect, making the power of the lensing signal in this model lower by 10% than in the ?CDM scenario. Moreover, we compare the behaviour of CDM and baryons in CoDECS separately, in order to isolate effects coming from the coupling with the DE component. We find that, in the bouncing scenario, baryons show an opposite trend with respect to CDM, due to the coupling of the latter with the DE component. These results confirm the relevance of CMB lensing as a probe for DE at the early stages of cosmic acceleration, and demonstrate the reliability of N-body based large scale CMB lensing simulations in the context of DE studies.

Carbone, Carmelita [INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Baldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Pettorino, Valeria [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH–1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Baccigalupi, Carlo, E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it, E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it, E-mail: valeria.pettorino@unige.ch, E-mail: bacci@sissa.it [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, Trieste, I-34136 (Italy)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic fields are everywhere in nature and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large- scale structure. In this review we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cut off scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude $B_\\lambda$ and the power spectral index $n_B$ which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.

Dai G. Yamazaki; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Toshitaka Kajino; Grant J. Mathew

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Using SCUBA to place upper limits on arcsecond scale CMB anisotropies at 850 microns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SCUBA instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has already had an impact on cosmology by detecting relatively large numbers of dusty galaxies at high redshift. Apart from identifying well-detected sources, such data can also be mined for information about fainter sources and their correlations, as revealed through low level fluctuations in SCUBA maps. As a first step in this direction we analyse a small SCUBA data-set as if it were obtained from a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) differencing experiment. This enables us to place limits on CMB anisotropy at 850 microns. Expressed as Q_{flat}, the quadrupole expectation value for a flat power spectrum, the limit is 152 microKelvin at 95 per cent confidence, corresponding to C_0^{1/2} < 355 microKelvin for a Gaussian autocorrelation function, with a coherence angle of about 20--25 arcsec; These results could easily be reinterpretted in terms of any other fluctuating sky signal. This is currently the best limit for these scales at high frequency, and comparable to limits at similar angular scales in the radio. Even with such a modest data-set, it is possible to put a constraint on the slope of the SCUBA counts at the faint end, since even randomly distributed sources would lead to fluctuations. Future analysis of sky correlations in more extensive data-sets ought to yield detections, and hence additional information on source counts and clustering.

Colin Borys; Scott C. Chapman; Douglas Scott

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

MAPCUMBA : a fast iterative multi-grid map-making algorithm for CMB experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The data analysis of current Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments like BOOMERanG or MAXIMA poses severe challenges which already stretch the limits of current (super-) computer capabilities, if brute force methods are used. In this paper we present a practical solution to the optimal map making problem which can be used directly for next generation CMB experiments like ARCHEOPS and TopHat, and can probably be extended relatively easily to the full PLANCK case. This solution is based on an iterative multi-grid Jacobi algorithm which is both fast and memory sparing. Indeed, if there are N_tod data points along the one dimensional timeline to analyse, the number of operations is O(N_tod ln N_tod) and the memory requirement is O(N_tod). Timing and accuracy issues have been analysed on simulated ARCHEOPS and TopHat data, and we discuss as well the issue of the joint evaluation of the signal and noise statistical properties.

O. Doré; R. Teyssier; F. R. Bouchet; D. Vibert; S. Prunet

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Neural networks and separation of background and foregrounds in astrophysical sky maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neuralnetwork for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps.Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions onthe signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal mapsthemselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate thephysical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test thecapabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, takenfrom simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are goingto be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the MicrowaveAnisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps areat the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\scPlanck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysicalradio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galacticdiffuse emissions from thermal dust...

Baccigalupi, C; Burigana, C; De Zotti, G; Farusi, A; Maino, D; Maris, M; Perrotta, F; Salerno, E; Toffolatti, L; Tonazzini, A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Future Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise some aspects of experiments currently being built or planned, and indulge in wild speculation about possibilities on the more distant horizon.

Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Cosmic Background Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise the current status of cosmic microwave background spectrum and anisotropy measurements, and their theoretical interpretation. This is the update of the mini-review for the 1997 web-version of the Review of Particle Properties.

George Smoot; Douglas Scott

1997-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Anomalous Microwave Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

A. Kogut

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Two Phase Dynamics as the Origin to: 0.25 keV and 0.1 keV X-ray Diffuse Backgrounds, CMB, Global Quantized Redshift, 10 Mpc Space distributions and 30 Myr Cycles at Earth Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Alternative to explain the origin of matter-background connections from the paper "Do Cosmic Backgrounds Cyclical Renew by Matter and Quanta Emissions?..." proposed: A sequence of discontinuous small changes of light speed in time as the cause, which provoke that criticality processes take place every 26-30 million years. Then, matter particles and quanta reach at one threshold value, and are compelled to reorganize their internal energy and make emissions that later becomes in current cosmic backgrounds. The small discontinues relative decreasing of c of about 10 -5) should do some small effects on planet and living bodies. Cyclic small reorganization of matter particles is consider as the astrophysical origin of Earth cyclic catastrophes. And at space global distribution: quantized redshift, change of galaxy fractal distribution at 10 Mpc scale, galaxy average luminosity and the luminosity fluctuation of galaxy pairs are enhanced out to separations near 10 Mpc. Also proposed: Like the Universe is observed flat in distance and time, the gravitational constant G might decrease with time, which may originate the Earth orbit eccentricity cycle of 100000 yr and, provoke the former mentioned sequence of c decrease in time. And, every 6 million years, the accumulation of G relative decrease of about 10-5 in G compelled space-time to reach at one threshold value that, trigger small relative decrease of light speed c of about 10-5 cyclically. This is interpreted as the Universe has two dynamical phases following one each other cyclically with intervals of 26-30 million years respectively: One of about 0.1 million years, called "activation phase", at which the critical processes take place, follows by longer "inhibition phase". The present approach indicates the existence of a subtle non linear dynamics, which could also contribute to the origin of galaxy fractal distribution.

Eduardo del Pozo Garcia

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry.

Mitra, Sanjit [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bose, Sukanta [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using BBN in cosmological parameter extraction from CMB: a forecast for Planck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data from future high-precision Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements will be sensitive to the primordial Helium abundance $Y_p$. At the same time, this parameter can be predicted from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) as a function of the baryon and radiation densities, as well as a neutrino chemical potential. We suggest to use this information to impose a self-consistent BBN prior on $Y_p$ and determine its impact on parameter inference from simulated Planck data. We find that this approach can significantly improve bounds on cosmological parameters compared to an analysis which treats $Y_p$ as a free parameter, if the neutrino chemical potential is taken to vanish. We demonstrate that fixing the Helium fraction to an arbitrary value can seriously bias parameter estimates. Under the assumption of degenerate BBN (i.e., letting the neutrino chemical potential $\\xi$ vary), the BBN prior's constraining power is somewhat weakened, but nevertheless allows us to constrain $\\xi$ with an accuracy that rivals bounds inferred from present data on light element abundances.

Jan Hamann; Julien Lesgourgues; Gianpiero Mangano

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: FINAL MAPS AND RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C {sup –1} weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ?CDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t {sub 0} = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H {sub 0} = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n{sub s} = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (?{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter ?CDM model, based on CMB data alone. For a model including tensors, the allowed seven-parameter volume has been reduced by a factor 117,000. Other cosmological observations are in accord with the CMB predictions, and the combined data reduces the cosmological parameter volume even further. With no significant anomalies and an adequate goodness of fit, the inflationary flat ?CDM model and its precise and accurate parameters rooted in WMAP data stands as the standard model of cosmology.

Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Drive, Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gold, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CMB: The ultimate test for theoretical models aiming at describing the very early universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I will illustrate how one can use the cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements, in order to test theoretical models aiming at describing the early universe.

Mairi Sakellariadou

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Recent CMB Results Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent CMB Results by Ned Wright (UCLA) ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-DT.html ·http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;A Big Media Splash in 1992

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

111

The Impact of the CMB on Large-Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COBE detection of microwave anisotropies provides the best way of fixing the amplitude of cosmological fluctuations on the largest scales. We discuss the impact of this new, precise normalization and give fitting formulae for the horizon-crossing amplitude as a function of \\Omega_0 and n for both open and flat cosmologies. We also discuss the relevant normalization (\\sigma_8) at galaxy-clustering scales. Already it is clear that the inferred \\sigma_8 can be unnaccepatably high for some of the simplest inflationary models, although many minor variants give an adequate fit. Generic topological defect models appear to fare rather badly, and it is unclear whether minor variants or improved calculations will help much. The detection and mapping of structure in the CMB anisotropy spectrum on smaller scales in the near future will enable us to achieve much stronger constraints on models.

Martin White; Douglas Scott

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measuring CMB polarisation with the Planck mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we discuss why and how the Planck mission, originally designed and proposed for mapping CMB intensity fluctuations, has been revised for polarisation measurement capability as well.

J. Delabrouille

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microwave detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

Meldner, Heiner W. (Moss Beach, CA); Cusson, Ronald Y. (Chapel Hill, NC); Johnson, Ray M. (San Ramon, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Microwave detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

1985-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Illuminating the background : topics in cosmic microwave background polarization research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results in electric dipole radiation. For an unpolarizedincom- ing radiation. Because the electric field oscillates,

Miller, Nathan James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cosmic Microwave Background Theory J. Richard Bond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\Omega tot , but theoretical forecasts of fu­ ture long duration balloon and satellite experi­ ments gas processes can obscure the direct con­ nection to the early universe physics. Most easily inter

Bond, Dick

118

Cosmic Microwave Background Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNatural Gas UsageCosmic Frontier High

119

Hybrid Estimation of CMB Polarization Power Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper generalises the hybrid power spectrum estimator developed in Efstathiou (2004a) to the estimation of polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The hybrid power spectrum estimator is unbiased and we show that it is close to optimal at all multipoles, provided the pixel noise satisfies certain reasonable constraints. Furthermore, the hybrid estimator is computationally fast and can easily be incorporated in a Monte-Carlo chain for Planck-sized data sets. Simple formulae are given for the covariance matrices, including instrumental noise, and these are tested extensively against numerical simulations. We compare the behaviour of simple pseudo-Cell estimates with maximum likelihood estimates at low multipoles. For realistic sky cuts, maximum likelihood estimates reduce very significantly the mixing of E and B modes. To achieve limits on the scalar-tensor ratio of r<<0.1 from sky maps with realistic sky cuts, maximum likelihood methods, or pseudo-Cell estimators based on unambiguous E and B modes, will be essential.

G. Efstathiou

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microwave generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The impact of non-Planckian effects on radio cosmological backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the radio cosmological background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at $\

Colafrancesco, Sergio; Marchegiani, Paolo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN); Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Ferber, Mattison K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Forecast Constraints on Inflation from Combined CMB and Gravitational Wave Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, BBO (Big Bang Observer), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parameterization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Christopher Gordon; Joseph Silk; Naoshi Sugiyama

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular scale cmb Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of CMB polarization spectrum by the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer on the intermediate band... . The Gaussianity of the CMB anisotropy on large angular scales directly...

126

CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation ? with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (?)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (?)F{sup 2} interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ? 10{sup 16}GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (?) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

Peloso, Marco [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

A perspective on the CMB acoustic peak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMB angular spectrum measurements suggest a flat universe. This paper clarifies the relation between geometry and the spherical harmonic index of the first acoustic peak ($\\ell_{peak}$). Numerical and analytic calculations show that $\\ell_{peak}$ is approximately a function of $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M$ where $\\Omega_K$ and $\\Omega_M$ are the curvature ($\\Omega_K > 0$ implies an open geometry) and mass density today in units of critical density. Assuming $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M \\ll 1$, one obtains a simple formula for $\\ell_{peak}$, the derivation of which gives another perspective on the widely-recognized $\\Omega_M$-$\\Omega_\\Lambda$ degeneracy in flat models. This formula for near-flat cosmogonies together with current angular spectrum data yields familiar parameter constraints.

T. A. Marriage

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heavy sterile neutrinos, entropy and relativistic energy production, and the relic neutrino background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the implications of the existence of heavy neutral fermions (i.e., sterile neutrinos) for the thermal history of the early universe. In particular, we consider sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the 100 MeV to 500 MeV range, with couplings to ordinary active neutrinos large enough to guarantee thermal and chemical equilibrium at epochs in the early universe with temperatures T > 1 GeV, but in a range to give decay lifetimes from seconds to minutes. Such neutrinos would decouple early, with relic densities comparable to those of photons, but decay out of equilibrium, with consequent prodigious entropy generation prior to, or during, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of the ranges of sterile neutrino rest mass and lifetime considered are at odds with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) limits on the relativistic particle contribution to energy density (e.g., as parameterized by N_eff). However, some sterile neutrino parameters can lead to an acceptable N_eff. These parameter ranges are accompanie...

Fuller, George M; Kusenko, Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

On the Stability of the CMB Autocorrelation Function on Cosmological Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation angular autocorrelation function in Friedman Universe with negative curvature (k=-1) are studied. The dependence of the spectral index of autocorrelation function on the density parameter of the Universe is studied numerically, taking into account the effect of geodesic mixing, occuring in k=-1 curvature Universes.

A. A. Melkonian

1999-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

CMB distortions from damping of acoustic waves produced by cosmic strings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study diffusion damping of acoustic waves in the photon-baryon fluid due to cosmic strings, and calculate the induced ?- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background. For cosmic strings with tension within current bounds, their contribution to the spectral distortions is subdominant compared to the distortions from primordial density perturbations.

Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay, E-mail: Hiroyuki.Tashiro@asu.edu, E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu, E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The amplitudes of fluctuations in the 2dFGRS and the CMB, and implications for galaxy biasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the amplitudes of fluctuations probed by the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and by the latest measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. By combining the 2dFGRS and CMB data we find the linear-theory rms mass fluctuations in 8 Mpc/h spheres to be sigma_8 = 0.73 +-0.05 (after marginalization over the matter density parameter Omega_m and three other free parameters). This normalization is lower than the COBE normalization and previous estimates from cluster abundance, but it is in agreement with some revised cluster abundance determinations. We also estimate the scale-independent bias parameter of present-epoch L_s = 1.9L_* APM-selected galaxies to be b(L_s,z=0) = 1.10 +- 0.08 on comoving scales of 0.02 < k < 0.15 h/Mpc. If luminosity segregation operates on these scales, L_* galaxies would be almost un-biased, b(L_*,z=0) = 0.96. These results are derived by assuming a flat Lambda-CDM Universe, and by marginalizing over other free parameters and fixing the spectral index n=1 and the optical depth due to reionization tau=0. We also study the best fit pair (Omega_m,b), and the robustness of the results to varying n and tau. Various modelling corrections can each change the resulting b by 5-15 per cent. The results are compared with other independent measurements from the 2dFGRS itself, and from the SDSS, cluster abundance and cosmic shear.

Ofer Lahav; Sarah L. Bridle; Will J. Percival; John A. Peacock; George Efstathiou; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Darren S. Madgwick; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

CMB and Molecules at High Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It becomes possible now to detect cold molecules at high redshift in the millimeter domain. Since the first discovery in 1992 by Brown and van den Bout of CO lines at z=2.28 in a gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy, nearly ten objects are now known to possess large quantities of molecular gas beyond z=1 and up to z = 5, through millimeter and sub-millimeter emission lines. The continuum dust emission is the most easily detected: in the mm domain, the emission is stronger for the more redshifted objects. For the CO lines, the situation is less favorable, and the reported detections are helped by gravitational amplification. The increase of the CMB temperature T_{bg} with redshift helps the rotational line excitation (especially at high z), but not its detection. Absorption in front of quasars is a more sensitive probe of cold gas at high redshift, able to detect individual clouds of a few solar masses (instead of 10^{10} Mo for emission). From the diffuse components, one can measure the cosmic black body temperature as a function of redshift. The high column densities component allow to observe important molecules not observable from the ground, like O2, H2O and LiH for example.

F. Combes

1999-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Quantum Illumination at the Microwave Wavelengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum illumination is a quantum-optical sensing technique in which an entangled source is exploited to improve the detection of a low-reflectivity object that is immersed in a bright thermal background. Here we describe and analyze a system for applying this technique at microwave frequencies, a more appropriate spectral region for target detection than the optical, due to the naturally-occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-optomechanical converter to entangle microwave signal and optical idler fields, with the former being sent to probe the target region and the latter being retained at the source. The microwave radiation collected from the target region is then phase conjugated and upconverted into an optical field that is combined with the retained idler in a joint-detection quantum measurement. The error probability of this microwave quantum-illumination system, or quantum radar, is shown to be superior to that of any classical microwave radar of equal transmitted energy.

Shabir Barzanjeh; Saikat Guha; Christian Weedbrook; David Vitali; Jeffrey H. Shapiro; Stefano Pirandola

2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

Morris, VR

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Heavy sterile neutrinos, entropy and relativistic energy production, and the relic neutrino background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the implications of the existence of heavy neutral fermions (i.e., sterile neutrinos) for the thermal history of the early universe. In particular, we consider sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the 100 MeV to 500 MeV range, with couplings to ordinary active neutrinos large enough to guarantee thermal and chemical equilibrium at epochs in the early universe with temperatures T > 1 GeV, but in a range to give decay lifetimes from seconds to minutes. Such neutrinos would decouple early, with relic densities comparable to those of photons, but decay out of equilibrium, with consequent prodigious entropy generation prior to, or during, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of the ranges of sterile neutrino rest mass and lifetime considered are at odds with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) limits on the relativistic particle contribution to energy density (e.g., as parameterized by N_eff). However, some sterile neutrino parameters can lead to an acceptable N_eff. These parameter ranges are accompanied by considerable dilution of the ordinary background relic neutrinos, possibly an adverse effect on BBN, but sometimes fall in a range which can explain measured neutrino masses in some particle physics models. A robust signature of these sterile neutrinos would be a measured N_eff not equal to 3 coupled with no cosmological signal for neutrino rest mass when the detection thresholds for these probes are below laboratory-established neutrino mass values, either as established by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation scale or direct measurements with, e.g., KATRIN or neutrino-less double beta decay experiments.

