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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

surface science | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface science surface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission. Abstract: New photocathode...

2

Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of Surfaces...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of Surfaces and Porosity in a Plate-Like ?-Al2O3. Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of...

3

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Surface and Interface Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Carlos Gutierrez Carlos Gutierrez Manager Resources Department Folder 01114 Sharepoint Visit Our Labs Grest Group Nanorheology Research (514 KB PDF) Interfacial Force Microscopy Group (701 KB PDF) Research Image Gallery (3,698 KB PDF) Surface Imaging Laboratory Technology - Metals for tomorrow Tina Nenoff Departments Surface and Interface Sciences The Surface and Interface Sciences Department is engaged in a diverse portfolio of leading-edge research projects related to the understanding

4

In-situ UHV Electron Microscopy of Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently great progress has been made in surface science due to the development of ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) techniques and related surface-analytical methods like ... (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), UHV

Katsumichi Yagi; Kunio Takayanagi; Goro Honjo

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

6

X-Ray Microscopy and Imaging: Science and Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fields: Biology and Life Sciences Environmental Sciences Materials Science Nanoscience Optics and Fundamental Physics Our research often employs the following techniques:...

7

ELSEVIER Surface Science 385 (1997) L971-L977 surface science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methanol. Though both produce methoxy intermediates, the three-dimensional oxide surface is much lessELSEVIER Surface Science 385 (1997) L971-L977 surface science Surface Science Letters Methanol on O for publication 12 May 1997 Abstract The adsorption and decomposition of methanol on the variously oxidized Mo(110

Goodman, Wayne

8

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using electron scattering and microscopy and scanning probe techniques. The research includes experiments and theory to understand the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures of materials.

9

ELSEVIER Surface Science 329 (1995) 255-268 Predicting STM images of molecular adsorbates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELSEVIER Surface Science 329 (1995) 255-268 Predicting STM images of molecular adsorbates V of a simple computational method for predicting scanning tunneling microscopy images for molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces. Development of the technique is described, including adsorbate geometry selection

Chiang, Shirley

10

Surface science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface science Surface science Subscribe to RSS - Surface science The study of the chemical and physical processes that occur in the interface between two phases of matter, such as solid to liquid or liquid to gas. Bruce E Koel Bruce Koel is professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton University. He is associated faculty in chemistry at the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM); associated faculty in the Princeton Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and a collaborator on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at PPPL. Koel is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the American Vacuum Society, and a member of the governing board of the Council for Chemical Research.

11

Geochemistry Atomic Force Microscopy | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging modes: contact, intermittent contact, phase imaging, magnetic force microscopy, electric force microscopy, surface potential microscopy, scanning capacitance microscopy,...

12

Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......properties of a solid material at a high spatial resolution...situ TEM is becoming an active field of research that is directly related to materials science, nanomechanics...cobalt dioxide (LiCoO2) cathode-and the in situ observation...5-V against a LiCoO2 cathode. The single-crystal......

Zhong Lin Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, 1205 W. State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Birck Nanotechnology Center, 1205 W. State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Proksch, Roger, E-mail: Roger.Proksch@oxinst.com [Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Ave., Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)] [Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Ave., Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

Land Surface Reflectance: A Possible Earth Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in magenta, water bodies are outlined in white. MODIS Surface Reflectance South Africa From: E. Vermote, UMD information ­ Viewing geometry (view and solar zenith and azimuth angles) ­ Geolocation (lat 15, 2005 - Wolfe - San Diego 5 Target Communities · Land earth science community ­ Energy Balance

15

LANL: Facility Focus, MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

07-018 Spring 2007 07-018 Spring 2007 T he MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory is home to a one-of-a-kind integrated instrument for surface science and materials research, allowing scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory the unique opportunity to perform coordinated research using ultra-high vacuum surface measurements, in situ reactions, and materials synthesis tools. Housed in the Materials Science Laboratory, the surface science instrument features an ultra-clean integrated system for surface analysis and in situ surface modification, thin film deposition, and surface gas reactions. This integrated system is used for analytical surface science; materials electronic

16

Electronic structure of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductor cleavage surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of cleavage surfaces of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductors. CdSe(1120), CdSe(1010), and CdS(1010) were investigated. The STM images confirm a 11 reconstruction for all surfaces. At negative and positive sample voltages the occupied and empty dangling-bond states above anions and cations, respectively, dominate the contrast of the STM images. No states in the band gap were found. The electronic structure of the surface permits the observation of dopant atoms in subsurface layers and thus also cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy studies of point defects and heterostructures.

B. Siemens, C. Domke, Ph. Ebert, and K. Urban

1997-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Momentum-resolved Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Master Thesis, Electron Microscopy Group of Materials Science, Prof. Ute Kaiser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Materials Science, Prof. Ute Kaiser Background Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a well like plasmons at a few 10eV, to core-shell excitations at high energy losses. In addition to the energy Microscopy group of Material Sciences in Ulm has gained experience in the acquisition and analysis of energy

Pfeifer, Holger

18

Raman Microscopy and Mapping as a Probe for Photodegradation in Surface Relief Gratings Recorded on Layer-by-Layer Films of Congo Red/Polyelectrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman microscopy, mapping, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering techniques have been applied to investigate the degradation of Congo Red (CR) in a surface relief grating (SRG)...

Constantino, C J L; Aroca, R F; He, J -A; Zucolotto, V; Li, L; Oliveira, O N; Kumar, J; Tripathy, S K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Surface Science Letters Structures of adsorbed water layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Science Letters Structures of adsorbed water layers on MgO: an ab initio study R.M. Lynden; Single crystal surfaces 1. Introduction The structure of adsorbed ®lms of water on a perfect surface. Experimentally, water is found to adsorb reversibly on a ¯at MgO surface to form a monolayer at temperatures

Alavi, Ali

20

PHaSE | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

scanning probe microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, surface science, neutron diffraction and scattering, density functional theory (DFT), monte carlo (MC),...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Concepts, Instruments, and Model Systems that Enabled the Rapid Evolution of Surface Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past forty years, surface science has evolved to become both an atomic scale and a molecular scale science. Gerhard Ertl's group has made major contributions in the field of molecular scale surface science, focusing on vacuum studies of adsorption chemistry on single crystal surfaces. In this review, we outline three important aspects which have led to recent advances in surface chemistry: the development of new concepts, in situ instruments for molecular scale surface studies at buried interfaces (solid-gas and solid-liquid), and new model nanoparticle surface systems, in addition to single crystals. Combined molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction (LEED)- surface structure studies on metal single crystal surfaces revealed concepts, including adsorbate-induced surface restructuring and the unique activity of defects, atomic steps, and kinks on metal surfaces. We have combined high pressure catalytic reaction studies with ultra high vacuum (UHV) surface characterization techniques using a UHV chamber equipped with a high pressure reaction cell. New instruments, such as high pressure sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) which permit molecular-level surface studies have been developed. Tools that access broad ranges of pressures can be used for both the in situ characterization of solid-gas and solid-liquid buried interfaces and the study of catalytic reaction intermediates. The model systems for the study of molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystals to nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm size range, which are currently the preferred media in catalytic reaction studies.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Theoretical Surface Science Wintersemester 2007/08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Surfaces · Processes on surfaces play an enormous- ly important technological role · Harmful processes: 1. Rust, corrosion 2. Wear · Advantageous processes: 1. Production of chemicals 2. Conversion) DFT surface band structure M F M 0 5 -10 -5 Energy(eV) Cu(111): Band gas and parabolic surface band

Pfeifer, Holger

23

Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electronic properties of the Ga vacancy in GaP(110) surfaces determined by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic properties of uncharged Ga monovacancies in GaP(110) surfaces are determined from voltage-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy images. The signatures of localized defect states in the band gap are analyzed and their spatial location is determined. Empty and occupied defect states exist. Depressed dangling bonds in the occupied-state images indicate an inward relaxation of the neighboring P atoms. The results agree with recent theoretical work.

Ph. Ebert and K. Urban

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Scanning tunneling microscopy on unpinned GaN(1100) surfaces: Invisibility of valence-band states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the origins of the tunnel current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy experiments on GaN(1100) surfaces. By calculating the tunnel currents in the presence of a tip-induced band bending for unpinned n-type GaN(1100) surfaces, we demonstrate that only conduction-band states are observed at positive and negative voltage polarities independent of the doping concentration. Valence-band states remain undetectable because tunneling out of the electron-accumulation zone in conduction-band states dominates by four orders of magnitude. As a result band-gap sizes cannot be determined by STM on unpinned GaN(1100) surfaces. Appropriate band-edge positions and gap sizes can be determined on pinned surfaces.

Ph. Ebert, L. Ivanova, and H. Eisele

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

Science for Problems Under the Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans have entered into and explored a wide range of environments, ranging from the deep ocean to the upper atmosphere and even outer space. But for the most part, the subsurface environment hidden beneath the surface of our planet remains enigmatic and directly observable only through limited points of access. Nevertheless, physical, chemical and biological processes in Earths subsurface are central players in several interrelated energy and environmental issues critical to the worlds security and economy. Leadership-class computing will soon be brought to bear on understanding and predicting these processes across a wide range of time and space scales.

Scheibe, Timothy D.; Meakin, Paul; Lichtner, Peter C.; Zachmann, David

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

The surface science of titanium dioxide Ulrike Diebold*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface science of titanium dioxide Ulrike Diebold* Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA Manuscript received in final form 7 October 2002 Abstract Titanium dioxide is reviewed on the adsorption and reaction of a wide variety of inorganic molecules (H2, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, N2

Diebold, Ulrike

28

Direct determination of exact charge states of surface point defects using scanning tunneling microscopy: As vacancies on GaAs ,,110...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microscopy: As vacancies on GaAs ,,110... Kuo-Jen Chao, Arthur R. Smith, and Chih-Kang Shih* Department of the charge state of surface As vacancies on p-type GaAs 110 using scanning tunneling microscopy. This method utilizes the compensation between the local band bending result- ing from the As vacancy and the p

29

Surface Science Letters Bulk-defect dependent adsorption on a metal oxide surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6028(01)01067-6 #12;Titanium dioxide is a wide-band gap semicon- ductor (Egap 3 eV) that can easily be reducedSurface Science Letters Bulk-defect dependent adsorption on a metal oxide surface: S/TiO2(1 1 0) E Abstract The adsorption of molecular sulfur on TiO2(1 1 0)(1 ? 1) has been studied with scanning tunneling

Diebold, Ulrike

30

Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in science often follows or parallels the development of new techniques. The optical microscope helped convert medicine and biology from a speculative activity in old times to today's sophisticated scientific disciplines. The telescope changed the study and interpretation of heavens from mythology to science. X-ray diffraction enabled the flourishing of solid state physics and materials science. The technique object of this review, Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy or APPES for short, has also the potential of producing dramatic changes in the study of liquid and solid surfaces, particularly in areas such as atmospheric, environment and catalysis sciences. APPES adds an important missing element to the host of techniques that give fundamental information, i.e., spectroscopy and microscopy, about surfaces in the presence of gases and vapors, as encountered in industrial catalysis and atmospheric environments. APPES brings electron spectroscopy into the realm of techniques that can be used in practical environments. Decades of surface science in ultra high vacuum (UHV) has shown the power of electron spectroscopy in its various manifestations. Their unique property is the extremely short elastic mean free path of electrons as they travel through condensed matter, of the order of a few atomic distances in the energy range from a few eV to a few thousand eV. As a consequence of this the information obtained by analyzing electrons emitted or scattered from a surface refers to the top first few atomic layers, which is what surface science is all about. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and other such techniques have been used for decades and provided some of the most fundamental knowledge about surface crystallography, composition and electronic structure available today. Unfortunately the high interaction cross section of electrons with matter also prevents them from traveling long distances unscattered in gas environments. Above the millibar pressure range this distance is reduced to less that a millimeter, effectively preventing its use in the most relevant environments, usually between millibars and atmospheric pressures. There is therefore a large gap of several orders of magnitude where information about surfaces is scarce because these powerful electron spectroscopies cannot operate. One characteristic of surfaces in ambient pressure environments is that they are covered by dense layers of molecules, even when their binding energy is weak. Water for example is known to form layers several molecules thick at room temperature in humid environments. Metals readily form oxide films several layers thick in oxygen atmospheres. Dense layers of adsorbed molecules can also be produced in ultra high vacuum, often by the simple and expedient method of cooling the sample to cryogenic temperatures. A large amount of data has been obtained in the past in UHV by surface scientists using this method. While this has provided valuable information it begs the question of whether the structures formed in this manner represent equilibrium structures or metastable ones, kinetically trapped due to high activation energies that cannot be overcome at low temperature. From a thermodynamic point of view is interesting to consider the entropic contribution to the Gibbs free energy, which we can call 'the pressure factor', equal to kT.logP. This factor amounts to a sizeable 0.3 eV difference at room temperature between UHV (<10{sup -8} Pascal) and atmospheric pressures. Such change if free energy can definitely result in changes in surface structure and stability. Entire areas of the phase diagram are out of reach due to the pressure gap. Even when cooling is not necessary, many surface treatments and most chemical reactions necessitate the presence of gases at pressures ranging from millibar to bars. What is the structure and chemical nature of the species formed on the surface in equilibrium with suc

Salmeron, Miquel; Salmeron, Miquel; Schlogl, Robert

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

Deformation induced changes in surface properties of polymers investigated by scanning force microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study the possibility of combining commercial Scanning Force Microscopes (SFM) with stretching devices for the investigation of microscopic surface changes during stepwise elongation is investigated. Different types of stretching devices have been developed either for Scanning Platform-SFM or for Stand Alone-SFM. Their suitability for the investigation of deformation induced surface changes is demonstrated. A uniaxially oriented polypropylene film is stretched vertically to its extrusion direction. The reorientation of its microfibrillar structure is investigated and correlated to macroscopic structural changes determined by taking a force-elongation curve. Microtome cuts of natural rubber filled with 15 PHR carbon black are stretched. Changes in topography, local stiffness and adhesive force are simultaneously reported by using a new imaging method called Pulsed Force Mode (PFM).

Sabine Hild; Armin Rosa; Othmar Marti

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

Simulations of friction force microscopy on the KBr(001) surface based on ab initio calculated tip-sample forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on ab initio-based simulations of friction-force microscopy on the KBr(001) surface at zero and nonzero temperature. To simulate sliding friction, we employ an extended three-dimensional (3D) Prandtl-Tomlinson model. The microscopic part of the tip is modeled by K+- or Br--terminated tips. We use a tip-surface interaction potential, which is calculated within local-density approximation of density-functional theory and supplemented by a long-range van der Waals interaction resulting from the macroscopic part of the tip. Thermal fluctuations are included via random white noise. The loading force acting on the tip enters the Langevin equation of motion separately from all other forces so that it can be changed at will. We analyze friction as a function of loading force, temperature, and mass of the tip and identify regions of these parameters where distinct stick-slip behavior or ultra-low friction occurs. A comparison of our 3D ab initioresults with those obtained using sinusoidal tip-surface forces (1D model) is very revealing. By and large, both approaches yield results in good agreement at T=0K. At higher temperatures, however, distinct differences occur. For example, at T=295K, the 1D model calculations overestimate the friction hysteresis and energy dissipation, and for positive loading forces they even can yield a different periodicity in the friction-force profile.

Christine Wieferink; Peter Krger; Johannes Pollmann

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Profile of Professor of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy for Nanomaterials in the Quantum Nanoscience department (Kavli Institute, faculty of Applied Sciences)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscience department (Kavli Institute, faculty of Applied Sciences) Workload and duration The Quantum Nanoscience department is planning to appoint a permanent full-time professor in the research area of High the High-Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) group in the Quantum Nanoscience department at TU Delft

35

Applied Surface Science 292 (2014) 10301039 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Science journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/apsusc Micro-arc oxidization of a novel Mg­1Ca Keywords: Mg­1Ca alloy Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) Electrolyte Corrosion resistance Cytotoxicity a b s t r a c t A newly-developed Mg­1Ca (wt%) alloy was treated by micro-arc oxidization (MAO) in KF

Zheng, Yufeng

36

A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

Powers, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advances in the Surface Science of TiO2 A Global Perspective...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ultraviolet catalysis thin films semiconductors renewable energy ultra-high vacuum UHV VT SPM atomic-resolution imaging proteins surface science Volume: 28 Issue: 10 Pages:...

38

Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, strained super-lattice GaAs photocathode samples, removed from the CEBAF...

39

The impact of surface science on the commercialization of chemical processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface science developed instruments for atomic- and molecular-scale studies of catalyst surfaces, their composition and structure, both in a vacuum and at high pressures, under reaction conditions (bridging ...