George M. Fuller; Chad T. Kishimoto; Alexander Kusenko

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

High brightness microwave lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

http://cmb.ornl.gov Center for Molecular Biophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the Biosciences Division of the Energy and Engineering Sciences Directorate at ORNL and with the Department, incorporating elements of theoretical physics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics and simulation the Decades Five Germans in Tennessee Publications Staff CMB External Funding Supercomputer Allocations Awards

140

Issues and methods for CMB anisotropy data reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major issues and existing methods for the reduction of CMB anisotropy data are reviewed. An emphasis is put on the proper modelling of the data. It is suggested that the robustness of methods could be improved by taking into account the uncertainty of the model for finding optimal solutions.

J. Delabrouille

2000-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Non-gaussianity in the foreground-reduced CMB maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Abridged]: A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity by using the CMB data is crucial not only to discriminate inflationary models but also to test alternative scenarios. Non-Gaussianity offers, therefore, a powerful probe of the physics of the primordial universe. The extraction of primordial non-Gaussianity is a difficult enterprise since several effects of non-primordial nature can produce non-Gaussianity. Most of the Gaussianity analyses of CMB data have been performed by using part-sky frequency, where masks are used to deal with the galactic diffuse foreground emission. However, full-sky map seems to be potentially more appropriate to test for Gaussianity of the CMB data. On the other hand, masks can induce bias in some non-Gaussianity analyses. Here we use two recent large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators, based on skewness and kurtosis of large-angle patches of CMB maps, to examine the question of non-Gaussianity in the available full-sky five-year and seven-year WMAP maps. We show that these full-sky foreground-reduced maps present a significant deviation from Gaussianity of different levels, which vary with the foreground-reducing procedures. We also make a Gaussianity analysis of the foreground-reduced five-year and seven-year WMAP maps with a KQ75 mask, and compare with the similar analysis performed with the full-sky foreground-reduced maps. This comparison shows a significant reduction in the levels of non-Gaussianity when the mask is employed, which provides indications on the suitability of the foreground-reduced maps as Gaussian reconstructions of the full-sky CMB.

A. Bernui; M. J. Reboucas

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Constraints on dark matter annihilation from CMB observations before Planck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compute the bounds on the dark matter (DM) annihilation cross section using the most recent Cosmic Microwave Background measurements from WMAP9, SPT'11 and ACT'10. We consider DM with mass in the MeV–TeV range annihilating 100% into either an e{sup +}e{sup ?} or a ?{sup +}?{sup ?} pair. We consider a realistic energy deposition model, which includes the dependence on the redshift, DM mass and annihilation channel. We exclude the canonical thermal relic abundance cross section ((?v) = 3 × 10{sup ?26}cm{sup 3}s{sup ?1}) for DM masses below 30 GeV and 15 GeV for the e{sup +}e{sup ?} and ?{sup +}?{sup ?} channels, respectively. A priori, DM annihilating in halos could also modify the reionization history of the Universe at late times. We implement a realistic halo model taken from results of state-of-the-art N-body simulations and consider a mixed reionization mechanism, consisting on reionization from DM as well as from first stars. We find that the constraints on DM annihilation remain unchanged, even when large uncertainties on the halo model parameters are considered.

Lopez-Honorez, Laura [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Vincent, Aaron C., E-mail: llopezho@vub.ac.be, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Non Thermal Features in the Cosmic Neutrino Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review some of the basic information on the Cosmic Neutrino Background momentum distribution. In particular, I discuss how present data from several cosmological observables such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure power spectrum constrain possible deviations from a standard Fermi-Dirac thermal distribution.

G. Mangano

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

BBN And The CMB Constrain Neutrino Coupled Light WIMPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abridged) In the presence of a light WIMP (mass m_chi 35 MeV, equivalent to no light WIMP at all. Without any light WIMP, BBN alone prefers Delta N_nu = 0.50 +- 0.23, favoring neither Delta N_nu = 0, nor a fully thermalized sterile neutrino (Delta N_nu = 1). This result is consistent with the CMB constraint, N_eff = 3.30 +- 0.27, limiting "new physics" between BBN and recombination. Combining BBN and CMB data gives Delta N_nu = 0.35 +- 0.16 and N_eff = 3.40 +- 0.16; while BBN and the CMB combined require Delta N_nu > 0 at ~98% confidence, they disfavor Delta N_nu > 1 at > 99% confidence. Allowing a neutrino-coupled light WIMP extends the allowed range slightly downward for Delta N_nu and slightly upward for N_eff simultaneously, leaving best-fit values unchanged.

Nollett, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, Arvid C. (Lake in the Hills, IL); Thigpen, Larry T. (Angier, NC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Higher-Order Gravitational Perturbations of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the behavior of light rays in perturbed Robertson-Walker cosmologies, calculating the redshift between an observer and the surface of last scattering to second order in the metric perturbation. At first order we recover the classic results of Sachs and Wolfe, and at second order we delineate the various new effects which appear; there is no {\\it a priori} guarantee that these effects are significantly smaller than those at first order, since there are large length scales in the problem which could lead to sizable prefactors. We find that second order terms of potential observational interest may be interpreted as transverse and longitudinal lensing by foreground density perturbations, and a correction to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

Ted Pyne; Sean M. Carroll

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshort version)UnveilsGeorge Crabtree,George

150

NEAR-MILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF THE MICROWAVE BACKGROUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminated at time B. Thermometers T1 through T7 are locatedindicated in Fig. 1. The thermometer T8 , which was immersedand a heater. A separate thermometer was used to monitor the

Woody, D.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.

P. Giommi; M. Capalbi; E. Cavazzuti; S. Colafrancesco; A. Cucchiara; A. Falcone; J. Kennea; R. Nesci; M. Perri; G. Tagliaferri; A. Tramacere; G. Tosti; A. J. Blustin; G. Branduardi-Raymont; D. N. Burrows; G. Chincarini; A. J. Dean; N. Gehrels; H. Krimm; F. Marshall; A. M. Parsons; B. Zhang

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microwave coupler and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

Holcombe, C.E.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Emitron: microwave diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cosmological Implications of the CMB Large-scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WMAP and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full CMB sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early Universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In LCDM, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. These low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects. If this is not the case, however, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. Ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ~0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ~4.9% level; under the least favourable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ~0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R_h=ct Universe would then be ~7-10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs-Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is > 7%, much more likely than in LCDM. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a maximum fluctuation size at the time of recombination, which is absent in the latter because of inflation.

Fulvio Melia

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Inflation and CMB Anisotropy from Quantum Metric Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model of cosmological evolution of the early and late Universe which is consistent with observational data and naturally explains the origin of inflation and dark energy. We show that the de Sitter accelerated expansion of the FLRW space with no matter fields (hereinafter, empty space) is its natural state, and the model does not require either a scalar field or cosmological constant or any other hypotheses. This is due to the fact that the de Sitter state is an exact solution of the rigorous mathematically consistent equations of one-loop quantum gravity for the empty FLRW space that are finite off the mass shell. Space without matter fields is not empty, as it always has the natural quantum fluctuations of the metric, i.e. gravitons. Therefore, the empty (in this sense) space is filled with gravitons, which have the backreaction effect on its evolution over time forming a self-consistent de Sitter instanton leading to the exponentially accelerated expansion of the Universe. At the start and the end of cosmological evolution, the Universe is assumed to be empty, which explains the origin of inflation and dark energy. This scenario leads to the prediction that the signs of the parameter 1+w should be opposite in both cases, and this fact is consistent with observations. The fluctuations of the number of gravitons lead to fluctuations of their energy density which in turn leads to the observed CMB temperature anisotropy of the order of 10^-5 and CMB polarization. In the frame of this scenario, it is not a hypothetical scalar field that generates inflation and relic gravitational waves but on the contrary, the gravitational waves (gravitons) generate dark energy, inflation, CMB anisotropy and polarization.

Leonid Marochnik; Daniel Usikov

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

CMB constraint on non-Gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity in CDM isocurvature perturbations. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations can be produced in various models at the very early stage of the Universe. Since the isocurvature perturbations little affect the structure formation at late times, CMB is the best probe of isocurvature non-Gaussianity at least in the near future. In this paper, we focus on non-Gaussian curvature and isocurvature perturbations of the local-type, which are uncorrelated and in the form ? = ?{sub G}+(3/5)f{sub NL}(?{sub G}{sup 2}?(?{sub G}{sup 2})) and S = S{sub G}+f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}(S{sub G}?(S{sub G}{sup 2})), and constrain the non-linearity parameter of isocurvature perturbations, f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, as well as the curvature one f{sub NL}. For this purpose, we employ several state-of-art techniques for the analysis of CMB data and simulation. Assuming that isocurvature perturbations are subdominant, we apply our method to the WMAP 7-year data of temperature anisotropy and obtain constraints on a combination ?{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, where ? is the ratio of the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations to that of the adiabatic ones. When the adiabatic perturbations are assumed to be Gaussian, we obtained a constraint ?{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = 40±66 assuming the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is scale-invariant. When we assume that the adiabatic perturbations can also be non-Gaussian, we obtain f{sub NL} = 38±24 and ?{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = ?8±72. We also discuss implications of our results for the axion CDM isocurvature model.

Hikage, Chiaki [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Takahashi, Tomo, E-mail: hikage@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on non-Gaussianity estimators f{sub NL}. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax = 2000) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup ?3} for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance ? for f{sub NL} both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating f{sub NL} it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects if the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.

Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Liguori, Michele; Renzi, Alessandro [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es, E-mail: arenzi@pd.infn.it [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of radiation-like solid on CMB anisotropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the power in the lowest multipoles of CMB anisotropies in the presence of radiation-like solid, a hypothetical new kind of radiation with nonzero shear modulus. If only the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe effect is taken into account, the shear modulus to energy density ratio must be in absolute value of order $10^{-5}$ or less for the theory to be consistent with observations within cosmic variance. With the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect switched on, the constraint is relaxed almost by two orders of magnitude.

Vladimír Balek; Matej Škovran

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Initial Tests for an Analog Continuum Correlator for CMB Interferometry Huan T. Tran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Lyman Page Abstract We are proposing to build a high frequency interferometer to study the CMB;2 Initial Tests for an Analog Continuum Correlator for CMB Interferometry Huan T. Tran Abstract We-15) and work below 35 GHz and hence rely heavily on HEMT technology. We are in the initial planning stages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop (held in Long Beach, CA, on July 25, 2012), academic and industry experts discussed the existing and emerging electrotechnologies – such as microwave ...

162

COBE Data Spatial--Frequency Analysis and CMB Anisotropy Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the problem of CMB spectrum corruption during Galactic emission removing. A new technique of spatial--frequency data reduction is proposed. The technique gives us a possibility to avoid a spatial harmonics nonorthogonality. The proposed technique is applied to the two-year COBE DMR sky maps. We exclude the harmonics with l=7, 9,13, 23 and 25 as having anomalous statistics noise behavior. One shows that procedure do not give systematic errors, if the data are statistically regular. The spectral parameter of the power spectrum of primordial perturbation $n=1.84 \\pm 0.29$ and quadrupole moment $Q_2=15.22 \\pm 3.0$ are estimated. The power spectrum estimation results are inconsistent with the Harrison-Zel`dovich $n=1$ model with the confidence 99%. It is shown a necessity of an increasing a survey sensitivity to reach a more reliable estimation of the cosmological signal.

A. A. Brukhanov; D. P. Skulachev; I. A. Strukov; T. V. Konkina

1995-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low-l CMB Power Loss in String Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lack of power on large scales (l < 40) might have been observed by the PLANCK satellite. We argue that this putative feature can be explained by a phase of fast roll at the onset of inflation. We show that in the context of single field models what is required is an asymmetric inflection point model of which fibre inflation is a string motivated example. We study the ability of fibre inflation to generate a suppression of the CMB 2-point function power at low l, finding that the potential derived from string loops is not steep enough for this purpose. We introduce a steeper contribution to the potential, that dominates away from the inflationary region, and show that if properly tuned it can indeed lead to a spectrum with lack of power at large scales.

Francisco G. Pedro; Alexander Westphal

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dark energy rest frame and the CMB dipole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If dark energy can be described as a perfect fluid, then, apart from its equation of state relating energy density and pressure, we should also especify the corresponding rest frame. Since dark energy is typically decoupled from the rest of components of the universe, in principle such a frame could be different from that of matter and radiation. In this work we consider the potential observable effects of the motion of dark energy and the possibility to measure the dark energy velocity relative to matter. In particular we consider the modification of the usual interpretation of the CMB dipole and its implications for the determination of matter bulk flows on very large scales. We also comment on the possible origin of a dark energy flow and its evolution in different models.

Antonio L. Maroto

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Towards a proof of the equivalence between FRW background expansion and statistical isotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We will expose in this paper our advances towards a proof of the equivalence between FRW background expansion, during some period of time that contains primordial inflation, and the statistical isotropy of the primordial curvature perturbation $\\zeta$ at the end of this period of time. Our motivation rests on the growing interest in the existence of a preferred direction in the Universe hinted by the continuous presence of anomalies in the CMB data.

Rodriguez, Yeinzon; Nieto, Carlos M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

CMB Anisotropies, Large-Scale Structure and the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are now beginning to learn detailed information about cosmological parameters from the shapes of the matter and radiation power spectra, together with their relative normalization. As more high quality data are gathered from galaxy surveys and from microwave anisotropies, the range of allowed models is expected to get incrementally smaller. The amount of information potentially available from a high-resolution satellite experiment should allow a determination of essentially {\\it all} currently discussed cosmological parameters to less than ~10%.

Douglas Scott

1995-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cosmic Background Radiation Mini-Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a complete re-write of the mini-review for the Review of Particle Physics (a.k.a the Partcicle Data Book), which includes an assessment of the CMB anisotropy results and their interpretation up until the end of 2003. It forms a compact overview of the field at this time. Sections headings are: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

Douglas Scott; George Smoot

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Detecting anomalies in CMB maps: a new method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ever since WMAP announced its first results, different analyses have shown that there is weak evidence for several large-scale anomalies in the CMB data. While the evidence for each anomaly appears to be weak, the fact that there are multiple seemingly unrelated anomalies makes it difficult to account for them via a single statistical fluke. So, one is led to considering a combination of these anomalies. But, if we "hand-pick" the anomalies (test statistics) to consider, we are making an \\textit{a posteriori} choice. In this article, we propose two statistics that do not suffer from this problem. The statistics are linear and quadratic combinations of the $a_{\\ell m}$'s with random co-efficients, and they test the null hypothesis that the $a_{\\ell m}$'s are independent, normally-distributed, zero-mean random variables with an $m$-independent variance. The motivation for such statistics is generality; equivalently, it is a non \\textit{a posteriori} choice. But, a very useful by-product of considering such stat...

Neelakanta, Jayanth T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oscillations in the CMB from Axion Monodromy Inflation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the CMB observables in axion monodromy inflation. These well-motivated scenarios for inflation in string theory have monomial potentials over super-Planckian field ranges, with superimposed sinusoidal modulations from instanton effects. Such periodic modulations of the potential can drive resonant enhancements of the correlation functions of cosmological perturbations, with characteristic modulations of the amplitude as a function of wavenumber. We give an analytical result for the scalar power spectrum in this class of models, and we determine the limits that present data places on the amplitude and frequency of modulations. Then, incorporating an improved understanding of the realization of axion monodromy inflation in string theory, we perform a careful study of microphysical constraints in this scenario. We find that detectable modulations of the scalar power spectrum are commonplace in well-controlled examples, while resonant contributions to the bispectrum are undetectable in some classes of examples and detectable in others. We conclude that resonant contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum are a characteristic signature of axion monodromy inflation that, in favorable cases, could be detected in near-future experiments.

Flauger, Raphael; /Texas U.; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Westphal, Alexander; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Xu, Gang; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Towards a free-free template for CMB foregrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A full-sky template map of the Galactic free-free foreground emission component is increasingly important for high sensitivity CMB experiments. We use the recently published \\ha data of both the northern and southern skies as the basis for such a template. The first step is to correct the \\ha maps for dust absorption using the 100 $\\mu$m dust maps of Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). We show that for a range of longitudes, the Galactic latitude distribution of absorption suggests that it is 33 per cent of the full extragalactic absorption. A reliable absorption-corrected \\ha map can be produced for $\\sim 95$ per cent of the sky; the area for which a template cannot be recovered is the Galactic plane area $|b| 5^{\\circ}$, $l=260^{\\circ}-0^{\\circ}-160^{\\circ}$ and some isolated dense dust clouds at intermediate latitudes. The second step is to convert the dust-corrected \\ha data into a predicted radio surface brightness. The free-free emission formula is revised to give an accurate expression (1 per...

Dickinson, C; Davis, R J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

String Theory clues for the low-$\\ell$ CMB ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Brane Supersymmetry Breaking" is a peculiar string-scale mechanism that can unpair Bose and Fermi excitations in orientifold models. It results from the simultaneous presence, in the vacuum, of collections of D-branes and orientifolds that are not mutually BPS, and is closely tied to the scale of string excitations. It also leaves behind, for a mixing of dilaton and internal breathing mode, an exponential potential that is just too steep for a scalar to emerge from the initial singularity while descending it. As a result, in this class of models the scalar can generically bounce off the exponential wall, and this dynamics brings along, in the power spectrum, an infrared depression typically followed by a pre-inflationary peak. We elaborate on a possible link between this type of bounce and the low-$\\ell$ end of the CMB angular power spectrum. For the first 32 multipoles, one can reach a 50 % reduction in $\\chi^{\\,2}$ with respect to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM setting.

Kitazawa, N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microwave hematoma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Plume heat flow is much lower than CMB heat flow Eric Mittelstaedt a,*, Paul J. Tackley a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to follow a power-law size distribution, estimated a plume heat flux as high as 35% of surface heat fluxPlume heat flow is much lower than CMB heat flow Eric Mittelstaedt a,*, Paul J. Tackley a, of the heat conducted across the CMB. Here this assumption is explored using numerical convection models

Tackley, Paul J.

176

Gigatron microwave amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron tube for achieving high power at high frequency with high efficiency, including an input coupler, a ribbon-shaped electron beam and a traveling wave output coupler. The input coupler is a lumped constant resonant circuit that modulates a field emitter array cathode at microwave frequency. A bunched ribbon electron beam is emitted from the cathode in periodic bursts at the desired frequency. The beam has a ribbon configuration to eliminate limitations inherent in round beam devices. The traveling wave coupler efficiently extracts energy from the electron beam, and includes a waveguide with a slot therethrough for receiving the electron beam. The ribbon beam is tilted at an angle with respect to the traveling wave coupler so that the electron beam couples in-phase with the traveling wave in the waveguide. The traveling wave coupler thus extracts energy from the electron beam over the entire width of the beam.

McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Gigatron microwave amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron tube for achieving high power at high frequency with high efficiency is described, including an input coupler, a ribbon-shaped electron beam and a traveling wave output coupler. The input coupler is a lumped constant resonant circuit that modulates a field emitter array cathode at microwave frequency. A bunched ribbon electron beam is emitted from the cathode in periodic bursts at the desired frequency. The beam has a ribbon configuration to eliminate limitations inherent in round beam devices. The traveling wave coupler efficiently extracts energy from the electron beam, and includes a waveguide with a slot there through for receiving the electron beam. The ribbon beam is tilted at an angle with respect to the traveling wave coupler so that the electron beam couples in-phase with the traveling wave in the waveguide. The traveling wave coupler thus extracts energy from the electron beam over the entire width of the beam.

McIntyre, P.M.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Microwave Regenerated DPF for Auxiliary Power Units and Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Microwave Regenerated DPF for Auxiliary Power Units and Diesel Hybrid Vehicles Microwave Regenerated DPF for Auxiliary Power Units and Diesel Hybrid Vehicles Microwave regeneration...

179

EBSD Images Theoretical Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation EBSD Images Theoretical Background Defects in the Weld Grain Growth Low Speed Welding High Speed Welding Conclusion Heat-Affected Zone Observations Welding Experiments The low density in the transportation industries. Reproducibility and the low cost make welding a major large scale assembly process

Candea, George

180

David Smith Academic background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

David Smith Academic background Ph.D. in Mathematics (Algebra), Université de Sherbrooke, Canada project program (I. Assem, F. Bergeron, C. Reutenauer, D. Smith) $132,000 ($44,000 per year for 3 years. Schiffler and D. Smith, Friezes, strings and cluster variables, to appear in Glasgow Mathematcal Journal. 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ARM - Methane Background Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background Information Outreach Home Room News

182

Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, with ?m{sub ?} = (0.32±0.11) eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass m{sub ??} involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (??0?) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based ??0? experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kg·year, could already have a sizeable opportunity to observe ??0? events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 ton·year, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely.

Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Vidal, J. Muñoz; Peña-Garay, C., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: jmalbos@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: penya@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46090 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

LTS Background - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space control News & EventsModelingBackground

184

SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

Haase, Andy

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

DeFreitas, Dennis Michael (Oxford, NY); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7?mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple ?/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo, E-mail: guanjg@whut.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhai, Pengcheng [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Microwave treatment of vulcanized rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds broken by microwave radiation. The direct application of microwaves in combination with uniform heating of the crumb rubber renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger particle sizes and/or loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures to produce recycled composite products with good properties.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Folz, Diane C. (Gainesville, FL)

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

Current Dark Matter Annihilation Constraints from CMB and Low-Redshift Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated constraints on dark matter cross section and mass are presented combining CMB power spectrum measurements from Planck, WMAP9, ACT, and SPT as well as several low-redshift datasets (BAO, HST, supernovae). For the CMB datasets, we combine WMAP9 temperature and polarization data for l 2500, and Planck CMB four-point lensing measurements. We allow for redshift-dependent energy deposition from dark matter annihilation by using a `universal' energy absorption curve. We also include an updated treatment of the excitation, heating, and ionization energy fractions, and provide updated deposition efficiency factors (f_eff) for 41 different dark matter models. Assuming perfect energy deposition (f_eff = 1) and a thermal cross section, dark matter masses below 26 GeV are excluded at the 2-sigma level. Assuming a more generic efficiency of f_eff = 0.2, thermal dark matter masses below 5 GeV are disfavored at the 2-sigma level. These limits are a factor of ~2 improvement over those from WMAP9 data alone. These current constraints probe, but do not exclude, dark matter as an explanation for reported anomalous indirect detection observations from AMS-02/PAMELA and the Fermi Gamma-ray Inner Galaxy data. They also probe relevant models that would explain anomalous direct detection events from CDMS, CRESST, CoGeNT, and DAMA, as originating from a generic thermal WIMP. Projected constraints from the full Planck release should improve the current limits by another factor of ~2, but will not definitely probe these signals. The proposed CMB Stage IV experiment will more decisively explore the relevant regions and improve upon the Planck constraints by another factor of ~2.

Mathew S. Madhavacheril; Neelima Sehgal; Tracy R. Slatyer

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Paulauskas, Felix L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fathi, Zakaryae (Cary, NC); Wei, Jianghua (Raleigh, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Scanning tip microwave near field microscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an endwall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Alameda, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Wei, Tao (Albany, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Non-Gaussianity in the HILC foreground-reduced three-year WMAP CMB map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity in the CMB data is essential not only to test alternative models of the physics of the early universe but also to discriminate among classes of inflationary models. Given this far reaching consequences of such a non-Gaussianity detection for our understanding of the physics of the early universe, it is important to employ alternative indicators in order to have further information about the Gaussianity features of CMB that may be helpful for identifying their origins. In this way, a considerable effort has recently gone into the design of non-Gaussianity indicators, and in their application in the search for deviation from Gaussianity in the CMB data. Recently we have proposed two new large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators which provide measures of the departure from Gaussianity on large angular scales. We have used these indicators to carry out analyses of Gaussianity of the single frequency bands and of the available foreground-reduced {\\it five-year} maps with and without the KQ75 mask. Here we extend and complement these studies by performing a new analysis of deviation from Gaussianity of the {\\it three-year} harmonic ILC (HILC) foreground-reduced full-sky and KQ75 masked maps obtained from WMAP data. We show that this full-sky foreground-reduced maps presents a significant deviation from Gaussianity, which is brought down to a level of consistency with Gaussianity when the KQ75 mask is employed.

A. Bernui; M. J. Reboucas

2010-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies a...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Colafrancesco, S; Cucchiara, A; Falcone, A; Kennea, J; Nesci, R; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Tramacere, A; Tosti, G; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G; Dean, A J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Marshall, F; Parsons, A M; Zhang, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microwave sintering of boron carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

6, 54275456, 2006 Passive microwave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 5427­5456, 2006 Passive microwave 3-D polarization effects from rainy clouds A. Battaglia radiometers A. Battaglia 1 , C. Simmer 1 , and H. Czekala 2 1 Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn April 2006 ­ Published: 27 June 2006 Correspondence to: A. Battaglia (batta@uni-bonn.de) 5427 #12;ACPD 6

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Constraining SUSY with Heavy Scalars -- using the CMB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If low-energy SUSY exists, LHC data favors a high mass scale for scalar superpartners (above a TeV), while sfermions and the dark matter can be parametrically lighter -- leading to a so-called split-spectrum. When combining this fact with the motivation from fundamental theory for shift-symmetric scalars (moduli) prior to SUSY breaking, this leads to a non-thermal history for the early universe. Such a history implies different expectations for the microscopic properties of dark matter, as well as the possibility of dark radiation and a cosmic axion background. In this paper we examine how correlated and mixed isocurvature perturbations are generated in such models, as well as the connection to dark radiation. WMAP constraints on multiple correlated isocurvature modes allow up to half of the primordial perturbations to be isocurvature, contrary to the case of a single isocurvature mode where perturbations must be dominantly adiabatic. However, such bounds are strongly prior dependent, and have not been investigated with the latest Planck data. In this paper we use the example of a SUSY non-thermal history to establish theoretical priors on cosmological parameters. Of particular interest, we find that priors on dark radiation are degenerate with those on the total amount of isocurvature -- they are inversely correlated. Dark radiation is tightly constrained in the early universe and has been used recently to place stringent constraints on string-based approaches to beyond the standard model. Our results suggest such constraints can require more input from theory. Data from cosmological probes -- such as Planck -- can help guide model building in models of the MSSM, split-SUSY, and beyond. Our model also demonstrates the utility of UV models in constructing cosmological priors. (abridged)

Luca Iliesiu; David J. E. Marsh; Kavilan Moodley; Scott Watson

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

202

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Note: Cryogenic coaxial microwave filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The careful filtering of microwave electromagnetic radiation is critical for controlling the electromagnetic environment for experiments in solid-state quantum information processing and quantum metrology at millikelvin temperatures. We describe the design and fabrication of a coaxial filter assembly and demonstrate that its performance is in excellent agreement with theoretical modelling. We further perform an indicative test of the operation of the filters by making current-voltage measurements of small, underdamped Josephson junctions at 15 mK.

Tancredi, G.; Meeson, P. J. [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Schmidlin, S. [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom) [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Backgrounds of squeezed relic photons and their spatial correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the production of multi-photons squeezed states induced by the time variation of the (Abelian) gauge coupling constant in a string cosmological context. Within a fully quantum mechanical approach we solve the time evolution of the mean number of produced photons in terms of the squeezing parameters and in terms of the gauge coupling. We compute the first (amplitude interference) and second order (intensity interference) correlation functions of the magnetic part of the photon background. The photons produced thanks to the variation of the dilaton coupling are strongly bunched for the realistic case where the growth of the dilaton coupling is required to explain the presence of large scale magnetic fields and, possibly of a Faraday rotation of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

Massimo Giovannini

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Process for microwave sintering boron carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

Process for microwave sintering boron carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (440 Sugarwood Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922); Morrow, Marvin S. (Rte. #3, Box 113, Kingston, TN 37763)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SKA - EoR correlations and cross-correlations: kSZ, radio galaxies, and NIR background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe's Cosmic Dawn (CD) and Epoch of Reionization (EoR) can be studied using a number of observational probes that provide complementary or corroborating information. Each of these probes suffers from its own systematic and statistical uncertainties. It is therefore useful to consider the mutual information that these data sets contain. In this paper, we discuss a potential of cross-correlations between the SKA cosmological 21 cm data with: (i) the kinetic Sunyaev- Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect in the CMB data; (ii) the galaxy surveys; and (iii) near infrared (NIR) backgrounds.

Jelic, Vibor; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Vrbanec, Dijana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Primordial Helium Abundance from CMB: a constraint from recent observations and a forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We studied a constraint on the primordial helium abundance Y_p from current and future observations of CMB. Using the currently available data from WMAP, ACBAR, CBI and BOOMERANG, we obtained the constraint as Y_p = 0.25^{+0.10}_{-0.07} at 68% C.L. We also provide a forecast for the Planck experiment using the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. In addition to forecasting the constraint on Y_p, we investigate how assumptions for Y_p affect constraints on the other cosmological parameters.

Kazuhide Ichikawa; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Tomo Takahashi

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pure pseudo-C_l estimators for CMB B-modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast heuristically weighted, or pseudo-C_l, estimators are a frequently used method for estimating power spectra in CMB surveys with large numbers of pixels. Recently, Challinor & Chon showed that the E-B mixing in these estimators can become a dominant contaminant at low noise levels, ultimately limiting the gravity wave signal which can be detected on a finite patch of sky. We define a modified version of the estimators which eliminates E-B mixing and is near-optimal at all noise levels.

Kendrick M. Smith

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This concern is based on PTPC's interpretation of section 3.2 of BPA's Regional Dialogue Load Following Power Sales Agreement (Power Sales Agreement) template: 3.2 Take or Pay...

211

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

maintenance personnel, and film crews use small, portable lighting systems known as "mobile lighting." Traditionally, mobile lighting units are powered by diesel fuel generators...

212

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Bureau of Reclamation signed 10-year agreements - known as the Columbia Basin Fish Accords - with four Northwest tribes and two states on May 2, 2008. These historic...

213

Background:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

files in future will now work correctly with that setting. (back to TOC) Importing the SSL Certificate in MSIE7 on Windows Vista Connecting to a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) enabled...

214

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solutions in the area to meet its space needs and increase employee efficiency and productivity For the past 10 years, BPA has provided work space for area employees through a...

215

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operations through another supplier if BPA was unable to supply Alcoa's Intalco smelter. In such circumstances, the demand shift would not materialize because the Intalco...

216

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Administration, January 14, 2011 Figure 2 - Natural Gas Rig Count U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Count) 0 400 800 1200 1600 2000 J a n - 0 7 M a r - 0 7 M a y -...

217

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

V. RESPONSE TO COMMENTS: SPECIFIC CONTRACT ISSUES ... 14 a. Whether the ten year term of the Agreement is reasonable and consistent with sound business...

218

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P T E M0

219

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P T E M0Tech

220

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P T E

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P T

222

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P TBPA, the

223

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P TBPA,

224

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P

225

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE P

226

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdfDECEMBERE PAGENCY

227

Background  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite JC-118794ArgonneAnalysing the EffectEnergy Star

228

Background:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U LY 2 9

229

Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_

230

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable energy sources are critical to the nation's future, and hydrogen-powered fuel cells offer an attractive alternative to current technologies. However, fuel cell...

231

Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10^-5 counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of 22Na, 26Al, 226Ra and 228Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

B. Majorovits; I. Abt; M. Laubenstein; O. Volynets

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

A test of the Poincare dodecahedral space topology hypothesis with the WMAP CMB data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been suggested by Roukema and coworkers (hereafter R04) that the topology of the Universe as probed by the ``matched circles'' method using the first year release of the WMAP CMB data, might be that of the Poincar\\'e dodecahedral space (PDS) model. An excess in the correlation of the ``identified circles'' was reported by R04, for circles of angular radius of ~11 deg for a relative phase twist -36deg, hinting that this could be due to a Clifford translation, if the hypothesized model were true. R04 did not however specify the statistical significance of the correlation signal. We investigate the statistical significance of the signal using Monte Carlo CMB simulations in a simply connected Universe, and present an updated analysis using the three-year WMAP data. We find that our analyses of the first and three year WMAP data provide results that are consistent with the simply connected space at a confidence level as low as 68%.

B. S. Lew; B. F. Roukema

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microwave-triggered laser switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-repetition rate switch is described for delivering short duration, high-powered electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

Piltch, M.S.

1982-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microwave-triggered laser switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-repetition rate switch for delivering short duration, high-power electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Microwave-enhanced chemical processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the disposal of toxic wastes including chlorinated hydrocarbons, comprising, establishing a bed of non-metallic particulates having a high dielectric loss factor. Intimate contact of the particulates and the toxic wastes at a temperature in excess of about 400 C in the presence of microwave radiation for a time sufficient breaks the hydrocarbon chlorine bonds. Detoxification values in excess of 80 are provided and further detoxification of the bed is followed by additional disposal of toxic wastes. 1 figure.

Varma, R.

1990-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Microwave Meals in a Hurry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of time to prepare complete meals. Select dishes that are family favorites and use tested recipes . Learning to adapt recipes for microwave cooking comes. later with experience. In general, advance meal planning is the key to getting the most out.... For example, whole carrots stay hot longer than sliced carrots. Cooking and then serving food in the same dish extends holding time. So does wrapping or cov ering the food in plastic wrap or foil, or covering it with a lid. Cook foods with a long holding...

Haggard, Marilyn A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Microwave drying of ferric oxide pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of microwave energy for the drying of ferric oxide pellets has been investigated and evaluated. It is shown that the microwave drying rates are much higher than those observed in the conventional process. Also there is some potential for improved quality of the product. As a stand-alone technology it is unlikely that microwave drying would be economical for pellets due to the low cost of conventional fuels. However, based on an understanding of the drying mechanisms in the conventional process and in the microwave process, it is shown that microwave-assisted drying offers considerable potential. In this hybrid process, the advantages of the two drying techniques are combined to provide an improved drying process.

Pickles, C.A.; Xia, D.K. [Queens` Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electrodeless lamp energized by microwave energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an electrodeless lamp. It comprises: a microwave cavity; a source of microwaves in communication with the cavity; a lamp envelope containing a plasma-forming medium mounted within the microwave cavity; a gas manifold for feeding gas to at least one gas passageway for directing a stream of gas to the outer surface of the envelope; a gas leak passageway leading from the gas manifold; a conductive mesh assembly for retaining microwaves within the cavity and permitting light to be emitted from the cavity. The assembly including gas flow blocking means for preventing the flow of gas through the gas leak passageway when the screen is in place in the lamp; and means for shutting off the source of microwaves when the gas pressure in the manifold drops below a predetermined value.

Ervin, R.M.; Perret, J.

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microwave generated plasma light source apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave generated plasma light source including a microwave generator, a microwave cavity having a light reflecting member forming at least a portion of the cavity, and a member transparent to light and opaque to microwaves disposed across an opening of the cavity opposite the feeding opening through which the microwave generator is coupled. An electrodeless discharge bulb is disposed at a position in the cavity such that the cavity operates as a resonant cavity at least when the bulb is emitting light. In the bulb is encapsulated at least one discharge light emissive substance. The bulb has a shape and is sufficiently small that the bulb acts substantially as a point light source.

Yoshizawa, K.; Ito, H.; Kodama, H.; Komura, H.; Minowa, Y.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with the BICEP Telescope at the South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures of the adsorption pumps, gas-gap heat switches,operating the adsorption pumps and the heat switches, for

Takahashi, Yuki David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Antenna-coupled Superconducting Bolometers for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.3.2 Superconducting microstrip simulations 4.4 Impedance4.3 Superconducting microstrip . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1Principles of superconductive devices and circuits, (second

Myers, Michael James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effects of Mass Varying Neutrinos on Cosmological Parameters as determined from the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In models with a light scalar field (the `acceleron') coupled to neutrinos, neutrino masses depend on neutrino density. The resulting coupled system of mass varying neutrinos (MaVaNs) and the acceleron can act as a negative pressure fluid and is a candidate for dark energy \\cite{Fardon:2003eh} . MaVaNs also allow for higher $\\Sigma$m$_\

Akshay Ghalsasi; Ann E. Nelson

2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Implications about the large scale properties of the universe from the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JCAP 06 (2012) 003, arXiv:1104.0015 N. Akopov, Z.Akopov, G. Aslanyan, L. Grigoryan “A-dependence of coherent

Aslanyan, Grigor; Aslanyan, Grigor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Implications about the large scale properties of the universe from the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power spectrum, the correlation between ? lm ’s takesthe form ? lm ? ? l ? m ? = ? ll ? ? mm ? C l ? C l ? = 4?spherical harmonics n , x) = a lm (x)Y lm (ˆ n ) , lm where

Aslanyan, Grigor; Aslanyan, Grigor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A New Upper Limit on the Large Angular Scale Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property knowledge, Brian Keat- ing, also deserves much credit. Thanks to him I have finally memorized the radiometer

Timbie, Peter

247

Detec%on of compact sources in complex microwave and submillimeter backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to learn things about the origin the Universe, it's age, matter and energy content, geometry, dynamics, etc beams (non- gaussianity and non-circularity of the detectors), scanning strategy, calibration sources the detection and the characterization of a compact sources (shape, position angle, flux density estimation

Masci, Frank

248

Cosmological Perturbations of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological perturbations generated quantum-mechanically (as a particular case, during inflation) possess statistical properties of squeezed quantum states. The power spectra of the perturbations are modulated and the angular distribution of the produced temperature fluctuations of the CMBR is quite specific. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature fluctuations caused by squeezed gravitational waves. The predicted angular pattern can, in principle, be revealed by the COBE-type observations.