Gabor A. Somorjai; Jeong Y. Park

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

High resolution, high speed ultrahigh vacuum microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history and future of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is discussed as it refers to the eventual development of instruments and techniques applicable to the real time in situ investigation of surface processes with high resolution. To reach this objective, it was necessary to transform conventional high resolution instruments so that an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment at the sample site was created, that access to the sample by various in situ sample modification procedures was provided, and that in situ sample exchanges with other integrated surface analytical systems became possible. Furthermore, high resolution image acquisition systems had to be developed to take advantage of the high speed imaging capabilities of projection imaging microscopes. These changes to conventional electron microscopy and its uses were slowly realized in a few international laboratories over a period of almost 40 years by a relatively small number of researchers crucially interested in advancing the state of the art of electron microscopy and its applications to diverse areas of interest; often concentrating on the nucleation, growth, and properties of thin films on well defined material surfaces. A part of this review is dedicated to the recognition of the major contributions to surface and thin film science by these pioneers. Finally, some of the important current developments in aberration corrected electron optics and eventual adaptations to in situ UHV microscopy are discussed. As a result of all the path breaking developments that have led to today's highly sophisticated UHV-TEM systems, integrated fundamental studies are now possible that combine many traditional surface science approaches. Combined investigations to date have involved in situ and ex situ surface microscopies such as scanning tunneling microscopy/atomic force microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, and photoemission electron microscopy, and area-integrating techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, high-resolution electron energy-loss and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, and others. Material systems ranging from atomic layers of metals and semiconductors to biology related depositions are being investigated. In the case of biological materials, however, strict limitations to high-resolution applications are imposed by electron radiation damage considerations.

Poppa, Helmut [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface Science 425 (1999) 114 Non-adiabatic charge transfer process of oxygen on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Science 425 (1999) 1­14 Non-adiabatic charge transfer process of oxygen on metal surfaces November 1998 Abstract The dynamics of charge transfer processes of oxygen on metal surfaces a different charged oxygen species. Empirical universal potential energy functions have been constructed

Zeiri, Yehuda

42

Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Electronic and structural properties of the InP(100)(2נ4) surface studied by core-level photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The (2נ4)-reconstructed InP(100) surfaces have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and synchrotron-radiation core-level photoelectron spectroscopy. STM observations show that the ?2 model describes the atomic structure of the InP(100)(2נ4) surface in a limited range of the surface-preparation conditions, as predicted theoretically but not previously observed. STM results also support the accuracy of the previously found mixed-dimer structure for the InP(100)(2נ4) surface under less P-rich conditions. A study of P 2p core-level photoelectron spectra, measured with different surface-sensitivity conditions, demonstrates that P 2p photoemission from the mixed-dimer InP(100)(2נ4) surface consists of at least two surface-core-level-shift (SCLS) components which have kinetic energies approximately 0.4eV higher and 0.3eV lower than the bulk emission. On the basis of the surface-sensitivity difference between these SCLSs, they are related to the third-layer and top-layer P sites in the mixed-dimer structure, respectively.

P. Laukkanen; J. Pakarinen; M. Ahola-Tuomi; M. Kuzmin; R.E. Perl; I.J. Vyrynen; A. Tukiainen; V. Rimpilinen; M. Pessa; M. Adell; J. Sadowski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Surface Science 411 (1998) 137153 Intrinsic defects on a TiO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(UHV). After annealing to 1100 K in UHV, a (1?1) surface with a terrace width of ~100 A° is obtained defects) in the bridging oxygen rows are created by the high-temperature anneal in UHV. In STM images]. and annealed to ~1100 K in UHV. We first discussRecently, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy the overall morph

Diebold, Ulrike

45

Surface Science 232 (1990) 353-366 North-Holland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terms of beam energy and flux, crystal orientation, and surface environment, under both UHV (lo-" Torr) and non-UHV (lo-' Torr) conditions. The microscope vacuum was determined to be a major factor in the type of surface damage observed. Under UHV conditions, NiO showed only ballistic surface erosion. Under non-UHV

Marks, Laurence D.

46

The Physics of Ultrahigh-Density Magnetic Recording Series in Surface Sciences, 41)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Physics of Ultrahigh-Density Magnetic Recording (Springer Series in Surface Sciences, 41. #550, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 + Materials Science and Engineering Department and Data Storage Systems an overview of the effects of various microstructural features on the resulting magnetic properties

Laughlin, David E.

47

Three- to two-dimensional transition in electrostatic screening of point charges at semiconductor surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrostatic screening of localized electric charges on semiconductor surfaces is investigated quantitatively by statistically analyzing the spatial distribution of thermally formed positively charged anion surface vacancies on GaAs and InP(110) surfaces. Two screening regimes are found: at low vacancy concentrations the vacancy charges are found to be three-dimensionally screened by bulk charge carriers. The corresponding screening length, which increases strongly with decreasing carrier concentration, is best described by the classical bulk screening length evaluated with a surface dielectric constant. With increasing vacancy concentration at given bulk carrier concentration, a three- to two-dimensional screening transition occurs. At high vacancy concentrations, the screening is found to be governed by charge carriers located in a two-dimensional surface vacancy defect band, which is partially filled due to the vacancy-induced surface band bending.

A. Laubsch, K. Urban, and Ph. Ebert

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Combined short scale roughness and surface dielectric function gradient effects on the determination of tip-sample force in atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution of tip roughness to the van der Waals force between an atomic force microscopy probe tip and the sample is calculated using the multilayer effective medium model, which allows us to consider the relevant case of roughness characterized by correlation length and amplitude in the nanometer scale. The effect of the surface dielectric function gradient is incorporated in the tip-sample force model. It is concluded that for rms roughness in the few nanometers range the effect of short scale tip roughness is quite significant.

Gusso, Andr, E-mail: gusso@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Departamento de Cincias Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)] [Departamento de Cincias Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

NANOMETER-SCALE INVESTIGATIONS BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY INTO THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TREATMENTS ON THE SURFACE STRUCTURE OF HAIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-section through both images (Fig. 4(d)) reveals the correlation, and that the modulation in surface potential associated with the deposits is of the order 70 mV. To test this further, an area of a freshly cleaned (by soaking in ethanol overnight and by rinsing... to determine the adhesion force (the force necessary to pull the cantilever off the surface) and adhesion energy between the tip and the surface area of interest. Force volume spectroscopy on a the bare hair surface and on a deposit as shown in Fig. 4(g) and (h...

Durkan, C.; Wang, N.

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Absence of spin-flip transition at the Cr(001) surface: A combined spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and neutron scattering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin-density wave (SDW) on Cr(001) has been investigated at temperatures between 20-300 K by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM). Although neutron-scattering data measured on the same crystal clearly show a spin-flip transition from a transversal (T)-SDW to a longitudinal (L)-SDW at the expected spin-flip (SF) temperature T{sub SF}=123 K, no change was found on the Cr(001) surface with SP-STM. Throughout the entire temperature range the Cr(001) surface maintains a topological antiferromagnetic order with an in-plane magnetization that inverts between adjacent atomically flat terraces separated by monatomic step edges. The experimental results are interpreted by an absence of a spin-flip transition in the near-surface region probably driven by the surface anisotropy. The continuous connection of the surface T-SDW to the bulk L-SDW is accomplished by the formation of a 90 deg. domain wall just below the surface.

Haenke, T.; Krause, S.; Berbil-Bautista, L.; Bode, M.; Wiesendanger, R.; Wagner, V.; Lott, D.; Schreyer, A. [Institute of Applied Physics and Microstructure Research Center, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Institut fuer Werkstoffforschung, GKSS Forschungszentrum, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Surface [4 + 2] Cycloaddition Reaction of Thymine on Si(111)77 Observed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WATLab and Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada ... Simple hydrocarbons(1) with aliphatic chain backbones, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic molecules without and with heteroatoms(3) have been investigated by a number of experimental methods, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as computational methods based on density functional theory (DFT), MollerPlesset perturbation theory (MP2), and semiempirical techniques. ...

A. Chatterjee; L. Zhang; K. T. Leung

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

Surface Science 430 (1999) L515L520 www.elsevier.nl/locate/susc Surface Science Letters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Science and Technology, 790-784 Pohang, South Korea b Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem, Germany Received 14 October 1998; accepted for publication 11 January. This substrate was chosen since the clean W(001)* Corresponding author. Fax: +82-562-279-3099. E-mail address

56

Molecular Science Computing | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientific Capabilities Molecular Science Computing Overview Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Deposition and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science...

57

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The Effects of Surface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Effects of Surface Interactions on Summertime Arctic Clouds at Coastal The Effects of Surface Interactions on Summertime Arctic Clouds at Coastal and Inland Locations Doran, J. Christopher Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Barnard, James Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Shaw, William Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Cloud optical depths, effective droplet radii, base heights, and liquid water paths at Barrow and Atqasuk have been compared for the warm months (mid-June through mid-September) for the years 2001-2003. The optical depths at Atqasuk were about 26% larger than those at Barrow, only 100 km away, and the ratio of measured irradiance to clear sly irradiance was almost 20% smaller at Atqasuk under cloudy conditions. The differences appear to be caused by enhanced surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat

58

Formation of the 55 reconstruction on cleaved Si(111) surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transformation of cleaved Si(111)21 surfaces into apparent 11, 55, and 77 structures has been studied with the scanning tunneling microscope. Two reaction paths are identified, one proceeding through a disordered adatom arrangement into the 77 structure, and the other proceeding directly from 21 into the 55 structure. Near a nucleation site (step or domain boundary), the first path is favored due to the abundance of adatoms on the surface, and far from a nucleation site the second path dominates.

R. M. Feenstra and M. A. Lutz

1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preparation of TiO2(110)-(1x1) Surface via UHV Cleavage: An scanning tunneling microscopy study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TiO2(110) surface was successfully prepared in-situ by UHV cleaving of a commercial TiO2 crystal.. STM imaging revealed atomically flat more than 1 ?m wide terraces with (110) orientation separated by steps running in [001] direction, with very low kink density. Atomically resolved STM images show periodicity in the [001] and [ ] directions with the unit cell parameters measured to ~3 and 6.5 respectively which are closed to the expected values of bulk terminated (1x1) surface.

Bondarchuk, Olexsandr; Lyubinetsky, Igor

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better. We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

Shen, Weidian

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Surface Geometric Structure of Chemically Modified Silica Studied by Direct Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Imaging and Adsorption Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The equation to estimate the surface area (m2g-1) according to the latter method is where NA is Avogadro's constant (mol-1), ? is the adsorbed amount (mL STPg-1), and P represents the relative pressure at which the monolayer is formed on the unmodified sample. ...

Masayoshi Fuji; Kotoe Machida; Takashi Takei; Tohru Watanabe; Masatoshi Chikazawa

2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Overview of surface science and catalysis by Qifei Wu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces: single crystal transition metals, metal nanoparticles (Au), metal oxides, sulfides, carbides: · Metcars are the better catalysts for HDS than the other metal carbide materials. · Metcars have better: Sulfides (RuS2), carbides (MoC, TiC) #12;Density Functional Theory in Catalysis Employ DFT to understand

64

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the surfaces of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains a detailed description of the experimental complexities encountered in developing scanning tunneling microscope (STM) probing of atomic structure on the surface of freshly-grown hydrogenated-amorphous semiconductors. It also contains a speculative microscopic film-growth model that explains differences between the disorder in CVD grown a-Ge:H versus a-Si:H films. This model is derived from prior results obtained in the chemical analysis of GeH{sub 4} plasmas, combined with surface reaction and thermodynamic considerations. The neutral radical fragments of silane, disilane and germane dissociation in discharges, which dominate the vapor and film-growth reactions, have been deduced from detailed analysis of prior data and are reported. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Gallagher, A.; Ostrom, R.; Tannenbaum, D. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and atomic force microscopy of brass electrodes in sulfuric acid solution containing benzotriazole and chloride ion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different methods were used to roughen brass (Cu/Zn = 67/33) electrodes in 0.5 M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] containing 1.0 mM benzotriazole (BTAH): (1) polarization at +0.05 V vs. saturated calomel for 5 min; (2) immersion in the above solution for six hours; and (3) oxidation-reduction cycling in the presence of chloride ion. The surfaces prepared by the first two methods exhibited surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of the polymeric complex [Cu(I)BTA][sub s]. The SERS spectrum obtained from electrodes prepared by the third method is very similar to that of [Cu(I)CIBTAH][sub 4]. Examination of the electrodes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a large number of grain boundary sites are formed by the roughening processes. This effect is attributed to the loss of zinc, which occurs during corrosion of the mirror-like, polished brass electrode surface in the sulfuric acid solution. 11 refs., 5 figs.

Rubim, J.C.; Kim, J.; Henderson, E.; Cotton, T.M. (Instituto de Quimica da Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil) Ames Lab., IA (United States) Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Surface Science 175 (1986) 215-225 North-Holland, Amsterdam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Tropsch, and ammonia synthesis. The penetration of hydrogen into the bulk causing embrittlement of materialsSurface Science 175 (1986) 215-225 North-Holland, Amsterdam 215 KINETICS OF HYDROGEN ABSORPTION The kinetics of hydrogen absorption by Pd(ll0) have been measured as a function of impurity sulfur coverage

Goodman, Wayne

67

Evolving research directions in Surface OceanLower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science Cliff S. Law. Understanding the exchange of energy, gases and particles at the ocean­atmosphere interface is critical­Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) coordinates multi-disciplinary ocean­ atmosphere research projects that quantify

68

Scanning tuneeling microscopy studies of fivefold surfaces of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals and of thin silver films on those surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work in this dissertation mainly focuses on the clean fivefold surfaces of i-Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals as well as the nucleation and growth of Ag films on these surfaces. In addition, Ag film growth on NiAl(110) has been explored in the frame of this dissertation. First, we have investigated the equilibration of a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal at 900-915 K and 925-950 K, using Omicron variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Annealing at low temperatures resulted in many voids on some terraces while the others were almost void-free. After annealing at 925-950K, void-rich terraces became much rarer. Our STM images suggest that through growth and coalescence of the voids, a different termination becomes exposed on host terraces. All of these observations in our study indicate that even after the quasicrystalline terrace-step structure appears, it evolves with time and temperature. More specifically, based on the STM observations, we conclude that during the annealing a wide range of energetically similar layers nucleate as surface terminations, however, with increasing temperature (and time) this distribution gets narrower via elimination of the metastable void-rich terraces. Next, we have examined the bulk structural models of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal in terms of the densities, compositions and interplanar spacings for the fivefold planes that might represent physical surface terminations. In our analyses, we mainly have focused on four deterministic models which have no partial or mixed occupancy but we have made some comparisons with an undeterministic model. We have compared the models with each other and also with the available experimental data including STM, LEED-IV, XPD and LEIS. In all deterministic models, there are two different families of layers (a pair of planes), and the nondeterministic model contains similar group of planes. These two families differ in terms of the chemical decoration of their top planes. Hence, we name them as Pd+(with Pd) and Pd-(without Pd). Based on their planer structure and the step height, it can be said that these two families can be viable surface terminations. However, besides the Pd content, these two sets differ in terms of relative densities of their top planes as well as the gap separating the layer from the nearest atomic plane. The experimental data and other arguments lead to the conclusion that the Pd- family is favored over the Pd+. This has an important implication on the interpretation of local motifs seen in the high resolution STM images. In other words, the dark stars are not formed by cut-Bergmans rather they are formed by cut-Mackays.

Unal, Baris

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Acknowledgment EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Acknowledgment Please acknowledge your use of the EMC in your publications and presentations with the following acknowledgment statement: The electron microscopy was accomplished at the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 by UChicago Argonne, LLC.

70

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SAMM SAMM EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Sub-Ångstrom Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility In order to meet the scientific challenges of the future, the EMC has built a new state-of-the-art laboratory space for advanced electron microscopy. The new building has been designed to provide next- generation science with an operating environment that cannot be attained by renovating existing facilities. The EMC staff learned as much as possible from similar efforts around the world, including the SuperSTEM building at Daresbury, the Triebenberg Special Laboratory, the AML at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the new NIST building, and various facilities for nanoscience.

71

Surface Science Reports 64 (2009) 233254 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these systems. The role of surfaces in these small-scale systems has led to natural interest in developing purification Energy generation a b s t r a c t Phenomena in microsystems and nanosystems are influenced

72

Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) provides information on the crystallographic structure of a sample, while scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) provides information on its electrical properties. The advantage of these techniques is their high spatial resolution, which cannot be attained with any other techniques. However, because these techniques analyze the top layers of the sample, surface or cross section features directly influence the results of the measurements, and sample preparation is a main step in the analysis. In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe films. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Characterization of Cell Surface and EPS Remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis-like 1 Signal Transduction Pathway mutants by Atomic Force Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must quickly sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the modulation of multiple cellular responses, including motility, EPS production, and cell-to-cell interactions. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from Azospirillum brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation. In A. brasilense, cell surface properties, including EPS production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have detected distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains that are absent in the wild type strain. Whereas the wild type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition and lectin-binding assays suggest that the composition of EPS components in the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that mutations in the Che1 pathway that result in increased flocculation are correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix structure produced by the mutants, including likely changes in the EPS structure and/or composition.

Billings, Amanda N [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Bible, Amber [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alexandre, Gladys [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Office of Science User Facility An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

76

Surface Science 415 (1998) 363375 Epitaxial growth of Cu onto Si(111) surfaces at low temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 10 and 3 monolayers (ML), respectively. This change is attributed to the silicide formation on the Si(111)-(7?7) surface at 160 K is proposed. The changes in periodicity are due to the silicide rights reserved. Keywords: Copper; Epitaxy; Electron­solid diffraction; Metallic films; Metal

Hasegawa, Shuji

77

4th-International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Science - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 4-th International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Dynamics (UDS4) was held at the Telluride Summer Research Center on June 22-27, 2003. The International Organizing Committee consisting of Hrvoje Petek (USA), Xiaoyang Zhu (USA), Pedro Echenique (Spain) and Maki Kawai (Japan) brought together a total of 51 participants 16 of whom were from Europe, 10 from Japan, and 25 from the USA. The focus of the conference was on ultrafast electron or light induced processes at well-defined surfaces. Ultrafast surface dynamics concerns the transfer of charge and energy at solid surfaces on the femtosecond time scale. These processes govern rates of fundamental steps in surface reactions, interfacial electron transfer in molecular electronics, and relaxation in spin transport. Recent developments in femtosecond laser technology make it possible to measure by a variety of nonlinear optical techniques directly in the time domain the microscopic rates underlying these interfacial processes. Parallel progress in scanning probe microscopy makes it possible at a single molecular level to perform the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy measurements, to induce reactions with tunneling electrons, and to observe their outcome. There is no doubt that successful development in the field of ultrafast surface dynamics will contribute to many important disciplines.

Hrvoje Petek

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science newsroomassetsimagesscience-icon.png Science Cutting edge, multidisciplinary national-security science. Health Space Computing Energy Earth Materials Science...

79

Applied Surface Science 263 (2012) 712721 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ties make Pd a very useful element in a wide range of applications such as fuel cell catalysts [14 structures show promise in future applications such as sensors, water purification systems, fuel cell], sensors [15], dechlorination catalysts [16], and hydrogen storage media [17,18]. For surface dependent

Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

80

Evolution of the Surface Science of Catalysis from Single Crystals to Metal Nanoparticles under Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum studies of metal single crystal surfaces using electron and molecular beam scattering revealed that the surface atoms relocate when the surface is clean (reconstruction) and when it is covered by adsorbates (adsorbate induced restructuring). It was also discovered that atomic steps and other low coordination surface sites are active for breaking chemical bonds (H-H, O=O, C-H, C=O and C-C) with high reaction probability. Investigations at high reactant pressures using sum frequency generation (SFG)--vibrational spectroscopy and high pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HPSTM) revealed bond breaking at low reaction probability sites on the adsorbate-covered metal surface, and the need for adsorbate mobility for continued turnover. Since most catalysts (heterogeneous, enzyme and homogeneous) are nanoparticles, colloid synthesis methods were developed to produce monodispersed metal nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range and controlled shapes to use them as new model catalyst systems in two-dimensional thin film form or deposited in mesoporous three-dimensional oxides. Studies of reaction selectivity in multipath reactions (hydrogenation of benzene, cyclohexene and crotonaldehyde) showed that reaction selectivity depends on both nanoparticle size and shape. The oxide-metal nanoparticle interface was found to be an important catalytic site because of the hot electron flow induced by exothermic reactions like carbon monoxide oxidation.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Structural defects in epitaxial graphene layers synthesized on C-terminated 4H-SiC (0001{sup }) surfaceTransmission electron microscopy and density functional theory studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal structural defects in graphene multilayers synthesized on the carbon-terminated face of a 4H-SiC (0001{sup }) substrate were investigated using the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The analyzed systems include a wide variety of defected structures such as edge dislocations, rotational multilayers, and grain boundaries. It was shown that graphene layers are composed of grains of the size of several nanometres or larger; they differ in a relative rotation by large angles, close to 30. The structure of graphene multilayers results from the synthesis on a SiC (0001{sup }) surface, which proceeds via intensive nucleation of new graphene layers that coalesce under various angles creating an immense orientational disorder. Structural defects are associated with a built-in strain resulting from a lattice mismatch between the SiC substrate and the graphene layers. The density functional theory data show that the high-angular disorder of AB stacked bi-layers is not restoring the hexagonal symmetry of the lattice.

Borysiuk, J., E-mail: jolanta.borysiuk@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); So?tys, J.; Piechota, J. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, University of Warsaw, Pawi?skiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Krukowski, S. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, University of Warsaw, Pawi?skiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Soko?owska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Baranowski, J. M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wlczy?ska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); St?pniewski, R. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED Correspondence and requests for materials: konradr@asu.edu and varanasi@mit.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficients has potential for efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of fluids with high or moderate surface tension27­31 or Marangoni dropwise condensation of binary mixtures1 SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED SURFACES Correspondence and requests

83

J. DISPERSION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 19(6&7) 1151-1162 (1998) SURFACE TENSION, STICKINESS AND ENGULFMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. DISPERSION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 19(6&7) 1151-1162 (1998) SURFACE TENSION, STICKINESS,2] that there were three important factors to consider in the mechanism of phagocytosis; these were surface tension] and Fowkes [10] then linked the Hamaker Constant to the dispersion contribution to surface tension. Van Oss

Schofield, Andrew B.

84

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Laboratory Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

85

Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

La Rosa, Andres H.

86

Electron Microscopy Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Electron Microscopy Lab Electron Microscopy Lab Focusing on the study of microstructures with electron and ion beam instruments, including crystallographic and chemical techniques. April 12, 2012 Transmission electron microscope Rob Dickerson examines a multiphase oxide scale using the FEI Titan 80-300 transmission electron microscope. Contact Rob Dickerson (505) 667-6337 Email Rod McCabe (505) 606-1649 Email Pat Dickerson (505) 665-3036 Email Tom Wynn (505) 665-6861 Email Dedicated to the characterization of materials through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures in support of Basic Energy Science, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, DoD, DOE, Work for Others, nuclear energy, and weapons programs. Go to full website »

87

Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

88

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Training Training EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers User Training Prior Training in Electron Microscopy: People who wish to operate TEMs must have at least one college-level course in TEM with a lab component or previous TEM experience. The college course can't be one in which TEM was just one of many topics. For researchers who lack academic training and/or practical experience in electron microscopy, we suggest the short courses in TEM at the Hooke College of Applied Sciences, and the hands-on TEM courses at Northwestern University or the University of Chicago or Northern Illinois University.

89

New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology** By Zhong Lin Wang* 1. Electron Microscopy and Nanotechnology Nanotechnology, as an international initiative for science manufacturing are the foundation of nanotechnology. Tracking the historical background of why nanotechnology

Wang, Zhong L.

90

Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This (<100 [Angstrom]) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 [times] r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm[sup 2] catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on Pt-on-alumina'' and on alumina-on-Pt'' are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

Boszormenyi, I.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This (<100 {Angstrom}) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 {times} r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm{sup 2} catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on ``Pt-on-alumina`` and on ``alumina-on-Pt`` are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

Boszormenyi, I.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Molecular Science Computing | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Science Computing Overview Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Deposition and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR...

93

True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces: High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts is studied in Chapter 8.and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts, in order toseek the influence of catalyst surface structure on

Zhu, Zhongwei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General Information for EMC Users General Information for EMC Users The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory. It is one of three scientific user facilities for electron beam microcharacterization and one of several National User Facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory. As a scientific user facility, the EMC supports user-accessible instruments (Resources) for high spatial resolution microanalysis, field imaging, nanoscale structural characterization, nanoscale fabrication and manipulation, and unique in situ studies of materials under the influence of ion-beam irradiation. These capabilities are used in a diverse variety of research areas to address grand challenge scientific questions encompassing, for example, energy-related studies, biology, astrophysics, archaeology, superconductivity, nanotechnology, environmental engineering, tribology, and ferroelectricity. The research is performed both by users and by EMC staff. While many users work independently, the most challenging research activities require extensive contributions from EMC staff.

96

Electrochemical surface science twenty years later: Expeditions into the electrocatalysis of reactions at the core of artificial photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface science research fixated on phenomena and processes that transpire at the electrode-electrolyte interface has been pursued in the past. A considerable proportion of the earlier work was on materials and reactions pertinent to the operation of small-molecule fuel cells. The experimental approach integrated a handful of surface-sensitive physicalanalytical methods with traditional electrochemical techniques, all harbored in a single environment-controlled electrochemistry-surface science apparatus (EC-SSA); the catalyst samples were typically precious noble metals constituted of well-defined single-crystal surfaces. More recently, attention has been diverted from fuel-to-energy generation to its converse, (solar) energy-to-fuel transformation; e.g., instead of water synthesis (from hydrogen and oxygen) in fuel cells, water decomposition (to hydrogen and oxygen) in artificial photosynthesis. The rigorous surface-science protocols remain unchanged but the experimental capabilities have been expanded by the addition of several characterization techniques, either as EC-SSA components or as stand-alone instruments. The present manuscript describes results selected from on-going studies of earth-abundant electrocatalysts for the reactions that underpin artificial photosynthesis: nickel-molybdenum alloys for the hydrogen evolution reaction, calcium birnessite as a heterogeneous analogue for the oxygen-evolving complex in natural photosynthesis, and single-crystalline copper in relation to the carbon dioxide reduction reaction.

Manuel P. Soriaga; Jack H. Baricuatro; Kyle D. Cummins; Youn-Geun Kim; Fadl H. Saadi; Guofeng Sun; Charles C.L. McCrory; James R. McKone; Jesus M. Velazquez; Ivonne M. Ferrer; Azhar I. Carim; Alnald Javier; Brian Chmielowiec; David C. Lacy; John M. Gregoire; Jean Sanabria-Chinchilla; Xenia Amashukeli; William J. Royea; Bruce S. Brunschwig; John C. Hemminger; Nathan S. Lewis; John L. Stickney

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the surface topography of commercial fluid cracking catalysts (FCCs) and pillared interlayered clay (PILC) catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atomic force microscope operating in contact or Tapping ModeTM has been used to study the surface morphology, nanostructure, clay plates packing and conformation while providing nanometer-scale features of \\{FCCs\\} surfaces not readily accessible by other microscopic techniques. Contact mode micrometer-scale (15?m x 15?m) AFM images have revealed that the topography and molecular organization of the surface of several commercial \\{FCCs\\} are fairly heterogenous in nature, frequently containing discontinuities represented by deep trenches, valleys and crater-like openings with micrometer dimensions. Surfaces are in general, composed of short stacks of plates with voids or pores between these stacks resulting from materials occlusion between plates, from missing plates, missing stacks of plates and from misaligned stacks of plates. Gross structural differences between fresh and equilibrium FCCs, were not observed. However surfaces of equilibrium \\{FCCs\\} may contain debris possibly representing NiO and V2O5 deposits, in agreement with chemical analysis. Not all equilibrium microspheres contain surface debris. Thus AFM images allow the distinction of old and young FCC fractions in equilibrium FCC samples. Coke deposits during gas oil cracking at MAT conditions, are imaged as raised surface features representing molecules or cluster of molecules. Contact-mode AFM images of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) cracking catalysts having alumina clusters as the structure supporting pillars, represent the catalyst surface as a collection of white spots in an hexagonal arrangements having nearest neighbor and lateral distances in agreement with the repeat distances of the clay siloxane layer; evidenced of surface alumina debris was not observed an all the extraframework alumina introduced by the pillaring reaction is located in the clay interlamellar space. After exposure for 5h to 100% steam at 760 C and 1 atm, the structural parameters of the surface disappear when the PILC was prepared using montmorillonite and were retained when the PILC was prepared from rectorite. Thus \\{PILCs\\} collapse is the result of the clay (single) silicate layer hydrothermal instability and it occurs irrespective of the hydrothermal stability of the pillars used. In contrast to FCCs, coke deposition from gas oil cracking at MAT conditions, form on the surface of pillared rectorites a layer geometrically similar to graphite that can be easily removed by heating in air at 600C without affecting the PILC's structure or cracking activity.

Mario L. Occelli; Scot A.C. Gould

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Study of hard disk and slider surfaces using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to study the properties of amorphous hard carbon overcoats on disks and sliders, and the properties of the lubricant. The modification of lubricants after performing thermal desorption studies was measured by NEXAFS, and the results are compared to the thermal desorption data. The study of lubricant degradation in wear tracks is described. Sliders were investigated before and after wear test, and the modification of the slider coating as well as the transfer of lubricant to the slider was studied. The studies show that the lubricant is altered chemically during the wear. Fluorine is removed and carboxyl groups are formed.

Anders, S.; Stammler, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.; Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States). Almaden Research Center; Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Wear 267 (2009) 417424 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wear 267 (2009) 417­424 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Wear journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/wear. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA b Dept. of Mechanical Keywords: Electrical contacts Non-ferrous metals Electron microscopy Surface analysis a b s t r a c t Metal

Sawyer, Wallace

100

Molecular Science Computing Policies | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Molecular Science Computing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Molecular Studies of Surfaces under Reaction Conditions; Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Instruments developed in our laboratory permit the atomic and molecular level study of NPs under reaction conditions (SFG, ambient pressure XPS and high pressure STM). These studies indicate continuous restructuring of the metal substrate and the adsorbate molecules, changes of oxidation states with NP size and surface composition variations of bimetallic NPs with changes of reactant molecules.

Somorjai, G.A.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Structure, defects, and impurities at the rutile TiO2(011)-(2 1) surface: A scanning tunneling microscopy study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available online 21 July 2006 Abstract The titanium dioxide rutile (011) (equivalent to (101)) surface boundaries 1. Introduction Titanium dioxide is a versatile material that finds appli- cations in a wide range) structure are active adsorption sites. Segregation of calcium impurities from the bulk results in an ordered

Diebold, Ulrike

103

Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied temperature are reported. The slow dynamic behavior of vacancies and As adatoms can be resolved within a time scale of about one minute, The vacancies and As adatoms are observed to move preferably along the [110

104

The surface and materials science of tin oxide Matthias Batzill *, Ulrike Diebold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

com- position from stoichiometric surfaces with Sn4+ surface cations into a reduced surface with Sn2 adsorption and reaction studies on SnO2 sur- faces have been hampered by the challenges of preparing well

Diebold, Ulrike

105

Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

McIntyre, B.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microscopy (XSD-MIC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports...

107

Surface Science Letters Nature of the excited states of the rutile TiO2(110) surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nature of the electronically excited states on titanium dioxide surface is important for under- standing to the band gap in titanium dioxide that slows down recombina- tion of the electron­hole pair produced upon with adsorbed water molecule. The calculated adsorption energies and geometries are compared with available

Truong, Thanh N.

108

Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a self-confessed purveyor of ``frequently outrageous views,'' Steve Fuller can be relied on for a spirited and provocative text - and so this proves. Jerry Ravetz's gushing endorsement on the back cover claims that the public's understanding of science ``will never be the same again'' and that the book proves Steve Fuller to be ``actually science's best friend.'' But those of an orthodox scientific persuasion (though perhaps not his intended audience) are likely to be provoked into dyspeptic displeasure by the first few sideswipes at what they hold most dear. This short text comprises one volume of the series `` Concepts in Social Science,'' in publishing order sandwiched between Rights and Liberalism. Its expressed aim is that the reader come away thinking ``that the idea and institution of `science' go to the very heart of what the social sciences are about.'' In a style that is always inspired but for all save the cognoscenti can sometimes verge on the abstruse, Fuller argues that social and scientific realities are inextricably intertwined. Science's implausible knowledge claims of detachment and objectivity succeed only in perpetuating self-delusion, sowing the seeds for science's own demise. For those familiar with the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) debates, the overall message will not be entirely new - and indeed the book is in part a reworking of some of Fuller's previously-published journal articles - but the liveliness of this contentious prose and its immodest, sweeping polemical style present a critical case against science that is often uncomfortably near the bone. What is impressive is Fuller's intellectual boldness in weaving together a wealth of sociological, philosophical and historical arguments that aim to reveal for public scrutiny the true nature of science. The picture of science created is of its frailty and everydayness - qualities that Fuller claims have been disguised by an unattractive mix of intellectual cunning and social naivet from scientists. Fuller portrays a lay public that combines insight and innocence. Sometimes the public can see through science's ploys for extravagant research proposals, thereby ``displaying a fundamentally sound instinctive response to science.'' At other times, the public is foolish enough to regard scientific knowledge as distinct and authoritative - ``reliable'' lay beliefs about science he says are sadly rare. Thus, in Fuller's eyes, misunderstandings of science abound. Whereas some critics see the yearly panjandrum that constitutes Science Weeks as a clumsy and politically naive stab at ``public relations,'' Fuller sees darker forces of ignorance at work - ``evidence of the scientific community misunderstanding something significant about the social conditions that enable its existence.'' Tackling the public understanding of science (PUS) debate in such a spirit in Chapter 1 sets the tone for the protracted dissection of science that follows. But Fuller's aim is more to do with the revelation of sociological phenomena than with ridicule of science. For example, in Chapter 2 the idiosyncrasies of particular scientific disciplines are picked apart (in the best sociological tradition, physics comes in for a good deal of epistemological stick). Fuller succeeds in portraying the various branches of science as fundamentally different, with distinct working practices shaped by different histories and presumptions. Why, the author then muses, are interdisciplinary wars within science rare, in contrast to social science? With such questions to crack, science is rich pickings for sociological inquiry. In Chapter 3, Fuller's concern is the many-layered meanings of the terms science, scientific and scientists. Here the author takes us through the sociological and philosophical twists and turns of meaning with ideological ease, neatly contrasting today's science with that of the past. For example, long gone is science's unquestioned claim always to serve the best interest of the state; now science is self-serving. Much missed too is science's ability to stab

Jeff Thomas, Centre for Science Education, The Open

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SCIENCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SCIENCE ... Sedoheptulose phosphate may be an important intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism in animals as well as in plants, the NIH scientists observe. ... NOL Makes Magnetic Material ...