L. P. Grishchuk

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Measurements of Secodary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with the South Pole Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the physics of Josephson junctions, SQUID noise performance,insulating barriers, or Josephson junctions(Josephson, 1962;current, I c , of a Josephson junction determine how much

Lueker, Martin Van

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2005; O'Dwyer et al. 2005; Donzelli 2006), and uses iden- tical aluminum coated carbon fiber reflectors gear.12 This table, as described in Mei

Timbie, Peter

251

Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with the BICEP Telescope at the South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loss tangent ? 0.01 a PETP (Mylar) PTFE (Teflon) Thicknessaluminum, but fortunately PP and PETP had higher contractionand made both the PP and PETP sheets loose even though these

Takahashi, Yuki David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background At Degree Angular Scales.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are 36­39.5, 39.5­43, 43­46 GHz. The six channels in each radiometer view the sky in a single­axis parabola. The FWHM beam in K a band is 1:42 \\Sigma 0:02 ffi and in Q band is 1:04 \\Sigma 0:02 ffi . After

253

Antenna-coupled Superconducting Bolometers for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ment with Newton’s law of gravitation. Only in cases ofpublished his Law of Universal Gravitation. This theory

Myers, Michael James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Measurements of Secodary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with the South Pole Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dark lines indicate regions where the underlying silicon has been etched away leaving the spiderweb membrane suspended, although the web

Lueker, Martin Van

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Microwave processing for carbide ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines (USBM) has developed a process for synthesizing carbide ceramics in a microwave-induced plasma (MIP). For example, the process forms tungsten carbide with only 0.04% free carbon impurity at an average particle size of 0.05 {mu}m. Starting materials are tungsten oxide, carbon, and carbon monoxide. Commercial methods to produce tungsten carbide require heating to 1,500 C for up to 7 hours. Using the USBM method, tungsten carbide can be produced in approximately 10 minutes using a 30 kW, 915 mHz microwave unit. The reaction is carried out in a short-circuited waveguide to create a standing wave. Reactants rest on a carbon pedestal inside a closed zirconia crucible filled with carbon monoxide. The crucible is place at a field maximum within the waveguide. The waveguide was filled with helium to protect the waveguide. A procedure for producing carbide on a larger scale is described. Other ceramic compounds have been produced using this method, including silicon carbide and titanium carbide.

Tolley, W.K.; Church, R.H. [Bureau of Mines, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Salt Lake City Research Center

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microwave sintering of nanocrystalline ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single-mode cavity microwave furnace, operating in the TE{sub 103} mode at 2.45 GHz, has been set up at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and is currently being used to investigate sintering of nanocrystalline ceramics. This presentation will discuss the apparatus used and the results obtained to date. The high purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline powders were prepared by the sol-gel method. These powders were first uniaxially pressed to 14 MPa, CIP`ed to various pressures > 420 MPa and finally sectioned into wafers. The density of the green wafers was 30 to 38% TD. The wafers were heated in the microwave furnace for up to three hours at temperatures {<=} 1720{degrees}C. The temperature of the workpiece was monitored using an optical pyrometer. Final densities up to 80% TD have been obtained to date for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and up to 52% TD for TiO{sub 2}. Work is ongoing to characterize the sintered compacts, optimize the casketing for this furnace, and lay the groundwork for new studies using a 35 GHz gyrotron and quasioptical gyrotron tunable from 85 to 120 GHz.

Bruce, R.W. [United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Rayne, R.; Chow, G.M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Low density inorganic foams fabricated using microwaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our work was to determine if high temperature foams could be made using microwave heating; and if so, to investigate some of their properties. Several foams were made and their compressive strengths, tensile strengths and densities were determined. Foams were made of glass, metal-glass, glass-fiber, metal-glass-fiber, and fly ash. The microwave source used was a Litton model 1521 microwave oven which operated at 2.45 GHz and had an output of 700 watts.

Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.; Gregory, T.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Blind MD-MC Component Separation for Polarized Observations of the CMB with the EM Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the PolEMICA [Aumont & Macias-Perez 2007] (Polarized Expectation-Maximization Independent Component Analysis) algorithm which is an extension to polarization of the SMICA [Delabrouille et al. 2003] temperature component separation method. This algorithm allows us to estimate blindly in harmonic space multiple physical components from multi-detectors polarized sky maps. Assuming a linear noisy mixture of components we are able to reconstruct jointly the electromagnetic spectra of the components for each mode T, E and B, as well as the temperature and polarization spatial power spectra, TT, EE, BB, TE, TB and EB for each of the physical components and for the noise on each of the detectors. This has been tested using full sky simulations of the Planck satellite polarized channels for a 14-months nominal mission assuming a simple linear sky model including CMB, and optionally Galactic synchrotron and dust emissions.

J. Aumont

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chiral-field microwave antennas (Chiral microwave near fields for far-field radiation)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a single-element structure we obtain a radiation pattern with a squint due to chiral microwave near fields originated from a magnetostatic-mode ferrite disk. At the magnetostatic resonances, one has strong subwavelength localization of energy of microwave radiation. Magnetostatic oscillations in a thin ferrite disk are characterized by unique topological properties: the Poynting-vector vortices and the field helicity. The chiral-topology near fields allow obtaining unique phase structure distribution for far-field microwave radiation.

Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Planar slot coupled microwave hybrid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A symmetrical 180.degree. microwave hybrid is constructed by opening a slot line in a ground plane below a conducting strip disposed on a dielectric substrate, creating a slot coupled conductor. Difference signals propagating on the slot coupled conductor are isolated on the slot line leaving sum signals to propagate on the microstrip. The difference signal is coupled from the slot line onto a second microstrip line for transmission to a desired location. The microstrip branches in a symmetrical fashion to provide the input/output ports of the 180.degree. hybrid. The symmetry of the device provides for balance and isolation between sum and difference signals, and provides an advantageous balance between the power handling capabilities and the bandwidth of the device.

Petter, Jeffrey K. (Williston, VT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment south microwave Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Christopher Marion Supervisor: Prof Kristian Waters Summary: microwaves) Optimization of the microwave pre-treatment process Assess the effect of the microwave pre......

262

CMB constraints on mass and coupling constant of light pseudoscalar particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformation of CMB photons into light pseudoscalar particles at post big bang nucleosynthesis epoch is considered. Using the present day value of a large scale magnetic field to estimate it at earlier cosmological epochs, the oscillation probability of photons into light pseudoscalar particles with an account of coherence breaking in cosmological plasma is calculated. Demanding that the photon transformation does not lead to an exceedingly large CMB spectral distortion and temperature anisotropy, the constraints on the coupling constant of axion like particles to photons, $ g_{\\phi\\gamma} B \\lesssim (10^{-15} - 10^{-12}) \\textrm{nG}\\times \\textrm{GeV}^{-1}$, are found for the axion like particle mass in the interval $10^{-25}$ eV $\\lesssim m_{\\phi}\\lesssim 10^{-5}$ eV, where $B$ is the strength of the large scale magnetic field at the present time. Our results update the previously obtained ones since we use the density matrix formalism which is more accurate than the wave function approximation for the description of oscillations with an essential coherence breaking. In the axion like particle mass range $10^{-25}$ eV $\\lesssim m_{\\phi}\\lesssim 10^{-14}$ eV, weaker limits, by at least 2 orders of magnitude $g_{\\phi\\gamma} B \\lesssim 10^{-11}\\textrm{nG}\\times \\textrm{GeV}^{-1}$, are obtained in comparison with the wave function approximation. In the mass range $10^{-14}$ eV $\\lesssim m_{\\phi}\\lesssim 10^{-5}$ eV, on the other hand, limits that are stronger, by more than an order of magnitude are obtained. Our results are derived by using upper limits on spectral distortion parameter $\\mu$ and temperature anisotropy $\\Delta T/T$ found by COBE and expected sensitivities by PIXIE/PRISM.

Damian Ejlli; Alexander D. Dolgov

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 3 Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds New physics is often discovered by pushing energies. With the current large mixing angle-MSW oscillation parameters, Borexino expects to observe 0.35 neutrino events per day per ton from 7Be in the energy window. Because there are so few events

264

REFERENCE AND BACKGROUND CHECK PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REFERENCE AND BACKGROUND CHECK PROCESS Workforce Planning | 408-924-2250 classcomp process. Workforce Planning will arrange this directly with the finalist(s) once the hiring manager has provided the finalist(s) name(s) to Workforce Planning. An exception to this process is for any candidates

Su, Xiao

265

Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Echo of the Big Bang Anisotropies in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Some Facts 7) CMB highly (impressively) Isotropic: - in each direction on the sky the radiation has Microwave Radiometer Cosmic Microwave Background #12;7/1/2009 6 Spectrum Blackbody Radiation John Mather: - photon energy 4) Energy Density Radiation evolves: Cosmic Radiation 44 )1()( ztarad 3 )(tanrad 1 )(tarad

Weijgaert, Rien van de

268

The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

BEDES Background | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE BlogAttachmentFlash2011-21 AuditInsulatedEnergyBackground BEDES

270

Missing Gamma-Rays from kpc-scale AGN Jets: A Test of the IC/CMB Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical origin of the X-ray emission in powerful quasar jets has been a long-standing mystery. Though these jets start out on the sub-pc scale as highly relativistic flows, we do not have any direct measurement of their speeds on the kpc scale, where the vast distances from the core necessitate in situ particle acceleration. If the jets remain highly relativistic on kpc scales, then the X-rays could be due to inverse-Compton upscattering of CMB photons. However, the IC/CMB explanation predicts a high level of gamma-ray emission, which should be detectible by the Fermi/LAT. We have searched for and ruled out this emission at a high level of significance for the well-known sources 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752, suggesting the X-rays are synchrotron, though of unknown origin. These recent results with Fermi also suggest that the kpc-scale jets in powerful quasars are significantly slower than have been presumed under the IC/CMB model. I will discuss the surprising implications of these findings for the energetics...

Meyer, Eileen T; Sparks, William B; Godfrey, Leith; Perlman, Eric

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chameleon-like cosmology in light of SNeIa, CMB, BAO and OHD observational data sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During this work an interacting chameleon-like scalar field scenario, by considering SNeIa, CMB, BAO and OHD data sets is investigated. Some cosmological parameters includes of Hubble, deceleration and coincidence parameters in such mechanism are analysed. It is realized for estimation the free parameters of a theoretical model, it is better all mentioned observational data sets be considered. In fact if one considers SNeIa, CMB and BAO but ignores OHD it maybe leads to an incorrect result. Also it will find out, when we margin the free parameters, the $\\chi _{\\rm{T}}^2$ function should be re-weighted, this fact arises from the abundance of SNeIa and OHD sources in comparison to CMB and BAO data sets. We margin the likelihood $\\mathcal{L} (\\Omega_{\\rm{m0}} ,\\omega_1 , \\beta)$ with respect to $\\omega_1$, $\\beta$ and $\\Omega_{\\rm{m0}}$ respectively and by means of two dimensional confidence levels $68.3\\%$, $90\\%$ and $95.4\\%$, the relative probability functions are plotted. Also the quantities which maximize t...

Rabiei, Sayed Wrya; Saaidi, Khaled; Aghamohammadi, Ali

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in EnergyFaceoff Round 4? Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in EnergyFaceoff Round 4?...

274

Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Hadas, Yoav [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael, PO Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel); Schamiloglu, Edl [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1?}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

1980-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Background canceling surface alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Low Background Counting At SNOLAB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Low background aspects of GERDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

Simgen, Hardy [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Apparatus for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (Oak Ridge, TN)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microwave joining of SiC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on identification of the most effective joining methods for scale-up to large tube assemblies, including joining using SiC produced in situ from chemical precursors. During FY 1996, a new microwave applicator was designed, fabricated and tested that provides the capability for vacuum baking of the specimens and insulation and for processing under inert environment. This applicator was used to join continuous fiber-reinforced (CFCC) SiC/SiC composites using a polymer precursor to form a SiC interlayer in situ.

Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Tian, Y.L. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

International Conference on Microwave and High Frequency Heating Nottingham, UK, September 2013 Scaling Up Reactors for Microwave-Assisted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 316 Scaling Up Reactors for Microwave-Assisted Chemistry via ANN Optimization Andrew O. Holmesa by demonstrating that a particular microwave reactor can be designed with the help of computer optimization optimization technique to a microwave reactor. This technique is used here to optimize the geometry of a system

Yakovlev, Vadim

285

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Optimized ECR plasma apparatus with varied microwave window thickness  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design. 9 figs.

Berry, L.A.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preliminary separation of galactic and cosmic microwave emission for the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary models of microwave emission from the Milky Way Galaxy based on COBE and other data are constructed for the purpose of distinguishing cosmic and Galactic signals. Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) maps, with the modeled Galactic emission removed, are fitted for a quadrupole distribution. Autocorrelation functions for individual Galactic components are presented. When Galactic emission is removed from the DMR data, the residual fluctuations are virtually unaffected, and therefore they are not dominated by any known Galactic emission component. 42 refs.

Bennet, C.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Hinshaw, G.; Wright, E.L.; Kogut, A.; De Amici, G.; Meyer, S.S.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.T.; Gulkis, S. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States) California, University, Berkeley (United States) Universities Space Research Association, Boulder, CO (United States) California, University, Los Angeles (United States) MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States) Princeton University, NJ (United States) JPL, Pasadena, Ca (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves up through high energy gamma waves. Microwaves extend over an important part of the elec be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight instruments can be divided into two broad classes: pas- sive, known as radiometers, and active, known

Long, David G.

290

Farinon microwave end of life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering report evaluates alternatives for the replacement of the Farinon microwave radio system. The system is beyond its expected life cycle and has decreasing maintainability. Principal applications supported by the Farinon system are two electrical utility monitor and control systems, the Integrated Transfer Trip System (ITTS), and the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system.

Poe, R.C.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

MICROWAVE PHOTOREACTOR FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL SYNTHESIS Milan Hajeka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a IR pyrometer or fiber optic thermometer (Nortech), according to Figure 1. A round part (200 mm of the reaction mixture is monitored by the IR pyrometer or fiber optic thermometer. The MW photoreactor has been scientific discipline and microwave (MW) irradiation represents a new way to increase the efficiency of many

Cirkva, Vladimir

292

Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxvlle, TN)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Map-making in small field modulated CMB polarisation experiments: approximating the maximum-likelihood method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map-making presents a significant computational challenge to the next generation of kilopixel CMB polarisation experiments. Years worth of time ordered data (TOD) from thousands of detectors will need to be compressed into maps of the T, Q and U Stokes parameters. Fundamental to the science goal of these experiments, the observation of B-modes, is the ability to control noise and systematics. In this paper, we consider an alternative to the maximum-likelihood method, called destriping, where the noise is modelled as a set of discrete offset functions and then subtracted from the time-stream. We compare our destriping code (Descart: the DEStriping CARTographer) to a full maximum-likelihood map-maker, applying them to 200 Monte-Carlo simulations of time-ordered data from a ground based, partial-sky polarisation modulation experiment. In these simulations, the noise is dominated by either detector or atmospheric 1/f noise. Using prior information of the power spectrum of this noise, we produce destriped maps of T, Q and U which are negligibly different from optimal. The method does not filter the signal or bias the E or B-mode power spectra. Depending on the length of the destriping baseline, the method delivers between 5 and 22 times improvement in computation time over the maximum-likelihood algorithm. We find that, for the specific case of single detector maps, it is essential to destripe the atmospheric 1/f in order to detect B-modes, even though the Q and U signals are modulated by a half-wave plate spinning at 5-Hz.

D. Sutton; B. R. Johnson; M. L. Brown; P. Cabella; P. G. Ferreira; K. M. Smith

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Constraints on the primordial gravitational waves with variable sound speed from current CMB data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We make a comprehensive investigation of the observational effect of the inflation consistency relation. We focus on the general single-field inflation model with the consistency relation $r=-8c_s n_t$, and investigate the observational constraints of sound speed $c_s$ by using the Seven-Year WMAP data, the BICEP tensor power spectrum data, and the constraints on $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm equil.}$ and $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm orth.}$ from the Five-Year WMAP observations. We find that the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ is much tighter if $c_s$ is small, since a large tilt $n_t$ is strongly constrained by the observations. We obtain $rsound speed $c_s$, it is not well constrained if only the CMB power spectrum data is used, while the constraints are obtainable by taking $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm equil.}$ and $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm orth.}$ priors into account. With the constraining data of $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm equil.}$ and $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm orth.}$, we find that, $c_s\\lesssim 0.01$ region is excluded at 99.7% CL, and the $c_s=1$ case (the single-field slow-roll inflation) is slightly disfavored at 68.3% CL. In addition, the inclusion of $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm equil.}$ and $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm orth.}$ into the analysis can improve the constraints on $r$ and $n_s$. We further discuss the implications of our constraints on the test of inflation models.