1952-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

113

Diphosphine Dioxide Cages and Hydrogen Peroxide Adducts of Phosphine Oxides: Syntheses and Applications in Surface Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the P=O group for probing the surface acidity of oxides. (c) Most importantly, getting more insight regarding the nature of the P=O/surface interaction. Hereby, the mobility of the adsorbed species is of fundamental interest. In the classical 31P MAS...

Hilliard, Casie Renee

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

Surface Science 150 (1985) 351-357 North-Holland, Amsterdam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with this reaction compare favorably with the corresponding values found for high-area, supported nickel catalysts and coworkers have 12-43 mod- eled nickel and ruthenium high-surface-area catalysts with Ni and Ru single chosen for study is carbon monoxide methanation CO+3H,+CH4+H,0. (1) Studies of this reaction over high-surface-area

Goodman, Wayne

115

SCIENCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SCIENCE ... Neutral V-particles were first discovered in 1947 at the University of Manchester where researchers observed v-shaped tracks in a magnetic cloud chamber exposed to cosmic rays. ...

1953-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these interactions modulate the abundance and characteristics of small and medium size cumuliform clouds that are generated by local convection. These interactions are not well understood and are responsible for large uncertainties in global climate models, which are used to forecast future climate states. The campaign will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; T Jackson; B.Kustas; PJ Lamb; GM McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Turner

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

118

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

119

Surface Science Perspectives Dispersed Au atoms, supported on TiO2(110)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activation energy for the oxidation of carbon monoxide? Many factors could con- tribute. For example); Catalysis; Gold; Titanium oxide; Surface defects At the end of the 1980s Haruta and coworkers made

Diebold, Ulrike

120

Surface Science 437 (1999) 173190 www.elsevier.nl/locate/susc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces. Titanium dioxide has important [1]. Since this time, its popularity has increased steadily, and to exploreperform experiments on a `well-characterized' system. For example, adsorption of water [2­5], its

Diebold, Ulrike

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Surface Science Prospectives Weakly bound buffer layers: A versatile template for metallic nano-clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at sub-micron width, millimeter long, were obtained experimentally, with line width determined are often used as convenient model systems for industrial supported catalysts that could be studied under- tal particles supported on high surface area materials, e.g. silica, alumina, titania or carbon, under

Asscher, Micha

122

ELSEVIER Surface Science 303 (lYY4) 206-230 ;,,.;_:_.y y .../. .' ..`,. :> .,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by means of the Fischer- Tropsch technique, and the steam reforming of natural gas to form so-called syngas. Representative examples are the ammonia synthesis via Haber-Bosch, the synthesis of alco- hols and hydrocarbons of products, and (7) diffusion of products from the surface. One typically treats these elementary reactions

Miller, William H.

123

Projection Microscopy for Frugal Science and Diagnostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Projection microscopes provide opportunities to reduce eye-strain, improve throughput, and facilitate user training. Here we present a frugal design for under $5 that provides quality...

Cybulski, James; Prakash, Manu

124

Nonlinear vibrational microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Abstract: Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile...

126

Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

149802 149802 , 1291 (2007); 318 Science et al. L. Ozyuzer, Superconductors Emission of Coherent THz Radiation from www.sciencemag.org (this information is current as of November 29, 2007 ): The following resources related to this article are available online at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291 version of this article at: including high-resolution figures, can be found in the online Updated information and services, http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291/DC1 can be found at: Supporting Online Material found at: can be related to this article A list of selected additional articles on the Science Web sites http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#related-content http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#otherarticles

127

SCience  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

all all SCience Chicago Office Environment, Safety and Health Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual December 2012 ~5 {?JI-- l L-H1- I Roxanne E. Purucker, Manager Date SC-CH FRAM Revision 7 Office of Science - Chicago Office SC-CH Revision History TITLE: SC-CH Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual POINT OF CONTACT: Karl Moro SCMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) TO BE UPDATED: December 31, 2013 Revision Date Reason/Driver Description 5 Oct 10 Annual review and revision of the SC-CH ES&H Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual Changes were primarily made to address administrative and organizational changes and general improvement of text and presentation. I 6 Nov 11 Annual review and revision of

128

Molecular Beam and Surface Science Studies of Heterogeneous Reaction Kinetics Including Combustion Dynamics. Final Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program examined the heterogeneous reaction kinetics and reaction dynamics of surface chemical processes which are of direct relevance to efficient energy production, condensed phase reactions, and mateials growth including nanoscience objectives. We have had several notable scientific and technical successes. Illustrative highlights include: (1) a thorough study of how one can efficiently produce synthesis gas (SynGas) at relatively low Rh(111) catalyst temperatures via the reaction CH{sub4}+1/2 O{sub2} {r_arrow} CO+2H{sub2}. In these studies methane activation is accomplished utilizing high-kinetic energy reagents generated via supersonic molecular beams, (2) experiments which have incisively probed the partial oxidation chemistry of adsorbed 1- and 2- butene on Rh and ice, as well as partial oxidation of propene on Au; (3) investigation of structural changes which occur to the reconstructed (23x{radical}3)-Au(111) surface upon exposure to atomic oxygen, (4) a combined experimental and theoretical examination of the fundamental atomic-level rules which govern defect minimization during the formation of self-organizing stepped nanostructures, (5) the use of these relatively defect-free nanotemplates for growing silicon nanowires having atomically-dimensioned widths, (6) a combined scanning probe and atomic beam scattering study of how the presence of self-assembling organic overlayers interact with metallic supports substrates - this work hs led to revision of the currently held view of how such adsorbates reconfigure surface structure at the atomic level, (7) an inelastic He atom scattering study in which we examined the effect of chain length on the low-energy vibrations of alkanethiol striped phase self-assembled monolayers on Au(111), yielding information on the forces that govern interfacial self-assembly, (8) a study of the vibrational properties of disordered films of SF{sub6} adsorbed on Au(111), and (9) a study of the activated chemistry and photochemistry of NO on NiO/Ni. Innovative STM and molecular beam instrumentation has been fabricated to enable this program.

Sibener, S. J.

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microscopy. I: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicates the spindle to be an orienting force through which a co-ordinated con tractile...asoT,E. M. and M@&soN,C. W. Handbook of Chemi cal Microscopy. Vol. 1. 1st...498 "586,1950. 164. NAORA, H. Fundamental Studies on the Determination of Desoxypentose-Nucleic...

Robert C. Mellors

1953-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE-EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis Science #12;ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis) ______________________________ ______________________________ Ergun Akleman Valerie Taylor (Member) (Head of Department) December 2003 Major Subject: Computer Science

Keyser, John

131

Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The mission of the Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is to: Conduct materials research using advanced microstructural characterization methods; Maintain unique resources and facilities for scientific research for the both the Argonne National Laboratory and national scientific community. Develop and expand the frontiers of microanalysis by fostering the evolution of synergistic state-of-the-art resources in instrumentation, techniques and scientific expertise; The staff members of the EMC carry out their own research as well as participate in collaborative programs with other scientists at Argonne National Laboratory as well as researchers, educators and students worldwide. The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff perform collaborative research with members of other Divisions at Argonne National Laboratory and with collaborators from universities and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

133

NREL: Energy Sciences - Klara Maturova  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Klara Maturova Klara Maturova Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Klara Maturova Phone: (303) 384-7909 Email: klara.maturova@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2010 Dr. Klara Maturova joined the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group at NREL in April 2010. Dr. Maturova obtained her M.Sc. degree (cum laude) in July 2005 at the Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic. She did research in the field of scanning probe microscopy and surface plasmon polaritons in the Solid State Physics and Surfaces Group. During her master study, she interned at the Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands, where she researched fullerene molecules on graphite and diamond surfaces. One year later, she bacame a Ph.D. student in Eindhoven's Molecular Materials and Nanosystems Group under the supervision of M. Kemerink and R.

134

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Submit an EMC Proposal Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Proposal Submission Deadline Dates for FY2014: November 1, 2013 March 7, 2014 July 11, 2014 Is your proposal a multi-facility proposal? In other words, do you intend to submit proposals to EMC and APS or CNM for your research project? If your answer is "yes," go now to the Proposal Gateway.

135

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMC Users Committee EMC Users Committee EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers EMC Users Committee An EMC Users Committee has been organized to enhance communication between the user community and the EMC. While the EMC relies on and encourages strong interaction among its users and between its staff and users, the Users Committee provides an additional formal mechanism for user input into EMC planning and operations to ensure that users' needs and concerns are addressed.

136

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

End-of-Proposal Report End-of-Proposal Report EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers End-of-Proposal Report In accordance with the User Agreement, please provide the EMC with the following information when your proposal expires (one year after its acceptance date or when the experiments end, whichever is sooner). A research summary/progress report using these two templates:

137

Electron Microscopy Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Becoming a User Becoming a User EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Procedure to Become a User at the EMC 1. Summary All users have to fulfill certain requirements before access to the EMC can be granted. The following list provides short descriptions of the requirements. Details can be found on this page and via the relevant links at the left. Register for access to Argonne's scientific user facilities (or update your user registration information).

138

Surface Imaging Using UHV-CTEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......review-article Review Surface Imaging Using UHV-CTEM Katsumichi Yagi Physics Department...conventional transmission electron microscopies (UHV-CTEM) is reviewed. Techniques for routine...surface dynamic processes. surface imaging|UHV-CTEM|surface structure| Review / Electron......

Katsumichi Yagi

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Abstract: In the...

140

Chapter 11 - Light sheet microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

Michael Weber; Michaela Mickoleit; Jan Huisken

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Laser scanning third-harmonic-generation microscopy in biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Denk, J. H. Stricker and W. W. Webb, "Two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy," Science 248, 73-76 (1990). 3. S. Maiti, J. B. Shear, R. M. Williams, W. R. Zipfel and W. W. Webb, "Measuring-214 (1996). 6. R. Hellwarth and P. Christensen, "Nonlinear optical microscopic examination of structure

Silberberg, Yaron

142

Integrating Experiment and Theory in Electrochemical Surface Science: Studies on the Molecular Adsorption on Noble-Metal Electrode Surfaces by Density Functional Theory, Electron Spectroscopy, and Electrochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The STM images of benzene chemisorbed on a Pd(111) electrode surface were simulated and the results suggested that, when the potential of the Pd electrode is held at 0.3 V, benzene is chemisorbed on a 3-fold site; while at 0.55 V, the molecule is adsorbed...

Javier, Alnald Caintic

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nuclear Materials Science:Materials Science Technology:MST-16...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and actinide fundamental science. Alison Costello One for the team by Diana Del Mauro Alison Costello Surface Science and Corrosion team staff member Alison Costello and...

144

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging (XMI) Imaging (XMI) About XMI Science and Research Beamlines Highlights Software and Tools Intranet Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts FAQs Beamlines News Publications APS Email Portal APS Intranet APS Phonebook APS Quick Links for Users APS Safety and Training Welcome to the X-ray Microscopy and Imaging group (XMI)! X-ray Microscopy and Imaging is part of the X-ray Science Division at the Advanced Photon Source. We develop and support a diverse and multidisciplinary user research program at Sectors 2 and 32 of the APS, with the overall goal to image and study materials structures at spatial and temporal resolutions that are most scientifically relevant to the cutting-edge advances in materials, biological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. To achieve this goal, we actively engage in various research activities including

145

Real-Space Identification of Intermolecular Bonding with Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atomic Force Microscopy 10.1126/science.1242603 Jun Zhang Pengcheng Chen Bingkai Yuan Wei Ji Zhihai Cheng Xiaohui Qiu 1Key Laboratory...Intermolecular Bonding with Atomic Force Microscopy Jun Zhang, Pengcheng Chen, Bingkai Yuan, Wei Ji, Zhihai Cheng, Xiaohui Qiu...

Jun Zhang; Pengcheng Chen; Bingkai Yuan; Wei Ji; Zhihai Cheng; Xiaohui Qiu

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Crystal Structure of a Coxsackievirus B3-RD Variant and a Refined 9-Angstrom Cryo-Electron Microscopy Reconstruction of the Virus Complexed with Decay-Accelerating Factor (DAF) Provide a New Footprint of DAF on the Virus Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...features with the fitted crystal structure of the virus...from the newly solved crystal structure of the RD variant...the virus surface as a bent cylinder crossing in...graph describing the spherical average distribution...map calculated from the crystal structure (white) was...

Joshua D. Yoder; Javier O. Cifuente; Jieyan Pan; Jeffrey M. Bergelson; Susan Hafenstein

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 MST-6 Home Home In the MSL FEI Tecnai F30 Analytical TEM/STEM JEOL 6300FXV High Resolution SEM JEOL 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Philips XL30 F Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System Phillips CM30 Transmission Electron Microscope In the Sigma Building JEOL 840 EPMA with Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM FEI XL30 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System CONTACTS Bob Field 665.3938 Pat Dickerson 665.3036 Rob Dickerson 667.6337 Rod McCabe 606.1649 The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML) is part of MST-6, the Materials Technology - Metallurgy Group within the Materials Science and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is a facility dedicated to the characterization of materials primarily through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures with several electron and ion beam instruments. Accessory characterization techniques and equipment include energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS), wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

148

Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness d{sub g}from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticleswas obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for d{sub g} were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

Lansker, Pia C., E-mail: pia.lansaker@angstrom.uu.se; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The ngstrm Laboratory, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Halln, Anders [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Elektrum 229, Kista, SE-164 40 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coal Combustion Fly Ash Characterization: Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis, Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Scanning Electron Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface and bulk properties of five samples of fly ash have been examined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy...

Rothenberg, S J; Denee, P; Holloway, P

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy...

151

Subsurface Science (The Molecular Environmental Science Group) |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Science Subsurface Science BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne arrow Subsurface Science The Molecular Environmental Science Group (MESG) The MESG is part of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main foci during the creation and growth of the MESG has been the development of an internationally recognized integrated multidisciplinary scientific team focused on the investigation of fundamental biogeochemical questions. Presently, expertise that is represented by members of the MES Group includes x-ray Physics, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Microbiology, (Bio)geochemistry, and radiolimnology. Additional expertise in electron microscopy, x-ray microscopy, Microbial Ecology, and Bioinformatics often is provided by collaborations with scientists outside of our group.

152

Recovery from acidification in European surface waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 283297 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Range Transboundary Air Pollution of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE). The first agreement) protocol, signed in 1999, incorporates additional air pollutants and is intended to bring a 63% reduction, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56) showed significant (p 0.05) decreasing trends in pollution

Boyer, Edmond

153

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 339 (2009) 9499 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wastewater. Thus, it is of great interest to study the interaction between common pharmaceuticals and clay on quality of surface and ground water. A survey in 1999­2000 on 139 US streams revealed that among the 95 organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) 82 were found with concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 150 g L-1 [1

Li, Zhaohui

154

Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10{sup 11} molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf [Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 20, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H{sup -} ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H{sup -} ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H{sup -} beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H{sup -} converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H{sup -} ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H{sup -} ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H{sup -} production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H{sup -} ion beams.

Tarvainen, O.; Rouleau, G.; Keller, R.; Geros, E.; Stelzer, J.; Ferris, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Atomic-Scale Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Applied To Mn3N2(010) Haiqiang Yang and Arthur R. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Arthur R. Smith Condensed Matter and Surface Science Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio

157

Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

Mingolo, N., E-mail: nmingol@fi.uba.ar; Martnez, O. E. [Facultad de Ingeniera, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Facultad de Ingeniera, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterisation of Hadley grains by confocal microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work forms part of an exploratory study to investigate the use of fluorescent laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) for imaging pores and voids in hardened mortar and concrete. The study has revealed the suitability of the technique for the characterisation of hollow shell (Hadley) hydration grains (these are grains that contain a void within the original boundary of the cement grain). It was found that Hadley grains could be imaged using fluorescent light techniques, subsequent to their impregnation by epoxy resin doped with a fluorescent dye. Prior to this work, it was not clear whether hollow grains were impregnated due to connections with capillary pores, or if they had been impregnated due to connections with damage caused during surface preparation (i.e. micro-cracks or deep surface scratches). However using the 3D LSCM imaging technique it was observed that connections between Hadley grains and hardened cement paste (HCP) capillary pores did exist, in different forms, at depths well below the surface providing conduits along which resin was able to flow and impregnate the hollow grains. Other aspects of imaging Hadley grains are also described, such as the sectioning of tips of larger grains often taken as separate smaller pores or grains in 2D images.

M.K. Head; H.S. Wong; N.R. Buenfeld

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Strengthening Today's Science Talent to Become Tomorrow's Science Leaders |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Today's Science Talent to Become Tomorrow's Science Today's Science Talent to Become Tomorrow's Science Leaders Strengthening Today's Science Talent to Become Tomorrow's Science Leaders December 15, 2010 - 11:56am Addthis Director Brinkman Director Brinkman Director of the Office of Science A hidden strength of science is its diversity. That strength was visible yesterday as the Energy Department celebrated its 13 winners of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Secretary Chu, Principal Deputy Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration Neile L. Miller and Undersecretary for Science Steve Koonin joined me in honoring these awardees, outstanding in science and service. Three winners came from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sergei V. Kalinin won for applying his insights into scanning probe microscopy principles to

162

Structure of the dimeric RCLH1PufX complex from Rhodobaca bogoriensis investigated by electron microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...j.boekema@rug.nl ). 1 Electron Microscopy Group, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, , Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG, Groningen, The Netherlands 2 IBDML - Developmental Biology Institute...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Photonics.com Spectra Home Technology World Innovative Products Business World Presstime Bulletin Article Abstracts Microscopy Focus | June 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Optical Science and Email Article Printer Friendly Save Article Enter search term Entire SiteExplore Photonics microscopy offers the highest resolution possible for this search, but the technique has difficulty imaging

Rogers, John A.

164

Schmahl, Kirz Receive Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Image of Compton Award The Advanced Photon Source (APS) and APS Users Organization (APSUO) are very pleased to announce that the 2005 Arthur H. Compton Award was given to Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz for pioneering and developing the field of x-ray microscopy using Fresnel zone plates. Because of their leadership over the last 30 years, x-ray microscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the study of nanoscale structures and phenomena in many areas of science. Their achievements have opened up productive research avenues in biology, polymers, electronic nanostructures, magnetic materials, meteoritics, and environmental sciences. " Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz have created a

165

Surface Localization Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi Lipoproteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these virulence factors reach the spirochetal surface. We observed in previous studies that monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fused to specifically mutated outer surface protein A (OspA) lipopeptides could be detected by epifluorescence microscopy...

Kumru, Ozan

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

NanoSciences Fondation Post-doc Position 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NanoSciences Fondation Post-doc Position ­ 2010 Postdoctoral position on SQUID microscopy The SuperNanoCharac project of the NanoSciences Fondation (Grenoble, France) seeks outstanding candidates for a postdoctoral

Canet, Léonie

167

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

168

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

169

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

170

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

171

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: About NCEM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NCEM NCEM The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) is one of the world's foremost centers for electron microscopy and microcharacterization. It is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Located adjacent to the University of California, Berkeley, NCEM was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron-optical characterization of materials with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. As a national user facility, NCEM is open to scientists from universities, government and industrial laboratories. The center provides cutting-edge instrumentation, techniques and expertise for advanced electron beam microcharacterization of materials at high spatial

172

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

173

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

174

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

175

Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

176

ELSEVIER Surface Science 407 (1998) 296 surface science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produces methyl radicals at elevated temperatures following methanol adsorption, whereas for methanol on 'Methanol on O/Mo( 110): specific site for methyl radical formation'" S.C. Street ~, D.W. Goodman-area (HSA), "real-world" molybdate catalysts. The 3D oxide prepared by us (i) does not produce methyl

Goodman, Wayne

177

Diffraction phase microscopy: monitoring nanoscale dynamics in materials science [Invited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes the fact that the phase of an imaging field is much more sensitive than its amplitude. As fields from the source interact with the specimen,...

Edwards, Chris; Zhou, Renjie; Hwang, Suk-Won; McKeown, Steven J; Wang, Kaiyuan; Bhaduri, Basanta; Ganti, Raman; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G; Rogers, John A; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China; 2 Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China; 3 School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute

Wang, Zhong L.

179

SURFACE SCIENCE INVESTIGATION OF CORROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relevance Methane extraction and transport Why does methane matter? The world emits approx. 582 million other resources such as coal which has been proven to reach its peak in 2020 Its infrastructure=h-KE BE is unique to the element and the electronic environment E h KE BE #12;Motivation The abundance of methane

Petta, Jason

180

Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy This facility consists of four top-of-the line transmission electron microscopes, two of which are highly specialized instruments capable of extreme levels of resolution, achieved through spherical aberration correction. The facility is also equipped with extensive sample-preparation capabilities. The scientific interests of the staff focus on understanding the microscopic origin of the physical and chemical behavior of materials, with specific emphasis on in-situ studies of materials in native, functional environments. Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with energy dispersive x-ray

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microscopy charges ahead | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microscopy charges ahead By Jared Sagoff * May 28, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Ferroelectric materials - substances in which there is a slight and reversible shift of...

182

Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy Home Researchers Publications Science Highlights Department of Energy Office of Science Search form Search Search TXM Search Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities Full-field TXM is an excellent method to examine nanoscale heterogeneties in many materials, including complex hierarchical systems such as catalysts, fuel cells and battery electrodes, and biological and environmental samples, at 30 nm resolution.The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography, as well as spectroscopic imaging for 2D and 3D elemental mapping and chemical mapping over tens of microns (up to mm in 2D). The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but mosaic images can be collected to

183

Synthesis and structure of Al clusters supported on TiO2,,110...: A scanning tunneling microscopy study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis and structure of Al clusters supported on TiO2,,110...: A scanning tunneling microscopy, Texas 77843-3255 Received 14 October 1997; accepted 6 April 1998 Al clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy. Al interacts strongly with the TiO2(110) surface

Goodman, Wayne

184

Nonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/20/2010 Published on Web: 11/16/2010 FIGURE 1. Illustration of the nonlinear dark-field imaging method. Two incidentNonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan, Stefano Palomba, Jan Renger, Romain Quidant Dark-field microscopy is a background-free imaging method that provides high sensitivity and a large

Novotny, Lukas

185

Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes Teri Wang Odom1 , Jason H. Hafner1 relationship between Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) atomic structure and electronic properties, (2, properties and application of carbon nanotube probe microscopy tips to ultrahigh resolution and chemically

Odom, Teri W.

186

Faculty Position in Materials Electron Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Position in Materials Electron Microscopy at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in electron microscopy of materials within its Institute of Materials. We seek exceptional individuals who community. Top-level applications are invited from candidates at the cutting edge of electron microscopic

Candea, George

187

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents Siavash Yazdanfar,a, * Chulmin Joo,a Chun limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared NIR fluorescent Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3420209 Keywords: two-photon microscopy; ultrafast fiber lasers; near-infrared

Larson-Prior, Linda

188

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Specimen Preparation Specimen Preparation Preparation of samples with large transparent areas and flat surfaces is a key element of electron microscopy. In particular, the interpretation of lattice or holographic images is often limited by the sample's geometry and surface roughness. These parameters are largely determined by a particular sample preparation procedure. The increasing demand for microscopes with a spatial resolution of better than 1Å increases the need for improved sample preparation techniques. A substantial effort at NCEM is devoted to the development of reliable and specialized thinning techniques. Current programs explore the application of chemicals to shape the surfaces of thin films, the use of nanospheres for observation of small particles, and the

189

All-fiber optical parametric amplifier for life-science application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate an all-fiber optical parametric amplifier for life-science (OPALS) application. Optical amplification of megahertz serial time-encoded amplified microscopy (STEAM)...

Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy; Xu, Yiqing; Zhang, Chi; Mussot, Arnaud; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Tsia, Kevin; Wong, Kenneth

190

Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SC e-journals, Materials Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Materials Science Materials Science Acta Materialia Advanced Composite Materials Advanced Energy Materials Advanced Engineering Materials Advanced Functional Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Powder Technology Advances in Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Annual Review of Materials Research Applied Composite Materials Applied Mathematical Modelling Applied Mathematics & Computation Applied Physics A Applied Physics B Applied Surface Science Archives of Computational Materials Science and Surface Engineering - OAJ Archives of Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Carbohydrate Polymers Carbon Catalysis Science & Technology Cellulose Cement and Concrete Research Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings Ceramics International Chalcogenide Letters - OAJ Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

192

Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observe the end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNT ends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failed to remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbon and oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed on the SWCNT ends.

Zhang Zhao-Xiang; Zhang Geng-Min; Du Min; Jin Xin-Xi; Hou Shi-Min; Sun Jian-Ping; Gu Zhen-Nan; Zhao Xing-Yu; Liu Wei-Min; Wu Jin-Lei; Xue Zeng-Quan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of electrostatic interactions between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential (SP) of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne Amplitude Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to Amplitude Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (AM-KPFM). We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

Joseph L. Garrett; David Somers; Jeremy N. Munday

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fast scanning two-photon microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast scanning two-photon microscopy coupled with the use light activated ion channels provides the basis for fast imaging and stimulation in the characterization of in vivo neural networks. A two-photon microscope capable ...

Chang, Jeremy T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence ...

Ashley E. Augspurger; Anthony S. Stender; Kyle Marchuk; Thomas J. Greenbowe; Ning Fang

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals Mohan Srinivasarao* and Richard S:photon tunnellingmicroscopy;single crystals; polyethylene) INTRODUCTION The study of morphology of polymers is an area

Srinivasarao, Mohan

197

Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from...

Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy using a Fresnel Zone Plate and a Transmission Grating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a hard X-ray phase imaging microscopy (a phase-difference microscopy) that consists of an objective and a transmission grating. The simple optical system provides a quantitative phase image, and does not need a wave field mostly coherent on the objective. Our method has a spatial resolution almost same as that of the absorption contrast microscope image obtained by removing the grating. We demonstrate how our approach provides a phase image from experimentally obtained images. Our approach is attractive for easily appending a quantitative phase-sensitive mode to normal X-ray microscopes, and has potentially broad applications in biology and material sciences.

Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan); Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Surface and Coatings Technology 174175 (2003) 839844 0257-8972/03/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and their surface characteristics M.C. Kim , S.H. Yang *, J an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet generated by nitrogen and oxygen gases under the atmospheric pressure at room of different metal- surfaces by atmospheric plasma jet treated under the condition of nearly atmospheric

Boo, Jin-Hyo

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied clay science Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: applied clay science Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Clay...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MASTER OF SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 75 DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL TO PREDICT AND ASSESS SURFACE Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering-December 2000 Advisors: Charles N. Calvano, Department of Mechanical Engineering David W. Byers, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division Survivability has

202

Biological Sciences at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Better knowledge of biomolecules and processes they undergo is vital for achieving a predictive, systems-level understanding of complex biological systems that have potential use in bioenergy, carbon cycling and biosequestration, and biogeochemistry. Areas that NERSC helps to enable include: Research activities using genomics and systems biology to understand plants and microbes. Developing and applying atomistic-molecular to coarse-grained mathematical models of potential energy surfaces, characterizing these surfaces through sampling techniques and finally generating ensemble or time averaged physical properties of biological phenomena. Fundamental research in the redesign of microbial metabolic processes to harness their potential in the conversion of biomass to

203

Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

Shapira, Yoram

204

Investigation of white etching layers on rails by optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray and synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patches of white etching layers on rail surfaces were investigated using sophisticated techniques like cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and synchroton X-ray diffraction. Optical microscopy failed to resolve the microstructure, but in the TEM submicron grains with high dislocation densities and occasional twins, which are characteristic features of high carbon martensite, were observed. The martensitic structure was confirmed by evaluation of synchroton X-ray diffraction line profiles. The latter technique also allowed to determine dislocation densities of the order of 1012 cm?2 and residual compressive stresses of about 200 MPa.

W. sterle; H. Rooch; A. Pyzalla; L. Wang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 379390 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years the 1970s. This area was included in the RECOVER:2010 project (Ferrier et al., 2001) to assess the effect 379 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 379­390 (2001) © EGS Trends in the chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

206

The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlO{sub x}, the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

Kim, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlO[sub x], the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

Kim, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ARM - TWP Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PacificTWP Science PacificTWP Science TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Science New VSAT dish installed in the Tropical Western Pacific. New VSAT dish installed in the Tropical Western Pacific. The following are the basic science goals of the TWP component of the ARM Climate Research Facility: Determine the magnitude of the surface radiation budget terms and determine their spatial and temporal variability. Identify bulk and optical properties of clouds in the TWP and how these properties affect the radiation budget. Understand the linkages among sea surface temperature,

209

In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

210

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

211

Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

212

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

213

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

01.2013 01.2013 Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University On November 1, 2013, Volker Rose was invited to present the Nanoscience Seminar at the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo. In his seminar he discussed the physical principles of Synchrotron X-ray Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SXSTM) as well as the recent progress made by his team at the Advanced Photon Source. He was invited by Prof. Yukio Hasegawa, who himself conducts SXSTM experiment at the Photon Factory in Tsukuba, Japan. The ISSP serves as the central laboratory of materials science in Japan equipped with state-of-art facilities. It was relocated to the new campus in Kashiwa of the University of Tokyo in 2000 after the 43 years of activities at the Roppongi campus in downtown Tokyo. Here ISSP is focusing

214

Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and transport measurements on adsorbate-induced two-dimensional electron systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed not only magnetotransport measurements on two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs) formed at the cleaved surfaces of p-InAs but also observations of the surface morphology of the adsorbate atoms, which induced the 2DES at the surfaces of narrow band-gap semiconductors, with use of a scanning tunneling microscopy. The electron density of the 2DESs is compared to the atomic density of the isolated Ag adatoms on InAs surfaces.

Masutomi, Ryuichi; Triyama, Naotaka; Okamoto, Tohru [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

Photon Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photon Science Along with its primary missions-global security, energy security, basic science, and national competitiveness-the NIF & Photon Science Directorate also pursues...

216

Science Engagement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Engagement Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1...

217

Science Briefs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Briefs newsroomassetsimagesnewsroom-icon.jpg Science Briefs Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing....

218

Detection Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Project Description Chemistry used in measurement and detection science plays a...

219

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

220

Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Center for Understanding and Control of Acid Gas-induced Evolution...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

and scattering, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, surface science, neutron diffraction and scattering, molecular dynamics (MD), density functional theory...

222

Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique Steffi Krause a technique, scanning photo-induced impedance micro- scopy (SPIM), suitable for the imaging of the complex Photoelectrochemistry has been used widely to study photo-thermally induced current changes at metal surfaces

Moritz, Werner

223

Development of novel two-photon microscopy for living brain and neuron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......novel two-photon microscopy for living brain and neuron Tomomi Nemoto 1 2 3 To whom...vital information on neural activity for brain function, even in light of its limitation...a several hundred micrometers from the brain surface. To break the limit of this penetration......

Tomomi Nemoto

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Examination of the cu/si(111) 55 structure by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The incommensurate 55 Cu/Si(111) structure has been examined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Images show that the surface structure is not well described as a hexagonal copper layer modulated at the Si(111) periodicity. Rather, the surface breaks up into 55 subunits which pack at spacings varying from 5 to 7 lattice constants, implying that substrate-adsorbate interactions dominate lateral interactions within the Cu adlayer.

R. J. Wilson; S. Chiang; F. Salvan

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Investigations into Protein-Surface Interactions via Atomic Force Microscopy and Surface Plasmon Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7.1. Fibrinogen 126 2.7.2. ATPase 127 2.7.2.1. Recombinant ATPase Preparation 127 2.7.2.2. Modifications to F1-ATPase 128 2.7.2.3. Protocol for Buffers and Dilutions 129 2.8. Summary 133 2.9. References 134 CHAPTER THREE: Fibrinogen Adsorption... Adsorption to a) Mica and b) Graphite with 1.0 nm height scale. 164 Figure 3.5: AFM height images (a & c 2.00 ?m x 2.00 ?m or b & d 1.00 ?m x 1.00 ?m) of 0.1 ?g/mL Fibrinogen Adsorption to Graphite with 5.0 nm height scales at pH 7 buffer (a-b) and p...

Settle, Jenifer Kaye

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF PAN-BASED CARBON FIBERS USING XPS, SIMS, AND AFM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF PAN-BASED CARBON FIBERS USING XPS, SIMS, AND AFM by Kris Anne Battleson on Carbon Fiber Surfaces.....................................17 Atomic Force Microscopy on Carbon Fiber Surfaces.....................................21 Numerical Methods...........................................................................

227

NREL: Energy Sciences - Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Materials Science Learn about our...

228

Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Metal Clusters Supported on Graphene and Silica Thin Film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The understanding of nucleation and growth of metals on a planar support at the atomic level is critical for both surface science research and heterogeneous catalysis studies. In this dissertation, two planar substrates, including graphene and ultra...

Zhou, Zihao

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Science Mathematics Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Mathematics Engineering . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', Mathematics, . ­ p.1 #12;Science Mathematics Engineering Science, Computer `Science', Mathematics, and Software Development

Hamlet, Richard

230

Hard-x-ray microscopy with Fresnel zone plates reaches 40 nm Rayleigh resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial improvements in the nanofabrication and characteristics of gold Fresnel zone plates yielded unprecedented resolution levels in hard-x-ray microscopy. Tests performed on a variety of specimens with 8-10 keV photons demonstrated a first-order lateral resolution below 40 nm based on the Rayleigh criterion. Combined with the use of a phase contrast technique, this makes it possible to view features in the 30 nm range; good-quality images can be obtained at video rate, down to 50 ms/frame. The important repercussions on materials science, nanotechnology, and the life sciences are discussed.

Chu, Y. S.; Yi, J. M.; De Carlo, F.; Shen, Q.; Lee, Wah-Keat [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wu, H. J.; Wang, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Liu, C. J.; Wang, C. H. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, S. R.; Chien, C. C. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science and System, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Y. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science and System, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Tkachuk, A.; Yun, W.; Feser, M. [Xradia Inc., 5052 Commercial Circle, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Liang, K. S. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yang, C. S. [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Je, J. H. [X-ray Imaging Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Use of fluorescence microscopy for quantifying phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sep 28, 1976 ... Abstract-Lake water samples were stained ... by the National Science. Foundation (DEB77-03906) and a research contract from the Energy.