Cheng Cheng; Qing-Guo Huang; Xiao-Dong Li; Yin-Zhe Ma

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Carbon monoxide line emission as a CMB foreground: tomography of the star-forming universe with different spectral resolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rotational lines of carbon monoxide and the fine structure lines of CII and of the most abundant metals, emitted during the epoch of enhanced star formation in the universe, are redshifted in the frequency channels where the present-day and future CMB experiments are sensitive. We estimate the contribution to the CMB angular power spectrum by the emission in such lines in merging star-forming galaxies. We used the Lacey-Cole approach to characterize the distribution of the merging halos, together with a parametrization for the star formation rate in each of them. Using observational data from a sample of local, low-redshift, and high-redshift objects, we calibrated the luminosity in each line as a function of the star formation rate. We show that the correlation term arising from CO line emission is a significant source of foreground for CMB in a broad range of frequencies (in particular in the 20-60 GHz band) and for 1000

Mattia Righi; Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Rashid Sunyaev

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

T. Padmanabhan

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Network Requirements Workshop - Documents and Background Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science...

299

Apparatus and method for microwave processing of materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a variable frequency microwave heating apparatus designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency heating apparatus is used in the method of the present invention to monitor the resonant processing frequency within the furnace cavity depending upon the material, including the state thereof, from which the workpiece is fabricated. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus includes a microwave signal generator and a high-power microwave amplifier or a microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A power supply is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator or microwave amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 10 figs.

Johnson, A.C.; Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Markunas, R.J.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Apparatus and method for microwave processing of materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency heating apparatus (10) is used in the method of the present invention to monitor the resonant processing frequency within the furnace cavity (34) depending upon the material, including the state thereof, from which the workpiece (36) is fabricated. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

Johnson, Arvid C. (Lake in the Hills, IL); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Markunas, Robert J. (Chapel Hill, NC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Universes with and without a center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two types of universe, with and without a center, are discussed; and their implications for the observed cmb (cosmic microwave background radiation) dipole are described. Theorems useful for understanding the cause for a cmb dipole are presented. Using the theorems stated and all existing data, a computation for the location of the center of the universe has been performed. In the universe without center, however, a complication arises by the appearance of the apparent center after the expansion of the universe has proceeded.

Yukio Tomozawa

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

A semi-analytical approach to perturbations in mutated hilltop inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study cosmological perturbations and observational aspects for mutated hilltop model of inflation. Employing mostly analytical treatment, we evaluate observable parameters during inflation as well as post-inflationary perturbations. This further leads to exploring observational aspects related to Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. This semi-analytical treatment reduces complications related to numerical computation to some extent for studying the different phenomena related to CMB angular power spectrum for mutated hilltop inflation.

Barun Kumar Pal; Supratik Pal; B. Basu

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Oscillations in the inflaton potential: Complete numerical treatment and comparison with the recent and forthcoming CMB datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amongst the multitude of inflationary models currently available, models that lead to features in the primordial scalar spectrum are drawing increasing attention, since certain features have been found to provide a better fit to the CMB data than the conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial spectrum. In this work, we carry out a complete numerical analysis of two models that lead to oscillations over all scales in the scalar power spectrum. We consider the model described by a quadratic potential which is superposed by a sinusoidal modulation and the recently popular axion monodromy model. Since the oscillations continue even on to arc minute scales, in addition to the WMAP data, we also compare the models with the small scale data from ACT. Though, both the models, broadly, result in oscillations in the spectrum, interestingly, we find that, while the monodromy model leads to a considerably better fit to the data in comparison to the standard power law spectrum, the quadratic potential superposed with a sinusoidal modulation does not improve the fit to a similar extent. We also carry out forecasting of the parameters using simulated Planck data for both the models. We show that the Planck mock data performs better in constraining the model parameters as compared to the presently available CMB datasets.

Moumita Aich; Dhiraj Kumar Hazra; L. Sriramkumar; Tarun Souradeep

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

First Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of CMB Polarization Power Spectra at 43 GHz in the Multipole Range 25 <= ell <= 475  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43GHz and 95GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the CMB. QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, >10,000hours of data were collected, first with the 19-element 43GHz array (3458hours) and then with the 90-element 95GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering ~1000deg^2. This paper reports initial results from the 43GHz receiver which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69uK sqrt(s). The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until th...

Bischoff, C; Buder, I; Chinone, Y; Cleary, K; Dumoulin, R N; Kusaka, A; Monsalve, R; Næss, S K; Newburgh, L B; Reeves, R; Smith, K M; Wehus, I K; Zuntz, J A; Zwart, J T L; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Church, S E; Dickinson, C; Eriksen, H K; Ferreira, P G; Gaier, T; Gundersen, J O; Hasegawa, M; Hazumi, M; Huffenberger, K M; Jones, M E; Kangaslahti, P; Kapner, D J; Lawrence, C R; Limon, M; May, J; McMahon, J J; Miller, A D; Nguyen, H; Nixon, G W; Pearson, T J; Piccirillo, L; Radford, S J E; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Samtleben, D; Seiffert, M; Shepherd, M C; Staggs, S T; Tajima, O; Thompson, K L; Vanderlinde, K; Williamson, R; Winstein, B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

Vallinotto, Alberto [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

An angular power spectrum analysis of the DRAO 1.4 GHz polarization survey: implications for CMB observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of the present analysis is to improve the knowledge of the statistical properties of the Galactic diffuse synchrotron emission, which constrains sensitive CMB anisotropy measurements. We have analysed the new DRAO 1.4 GHz polarization survey together with the Stockert 1.4 GHz total intensity survey and derived the angular power spectra (APSs) of the total intensity, the polarized emission, and their cross-correlation for the entire surveys and for three low-intensity regions. The APSs of the diffuse synchrotron emission are modelled by power laws. For the $E$ and $B$ modes, a slope of $\\alpha \\sim [-3.0,-2.5]$ for the multipole range $\\sim [30,300]$ is found. By the extrapolation of these results to 70 GHz, we can estimate the Galactic synchrotron contamination of CMB anisotropies, and we find results that are compatible with the ones coming from WMAP 3-yr data. In the low-intensity regions, the cosmological primordial B~mode peak at $\\ell \\sim 100$ should be clearly observable for a tensor-to-scalar ...

La Porta, L; Reich, W; Reich, P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

On the mechanism of electromagnetic microwave absorption in superfluid helium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In experiments on electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption in the microwave range in superfluid (SF) helium [1-3], a narrow EM field absorption line with a width on the order of (20-200) kHz was observed against the background of a wide absorption band with a width of 30-40 GHz at frequencies f{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 110-180 GHz corresponding to the roton gap energy {Delta}{sub r}(T) in the temperature range 1.4-2.2 K. Using the so-called flexoelectric mechanism of polarization of helium atoms ({sup 4}He) in the presence of density gradients in SF helium (HeII), we show that nonresonance microwave absorption in the frequency range 170-200 GHz can be due to the existence of time-varying local density gradients produced by roton excitations in the bulk HeII. The absorption bandwidth is determined by the roton-roton scattering time in an equilibrium Boltzmann gas of rotons, which is t{sub r-r} Almost-Equal-To 3.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} s at T = 1.4 K and decreases upon heating. We propose that the anomalously narrow microwave resonance absorption line in HeII at the roton frequency f{sub 0}(T) = {Delta}r(T)/2{pi}h appears due to the following two factors: (i) the discrete structure of the spectrum of the surface EM resonator modes in the form of a periodic sequence of narrow peaks and (ii) the presence of a stationary dipole layer in HeII near the resonator surface, which forms due to polarization of {sup 4}He atoms under the action of the density gradient associated with the vanishing of the density of the SF component at the solid wall. For this reason, the relaxation of nonequilibrium rotons generated in such a surface dipole layer is strongly suppressed, and the shape and width of the microwave resonance absorption line are determined by the roton density of states, which has a sharp peak at the edge of the roton gap in the case of weak dissipation. The effective dipole moments of rotons in the dipole layer can be directed either along or across the normal to the resonator surface, which explains the experimentally observed symmetric doublet splitting of the resonance absorption line in an external dc electric field perpendicular to the resonator surface. We show that negative absorption (induced emission) of EM field quanta observed after triggering a Kapitza 'heat gun' occurs when the occupation numbers for roton states due to 'pumping' of rotons exceed the occupation numbers of EM field photons in the resonator.

Pashitskii, E. A., E-mail: pashitsk@iop.kiev.ua; Pentegov, V. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nonlinear multiferroic phase shifters for microwave frequencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlinear microwave phase shifter based on a planar multiferroic composite has been studied. The multiferroic structure is fabricated in the form of a bilayer consisting of yttrium iron garnet and barium strontium titanate. The principle of operation of the device is based on the linear and nonlinear control of the phase shift of the hybrid spin-electromagnetic waves propagating in the bilayer. The linear control is realized with magnetic and electric fields. The nonlinear control is provided by the input power of microwave signal. The device showed a nonlinear phase shift up to 250°, electric field induced phase shift up to 330°, and magnetic field induced phase shift of more than 180°.

Ustinov, Alexey B.; Kalinikos, Boris A. [Department of Physical Electronics and Technology, St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Srinivasan, G. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hybrid Microwave-Cavity Heat Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose and analyze the use of hybrid microwave cavities as quantum heat engines. A possible realization consists of two macroscopically separated quantum dot conductors coupled capacitively to the fundamental mode of a microwave cavity. We demonstrate that an electrical current can be induced in one conductor through cavity-mediated processes by heating up the other conductor. The heat engine can reach Carnot efficiency with optimal conversion of heat to work. When the system delivers the maximum power, the efficiency can be a large fraction of the Carnot efficiency. The heat engine functions even with moderate electronic relaxation and dephasing in the quantum dots. We provide detailed estimates for the electrical current and output power using realistic parameters.

Christian Bergenfeldt; Peter Samuelsson; Björn Sothmann; Christian Flindt; Markus Büttiker

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

ARM - Measurement - Microwave narrowband brightness temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM Data DiscoverygovMeasurementsMicrowave

311

Quantum and Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Billiards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

B. Dietz; A. Richter

2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Quantum and Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Billiards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

B. Dietz; A. Richter

2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Issues in microwave power systems engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key issues in microwave power system engineering are beam safety, frequency allocation, and affordability. These major issues are presented, discussed, and suggestions for resolving them are offered. The issue of beam safety can be captured in the phrase ``Fear of Frying.`` Can a properly engineered beamed power safety system allay the public perception of microwave radiation dangers? Openness, visibility, and education may be keys to resolving this issue satisfactorily. ``Not in my Spectrum`` is a phrase that is frequently encountered in connection with the issue of where can the microwave power beam frequency be located. International cooperation may provide a part of the solution to this issue. ``Wow, that much?`` is a phrase encountered when dealing with the issue of economic affordability of large beamed power systems. A phased engineering approach for multiple uses even during construction is presented to aid in garnering revenue during the system build phase. Also, dual mode dc-RF converters are encouraged for bi-directional power flow utility and economies of scale in production.

Dickinson, R.M. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Joining of thermoplastic substrates by microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining two or more items having surfaces of thermoplastic material includes the steps of depositing an electrically-conductive material upon the thermoplastic surface of at least one of the items, and then placing the other of the two items adjacent the one item so that the deposited material is in intimate contact with the surfaces of both the one and the other items. The deposited material and the thermoplastic surfaces contacted thereby are then exposed to microwave radiation so that the thermoplastic surfaces in contact with the deposited material melt, and then pressure is applied to the two items so that the melted thermoplastic surfaces fuse to one another. Upon discontinuance of the exposure to the microwave energy, and after permitting the thermoplastic surfaces to cool from the melted condition, the two items are joined together by the fused thermoplastic surfaces. The deposited material has a thickness which is preferably no greater than a skin depth, .delta..sub.s, which is related to the frequency of the microwave radiation and characteristics of the deposited material in accordance with an equation.

Paulauskas, Felix L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The {ital COBE} Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background. I. Limits and Detections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer ({ital COBE}) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 {mu}m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 64 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level) and at 240 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 28 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 {mu}m data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 {mu}m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 {mu}m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of {nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} = 25 {plus_minus} 7 and 14 {plus_minus} 3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1} at 140 and 240 {mu}m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 {mu}m, 10.3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust production since the decoupling of the cosmic microwave background from matter. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

Hauser, M.G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Arendt, R.G. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reach, W.T. [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pei, Y.C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lubin, P. [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Smoot, G.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weiss, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilkinson, D.T. [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wright, E.L. [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)] [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon microwave plasma Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vortex Stabilization of Microwave PlasmaMicrowave... Plasma a b 2 1 3 5 4 6 7 1- quartz tube of microwave plasma torch; 2 -original tangential gas feeder; 3... Numerical Simulation...

317

Microwave-Assisted Ignition for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. B. (1988) Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals.novel microwave internal combustion engine ignition source,in the Internal Combustion Engine." SAE Technical Paper

DeFilippo, Anthony Cesar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials using microwave energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of recovering hydrogen from extraterrestrial materials (lunar and Martian soils, asteroids) using microwave energy is presented. Reasons for harvesting and origins and locations of hydrogen are reviewed. Problems of hydrogen recovery are discussed in terms of hydrogen release characteristics and microwave coupling to insulating materials. From results of studies of hydrogen diffusivities (oxides, glasses) and tritium release (oxides) as well as studies of microwave coupling to ilmenite, alkali basalt and ceramic oxides it is concluded that using microwave energy in hydrogen recovery from extraterrestrial materials could be the basis for a workable process.

Tucker, D.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Anderson, J.L.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Feber, R.C. Jr.; Frost, H.M.; Meek, T.T.; Wallace, T.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

Woskov, Paul (Bedford, MA) [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

advanced microwave circuits: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transition of photons in circuit quantum electrodynamics electrodynamics QED , superconduct- ing qubits are coupled with microwave photons in a trans- mission line and a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microwave-Assisted Ignition for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Emissions from HCCI Engines using a Consistent 3-Zoneof Microwave Plasma Combustion Engine (Part I: Concept ofPlasma Combustion Engine (Part II: Engine Performance of

DeFilippo, Anthony Cesar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solar Background Document 6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar Background Document 5 "Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid" Report (June 2012) Dams and Energy Sectors...

323

Final Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement Background...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 17, 2014 Page 1 Final Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement Background and Need: This Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement describes how Bonneville Power...

324

Microwave backgropund anisotropies, large-scale structure and cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review how the various large-scale data constrain cosmological parameters and, consequently, theories for the origin of large-scale structure in the Universe. We discuss the form of the power spectrum implied by the correlation data of galaxies and argue by comparing the velocity field implied by the distribution of light with the observed velocity flows that the bias parameter, $b$, is likely to be constant in the linear regime. This then allows one to estimate the density parameter, $\\Omega$, and $b$ directly from the \\underline{data} on $\\xi(r)$ and the velocity fields. We show that it is consistent with low values of $\\Omega^{0.6}/b$. We discuss the ways to normalise the optical data at $z\\sim0$ directly to the COBE (or other microwave background) data. The data on high-$z$ \\underline{galaxies} allows one to further constrain the shape of the \\underline{primordial} power spectrum at scales which are non-linear today ($< 8h^{-1}$Mpc) and we discuss the consistency of the data with inflationary models normalised to the large-scale structure observations.

A. Kashlinsky

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

The cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background from dark matter annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) The extragalactic background light (EBL) observed at multiple wavelengths is a promising tool to probe the nature of dark matter since it might contain a significant contribution from gamma-rays produced promptly by dark matter annihilation. Additionally, the electrons and positrons produced in the annihilation give energy to the CMB photons to populate the EBL with X-rays and gamma-rays. We here create full-sky maps of the radiation from both of these contributions using the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation. We use upper limits on the contributions of unknown sources to the EBL to constrain the intrinsic properties of dark matter using a model-independent approach that can be employed as a template to test different particle physics models (including those with a Sommerfeld enhancement). These upper limits are based on observations spanning eight orders of magnitude in energy (from soft X-rays measured by CHANDRA to gamma-rays measured by Fermi), and on expectations for the contributions f...

Zavala, Jesus; Slatyer, Tracy R; Loeb, Abraham; Springel, Volker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microwave scanning Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurements. Near-field microwave reflectometer... -field microwave probe and signal processing section. This automated scanning 12;platform is easy to use... scanning...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - active microwave medium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA: Artech House, 1981... . 41 F. Ulaby, R. Moore, and A. K. Fung, Microwave Remote Sensing: Active and Passive, vol. 3. Norwood... Sat Passive Microwave Polarimetric...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogue microwave photonics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 6 Abstract--A novel approach to generating a frequency-tunable microwave or sub-terahertz wave based on time-delayed Summary: , microwave...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - aura microwave limb Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measured by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 2... of the greenhouse effect. Nature, 342, 758-761. Read, W. G., and Coauthors, 2007: Aura Microwave Limb...

330

International Conference on Microwave and High Frequency Heating Nottingham, UK, September 2013 Underwater Microwave Ignition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cost operation [4, 5]. Thermite reaction as a self-propagated, high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process, Localized microwave heating, underwater ignition, combustion. INTRODUCTION Self-propagated thermite reactions between metal-oxide and metals typically burn at high flame temperatures, and require high

Jerby, Eli

331

Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

Chattopadhyay, Swapan [Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool and Manchester and Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Microwave sintering of single plate-shaped articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for high temperature sintering of plate-shaped articles of alumina, magnesia, silica, yttria, zirconia, and mixtures thereof using microwave radiation. An article is placed within a sintering structure located within a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled. 2 figs.

Katz, J.D.; Blake, R.D.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

Noise properties of mutually sustained microwave-optoelectronic oscillator pair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noise properties of mutually sustained microwave-optoelectronic oscillator pair E. Shumakher and G microwave-optoelectronic oscillator pair are described. The two oscillators have different spectral purities and exhibits low phase noise and highly suppressed spurious modes. Optoelectronic oscillators are employed

Eisenstein, Gadi

335

Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials Kenneth M. Bober/Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 ABSTRACT The microwave permittivity( r ) and permeability( r ) of composite materials. Polynomials are also used for the ferrite composites because it was determined that the MG theory was unable

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

336

Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.