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovation Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars The Lab's four Science Pillars...

233

Science Fairs for Science Literacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is supported by a National Science Foundation PostdoctoralT. Culbertson is a middle school science and math teacher.for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) (1990), Science for

Mackey, Katherine; Culbertson, Timothy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Contemporary biological science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Contemporary biological science covers a range of diverse and overlapping in cellular and molecular biology. Wichita State University's Department of Biological Sciences offers courses in most aspects of contemporary biological science. Our required core courses will expose you

235

The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 8599 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, turbulent heat flux, evaporation, remote sensing Introduction The estimation of atmospheric turbulent fluxes because of the heterogeneity of land surfaces and the dynamic nature of heat transfer processes. Remote be represented by point measurements only. Methods using remote sensing information to estimate heat exchange

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

The Huygens Surface Science Package J. C. Zarnecki, ' M. Banaszkiewicz,5 M. Bannister2 W. V. Boynton6 P. Challenor7 B. Clark,'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Probe in order for it to be the first point of contact with the surface, and the acoustic sounder and transmitters. The instrument weighs 4.2 kg and consumes approximately 10 W of power during descent. 177 #12;SP the abundances of the major ocean constituents, placing bounds on atmospheric and ocean evolution l measure

Lorenz, Ralph D.

237

The Science of Science Foundation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE 'science of ... of science' is an awkward name but, as it describes accurately what is meant, it ...

MAURICE GOLDSMITH

1965-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spatial resolution in vector potential photoelectron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental spatial resolution of vector potential photoelectron microscopy is found to be much higher than expected because of the cancellation of one of the expected contributions to the point spread function. We present a new calculation of the spatial resolution with support from finite element ray tracing, and experimental results.

Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)] [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Physical sectioning in 3D biological microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed in the Brain Networks Laboratory at Texas A&M University, has been used for the purpose of this study. However, the modes of characterizing chatter and its measurement are equally applicable to all current variants of 3D biological microscopy using...

Guntupalli, Jyothi Swaroop

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Physical sectioning in 3D biological microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed in the Brain Networks Laboratory at Texas A&M University, has been used for the purpose of this study. However, the modes of characterizing chatter and its measurement are equally applicable to all current variants of 3D biological microscopy using...

Guntupalli, Jyothi Swaroop

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feature Article NEXAFS microscopy and resonant scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conven- tional electron, X-ray and neutron scattering. We provide an overview of these synchrotron based and derivative struc- tures, ranging from spectroscopy to mechanical analysis and neutron scattering [9,10]. SomeFeature Article NEXAFS microscopy and resonant scattering: Composition and orientation probed

Hitchcock, Adam P.

242

Science in science fiction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Science fiction, from Star Trek to Star Wars, is hugely popular and pupils will surely have encountered good and bad physics there, but do they really notice? Discussing the science implied in books and movies, such as in the use of transporters, can be a good way of getting students interested in physics.

Jonathan Allday

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

1 Biomedical Sciences BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biomedical Sciences BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES The interdisciplinary doctoral programs in the biomedical sciences are organized within the Institute for Biomedical Sciences. The first full year of study toward are admitted directly into the Institute for Biomedical Sciences through Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

Vertes, Akos

244

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324328 Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324­328 Light-free magnetic resonance force for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD, USA Available online 4 November 2004 Abstract Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its

245

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPLEEM SPLEEM Publications Imaging Spin Reorientation Transitions in Consecutive Atomic Co layers, Farid El Gabaly, Silvia Gallego, M. Carmen Munoz, Laszlo Szunyogh, Peter Weinberger, Kevin F. McCarty, Christof Klein, Andreas K. Schmid, Juan de la Figuera, submitted Direct imaging of spin-reorientation transitions in ultra-thin Ni films by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, C. Klein, A. K. Schmid, R. Ramchal, and M. Farle, submitted Controlling the kinetic order of spin-reorientation transitions in Ni/Cu(100) films by tuning the substrate step-structure, C. Klein, R. Ramchal, A.K. Schmid, M. Farle, submitted Self-organization and magnetic domain microstructure of Fe nanowire arrays, N. Rougemaille and A.K. Schmid, submitted Self-Assembled Nanofold Network Formation on Layered Crystal Surfaces

246

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APS APS SXSPM News Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne (November 27, 2013) Cummings presents invited talk at magnetism meeting (November 11, 2013) Invited talk at ACSIN-12 & ICSPM21 in Japan (November 11, 2013) Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University (November 01, 2013) Scientists study old photos for new solutions to corrosion (October 21, 2013) More News Featured Image Recent Publications Kangkang Wang, Daniel Rosenmann, Martin Holt, Robert Winarski, Saw-Wai Hla, and Volker Rose, "An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 063704 (2013). More SXSPM Publications Upcoming Presentations V. Rose, 41st Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces (PCSI-41) (Invited Speaker)

247

Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Analysis of Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) data has identified three distinct, preferred...

249

Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys surface enhanced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

piston alloys at elevated temperature Summary: C. Optical microscopy of sectioned fracture surfaces for alloy A indicated that at low values of DK... and illustrates how the...

251

NEWTON's Material Science Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science Archive: Materials Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Materials Science Questions: Hydrogen Compounds and Heat Conduction Weaving Carbon Nanotubes Metal as Electrical Conductor, Not Thermal Steel Changes with Age PETE, Ultraviolet Light, Benefits Strength of Yarn by Spinning Each Substance Unique Density Alloy versus Constituent Density Knowing When Material is Melted Crystalline Metal Versus Metallic Glass and Conduction Super Glue, Surgery, and Skin Silica Gel Teflon Non-Stick Property Salt Crystal Formation Lubricating Rubber Bands and Elasticity Materials for Venus Probe Crystalline Solids and Lowest Energy Sodium Polycarbonate and Salt Water Early Adhesives Surface Energy and Temperature Separating Polypropylene, Polyester, and Nylon Factors Effecting Polymer Flexibility

252

Is sustainability science really a science?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively...

253

Computer Science Computer Science?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data and Information: Meet the challenges of"big data"via information management and through database in electrical engineering and computer science MSAIL: Artificial intelligence group HKN: Eta Kappa Nu honor

Eustice, Ryan

254

Science Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility LOOK INTO LANL - highlights...

255

Computer Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Science Computer Science1354608000000Computer ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Computer...

256

Information Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Science Information Science1354608000000Information ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov...

257

Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

Brierley, Andrew

258

1 Political Science POLITICAL SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political Science POLITICAL SCIENCE With Capitol Hill nearby and the White House just blocks away, GW is the ideal place to study political science. Students in the program benefit from rigorous study and behavioral sciences discipline in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the program examines politics

Vertes, Akos

259

1 Forensic Sciences FORENSIC SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Forensic Sciences FORENSIC SCIENCES As part of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences' natural, mathematical and biomedical sciences programs, the forensic sciences program provides an understanding of the integration of forensic disciplines with the investigation of criminal activity, along

Vertes, Akos

260

FORENSIC SCIENCE About Forensic Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fact Sheet FORENSIC SCIENCE About Forensic Science: The Forensic Science program at SJSU offers: The SJSU Forensic Science program delivers coursework and training to · Empowergraduatestobecomeagentsofchangetorecognize, document and report errors and injustices in the practice of forensic science and crime scene

Su, Xiao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

262

Microsoft PowerPoint - Gai_2014_CNMS_StaffScienceHighlight_NatureComm...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microscopy images, we identity and refine the surface adatom locations and oxygen vacancies. From these, local distortion angles are extracted based on the refined coordinates...

263

Science Organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

264

Fermilab | Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo Science Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Organization Photo and Video Gallery Diversity...

265

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

267

Life Sciences Division Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The vision of the Life Sciences Division is to advance basic knowledge, and The vision of the Life Sciences Division is to advance basic knowledge, and the health of humans and the biosphere, by elucidating the 4-Dimensional dynamics of complex biological systems -- ranging from molecules to microbes to humans. Research Highlights New Imaging Technique Identified to Monitor Progression of Heart Failure In a recent publication of Journal of Nuclear Medicine, a team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, the University of Utah, and UC San Francisco describe a new imaging technique used to monitor the progression of heart failure. More » Unlocking the Secrets of Proteins Cryoelectron microscopy is helping to unlock the secrets of proteins as never before, thanks to technology developed for one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes, TEAM, at Berkeley Lab's National Center for

268

Surface Characterization and Functionalization of Carbon Nanofibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon nanofibers are high-aspect ratio graphitic materials that have been investigated for numerous applications due to their unique physical properties such as high strength, low density, metallic conductivity, tunable morphology, chemical and environmental stability, as well as compatibility with organochemical modification. Surface studies are extremely important for nanomaterials because not only is the surface structurally and chemically quite different from the bulk, but its properties tend to dominate at the nanoscale due to the drastically increased surface-to-volume ratio. This review surveys recent developments in surface analysis techniques used to characterize the surface structure and chemistry of carbon nanofibers and related carbon materials. These techniques include scanning probe microscopy, infrared and electron spectroscopy, electron microscopy, ion spectrometry, temperature programmed desorption and atom probe analysis. In addition, this article evaluates the methods used to modify the surface of carbon nanofibers in order to enhance their functionality to perform across an exceedingly diverse application space.

Klein, Kate L [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Rack, Philip D [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF WEAKLY DEFORMED ALKALI HALIDE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

377 TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF WEAKLY DEFORMED ALKALI HALIDE CRYSTALS H. STRUNK Max'importance croissante du durcissement de la solution solide. Abstract. 2014 Transmission electron microscopy (TEM Abstracts 7j66 - 7 I' 1. Introduction. - It is only some years ago that transmission electron microscopy

Boyer, Edmond

270

Science | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neutron Science Neutron Science Neutron Scattering Science Neutrons are one of the fundamental particles that make up matter and have properties that make them ideal for certain types of research. In the universe, neutrons are abundant, making up more than half of all visible matter. Neutron scattering provides information about the positions, motions, and magnetic properties of solids. When a beam of neutrons is aimed at a sample, many neutrons will pass through the material. But some will interact directly with atomic nuclei and "bounce" away at an angle, like colliding balls in a game of pool. This behavior is called neutron diffraction, or neutron scattering. Using detectors, scientists can count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final position

271

In-situ spectro-microscopy on organic films: Mn-Phthalocyanine on Ag(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal phthalocyanines are attracting significant attention, owing to their potential for applications in chemical sensors, solar cells and organic magnets. As the electronic properties of molecular films are determined by their crystallinity and molecular packing, the optimization of film quality is important for improving the performance of organic devices. Here, we present the results of in situ low-energy electron microscopy / photoemission electron microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) studies of incorporation-limited growth [1] of manganese-phthalocyanine (MnPc) on Ag(100) surfaces. MnPc thin films were grown on both, bulk Ag(100) surface and thin Ag(100)/Fe(100) films, where substrate spin-polarized electronic states can be modified through tuning the thickness of the Ag film [2]. We also discuss the electronic structure and magnetic ordering in MnPc thin films, investigated by angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

Al-Mahboob A.; Vescovo, E.; Sadowski, J.T.

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

Christian Lessig Computing+Mathematical Sciences, California Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling, ...). ·Remote sensing (agriculture, ecology, ...). ·Heat transfer (architecture, combustion eng, ...). ·Atmospheric science (climate modelling, ...). ·Remote sensing (agriculture, ecology, ...). #12;18 Applications, ...). ·Medical imaging (microscopy, biopsy, ...). ·Atmospheric science (climate modelling, ...). ·Remote sensing

Desbrun, Mathieu

274

Instrument Series: Microscopy Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Transmission Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) provides in situ capabilities that enable atomic-resolution imaging and spectroscopic studies of materials under dynamic operating conditions. In contrast to traditional operation of TEM under high vacuum, EMSL's ETEM uniquely allows imaging within high- temperature and gas environments-with a gas pressure up to 20 Torr. With a spherical aberration corrector for the objective lens, the ETEM captures atomic-level processes as they occur, enabling vital research across a range of scientific fields. Research Applications Chemical science and engineering - providing in situ observation of catalytic processes with atomic-level resolution Materials science and engineering - allowing

275

Building Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

276

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

277

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

278

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

279

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

280

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reflection Phase-Contrast Microscopy (XRIM): Reflection Phase-Contrast Microscopy (XRIM): Observation of Subnanometre-High Surface Topography with X-ray Reflection Phase-Contrast Microscopy Schematic of an X-ray reflection interface microscope Schematic of an X-ray reflection interface microscope (XRIM), using Fresnel zone plate (FZP) optics to image an interface. XRIM image of an orthoclase surface XRIM image of an orthoclase (001) surface. The white box indicates a region with a 0.65 nm-high monomolecular step (seen as a dark line). The ability to image interfaces in complex environments is strongly limited. Scanned probe microscopies (e.g., atomic force microscopy) are widely used but require the use of a probe tip which can be invasive. X-ray-based techniques have mostly relied on laterally averaging approaches

282

X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 {mu}m, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu K{alpha}. At higher energies such as Ag K{alpha}, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection.

Ryon, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Warburton, W.K. [X-Ray Instrumentation Associates, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ARM - NSA Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AlaskaNSA Science AlaskaNSA Science NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Science Scientific objectives for the NSA/AAO site are provided below: Provide the comprehensive data sets necessary to develop and test continually improved algorithms for GCMs to describe radiative transfer and cloud processes at high latitudes; Specifically focus on development of algorithms to describe: radiative transfer within both the clear and cloudy atmosphere, especially at low temperatures; physical and optical behavior of water (ice) and land surfaces, both bare and snow-covered, especially during transitions from winter to summer and back; physical and optical behavior of ice and mixed phase clouds.

284

User Science Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Science Images User Science Images User Science Images Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Category NIMROD-1.png FES: NIMROD Simulation February 18, 2010 | Author(s): Dr. Charlson C. Kim (University of Washington) | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: https://nimrodteam.org/ Download Image: NIMROD-1.png | png | 1.5 MB Trajectory of an energetic ion in a Field Reverse Configuration (FRC) magnetic field. Magnetic separatrix denoted by green surface. Spheres are colored by azimuthal velocity. Image courtesy of Charlson Kim, University of Washington; NERSC repos m487, mp21, m1552 Scheibe.png BER: Pore-Scale Fluid Flow for Subsurface Reactive Transport January 1, 2008 | Author(s): Timothy D. Scheibe, PNNL | Category: Environmental Science | URL: http://http://subsurface.pnl.gov/

285

Political Science College of Arts and Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Political Science College of Arts and Sciences Degree Options Bachelor of Arts in Political Science General Political Science Global Politics Political Science Pre-Law Minors Political Science Program Law Campaign worker Politics Marketing and sales Nonprofit administration Consultant Certification

Collins, Gary S.

286

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Terminating combinator parsers in Agda and Computing Sciences Utrecht University June 12, 2008 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 2 Overview Totality Parser combinators Terminating combinator parsers #12;[Faculty of Science

Löh, Andres

287

Studies of heterogeneity properties of selected high-temperature superconductor surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen adsorption measured at 77 K was used to characterize the surface heterogeneity of high-temperature superconductor surfaces. Properties relating to adsorption and porosity ... microscopy (AFM) for a serie...

P. Staszczuk; D. Sternik; G. W. Ch?dzy?ski

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Faculty of Science Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science Computer Science Software engineering, network and system analysis continue a variety of computer science programs to prepare students for a career in the technology industry or in research and academia. A computer science degree provides an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals

289

Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

84 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

Brierley, Andrew

290

Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Border Security Comprehensive...

292

Science Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

293

Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques based on superconducting scanning probes. In periods 1--3 of this grant, which we now close at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and restart at Stanford University where our new lab is being built, we have demonstrated the ability to rapidly create Rb BECs and trap them within microns of a surface ina cryostat. Period 4 of this grant, to be performed at Stanford, will demonstrate the feasibility of using atom chips with a BEC to image transport features on a cryogenically cooled surface. Successful demonstration, in future funding cycles, will lead directly to the use of system for studies of transport in exotic and technologically relevant materials such as cuprate superconductors and topological insulators.

Lev, Benjamin L

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

Science DMZ for ALS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU...

295

Science DMZ Case Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @...

296

NERSC Science Gateways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

QCD, Materials Science, Science Gateways About Science Gateways A science gateway is a web based interface to access HPC computers and storage systems. Gateways allow science...

297

Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparatus employed to expose UHV-clean surfaces for poly- orMn 0.6 Si ?lms fabricated by UHV sputtering [51]. However,In an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber with good base

Jenkins, C.A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture...surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy|nanotechnology|hot spot|biological sciences...environmental science, basic sciences and medicine. The sensitivity of SM-SERS...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sorption of cadmium on humic acid: Mechanistic and kinetic studies with atomic force microscopy and X-ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of cadmium on humic acid: Mechanistic and kinetic studies with atomic force microscopy, Upton, New York 593-5000 USA. Liu, C., Frenkel, A. I., Vairavamurthy, A. and Huang, P. M. 2001. Sorption of Cd sorption by HAs, especially those pertaining to the surface features and structure of the Cd

Frenkel, Anatoly

300

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - active cell surface Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 5 Coaction of intercellular adhesion and cortical tension specifies tissue surface tension Summary: data in this study) indicate a depen- dence of the surface...