Plovnick, Ross (St. Louis Park, MN); Celikkaya, Ahmet (Woodbury, MN); Blake, Rodger D. (Tuscon, AZ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

MICROWAVE-BASED NDE OF FRP-JACKETED CONCRETE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROWAVE-BASED NDE OF FRP-JACKETED CONCRETE STRUCTURES Yoo Jin Kim, Franco De Flaviis University are presented in this paper. KEY WORDS: Microwave, Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE), FRP Jacket, Imaging Technol not be visually observed. Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been studied to detect cracks

De Flaviis, Franco

338

Selected applications of microwave radiometric techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements at 31. 4 GHz of an Oil Film on a Water Surface 75 80 93 96 97 114 122 126 127 132 LIST OF FIGURES ~Fi ure ~Pa e III-1 Laboratory measurements of the dielectric properties of moist sand 24 III-2 III-3 III-4 Effects of increasing.... Based on the characteristic of all bodies to radiate electromagnetic energy at a rate depen- dent upon their temperature, surface structure, and elec- tromagnetic properties, the microwave radiometer provides an all-weather, day-night means...

Jean, Buford Randall

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microwave photonics with Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce an architecture for a photonic crystal in the microwave regime based on superconducting transmission lines interrupted by Josephson junctions. A study of the scattering properties of a single junction in the line shows that the junction behaves as a perfect mirror when the photon frequency matches the Josephson plasma frequency. We generalize our calculations to periodic arrangements of junctions, demonstrating that they can be used for tunable band engineering, forming what we call a quantum circuit crystal. As a relevant application, we discuss the creation of stationary entanglement between two superconducting qubits interacting through a disordered media.

Zueco, David; Solano, Enrique; García-Ripoll, Juan José

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ARM - Field Campaign - Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops ARM Data DiscoverygovCampaignsMicrowave

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene's 3DRise |EnergyVehiclesMeasurementMicrowave

342

Going to the End of the Earth to Learn About the Beginning of the Universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is revolutionizing our understanding of the Universe. The CMB is the most powerful piece of evidence that we live in a geometrically flat Universe, dominated by cold dark matter and dark energy. Even with this basic cosmological model established, there are still many outstanding questions: What is dark energy? What is the sum of the neutrino masses? Are there unknown particle species that we can detect cosmologically? Did Inflation happen? I will review the history of measurements of the CMB; what have they told us so far, and how the South Pole has developed into the premier site for observations of the CMB. Finally, I will discuss new measurements and cosmological results from the South Pole Telescope, a 10-meter diameter telescope that is making precision measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the CMB.

Benson, Bradford [University of Chicago

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

343

Manipulating microwaves with magnetic-dipolar-mode vortices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a surge of interest in the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields. It is well known that, in optics, subwavelength confinement can be obtained from surface plasmon (quasielectrostatic) oscillations. In this article, we propose to realize subwavelength confinement in microwaves by using dipolar-mode (quasimagnetostatic) magnon oscillations in ferrite particles. Our studies of interactions between microwave electromagnetic fields and small ferrite particles with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations show strong localization of electromagnetic energy. MDM oscillations in a ferrite disk are at the origin of topological singularities resulting in Poynting vector vortices and symmetry breakings of the microwave near fields. We show that new subwavelength microwave structures can be realized based on a system of interacting MDM ferrite disks. Wave propagation of electromagnetic signals in such structures is characterized by topological phase variations. Interactions of microwave fields with an MDM ferrite disk and MDM-disk arrays open a perspective for creating engineered electromagnetic fields with unique symmetry properties.

Kamenetskii, E. O.; Sigalov, M.; Shavit, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, IL-84 105 Beer Sheva (Israel)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface. 7 figs.

White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Schaich, C.R.; Foster, D. Jr.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Schaich, Charles R. (Lenoir City, TN); Foster, Jr., Don (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sources of the Radio Background Considered  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

The South Pole Telescope bolometer array and the measurement of secondary Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy at small angular scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPIE Conf. Series, Vol. 7741 Battaglia, N. , Bond, J. R. ,The bottom right shows the Battaglia et al. (2010) adiabaticThe second recent model, by Battaglia et al. (2010), is the

Shirokoff, Erik D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microwaves, hyperthermia, and human leukocyte function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine whether exposure to microwaves (2450 MHz) affects the function of human leukocytes in the resting state and during antigenic or mitogenic challenge. This publication is a summary report of the construction and calibration of a waveguide exposure facility for in vitro irradiation of human leukocytes. Calorimetric determinations of specific absorption rates (SAR) were made using heating curves measured with a microwave transparent Vitek 101 Electrothermia Monitor. The correlation between SAR and forward power was highly significant (r=0.95). At a forward power of 0.55 W the average SAR was approximately 33 mW/ml. However, inhomogeneity and significant resonance absorption were noted in the dual vial waveguide exposure facility. A 30-point measurement of SAR distribution revealed that the SAR at any of the measured points could range between 0.12- and 3.94-fold of the average SAR within the given vial. Measurements indicated that this variability in SAR values did not create significant thermal gradients within the vials when external agitation was applied.

Roberts, N.J. Jr; Lu, S.; Michaelson, S.M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pattern formation and propagation during microwave breakdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During microwave breakdown at atmospheric pressure, a sharp plasma front forms and propagates toward the microwave source at high velocities. Experiments show that the plasma front may exhibit a complex dynamical structure or pattern composed of plasma filaments aligned with the wave electric field and apparently moving toward the source. In this paper, we present a model of the pattern formation and propagation under conditions close to recent experiments. Maxwell's equations are solved together with plasma fluid equations in two dimensions to describe the space and time evolution of the wave field and plasma density. The simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The model provides a physical interpretation of the pattern formation and dynamics in terms of ionization-diffusion and absorption-reflection mechanisms. The simulations allow a good qualitative and quantitative understanding of different features such as plasma front velocity, spacing between filaments, maximum plasma density in the filaments, and influence of the discharge parameters on the development of well-defined filamentary plasma arrays or more diffuse plasma fronts.

Chaudhury, Bhaskar [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Boeuf, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); LAPLACE, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhu, Guo Qiang [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Northwestern Polytechnique University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background from Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent exoplanet surveys have predicted a very large population of planetary systems in our galaxy, more than one planet per star on the average, perhaps totalling about two hundred billion. These surveys, based on electro-magnetic observations, are limited to a very small neighbourhood of the solar system and the estimations rely on the observations of only a few thousand planets. On the other hand, orbital motions of planets around stars are expected to emit gravitational waves (GW), which could provide information about the planets not accessible to electro-magnetic astronomy. The cumulative effect of the planets, with periods ranging from few hours to several years, is expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). We compute the characteristic GW strain of this background based on the observed distribution of planet parameters. We also show that the integrated extragalactic background is comparable or less than the galactic background at different frequencies. Our estimate shows that the net backg...

Ain, Anirban; Mitra, Sanjit

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Background and Motivation Biomass derived syngas contains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background and Motivation · Biomass derived syngas contains: CO, H2, small hydrocarbons, H2S prepared by SEA contain smaller metal particle sizes and have higher dispersion · The quantity of reducible

Das, Suman

352

Environmental Permit Application Background Statement (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of Chapter 79 of Delaware Title 7 is to ensure that the State has adequate information about the background of applicants or regulated parties for the purposes of processing permits and...

353

Low background counting techniques at SNOLAB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This proceedings will describe SNOLAB's High Purity Germanium Detectors, one of which has been in continuous use for the past seven years measuring materials for many experiments in operation or under construction at SNOLAB. A description of the characterisation of SNOLAB's new germanium well detector will be presented. In addition, brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and a description of SNOLAB's future low background counting laboratory will be given.

Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)] [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fractal generation of textures and backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTAL GENERATION OF TEXTURES AND BACKGROUNDS A Thesis by KEVIN DUANE REUTER Subtnitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999... Major Subject; Visualization Sciences FRACTAL GENERATION OF TEXTURES AND BACKGROUNDS A Thesis by KEVIN DUANE REUTER Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Reuter, Kevin Duane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil detection.

Jeff Brack; Ed Daw; Alexei Dorofeev; Anthony Ezeribe; Jean-Luc Gauvreau; Michael Gold; John Harton; Randy Lafler; Robert Lauer; Eric R. Lee; Dinesh Loomba; John Matthews; Eric H. Miller; Alissa Monte; Alex Murphy; Sean Paling; Nguyen Phan; Steve Sadler; Andrew Scarff; Daniel Snowden-Ifft; Neil Spooner; Sam Telfer; Daniel Walker; Matt Williams; Leonid Yuriev

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Cadeddu, Maria

358

Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and control of the thermal runaway of ceramic slab under microwave heating Changjun Liu of the dielectrics during microwave heating, in which there is a big jump of the steady-state temperature while the applied microwave power varies slightly. It hinders engineers in the applications of microwave heating

Sheen, Dongwoo

359

Ultrafast Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis of BiFeO3 Nanoplates Riad Nechache,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrothermal processes while requiring significantly less time and energy. In addition, we show that microwaveUltrafast Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis of BiFeO3 Nanoplates Shun Li, Riad Nechache,§ Ivan and very rapid (1­2 min) microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. We show that the microwave treatment

360

Portable microwave instrument for non-destructive evaluation of structural characteristics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable microwave instrument for evaluating characteristics of a structural member includes a source of microwave energy, a transmitter coupled to the source of microwave energy for transmitting a microwave signal at the structural member, and a receiver positioned on the same side of the structural member as the transmitter and being disposed to receive a microwave signal reflected by the structural member. A phase angle difference is determined between the transmitted microwave signal and the received microwave signal using a signal splitter and a balanced mixer. The difference in phase angle varies in accordance with differences in size, shape and locations of constituent materials within the structural member.

Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Crutcher, Richard I. (Knoxville, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Maddox, Stephen R. (Loudon, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Portable microwave instrument for non-destructive evaluation of structural characteristics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable microwave instrument for evaluating characteristics of a structural member includes a source of microwave energy, a transmitter coupled to the source of microwave energy for transmitting a microwave signal at the structural member, and a receiver positioned on the same side of the structural member as the transmitter and being disposed to receive a microwave signal reflected by the structural member. A phase angle difference is determined between the transmitted microwave signal and the received microwave signal using a signal splitter and a balanced mixer. The difference in phase angle varies in accordance with differences in size, shape and locations of constituent materials within the structural member. 6 figures.

Bible, D.W.; Crutcher, R.I.; Sohns, C.W.; Maddox, S.R.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electrical detection of microwave assisted magnetization reversal by spin pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microwave assisted magnetization reversal has been investigated in a bilayer system of Pt/ferromagnet by detecting a change in the polarity of the spin pumping signal. The reversal process is studied in two material systems, Pt/CoFeB and Pt/NiFe, for different aspect ratios. The onset of the switching behavior is indicated by a sharp transition in the spin pumping voltage. At a threshold value of the external field, the switching process changes from partial to full reversal with increasing microwave power. The proposed method provides a simple way to detect microwave assisted magnetization reversal.

Rao, Siddharth; Subhra Mukherjee, Sankha; Elyasi, Mehrdad; Singh Bhatia, Charanjit; Yang, Hyunsoo, E-mail: eleyang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and NUSNNI, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Santos, Mario G. [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W., E-mail: cwdomier@ucdavis.edu; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tobias, B. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quantum chaotic scattering in microwave resonators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a frequency range where a microwave resonator simulates a chaotic quantum billiard, we have measured moduli and phases of reflection and transmission amplitudes in the regimes of both isolated and of weakly overlapping resonances and for resonators with and without time-reversal invariance. Statistical measures for S-matrix fluctuations were determined from the data and compared with extant and/or newly derived theoretical results obtained from the random-matrix approach to quantum chaotic scattering. The latter contained a small number of fit parameters. The large data sets taken made it possible to test the theoretical expressions with unprecedented accuracy. The theory is confirmed by both a goodness-of-fit-test and the agreement of predicted values for those statistical measures that were not used for the fits, with the data.

Dietz, B.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Schaefer, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Friedrich, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Harney, H. L.; Weidenmueller, H. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Richter, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ECT, Villa Tambosi, I-38100 Villazzano (Trento) (Italy)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Inverse Problems 15 (1999) 329341. Printed in the UK PII: S0266-5611(99)97635-9 Bigger uncertainties and the Big Bang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy in the Universe. Evidence of this heterogeneity is the non-zero quadrupole term in the CMB, or on modelling the effect of unestimated high-frequency terms, without accounting for model uncertainty Background Explorer (COBE), carrying the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on 0266

Lineweaver, Charles H.

369

Predictions on the angular power spectrum of clustered extragalactic point sources at CMB frequencies from flat and all--sky 2D-simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present predictions on the angular power spectrum of CMB fluctuations due to extragalactic point sources (EPS) by using a method for simulating realistic 2D distributions of clustered EPS. Both radio and far--IR selected source populations are taken into account. To analyze different clustering scenarios, we exploit angular power spectra of EPS, $P(k)$, estimated either by data coming from currently available surveys or by means of theoretical predictions. By adopting the source number counts predicted by the Toffolatti et al. (1998) evolution model -- capable of accounting well for the available data at radio cm wavelengths -- we are able to reproduce current data on the two--point angular correlation functions, $w(\\theta)$, of radio sources. We can confirm that the detection of primordial CMB anisotropies is not hampered by undetected clustered sources at frequencies $\\leq 150-200$ GHz. On the other hand, our current findings show that at higher frequencies the clustering signal could severely reduce the detectability of intrinsic CMB anisotropies, thus confirming previous theoretical predictions. We also show that unsubtracted EPS can account for the excess signal at high multipoles detected by recent CMB anisotropy experiments. Moreover, the additional power due to the clustering of sources gives rise to a small but not negligible contribution to the same excess signal. As a final result, we also present an example of a currently feasible {\\it realistic map} of EPS at 70 GHz, by taking into account data on bright detected sources as well as the previously quoted model for number counts.

J. González-Nuevo; L. Toffolatti; F. Argüeso

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Background modeling for the GERDA experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutrinoless double beta (0???) decay experiment GERDA at the LNGS of INFN has started physics data taking in November 2011. This paper presents an analysis aimed at understanding and modeling the observed background energy spectrum, which plays an essential role in searches for a rare signal like 0??? decay. A very promising preliminary model has been obtained, with the systematic uncertainties still under study. Important information can be deduced from the model such as the expected background and its decomposition in the signal region. According to the model the main background contributions around Q{sub ??} come from {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Th, {sup 42}K, {sup 60}Co and ? emitting isotopes in the {sup 226}Ra decay chain, with a fraction depending on the assumed source positions.

Becerici-Schmidt, N. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for curing polymers incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity is disclosed. By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing. 15 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Paulauskas, F.L.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

Method for curing polymers using variable-frequency microwave heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for curing polymers (11) incorporating a variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34). By varying the frequency of the microwave signal, non-uniformities within the cavity (34) are minimized, thereby achieving a more uniform cure throughout the workpiece (36). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. The furnace cavity (34) may be adapted to be used to cure materials defining a continuous sheet or which require compressive forces during curing.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Paulauskas, Felix L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Slotted Ground Structures and Their Applications to Various Microwave Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(LPF) using slotted ground structure (SGS) with dumbbell shape is designed and measured to validate its theories. By using SGS techniques presented in this thesis, some other RF/microwave components such as a periodic structure, ultra-wideband bandpass...

Jung, Dong

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Temperature Modeling for Reaction Development in Microwave-Assisted Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made to evaluate and classify the effects of microwave irradiation. While it is commonly acknowledged energy, such as materials processing and food technologies, one can observe an expanding use

Yakovlev, Vadim

376

Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Virtual cathode microwave generator having annular anode slit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit therethrough effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators.

Kwan, Thomas J. T. (Los Alamos, NM); Snell, Charles M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Background field method and nonrelativistic QED matching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the resolution of an inconsistency between lattice background field methods and nonrelativistic QED matching conditions. In particular, we show that lack of on-shell conditions in lattice QCD with time-dependent background fields generally requires that certain operators related by equations of motion should be retained in an effective field theory to correctly describe the behavior of Green's functions. The coefficients of such operators in a nonrelativistic hadronic theory are determined by performing a robust nonrelativistic expansion of QED for relativistic scalar and spin-half hadrons including nonminimal electromagnetic couplings. Provided that nonrelativistic QED is augmented with equation-of-motion operators, we find that the background field method can be reconciled with the nonrelativistic QED matching conditions without any inconsistency. We further investigate whether nonrelativistic QED can be employed in the analysis of lattice QCD correlation function in background fields, but we are confronted with difficulties. Instead, we argue that the most desirable approach is a hybrid one which relies on a relativistic hadronic theory with operators chosen based on their relevance in the nonrelativistic limit. Using this hybrid framework, we obtain practically useful forms of correlation functions for scalar and spin-half hadrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields.

Jong-Wan Lee; Brian C. Tiburzi

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism: 1) What is Magnetism?Magnetism is a force or repulsion due to charge is called the electric force. But what about magnetism, is there a fundamental property of some matter that makes things magnetic? The answer is: "sort of." Electric current

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

380

UCHC Lockout/Tagout Policy Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCHC Lockout/Tagout Policy (4/09) Background: This safety policy is applicable to all Health Center: Lockout will be utilized for equipment which is designed with a lockout capability. A valve that can be locked out with a chain is considered as having a lockout capability. Only the Office of Research Safety

Kim, Duck O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background This thesis describes a multi-agent based architecture of the research and an outline plan for the rest of this thesis complete the chapter. 1.2 Software Project and monitor progress to check the development is on time and within budget. #12;3 1.3 Software Project

O'Connor, Rory

382

1 Introduction 1.1 Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;3 1 Introduction 1.1 Background Research method is a relevant topic to anybody performing. 1.2 Classical Research, Technology and Technology Research The term research is defined in several different ways. According to Merriam-Webster [1], research is "investigation or experimentation aimed

Stølen, Ketil

383

Cosmic Background Radiation Due to Photon Condensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that a collection of photons with nearly the same frequency exhibits a Bose "condensation" type of phenomenon at about 3 degrees K corresponding to a peak intensity at a wave length of about 0.4cm. This could give a mechanism for the observed Cosmic Background Radiation, and also explain some curious features.

B. G. Sidharth

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Perturbations of supertube in KK monopole background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study perturbations of supertube in KK monopole background, at both DBI and supergravity levels. We analyse both NS1-P as well as D0-F1 duality frames and study different profiles. This illuminates certain aspects of bound states of KK monopoles with supertubes.