303

Investigation of wettability by NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wettability of reservoir rock has an important impact on the efficiency of oil recovery processes and the distribution of oil and water within the reservoir. One of the potentially useful tools for wettability measurements is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spin-lattice relaxation. More recently using NMR microscopy NIPER has developed the capability of imaging one- and two-phase fluid systems in reservoir rock at resolutions to 25 microns. Effects seen in the images of fluids within the pore space of rocks near the rock grain surfaces hinted at the possibility of using NMR microscopy to map the wettability variations at grain sites within the pore space. Investigations were begun using NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation time measurements on rock/fluid systems and on well-defined fractional wet model systems to study these effects. Relaxation data has been modelled using the stretched exponential relationship recently introduced. Comparisons of the NMR microscopy results of the model system with the rock results indicate that the observed effects probably do not reflect actual wettability variations within the pore space. The results of the relaxation time measurements reveal that even in the simple model studied, the behavior of two phases is somewhat ambiguous and much more complex and requires more study.

Doughty, D.A.; Tomutsa, Liviu

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody-based surface plasmon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

characteristic: plasmon resonance frequencies... -field imaging, multipolar surface ... Source: Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Radiation Physics and...

305

EMSL: Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's unique and state-of-the-art capabilities along with staff expertise can help scientists gain a predictive understanding of the molecular-to-mesoscale processes in climate, biological, environmental and energy systems. These advancements are critical to development of sustainable solutions to the nation's energy and environmental challenges. Four Science Themes help EMSL define and direct the research investments and establish a portfolio of user projects to accelerate scientific innovation and discovery in the areas of environmental molecular science critical to DOE and the nation. EMSL's annual call for proposals solicits proposals on specific topics within these Science Themes. Over the next 10 years, EMSL will focus its science toward developing

306

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

307

Big Science  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

Dr. Thomas Zacharia

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Science stakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... central part of British science. Michael Faraday dazzled crowds there in the nineteenth century with pyrotechnic displays of chemistry. ...

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

310

In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

311

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience KenKen HawickHawick k.a.k.a.hawickhawick@massey.ac.nz@massey.ac.nz Massey UniversityMassey University #12;Computational Science / eScienceComputational Science / eScience Computational Science concerns the application of computer science to physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology

Hawick, Ken

312

Surface premelting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most important results obtained in the theory of surface premelting of crystals are briefly discussed on the basis of the vibration-positional model, the quasiliquid layer model, the surface roughness model, and in the case of ice, the model of the oriented dipoles at the surface. A review of the existing experimental results on surface premelting is presented, these results being obtained by investigating the crystal morphology, the polar diagram of the specific surface energy, the surface self-diffusion, the thermal emissivity, as well as upon application of LEED, NMR, Rutherford backscattering at proton channeling and ellipsometry. The agreement between theoretical and experimental data is discussed.

D. Nenow

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cells storage batteries variable load industrialpropulsion* storage batteries* fuel cells Ni-Zn cells Li(Al)Continued. II. Storage batteries A. Aqueous low-temperature

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corrosion, cracking, hydrogen embrittlement, corrosioncorrosion fatigue, hydrogen embrittlement, slow crackFossil Hydrogen diffusion barriers, to avoid embrittlement.

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Answer: Problems involving solar energy technology may beproblems John Apps, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Solar energyproblems are concentrated in fossil and fusion technologies and in environmental control, with solar and energy

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alkali, fluorine, water electrolysis) Problem: to reducepermit the photo- electrolysis of water with the production

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Center Geothermal energy conversion and surfacenuclear fusion, geothermal and solar energy technologies andnuclear fission, geothermal and solar energy technologies

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in energy programs. Question 1-1: The various fields of ERDA's mission include energy conservation, fossil, nuclear

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Surface nanobubbles: Seeing is believing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of surface nanobubbles has been previously suggested using various experimental techniques, including attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflectometry, and x-ray reflectivity, but all of these techniques provide a sole number to quantify the existence of gas over (usually) hundreds of square microns. Thus `nanobubbles' are indistinguishable from a `uniform gassy layer' between surface and liquid. Atomic force microscopy, on the other hand, does show the existence of surface nanobubbles, but the highly intrusive nature of the technique means that a uniform gassy layer could break down into nanobubbles \\textit{due to} the motion of the microscope's probe. Here we demonstrate \\textit{optical} visualisation of surface nanobubbles, thus validating their individual existence non-intrusively.

Karpitschka, Stefan; Seddon, James R T; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef; Riegler, Hans

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Surface nanobubbles: Seeing is believing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of surface nanobubbles has been previously suggested using various experimental techniques, including attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflectometry, and x-ray reflectivity, but all of these techniques provide a sole number to quantify the existence of gas over (usually) hundreds of square microns. Thus `nanobubbles' are indistinguishable from a `uniform gassy layer' between surface and liquid. Atomic force microscopy, on the other hand, does show the existence of surface nanobubbles, but the highly intrusive nature of the technique means that a uniform gassy layer could break down into nanobubbles \\textit{due to} the motion of the microscope's probe. Here we demonstrate \\textit{optical} visualisation of surface nanobubbles, thus validating their individual existence non-intrusively.

Stefan Karpitschka; Erik Dietrich; James R. T. Seddon; Harold J. W. Zandvliet; Detlef Lohse; Hans Riegler

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electron Microscopy Study of Novel Ru Doped La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Microscopy Study of Novel Ru Doped La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Dr. Evanston, IL 60208 Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have been the center of research activities with the goal of improving energy

Marks, Laurence D.

322

MICROCAVITYMICROCAVITY PLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENTPLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENT APPLICATIONS: BOUNDAPPLICATIONS: BOUND--FREE COUPLING, TRANSISTORFREE COUPLING, TRANSISTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Surface Treatment High Intensity Plasma Arc Lamp Spark Gap Plasma Display (150 inch Panasonic Electrode Glass6 mm 250 m LED Backlight Microcavity Lamp #12;OPERATION OF MICROCAVITY PLASMA DEVICESMICROCAVITYMICROCAVITY PLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENTPLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENT APPLICATIONS

Shyy, Wei

323

The nanostructure and microstructure of steels: Electrochemical Tafel behaviour and atomic force microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of chemical composition and heat treatment on a low-carbon steel, chromium steel and high speed steel has been examined by polarisation curves and electrochemical parameters deduced from the Tafel plots. The electrochemical corrosion resistance, which is small between the as-received steels become greater after heat treatment, following the order: carbon steelmicroscopy and optical microscopy, before and after surface etching with Nital (a solution of 5% HNO3 in ethanol). This causes preferential attack of the ferrite phases showing the carbide phases more clearly. From these nanostructural studies it was possible to better understand why the passive films formed on chromium steel and high speed steel have superior protective properties to those formed on carbon steel.

Valria A. Alves; Ana M. Chiorcea Paquim; Albano Cavaleiro; Christopher M.A. Brett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Recent Advances in Atomic-Scale Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Faradayweg 4-6 D-14195 Berlin (Dahlem) Germany WALTER R. L. LAMBRECHT Department of Physics, Case Western of atomically clean magnetic surfaces. Several key findings have been obtained. First, both magnetic and non Nanometer scale science and technology has been an area of intense research and development activity within

325

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

326

Contacts | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Points of Contact Science Points of Contact Name Research Area Doug Abernathy Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer (ARCS). Atomic-scale dynamics at thermal and epithermal energies Ke An Engineering Materials Diffractometer (VULCAN). Residual stress, deformation mechanism of materials, phase transitions/transformation, and in situ/operando neutron diffraction in material systems (e.g., working batteries). John Ankner Liquids Reflectometer (LR). Density profiles normal to the surface at liquid surfaces and liquid interfaces Bryan Chakoumakos Nuclear and magnetic crystal structure systematics and structure-property relationships among inorganic materials, powder and single-crystal neutron and x-ray diffraction methods Leighton Coates Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi). Protein crystallography, biological structure and function

327

STUDIES OF DENGUE FEVER VIRUS BY ELECTRON MICROSCOPY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MICROSCOPY Reginald L. Reagan A. L. Brueckner Live Stock Sanitary Service Laboratory...MICROSCOPY REGINALD L. REAGAN AND A. L. BRUECKNER Live Stock Sanitary Service Laboratory...material 233 REGINALD L. REAGAN AND A. L. BRUECKNER Figure 1. Dengue fever virus (mouse...

Reginald L. Reagan; A. L. Brueckner

1952-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

329

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions How to get beamtime ? 80% and more of our beamtime is awarded to General Users through the General User Proposal system. So, in order to receive beamtime for an experiment you have in mind, you would have to complete a short proposal form (specific instructions as to deadlines, etc), which can be found following this link. We are well oversubscribed, so prospective users may not get beamtime the first time they apply, but as proposals age, the score increases. Often, it is helpful for 'new' users to contact beamline staff first before submitting, so that potential pitfalls in experiments are avoided. For that purpose, you may wish to browse our webpages, and see who does what kind of science and applications, and directly email the person you think is most likely appropriate. When in doubt, you can also always send an email to Qun Shen, who then will make sure it reaches the appropriate people.

330

Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences...

331

Preparation of TiO2(110)-(1x1) Surface via UHV Cleavage: An scanning...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Preparation of TiO2(110)-(1x1) Surface via UHV Cleavage: An scanning tunneling microscopy study. Preparation of TiO2(110)-(1x1) Surface via UHV Cleavage: An scanning tunneling...

332

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Research, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy Science at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science...

334

What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science...

335

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

336

Popular Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... price. That, and a vocal public opinion in the world of science against comic, pyrotechnic, mvstic, or other profane tickling of the groundlings, might do much in a ...

VICTORIAN

1920-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

An Atomistic View on Fundamental Transport Processes on Metal Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this lecture I present an introduction to the time-resolved observation of atomic transport processes on metal surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy video sequences. The experimental data is analyzed using scaling law concepts known from statistical thermodynamics. I will present studies from metal surfaces in vacuum as well as in electrolyte.

Giesen, Margret [Forschungzentrum Juelich, Institute for Bio- and Nanosystems IBN 4, D 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

Surface Soil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

339

Atomic-force-microscopy observations of tracks induced by swift Kr ions in mica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the first time, latent tracks induced by swift Kr ions have been directly observed in mica. These tracks are imaged by atomic-force microscopy as hollows which are associated with softer areas in the mica surface. The track core is formed by disordered mica. The mean diameter of the observed hollows increases with the electronic stopping power of the ions. The track shape along the ion path is deduced from the analysis of both the number of the tracks per unit area and their diameter distribution. These observations are the first images of nanometric changes of elastic properties.

F. Thibaudau; J. Cousty; E. Balanzat; S. Bouffard

1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microstructure development in particulate coatings examined with high-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors used cryogenic scanning electron microscopy to examine the early stages of latex film formation. They visualized the influence of ionic strength and extent of carboxylation in latex-calcium carbonate formulations and in latex-only formulations. Results demonstrated that latex particles deposited on calcium carbonate surfaces creating a suspension of carboxylic acid-stabilized calcium carbonate particles. Images of consolidation fronts showed that variation of ionic strength and extent of carboxylation dramatically changes the way latex particles consolidate and form films.

Sheehan, J.G.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Takamura, Koichi [BASF Corp., Charlotte, NC (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Note: Spring constant calibration of nanosurface-engineered atomic force microscopy cantilevers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The determination of the dynamic spring constant (k d ) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers is of crucial importance for converting cantilever deflection to accurate force data. Indeed the non-destructive fast and accurate measurement method of the cantilever dynamic spring constant by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum.83 103705 (2012)] is confirmed here for plane geometry but surface modified cantilevers. It is found that the measured spring constants (k eff the dynamic one k d ) and the calculated (k d 1) are in good agreement within less than 10% error.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

Curvature Dependency of Surface Tension in Multicomponent Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curvature Dependency of Surface Tension in Multicomponent Systems Erik Santiso Dept. of Chemical InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). The effect of curvature on the surface tension of droplets for multicomponent systems, the relation between the surface tension at the surface of tension and the distance

Firoozabadi, Abbas

344

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

345

ALS Activity Report 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science U3 Protein Crystallography 4.2.2 MagneticMagnetic microscopy, spectromicroscopy Surface and materials science,and external magnetic field. Science Highlights / Nano and

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Switchable Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tethered films of poly n-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) films have been developed as materials that can be used to switch the chemistry of a surface in response to thermal activation. In water, PNIPAM exhibits a thermally-activated phase transition that is accompanied by significant changes in polymer volume, water contact angle, and protein adsorption characteristics. New synthesis routes have been developed to prepare PNIPAM films via in-situ polymerization on self-assembled monolayers. Swelling transitions in tethered films have been characterized using a wide range of techniques including surface plasmon resonance, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy, interfacial force microscopy, neutron reflectivity, and theoretical modeling. PNIPAM films have been deployed in integrated microfluidic systems. Switchable PNIPAM films have been investigated for a range of fluidic applications including fluid pumping via surface energy switching and switchable protein traps for pre-concentrating and separating proteins on microfluidic chips.

BUNKER, BRUCE C.; HUBER, DALE L.; KENT, MICHAEL S.; YIM, HYUN; CURRO, JOHN G.; LOPEZ, GABRIEL P.; KUSHMERICK, JAMES G.; MANGINELL, RONALD P.; MENDEZ, SERGIO

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Science Exhibition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Drierite, the desiccant used in industry...for drying solids, liquids, and gases. Samples of...Physical and Natural Sciences...liquids or gases, and controllable...of liquid or gas pressures over...washing, dehydration, clearing...Ward's Natural Science Establishment...

1946-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Data collected during the SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment and at the Barrow ARM site are used to...

351

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

Rambaut, Andrew

352

Science, Mathematics, Computer Science, Software Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......but in SE the lack of science makes `process' an...38] written about management science, which applies in spades...Computer science. Science, 157, 13731374...An InitialAlgebra Approach to the Specification......

Dick Hamlet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Becoming an NCEM User  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Research New Research Gallery Microscopy Links Becoming an NCEM User Step 1: Submit a proposal Step 2: Before you begin your research Step 3: Instrument qualification Step 4: Accessing NCEM facilities and performing research Step 1: Submit a proposal Deadlines for new proposals are March 15, June 15, September 15, December 15. Access to NCEM facilities is granted to researchers whose proposals are accepted by the NCEM proposal review committee. NCEM users are expected to have a strong background in transmission electron microscopy, and submitted proposals should include evidence of prior electron microscopy experience by the intended operator. Researchers who do not have sufficient experience in electron microscopy may be able to use NCEM facilities through a collaborative project.

354

Electron microscopy and microanalysis Two transmission electron microscopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron microscopy and microanalysis Two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and three scanning electron micro- scopes (SEM) are operated by the De- partment. Attachments for TEM include energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), scanning transmission attachment, serial electron energy loss

355

Sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscopy on magnetic molecules.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Magnetic molecules have attracted lots interest. In this work, an ultra-stable and low noise scanning tunneling microscopy operating at 400 mK using He-3 (930 mK (more)

Zhang, Lei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Measuring Shear Stress in Microfluidics using Traction Force Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traction force microscopy is a previously-developed method to measure shear forces exerted by biological cells on substrates to which they are adhered (Dembo, 1999). The technique determines the shear stress a...

Bryant Mueller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Doppler optical coherence microscopy for studies of cochlear mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of measuring subnanometer motions with micron scale spatial resolution in the intact mammalian cochlea using Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) is demonstrated. A novel DOCM system is described ...

Hong, Stanley S.

358

Fast live simultaneous multiwavelength four-dimensional optical microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between excitation power and sensitivity...throughput of both systems. Most modern microscopy systems have excellent...connected to a power source (Bioptechs...Pawley JB ( 2006 ) Handbook of Biological Confocal...image sequence restoration . IEEE T Pattern...

Peter M. Carlton; Jrme Boulanger; Charles Kervrann; Jean-Baptiste Sibarita; Jean Salamero; Susannah Gordon-Messer; Debra Bressan; James E. Haber; Sebastian Haase; Lin Shao; Lukman Winoto; Atsushi Matsuda; Peter Kner; Satoru Uzawa; Mats Gustafsson; Zvi Kam; David A. Agard; John W. Sedat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fluorescence microscopy with diffraction resolution barrier broken by stimulated emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intracavity frequency doubler. This system partly converted the Ti:Sapphire...the focused time-averaged power. The axial...processing. Computational image restoration can in addition improve...light. 1 Pawley J ( 1995 ) Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy...

Thomas A. Klar; Stefan Jakobs; Marcus Dyba; Alexander Egner; Stefan W. Hell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

Heller, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks, even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level.