Yogesh K. Srivastava

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cosmic IR Backgrounds Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic IR Backgrounds by Ned Wright (UCLA) http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html See: · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/DIRBE · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CIBR · http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

386

2013 National Geothermal Student Competition Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2013 National Geothermal Student Competition Background: The 2013 National Geothermal Student, is designed to advance the understanding of geothermal energy as a valued resource by promoting innovation to engage students in a collaborative exercise to develop a business plan for developing a geothermal

Carrington, Emily

387

Background Simulations for the International Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on superconducting technology to collide bunches of electrons and positrons. The baseline configuration (about 31 km in a clean experimental environment with low backgrounds. The LHC will likely discover the Higgs boson accelerator directly. DESY FLC, 22603 Hamburg, Germany, adrian.vogel@desy.de 1 #12;Figure 1: Overall view

388

Microwave mode shifting antenna system for regenerating particulate filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regeneration system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter including a microwave energy absorbing surface, and an antenna system comprising N antennas and an antenna driver module that sequentially drives the antenna system in a plurality of transverse modes of the antenna system to heat selected portions of the microwave absorbing surface to regenerate the PM filter, where N is an integer greater than one. The transverse modes may include transverse electric (TE) and/or transverse magnetic (TM) modes.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mathematical and experimental modelling of heat pump assisted microwave drying  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drying is one of the most energy intensive operations in industry and agriculture. In the quest to increase drying efficiency and product quality, new technologies and methods are constantly being sought. Of these technologies, heat pump assisted drying and microwave drying have proved to be the most promising contenders. In order to achieve a better understanding and provide a computer design tool for heat pump assisted convective and microwave drying, both mathematical modelling and experimental investigations of heat pump assisted microwave dryers have been undertaken in this study. A mathematical model has been developed to predict the steady-state performance of a heat pump assisted continuous microwave dryer, with emphasis on the simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the evaporator and drying chamber. The model is intend to serve as a design tool in the study of heat pump dryers. To achieve the optimum design, the influences of the key design and operating parameters, as well as the comparison of different drying configurations, have been examined. Based on investigation results, several methods have been proposed to improve the performance of heat pump assisted microwave drying, such as the use of a recuperator. To validate the above mathematical model, extensive drying tests using foam rubber as the test material have been conducted on a prototype heat pump assisted microwave dryer. The prototype heat pump input power was 5 kW with a maximum microwave input power of 10 kW. The experimental performance data confirmed the veracity of the simulation model. The experimental results on drying test materials indicate that with careful design heat pump assisted microwave drying is comparable to convective drying in energy consumption while with a much higher drying speed.

Xiguo Jia (Univ. of Queensland (Australia))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Proposal for an Optomechanical Microwave Sensor at the Subphoton Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of their low energy content, microwave signals at the single-photon level are extremely challenging to measure. Guided by recent progress in single-photon optomechanics and hybrid optomechanical systems, we propose a multimode optomechanical transducer that can detect intensities significantly below the single-photon level via adiabatic transfer of the microwave signal to the optical frequency domain where the measurement is then performed. The influence of intrinsic quantum and thermal fluctuations is also discussed.

Keye Zhang; Francesco Bariani; Ying Dong; Weiping Zhang; Pierre Meystre

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optomechanical microwave sensor at the sub-photon level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to their low energy content microwave signals at the single-photon level are extremely challenging to measure. Guided by recent progress in single-photon optomechanics and hybrid optomechanical systems, we propose a multimode optomechanical transducer that can detect intensities significantly below the single-photon level via adiabatic transfer of the microwave signal to the optical frequency domain where the measurement is then performed. The influence of intrinsic quantum and thermal fluctuations is also discussed.

Keye Zhang; Francesco Bariani; Ying Dong; Weiping Zhang; Pierre Meystre

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Injection locking of laser diodes for microwave signal generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INJECTION LOCKING OF LASER DIODES FOR MICROWAVE SIGNAL GENERATION A Thesis by BEN-MOU YU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment. of the requirement. for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987... Major Subject: Electrical Engineering INJECTION LOCKING OF LASER DIODES FOR MICROWAVE SIGNAL GENERATION A Thesis BEN. -MOU YU Approved as to style and content by: Taylor, Henry . (E. E. ) (Chairman of Committee) Chang, Kai (E. E. ) (Member) 0...

Yu, Ben-Mou

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cosmic Glows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the obligatory Cosmic Microwave Background review. I discuss the current status of CMB anisotropies, together with some points on the related topic of the Far-Infrared Background. We have already learned a number of important things from CMB anisotropies. Models which are in good shape have: approximately flat geometry; cold dark-matter, plus something like a cosmological constant; roughly scale invariant adiabatic fluctuations; and close to Gaussian statistics. The constraints from the CMB are beginning to be comparable to those from other cosmological measurements. With a wealth of new data coming in, it is expected that CMB anisotropies will soon provide the most stringent limits on fundamental cosmological parameters, as well as probing high energy particle physics and the Dark Ages of astrophysics. Nudge, nudge. Wink, wink. Say no more.

Douglas Scott

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method and device for microwave sintering large ceramic articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave sintering system and method are provided for extremely uniform sintering of large and/or irregular shaped ceramic articles at microwave frequencies of at least 28 GHz in the hundreds of kilowatts power range in an untuned cavity. A 28 GHz, 200 kw gyrotron with variable power output is used as the microwave source connected to an untuned microwave cavity formed of an electrically conductive housing through an overmoded waveguide arrangement which acts in conjunction with a mode promoter within the cavity to achieve unexpected field uniformity. The part to be sintered is placed in the cavity and supported on a removable high temperature table in a central location within the cavity. The part is surrounded by a microwave transparent bulk insulating material to reduce thermal heat loss at the part surfaces and maintain more uniform temperature. The cavity may be operated at a high vacuum to aid in preventing arcing. The system allows controlled increased heating rates of greater than 200.degree. C./min to provide rapid heating of a ceramic part to a selected sintering temperature where it is maintained by regulating the microwave power applied to the part. As a result of rapid heating, the extent of non-isothermal processes such as segregation of impurities to the grain boundaries are minimized and exaggerated grain growth is reduced, thereby strengthening the mechanical properties of the ceramic part being sintered.

Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

Vogt, G.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Sideband Mixing in Intense Laser Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electron propagator in a laser background has been shown to be made up of a series of sideband poles. In this paper we study this decomposition by analysing the impact of the residual gauge freedom in the Volkov solution on the sidebands. We show that the gauge transformations do not alter the location of the poles. The identification of the propagator from the two-point function is maintained but we show that the sideband structures mix under residual gauge transformations.

Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

A background free double beta decay experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new detection scheme for rejecting backgrounds in neutrino less double beta decay experiments. It relies on the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by electrons in the MeV region. The momentum threshold is tuned to reach a good discrimination between background and good events. We consider many detector concepts and a range of target materials. The most promising is a high-pressure 136Xe emitter for which the required energy threshold is easily adjusted. Combination of this concept and a high pressure Time Projection Chamber could provide an optimal solution. A simple and low cost effective solution is to use the Spherical Proportional Counter that provides two delayed signals from ionization and Cherenkov light. In solid-state double beta decay emitters, because of their higher density, the considered process is out of energy range. An alternative solution could be the development of double decay emitters with lower density by using for instance the aerogel technique. It is surprising that a technology used for particle identification in high-energy physics becomes a powerful tool for rejecting backgrounds in such low-energy experiments.

Ioannis Giomataris

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Superconducting Hair on Charged Black String Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behaviour of Dirac fermions in the background of a charged black string penetrated by an Abelian Higgs vortex is elaborated. One finds the evidence that the system under consideration can support fermion fields acting like a superconducting cosmic string in the sence that a nontrivial Dirac fermion field can be carried by the system in question. The case of nonextremal and extremal black string vortex systems were considered. The influence of electric and Higgs charge, the winding number and the fermion mass on the fermion localization near the black string event horizon was studied. It turned out that the extreme charged black string expelled fermion fields more violently comparing to the nonextremal one.

Lukasz Nakonieczny; Marek Rogatko

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leads to slow heating and allows decomposition of reagents or products over time. Microwave-assisted heating provides faster, localized heating at the molecular level with near instantaneous control over reaction parameters. In this work, microwave...

Majithia, Ravish

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

be virtually impossible to construct land lines and microwave networks in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) with a microwave radio transmission tail is not suit- able for very harsh terrain, or for locations that are more. The use of microwave repeater towers, requiring line- of-sight from one tower to the next, was ruled out

Brewer, Eric A.

404

Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002. Copyright SBMO ISSN 1516 one metric is not #12;Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

405

Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002. Copyright SBMO ISSN 1516 investigation is subsequently #12;Journal of Microwaves and Optoelectronics, Vol. 2, N.o 6, December 2002

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

406

Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of EnergyFaceoff Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of EnergyFaceoff November 24, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis The...

407

Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide yet versatile method to simultaneously achieve the exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide of crumpled, few-layer thick and electronically conductive graphitic sheets. Using the microwave exfoliated

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon-helium microwave plasma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 63 Development of a Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator Summary: to efficiently couple the microwave energy into the plasma,...

409

A background free double beta decay experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new detection scheme for rejecting backgrounds in neutrino less double beta decay experiments. It relies on the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by electrons in the MeV region. The momentum threshold is tuned to reach a good discrimination between background and good events. We consider many detector concepts and a range of target materials. The most promising is a high-pressure 136Xe emitter for which the required energy threshold is easily adjusted. Combination of this concept and a high pressure Time Projection Chamber could provide an optimal solution. A simple and low cost effective solution is to use the Spherical Proportional Counter that provides two delayed signals from ionization and Cherenkov light. In solid-state double beta decay emitters, because of their higher density, the considered process is out of energy range. An alternative solution could be the development of double decay emitters with lower density by using for instance the aerogel technique. It is surprising that a te...

Giomataris, Ioannis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

0.6 cu. ft. (17 litre) capacity microwave 700 watts of cooking power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Installation/yearly maintenance not included. Danby ENERGY STAR Mini Fridge (DCR88WDD) Danby Microwave (DMW608W

Lotze, Heike K.

411

apm background radiation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extragalactic Background Radiation Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Attenuation of high--energy gamma rays by pair--production with UV, optical and IR background photons provides a...

412

One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Spectral properties of microwave graphs with local absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of absorption on the spectra of microwave graphs has been studied experimentally. The microwave networks were made up of coaxial cables and T junctions. First, absorption was introduced by attaching a 50 Ohm load to an additional vertex for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry. The resulting level-spacing distributions were compared with a generalization of the Wigner surmise in the presence of open channels proposed recently by Poli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 174101 (2012)]. Good agreement was found using an effective coupling parameter. Second, absorption was introduced along one individual bond via a variable microwave attenuator, and the influence of absorption on the length spectrum was studied. The peak heights in the length spectra corresponding to orbits avoiding the absorber were found to be independent of the attenuation, whereas, the heights of the peaks belonging to orbits passing the absorber once or twice showed the expected decrease with increasing attenuation.

M. Allgaier; S. Gehler; S. Barkhofen; H. -J. Stöckmann; U. Kuhl

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Electrodeless Discharge Lamps Coated with the Titania Thin Film for Photocatalysis in a Microwave Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photochemical and photocatalytic reactions for degradation of organic pollutants. The electrodeless discharge lamp (EDL) generates UV/VIS radiation when placed into the microwave field and is connected to the objective of microwave photochemistry [1]. The degradation of mono-chloroacetic acid (MCAA) by microwave

Cirkva, Vladimir

415

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different Reactants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different in experimental development of large- scale and highly-productive reactors. This paper proposes to address this issue by developing microwave chemistry reactors as microwave systems, rather than as black

Yakovlev, Vadim

416

Apparatus with moderating material for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

RPV stops bump off the background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the 8 TeV LHC reach on pair produced heavy flavored di-jet resonances. Motivated by theories of R-parity violation in supersymmetry we concentrate on a final state with two b-jets and two light jets. We exploit b-tagging to reject the background and discuss its importance at the trigger level to probe light stops. We present kinematical selections that can be used to isolate the signal as a bump in the mass distribution of the candidate resonances. We find that stops with R-parity violating couplings giving rise to fully hadronic final states can be observed in the current run of the LHC. Remarkably, the LHC can probe stop masses well within the range predicted by naturalness.

Roberto Franceschini; Riccardo Torre

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Photonic microwave generation with high-power photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize and characterize high-power, high-linearity modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodiodes for low-phase-noise photonic microwave generation based on optical frequency division. When illuminated with picosecond pulses from a repetition-rate-multiplied gigahertz Ti:sapphire modelocked laser, the photodiodes can achieve 10 GHz signal power of +14 dBm. Using these diodes, a 10 GHz microwave tone is generated with less than 500 attoseconds absolute integrated timing jitter (1 Hz-10 MHz) and a phase noise floor of -177 dBc/Hz. We also characterize the electrical response, amplitude-to-phase conversion, saturation and residual noise of the MUTC photodiodes.

Fortier, Tara M; Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig; Taylor, Jennifer A; Fu, Yang; Campbell, Joe; Diddams, Scott A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microwaves and Chemistry: The Catalysis of an Exciting Marriage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Product distrihution of microwave catalysis of carbon dioxide and water. Product Relative % yield Methane 55.1 Methanol 5.5 Acetone 4.7 C J alcohols 5.8 C 4 alcohols 28.4 o.5,------------------ 0.4 'C v >= 0.3 !i ;:I '" 0.2 &1... our first major success in cracking methane to ethylene and hydrogen [1,2], lhe destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons [3,4], the hydrodesulfurization of hydrocracked pitch [5], and the microwave treatment of some Alberta oil sands and bitumens...

Wan, J.

420

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwave heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic and metal workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are then insulated and microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid-phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

Applications for Microwave Generators in the Process Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 14. Fix, S. R. "Microwave Devulcanization of Rub ber." (Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., lincoln, NE, USA). US 4,104,205, Elastomerics, Vol. 112, No.6, pp. 1980, 38-40 (Eng). 15. Yamashita, I., Yamamoto, N., and Mima, S., "Decomposition of Waste... August 1978. 18. Novotny, D. S., et al. "Devulcanization of Sulfer-Vulcanized Elastomers." (Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co.) Ger. Offen. 2,700,306, 18 August 1977, US Appl. 646,821, 6 January 1976. 19. "Microwave Hardenable Molding Sand." (Ko matsu...

Humphrey, J. L.; Vasilakos, N. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

ISO and the Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO observed, for the first time to such a high sensitivity level, the mid- and far-infrared universe. A Number of deep surveys were performed to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this review, I discuss and summarize results of mid-infrared ISOCAM and far-infrared ISOPHOT surveys, and show how our vision of the extragalactic infrared universe has become more accurate. In particular, ISO allowed us to resolve into sources a significant fraction of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) in the mid-infrared, and to probe a fainter population in the far-infrared with the detection of the CIB fluctuations. Together with other wavelength data sets, the nature of ISO galaxies is now in the process of being understood. I also show that the high quality of the ISO data put strong constraints on the scenarios of galaxy evolution. This induced a burst in the development of models, yielding to a more coherent picture of galaxy evolution. I finally emphasize the potential of the ISO data archive in the field of observational cosmology, and describe the next steps, in particular the forthcoming cosmological surveys to be carried out by SIRTF.

Herve Dole

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

K-mouflage Cosmology: the Background Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the cosmology of K-mouflage theories at the background level. We show that the effects of the scalar field are suppressed at high matter density in the early Universe and only play a role in the late time Universe where the deviations of the Hubble rate from its $\\Lambda$-CDM counterpart can be of the order five percent for redshifts $1 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 5$. Similarly, we find that the equation of state can cross the phantom divide in the recent past and even diverge when the effective scalar energy density goes negative and subdominant compared to matter, preserving the positivity of the squared Hubble rate. These features are present in models for which Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is not affected. We analyze the fate of K-mouflage when the nonlinear kinetic terms give rise to ghosts, particle excitations with negative energy. In this case, we find that the K-mouflage theories can only be considered as an effective description of the Universe at low energy below $1$ keV. In the safe ghost-free models, we find that the equation of state always diverges in the past and changes significantly by a few percent since $z\\lesssim 1$.

Philippe Brax; Patrick Valageas

2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP). [Microwave and non-microwave health and ecological assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the satellite power system (SPS), satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted to electricity. This SPS environmental assessment considers the microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and effects on electromagnetic systems. No environmental problem has been identified that would preclude the continued study of SPS technology. To increase the certainty of the assessment, some research has been initiated and long-term research is being planned.

Valentino, A.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

ECRH microwave beam broadening in the edge turbulent plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of turbulent plasma density fluctuations on angular and spatial beam width is treated analytically in the framework of WKB based eikonal method. Reasonable agreement of analytical and numerical treatment results is demonstrated within the domain of quasi-optical approximation validity. Significant broadening of microwave beams is predicted for future ECRH experiments at ITER.

Sysoeva, E. V.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia and RL PAT SPbSPU, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Silva, F. da [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Heuraux, S. [IJL UMR-7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

429

Use of passive microwave remote sensing to monitor soil moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 1998) Abstract - Surface soil moisture is a key variable to describe the water and energy soil layer) is a key variable in the water and energy exchanges at the land surfaceReview Use of passive microwave remote sensing to monitor soil moisture Jean-Pierre Wignerona

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields Marina Koledintseva, PoornaAA@mpei.ru Abstract-- An electromagnetic shielding of objects using ferrite-graphite composites is considered- shielding; dielectric base material; ferrite- graphite composite, Maxwell Garnett formulation I

Koledintseva, Marina Y.

431

Experimental Investigation of Microwave Vulnerabilities in CMOS Inverters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Investigation of Microwave Vulnerabilities in CMOS Inverters Agis A. Iliadis effects on single CMOS inverters, the fundamental building block of logic ICs, consisting of an NMOS and a PMOS transistor. The inverters were designed in our group and fabricated in the AMI-1.5µm MOSIS line

Anlage, Steven

432

Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet Ivan S. Ashcraft and David backscatter measurements are becoming an important tool for monitoring the dynamic behavior of the Greenland ice sheet. However, most Greenland studies assume constant backscatter for varying azimuth angles

Long, David G.

433

International Microwave Power Institute 127 ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL REGIMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for microwave heating. KEY WORDS: Electric field, dissipated power, micro- wave power, model, permittivity heating systems oper ating at 915 MHz is a standard feature protecting the magnetron from reflections LOAD E. Eves and V. Yakovlev Reflections, electric field and dissipated power of a 915 MHz water load

Yakovlev, Vadim

434

Microwave properties of nanodiamond particles Daniel Slocombe,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at microwave frequencies using a cavity perturbation technique, and results were compared with UV Raman detonation nanodiamond powders were sourced from PlasmaChem GmbH (G01 grade). This mate- rial is purified measured, designated U in what follows. Samples were then oxidised by burning the powders in air

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

Cadeddu, MP

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

Viswanathan, Tito

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

A SIMPLIFIED ANALYSIS FOR HIGH POWER MICROWAVE BANDPASS FILTER STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wireless diplexers. An exact analysis of the voltage/power distribution inside a filter involves the 3D is derived. This transformation is then used to relate the actual voltage distribution inside a transmissionA SIMPLIFIED ANALYSIS FOR HIGH POWER MICROWAVE BANDPASS FILTER STRUCTURES Apu Sivadas, Ming Yu

Yu, Ming

438

Flexible Graphene Field-Effect Transistors for Microwave Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible Graphene Field-Effect Transistors for Microwave Electronics Inanc Meric , Nicholas Petrone-frequency characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) has received significant interest due the very high carrier velocities in graphene. In addition to excellent electronic performance, graphene possesses

Shepard, Kenneth

439

Thermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) for sintering of ceramic composites [14]. The magnetic (H, the microwave energy is supplied locally to the powder. It creates a confined hotspot, and initiates a self-propagating the powder prior to its ignition is simulated theoretically, taking into account the powder's temperature

Jerby, Eli

440

Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: reconstruction by synthetic aperture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced thermoacoustic tomography (LMTT) based on focused transducers. Two microwave sources, which had frequencies of 9 GHz and 3 GHz, respectively, were used in the experiments for comparison. The 3-GHz system had a much larger imaging depth but a lower signal...

Feng, Dazi

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidic device. Many common biological and chemical applications require rapid and local control of temperature, such as PCR amplification of DNA, and can benefit from this new technique.

David Issadore; Katherine J. Humphry; Keith A. Brown; Lori Sandberg; David Weitz; Robert M. Westervelt

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES By Maria Q. Feng1 , Yoo Jin Kim2 , Franco De Flaviis3 , and Luis Jofre 4 ABSTRACT: Nondestructive assessment of concrete structures heavily and cracks inside concrete caused by aging, deterioration, and seismic loading. The authors have developed

De Flaviis, Franco

443

Polymer Surface Modification Using Microwave-Oven-Generated Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, diameter 160 mm) are from Fisher Scientific. Compressed oxygen and ethanol (100%) are from Air Products with plasma is a frequently used technique to accomplish surface modifi- cations that affect chemical products. Our approach relies on an unmodified "kitchen microwave oven" and standard laboratory glassware

Steinbock, Oliver

444

System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

White, Terry L; Paulauskas, Felix L; Bigelow, Timothy S

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Microwave-emitting rotor, separator apparatus including same, methods of operation and design thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for use in separating, at least in part, a mixture, including at least one chamber and at least one microwave generation device configured for communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber is disclosed. The rotor assembly may comprise an electric generator for generating electricity for operating the microwave generation device. At least one microwave generation device may be positioned within a tubular interior shaft extending within the rotor assembly. At least a portion of the tubular interior shaft may be substantially transparent to microwave energy. Microwave energy may be emitted in an outward radial direction or toward an anticipated boundary surface defined between a mixture and a separated constituent thereof. A method including flowing a mixture through at least one chamber and communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber while rotating same is disclosed. Methods of operating a centrifugal separator and design thereof are disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H.

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

422 IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 6, JUNE 2009 Instantaneous Microwave Frequency Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. I. INTRODUCTION MICROWAVE receiver for radar and other electronic warfare applications require of Information and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China (e-mail: chihao@zju.edu.cn). J. Yao is with the Department of Information and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University

Yao, Jianping

447

CMB @ 50 & NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13)CLEANCMB @ 50

448

Multiple concentric annuli for characterizing spatially nonuniform backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is presented for estimating the background at a given location on a sky map by interpolating the estimated background from a set of concentric annuli which surround this location. If the background is nonuniform but smoothly varying, this method provides a more accurate (though less precise) estimate than can be obtained with a single annulus. Several applications of multi-annulus background estimation are discussed, including direct testing for point sources in the presence of a nonuniform background, the generation of "surrogate maps" for characterizing false alarm rates, and precise testing of the null hypothesis that the background is uniform.

James Theiler; Jeff Bloch

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Uniform Gauge for D1-brane in General Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct uniform gauge D1-brane action in general background. We also discuss how this action transforms under double Wick rotation and determine transformation properties of background fields.

Kluson, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

MARSAME Appendix B B. SOURCES OF BACKGROUND RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: · The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) provides information concerning background radioactivity in Background as a Residual Radioactivity Criterion for Decommissioning NUREG-1501 (NRC 1994). · The United Nations Scientific

452

Plasma Physics Challenges of MMPlasma Physics Challenges of MM--toto--THz and High Power MicrowaveTHz and High Power Microwave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid StateSolid State Microwave Power ElectronicsMicrowave Power Electronics · Both convert kinetic Devices (Avg) Vacuum HPM (Peak) Solid State Lasers (Peak) Solid State Devices (Avg) Power(W) (Single ...BUT ... For f > 100 GHz VEDs frontier 1/f2P High power limit for Solid State 1/f 2 and HPM Frontier

453

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region ofis searching for neutrinoless double beta decay (0???), a

Andreotti, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for...

455

Surface-wave-enabled darkfield aperture for background suppression during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be directly incorporated onto optical sensors to accom- plish predetection background suppression if the sensor is fully capable of measuring the same weak signal in the absence of background (1, 2- trivial to employ. A sensor that can intrinsically cancel a strong background prior to signal detection

Yang, Changhuei

456

Microwave generated electrodeless lamp for producing bright output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave generated electrodeless light source for producing a bright output comprising a lamp structure including a microwave chamber and a plasma medium-containing lamp envelope having a maximum dimension which is substantially less than a wavelength disposed therein. To provide the desired radiation output the interior of the chamber is coated with a UV-reflective material and the chamber has an opening for allowing UV radiation to exit, which is covered with a metallic mesh. The chamber is arranged to be near-resonant at a single wavelength, and the lamp envelope has a fill including mercury at an operating pressure of 1-2 atmospheres, while a power density of at least 250-300 (watts/cm/sup 3/) is coupled to the envelope to result in a relatively high deep UV output at a relatively high brightness.

Wood, Ch. H.; Ury, M. G.

1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

Microwave measurement of the mass of frozen hydrogen pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nondestructive apparatus and method for measuring the mass of a moving object, based on the perturbation of the dielectric character of a resonant microwave cavity caused by the object passing through the cavity. An oscillator circuit is formed with a resonant cavity in a positive feedback loop of a microwave power amplifier. The moving object perturbs the resonant characteristics of the cavity causing a shift in the operating frequency of the oscillator proportional to the ratio of the pellet volume to the volume of the cavity. Signals from the cavity oscillation are mixed with a local oscillator. Then the IF frequency from the mixer is measured thereby providing a direct measurement of pellet mass based upon known physical properties and relationships. This apparatus and method is particularly adapted for the measurement of frozen hydrogen pellets.

Talanker, Vera (Golden, CO); Greenwald, Martin (Belmont, MA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Cosmological science enabled by Planck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planck will be the first mission to map the entire cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky with mJy sensitivity and resolution better than 10'. The science enabled by such a mission spans many areas of astrophysics and cosmology. In particular it will lead to a revolution in our understanding of primary and secondary CMB anisotropies, the constraints on many key cosmological parameters will be improved by almost an order of magnitude (to sub-percent levels) and the shape and amplitude of the mass power spectrum at high redshift will be tightly constrained.

Martin White

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Possible Explanation of Anomalous Earth Flybys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doppler shift observations of several spacecrafts during near Earth flybys show an unexplained frequency shift. This shift is interpreted as an unexpected velocity change called Earth flyby anomaly. A theory of non-privileged reference frames is used to study the Doppler shift in such frames which are experimentally justified by the measured dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the solar system. The system in which the CMB is isotropic defines the privileged reference frame. The calculated frequency shift in non-privileged reference frames may give an explanation of the anomalous Earth flybys.

Walter Petry

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cosmological Signature of New Parity-Violating Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does Nature yield any manifestations of parity violation other than those observed in weak interactions? A map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization will provide a new signature of P violation. We give two examples of new P violating interactions, which may have something to do with Planck-scale physics, inflation, and/or quintessence, that would give rise to such a signature. Although these effects would most likely elude detection by MAP and the Planck Surveyor, they may be detectable with a future dedicated CMB polarization experiment.

Arthur Lue; Limin Wang; Marc Kamionkowski

1999-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microwave background cmb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fabrication and characterization of aluminum airbridges for superconducting microwave circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting microwave circuits based on coplanar waveguides (CPW) are susceptible to parasitic slotline modes which can lead to loss and decoherence. We motivate the use of superconducting airbridges as a reliable method for preventing the propagation of these modes. We describe the fabrication of these airbridges on superconducting resonators, which we use to measure the loss due to placing airbridges over CPW lines. We find that the additional loss at single photon levels is small, and decreases at higher drive powers.

Chen, Zijun; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Megrant, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M., E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

462

Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

Marcinek, Marek (Warszawa, PL); Kostecki, Robert (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

463

Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

Niranjana, A. R., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Mahesh, S. S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Divakara, S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Somashekar, R., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

464

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROWAVE-ASSITED SYNTHESIS OF FLUORESCENT CARBON NANOPARTICLES A Thesis by BONNIE CHEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...-(hydroxymethyl) furfural (5- HMF) derivatives, which are major products of glucose decomposition. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This thesis was completed in my fourth year at Texas A&M University as a master's student, and analyzes, discusses and displays...

Chen, Bonnie

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

465

Novel Birefringent Frequency Discriminator for Microwave Photonic Links  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOVEL BIREFRINGENT FREQUENCY DISCRIMINATOR FOR MICROWAVE PHOTONIC LINKS A Dissertation by JAE HYUN KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...-Division Multiplexing OPD Optical Path Length Different OVA Optical Vector Network Analyzer PBS Polarization Beam Splitter PM Phase Modulation PD Photodiode PDL Polarization Dependent Loss PLC Planar Lightwave Circuit QWP Quarter Wave Plate RAMZI Ring...

Kim, Jae Hyun

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

CORRELATIONS IN THE (SUB)MILLIMETER BACKGROUND FROM ACT Multiplication-Sign BLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency correlation power spectra of the cosmic (sub)millimeter background at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST); and at 1380 and 2030 {mu}m (218 and 148 GHz) from observations made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The overlapping observations cover 8.6 deg{sup 2} in an area relatively free of Galactic dust near the south ecliptic pole. The ACT bands are sensitive to radiation from the cosmic microwave background, to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters, and to emission by radio and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs), while the dominant contribution to the BLAST bands is from DSFGs. We confirm and extend the BLAST analysis of clustering with an independent pipeline and also detect correlations between the ACT and BLAST maps at over 25{sigma} significance, which we interpret as a detection of the DSFGs in the ACT maps. In addition to a Poisson component in the cross-frequency power spectra, we detect a clustered signal at 4{sigma}, and using a model for the DSFG evolution and number counts, we successfully fit all of our spectra with a linear clustering model and a bias that depends only on redshift and not on scale. Finally, the data are compared to, and generally agree with, phenomenological models for the DSFG population. This study demonstrates the constraining power of the cross-frequency correlation technique to constrain models for the DSFGs. Similar analyses with more data will impose tight constraints on future models.

Hajian, Amir; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Viero, Marco P.; Bock, James J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Addison, Graeme [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Aguirre, Paula [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Appel, John William; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hasselfield, Matthew [Laboratoire APC, Universite Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris (France); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); and others

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Experimental test of a microwave ion beam source in oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments have demonstrated a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma disk ion source operating with inert gases both with and without an applied static magnetic field. Earlier results were reported using a preliminary, multicusp static magnetic field configuration produced by alternating pole, small, --2.5 kG rare earth magnets surrounding the microwave discharge zone. This electrodeless ion source has been rebuilt incorporating several improvements and has been experimentally tested with different discharge diffusion lengths. The improvements include removing the rare earth magnets from the inside of the microwave cavity and embedding them in the cavity walls. The placement and strength of the magnets allows electron cyclotron resonant surfaces (--875 G) to lie entirely within the discharge zone. Discharges with different diffusion lengths were created by varying the thickness of the disk-shaped discharge zone. The experimental performance with and without a static magnetic field is discussed at the low flow rates of 2--10 sccm and using a 2.5 cm diam double grid set. Experimental test results are compared to similar ion beam sources in oxygen that employ a dc discharge. The expected lifetime, startup, and shutdown problems and maintenance are also reviewed.

Asmussen, J.; Dahimene, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Interfacing microwave qubits and optical photons via spin ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A protocol is discussed which allows one to realize a transducer for single photons between the optical and the microwave frequency range. The transducer is a spin ensemble, where the individual emitters possess both an optical and a magnetic-dipole transition. Reversible frequency conversion is realized by combining optical photon storage, by means of EIT, with the controlled switching of the coupling between the magnetic-dipole transition and a superconducting qubit, which is realized by means of a microwave cavity. The efficiency is quantified by the global fidelity for transferring coherently a qubit excitation between a single optical photon and the superconducting qubit. We test various strategies and show that the total efficiency is essentially limited by the optical quantum memory: It can exceed 80% for ensembles of NV centers and approaches 99% for cold atomic ensembles, assuming state-of-the-art experimental parameters. This protocol allows one to bridge the gap between the optical and the microwave regime so to efficiently combine superconducting and optical components in quantum networks.

Susanne Blum; Christopher O'Brien; Nikolai Lauk; Pavel Bushev; Michael Fleischhauer; Giovanna Morigi

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [University of Maryland, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550W 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Lubin, P. M. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mirel, P. [Wyle Informations Systems, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Singal, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A., E-mail: Michael.D.Seiffert@jpl.nasa.gov [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Caixa Postal 515, 12245-970-Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

A microwave tomography system using a tunable mirror for beam steering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microwave tomography is a fast-growing technique in the fields of NDE and medical industry. This paper presents a new microwave tomography system which reduces the complexities of conventional microwave imaging systems by utilizing a reconfigurable mirror, a tunable reflectarray antenna. In order to build a tunable reflectarray with beam steering capabilities, the unit cell characteristics should dynamically alter. Modelling and experimental results of a single unit cell are presented in this work.

Tayebi, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Non-Destructive Evaluation Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physic (United States); Tang, J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Paladhi, P. Roy; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Non-Destructive Evaluation Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Temperature and pore pressure distribution in a concrete slab during the microwave decontamination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an application of microwave engineering, the new technology of concrete decontamination and decommissioning using microwave energy has been recently developed. The temperature and pore pressure within the concrete are studied theoretically in this paper. The heat and mass transfer within the porous concrete, coupled with temperature dependent dielectric property are investigated. The effects of microwave frequency (f), microwave power intensity (Q{sub 0,ave}), concrete porosity ({phi}) on the temperature and pore pressure distributions and their variations are fully discussed. The effects of the variation of complex dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}) and presentation of different steel reinforcements are also illustrated.

Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; White, T.L.; Grubb, R.G.; Foster, D. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electron cyclotron resonant multicusp magnetic field microwave plasma source for electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of electrodeless microwave ion and plasma sources has been a recent, very active research project at Michigan State University. The results are efficient, compact microwave discharge configurations that operate at low pressures (0.5 mtorr to 100 mtorr) and efficiently produce low energy ions and free radicals and broad ion beams for oxidation, deposition, and etching experiments. The microwave discharge technology developed for these applications may be useful for application in electric propulsion. This paper reviews this microwave applicator technology and indicates how it may be extended to higher power levels and applied to electric propulsion systems. 12 references.

Dahimene, M.; Mahoney, L.; Asmussen, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

Alton, G.D.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure microwave Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon as a reducing agent under a nitro- gen ... Source: Agrawal, Dinesh - Microwave Processing and Engineering Center, Pennsylvania State University Collection: Materials...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microwave processing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RF Phase Shifter Yu Yan and Jianping Yao... , Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--A novel tunable photonic microwave filter ... Source: Yao, Jianping - School of Information...

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - aces microwave link Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microw. Theory Tech., vol... 1 Abstract-- A novel approach to generating a frequency- tunable microwave or sub-terahertz wave... a dispersive fiber. By applying these optical...

477

Overcoming High Energy Backgrounds at Pulsed Spallation Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instrument backgrounds at neutron scattering facilities directly affect the quality and the efficiency of the scientific measurements that users perform. Part of the background at pulsed spallation neutron sources is caused by, and time-correlated with, the emission of high energy particles when the proton beam strikes the spallation target. This prompt pulse ultimately produces a signal, which can be highly problematic for a subset of instruments and measurements due to the time-correlated properties, and different to that from reactor sources. Measurements of this background have been made at both SNS (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, USA) and SINQ (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland). The background levels were generally found to be low compared to natural background. However, very low intensities of high-energy particles have been found to be detrimental to instrument performance in some conditions. Given that instrument performance is typically characterised by S/N, improvements in backgrounds can both improve instrument pe...

Cherkashyna, Nataliia; DiJulio, Douglas D; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Scherzinger, Julius; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P; Fissum, Kevin G; Ansell, Stuart; Iverson, Erik B; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X; Panzner, Tobias; Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Filges, Uwe; Kittelmann, Thomas; Extegarai, Maddi; Santoro, Valentina; Kirstein, Oliver; Bentley, Phillip M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ESnet supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research Engineering Services The Network OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network IPv6 Implementation Checklist ESnet IPv6 Mirror Servers...

479

Backgrounds and Projected Limits from Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple formula is introduced which indicates the amount by which projections of dark matter direct detection experiments are expected to be degraded due to backgrounds.

Scott Dodelson

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

480

accelerator related backgrounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the first years... Drozhdin, A I; Mokhov, N V 1996-01-01 2 Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: Background tests and thermodynamic analysis General Relativity & Quantum...