T. H. Besseling; M. Hermes; A. Kuijk; B. de Nijs; T. -S. Deng; M. Dijkstra; A. Imhof; A. van Blaaderen

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Natural Sciences Tripos EARTH SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The majority of Cambridge graduates remain within geology. Exploration and production of oil and gas still is the science of the Earth. What is the Earth made of? What processes shape and change it? What's happened of processes, geology is a holistic science, integrating physics, chemistry and biology with the evidence

Cambridge, University of

364

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE FACULTY OF SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE FACULTY OF SCIENCE AARHUS UNIVERSITY Grant Evaluations - observations and advice Michael I. Schwartzbach #12;DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE FACULTY OF SCIENCE AARHUS: Natural Sciences > 16 members, 2 for Computer Science/Mathematics A large volume: > in 2010 we received

366

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook 2013 #12;Welcome to Computer Science Welcome from the Head of Department 2 What is Computer Science? 2 Careers in Computer Science 3 What can you do with a Computer Science degree? 4 Meet our students 5 Academic information Important dates 7 Admission

Sun, Jing

367

Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cellECM and cellcell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

Hall, Matthew S. [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Long, Rong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Feng, Xinzeng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, YuLing [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hui, Chung-Yuen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu, Mingming, E-mail: mw272@cornell.edu [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

447 Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The Department of Computer Science provides undergraduate instruction leading to the bachelor's degree in computer science. This program in computer science is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting body recognized

Suzuki, Masatsugu

369

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedBasic Energy Sciences, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Adsorption of Glucose Oxidase onto Plasma-Polymerized Film Characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Quartz Crystal Microbalance, and Electrochemical Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption of glucose oxidase (GOD) onto plasma-polymerized thin films (PPF) with nanoscale thickness was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and electrochemical measurements. ... The electrophoretic mobility (u) of polystyrene particles at the PPF surfaces was measured, and the mobility obtained was converted into a zeta potential using the Smoluchowski equation, ? = 4??u/?, where ? is the viscosity of the solution and ? is the dielectric constant of the solvent. ...

Hitoshi Muguruma; Yoshihiro Kase; Naoya Murata; Kazunari Matsumura

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

Tung, Ryan C., E-mail: ryan.tung@nist.gov; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Faculty and Instructional Staff in the UW-Madison Department of Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions-- stress, strain rate, gaseous and chemical environments and radiation. Todd R. Allen Professor; nanoelectronics. Paul G. Evans Professor, Materials Science & Eng X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and optics; x. James A. Clum Visiting Professor, Materials Science & Engineering Materials and manufacturing processes

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

373

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities ISC Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and...

374

Atomic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Evidence of Local Structural Inhomogeneity and Nonuniform Dopant Distribution in Conducting Polybithiophene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Evidence of Local Structural Inhomogeneity and Nonuniform Dopant Distribution in Conducting Polybithiophene ... The fundamental difference between polymer grains and grain peripheral areas demonstrated by KFM was also supported by in situ contact-mode AFM data taken with the as-grown polymer film. ... (1)?Pekker, S.; Janossy, A. In Handbook of Conducting Polymers; Skotheim, T. A., Ed.; Marcel Dekker:? New York, 1986; Vol. ...

Oleg A. Semenikhin; Lei Jiang; Tomokazu Iyoda; Kazuhito Hashimoto; Akira Fujishima

1996-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

376

A new approach to nuclear microscopy: The ion-electron emission microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new multidimensional high lateral resolution ion beam analysis technique, Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy or IEEM is described. Using MeV energy ions, IEEM is shown to be capable of Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) measurements in semiconductors. IEEM should also be capable of microscopically and multidimensionally mapping the surface and bulk composition of solids. As such, IIEM has nearly identical capabilities as traditional nuclear microprobe analysis, with the advantage that the ion beam does not have to be focused. The technique is based on determining the position where an individual ion enters the surface of the sample by projection secondary electron emission microscopy. The x-y origination point of a secondary electron, and hence the impact coordinates of the corresponding incident ion, is recorded with a position sensitive detector connected to a standard photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). These signals are then used to establish coincidence with IBICC, atomic, or nuclear reaction induced ion beam analysis signals simultaneously caused by the incident ion.

Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Senftinger, B. [Staib Instrumente GmbH, Langenbach (Germany); Mellon, M. [Quantar Technologies Inc., Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

378

Energy Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Science Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbon-neutral energy technologies. To establish the scientific foundations for the kind of transformative breakthroughs needed to build a 21st-century energy economy, we must address fundamental questions involving matter and energy. Below is a sampling of such questions that can be addressed by light-source facilities:

379

Science Headlines  

Office of Science (SC) Website

is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en ACBFAD0E-6C01-4559-9833-E1AA...

380

Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis Georgia Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 Fourier transformation 1.5 Scattering factor and charge density function 1.6 Single scattering theory 1 Historical background Scope of the book Chapter 1. Kinematical electron diffraction 1.1 Electron wavelength 1.7 Reciprocal space and reciprocal lattice vector 1.8 Bragg's law and Ewald sphere 1.9 Abbe's imaging theory 1

Wang, Zhong L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Confocal microscopy studies of colloidal assembly on microfabricated physically templated surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1 Materials................................................................................. 52 4.2.2 Substrate preparation procedure ............................................. 53 4.2.3 PMMA machining... substrates.................................................... 74 5.3.2 Imaging of PMMA substrates................................................ 79 5.4 Conclusions...

Sharma, Sumit

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Viscous Nature of the Bond between Adhering Bacteria and Substratum Surfaces Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Biomedical Engineering Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands ... *Address: Henny C. van der Mei Department of Biomedical Engineering, FB40 University Medical Center Groningen Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands. ... This study was entirely funded by the University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ...

Yun Chen; Henny C. van der Mei; Henk J. Busscher; Willem Norde

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the TiO2 anatase ,,101... surface Wilhelm Hebenstreit,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tunneling sites in STM. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a versatile material that finds uses as a promoter. Fourfold-coordinated Ti atoms at step edges are preferred adsorption sites and allow the identification

Diebold, Ulrike

384

Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

Beauboeuf, Daniel P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Programmable surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microscopy techniques Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microscopy techniques and their practice in relationship to materials structure characterization... of Microscopy", Edited by P.W. Hawkes and J.C.H. Spence, Springer, 2006 (An...

387

Advances in cryogenic transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of dynamic self-assembling nanostructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elucidating the structural information of nanoscale materials in their solvent-exposed state is crucial, as a result, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has become an increasingly popular technique in the materials science, chemistry, and biology communities. Cryo-TEM provides a method to directly visualize the specimen structure in a solution-state through a thin film of vitrified solvent. This technique complements X-ray, neutron, and light scattering methods that probe the statistical average of all species present; furthermore, cryo-TEM can be used to observe changes in structure over time. In the area of self-assembly, this tool has been particularly powerful for the characterization of natural and synthetic small molecule assemblies, as well as hybrid organicinorganic composites. In this review, we discuss recent advances in cryogenic TEM in the context of self-assembling systems with emphasis on characterization of transitions observed in response to external stimuli.

Christina J. Newcomb; Tyson J. Moyer; Sungsoo S. Lee; Samuel I. Stupp

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

389

Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of disilane adsorption and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2x1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning tunneling microscopy has been employed to study the adsorption of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2{times}1) at various temperatures. Room-temperature exposures result in a random distribution of dissociation fragments on the surface. Formation of anisotropic monohydride islands and denuded zones as well as island coarsening is observed at higher temperatures. The results are strikingly similar to those reported for growth by molecular-beam epitaxy using pure Si, even though different surface reactions are involved in these two growth processes.

Lin, D.; Hirschorn, E.S.; Chiang, T. (Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)); Tsu, R.; Lubben, D.; Greene, J.E. (Department of Materials Science, Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

391

Neutron Science | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL's long history of neutron science began in the 1940s with the pioneering neutron scattering studies of Ernest Wollan and Clifford Shull. Shull was co-recipient of...

392

Determination and Characterization of Ice Propagation Mechanisms on Surfaces Undergoing Dropwise Condensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanisms responsible for ice propagation on surfaces undergoing dropwise condensation have been determined and characterized. Based on experimental data acquired non-invasively with high speed quantitative microscopy, the freezing process...

Dooley, Jeffrey B.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dynamics of Flagellum- and Pilus-Mediated Association of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Contact Lens Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lenses surfaces before and after wear using atomic force microscopy...initial event in sorption of marine bacteria to surfaces. J. Gen...associated with contact lens wear. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis...Influence of day and night wear on surface properties of silicone...

Victoria B. Tran; Suzanne M. J. Fleiszig; David J. Evans; Clayton J. Radke

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Materials Science Division - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home About MSD Information Awards Visit MSD Administrative Staff Division Personnel Research Research Groups Condensed Matter Theory Emerging Materials Energy Conversion and Storage Magnetic Films Molecular Materials Neutron and X-ray Scattering Superconductivity and Magnetism Surface Chemistry Synchrotron Radiation Studies Threat Detection and Analysis Group Research Areas Careers in MSD Internal Sites Search Front Slide 1 November 2013 - Patricia Dehmer (second from right), Deputy Director of Science Programs, DOE Office of Science, joined Argonne Director Eric Isaacs(left) and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences and Engineering Peter Littlewood(second from left) to tour the recently-opened Energy Sciences Building. Among Dehmer's stops was the crystal growth

395

Surface Plasmon mediated near-field imaging and optical addressing in nanoscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an overview of recent progress in plasmonics. We focus our study on the observation and excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with optical near-field microscopy. We discuss in particular recent applications of photon scanning tunnelling microscope (PSTM) for imaging of SPP propagating in metal and dielectric wave guides. We show how near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) can be used to optically and actively address remotely nano-objects such as quantum dots. Additionally we compare results obtained with near-field microscopy to those obtained with other optical far-field methods of analysis such as leakage radiation microscopy (LRM).

Drezet, A; Krenn, J R; Brun, M; Huant, S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Materials Science & Engineering | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering SHARE Materials Science and Engineering ORNL's core capability in applied materials science and engineering directly supports missions in clean energy, national security, and industrial competitiveness. A key strength of ORNL's materials science program is the close coupling of basic and applied R&D. Programs building on this core capability are focused on (1) innovations and improvements in materials synthesis, processing, and design; (2) determination and manipulation of critical structure-property relationships, and (3)

397

Invited Paper Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences, Ammasi Periasamy, Peter T. C. So, Editors,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raised in enriched vs. boring environments,1 after they have been sacrificed. Much has been gleaned from this approach, but it is difficult to relate the post-mortem morphology to the electrical activity the learning process, while simultaneously monitoring its electrical activity. We grow dissociated brain cell

398

SR-FTIR Microscopy and FTIR Imaging in the Earth Sciences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microscopes are equipped with two Schwarzschild objectives, which are based on two spherical mirrors centered on the same optical...optical elements (i.e., mirrors) of the IR microscope...the help of a total of 48 mirrors and is then sent into an...

Giancarlo Della Ventura; Augusto Marcelli; Fabio Bellatreccia

399

The OptIPuter microscopy demonstrator: enabling science through a transatlantic lightpath  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cluster software to the high performance computing (HPC) server 2008, which...necessary to connect both high performance computing (HPC) systems to do the...cluster software to the high performance computing (HPC) server 2008, which...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Diffraction phase microscopy: principles and applications in materials and life sciences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main obstacle in retrieving quantitative phase with high sensitivity is posed by the phase noise due to mechanical vibrations and air fluctuations that typically affect any...

Bhaduri, Basanta; Edwards, Chris; Pham, Hoa; Zhou, Renjie; Nguyen, Tan H; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Science Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that make it especially well suited to support life. Its macroscopic properties, like surface tension, solubility, and high melting and boiling temperatures, must come from its...

402

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons which have interact inelastically with the potentials of the atoms in the specimen and therefore resembles the better known Z2 (Z is atomic number) Rutherford scattering. One class of important catalysts consists of bronzes based on pentagonal {Mo6O21} building units; these include Mo5O14 and Mo17O47. In the last 20 years, new materials doped with

403

Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reducing Photobleaching in STED Microscopy with Higher Scanning Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photobleaching is a major limitation of super-resolution STED microscopy. We show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy is slowed down by scanning with a higher linear speed, enabled by the large field of view in our custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance. With a depletion irradiance of 0.4 GW/cm$^2$ (time average), we were able to slow down the photobleaching of the Atto 647N dye by 80% with 8-fold faster scanning. Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data qualitatively agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

Wu, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientificthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced5 Simulation Data Key Remote Science Drivers Instruments and

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Science Requirements Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors ESnet Live Blog Home Science Engagement Science Requirements Reviews Science Engagement Move your data Programs...

408

Science of Signatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science of Signatures Science of Signatures (SoS) The Lab's four Science Pillars harness capabilities for solutions to threats- on national and global scales. Contacts Pillar...

409

BES Science Network Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Basic Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted June 4-5, 2007 BES Science Network Requirements Workshop Basic Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of...

410

ORISE: Science Education Events  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Education Events Science Education Events Recognizing that vast improvements in science, technology, engineering and math are key to innovation and economic growth, the Oak...

411

More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics ORNL wins six R&D 100s R&D Magazine recognizes...

412

Top Science of 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RAPTOR telescope witnesses black hole birth science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research...

413

Top Science of 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

firsts pave way for greener, faster supercomputing science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique...

414

Science and Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovation science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Science and Innovation Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop...

415

Basic Energy Sciences Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basic Energy Sciences Reports Basic Energy Sciences Reports The list below of Basic Energy Sciences workshop reports addresses the status of some important research areas that can...

416

ORISE: Forensic Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forensic Science Forensic Science The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides direct forensic analytical support, consulting and training services to United...

417

The Science of Science Dr. Katy Brner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Science of Science Dr. Katy Börner Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, Director Information Visualization Laboratory, Director School of Library and Information Science Indiana University February 20th, 2008 Computational Scientometrics: Studying Science by Scientific Means Börner, Katy, Chen

Menczer, Filippo

418

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

Barrash, Warren

419

SCIENCE Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

420

On Sea Surface Roughness Parameterization and Its Effect on Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Sea Surface Roughness Parameterization and Its Effect on Tropical Cyclone Structure and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 Yihong Duan National 10, 2009 (Revised) Dateline Revised for Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Corresponding author

Wang, Yuqing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surface modification of biomaterials using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Academy of Sciences, , Shanghai...review the recent advances in surface...microelectronics, aerospace engineering...by a more recent study, in...development and recent progress...Ultimately, advances in emerging...National Natural Science Foundation...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an information bridge between super-resolution microscopy and structural biology by using generative models

Matsuda, Noboru

423

Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Forensic Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Promega's DNA IQ extraction method has been automated on the Beckman 2000 robot workstation and implemented into forensic casework by the Virginia Division of Forensic Science (39). ... Hairs, Fibers, Glass, and Paint. ... A study was undertaken to assess the distinctiveness of automotive paints (308). ...

T. A. Brettell; J. M. Butler; R. Saferstein

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

426

Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the material undergoes a phase transition. Herein, we show that thermotropic phase transitions in 4-Cyano-41 Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals A. Nicholas G-objects in various environments. It uses a photo-induced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking

Boyer, Edmond

427

Sample heating in near-field scanning optical microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating near the aperture of aluminumcoated,fiber opticnear-field scanning optical microscopy probes was studied as a function of input and output powers. Using the shear-force feedback method, near-field probes were positioned nanometers above a...

Erickson, Elizabeth S.; Dunn, Robert C.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nanometric depth resolution from multi-focal images in microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that have been stored in a computer, but it is noted that using...interdisciplinary Bridging the Gaps grant from the UK Engineering and...Physics, SUPA/IIS, School of Engineering and Physical...instrumentation Image Processing, Computer-Assisted methods Microscopy...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

ABSTRACTS IN REPORTS CONCERNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY PUBLISHED IN JAPAN:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Thoracic Lymphatics of Living Rabbits and Sites of Escape of Car- bon Particles from the Vessels: Fumihiko KATO (First Dept...deafness. Using light and elect- ron microscopy he studied the defective organ of Corti in Shaker-1 mouse, one strain of congeni......

ABSTRACTS

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A software environment has been developed for processing and reconstructing online the large amount of data generated at TOMCAT, a synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. It has been designed to minimize user interaction and maximize the reconstruction speed and therefore optimize beam time usage.

Hintermller, C.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Detection of protein conformation defects from fluorescence microscopy images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diagnostic method for protein conformational diseases (PCD) from microscopy images is proposed when such conformational conflicts involve muscular intranuclear inclusions (INIs) indicative of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), one variety of ... Keywords: Computer-aided diagnosis, Histogram, Microscopic images, Pattern classification, Protein conformational diseases, Texture analysis

Peifang Guo; Prabir Bhattacharya

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

433

Microscopy on the Nanotechnology Frontier Wednesday January 21, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. David Joy Distinguished Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering The University reliably measure its size, and the use of light ion beams for imaging and analysis. David Joy holds joint appointments as a Distinguished Professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The University

Fisher, Frank

434

Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear Science and Engineering | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supporting Organizations Nuclear Science Engineering Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science Engineering SHARE...

436

Step-by-step growth of epitaxially aligned polythiophene by surface-confined oligomerization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges in surface chemistry is to assemble aromatic building blocks into ordered structures that are mechanically robust and electronically interlinked, i.e. are held together by covalent bonds. We demonstrate the surface confined growth of ordered arrays of poly-EDOT chains, using the substrate (the 110 facet of copper) simultaneously as template and catalyst for polymerization. Copper acts as promoter for the Ullmann coupling reaction, while the inherent anisotropy of the fcc 110 facet confines growth to a single dimension. High resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultra high vacuum conditions allows us to simultaneously image PEDOT oligomers and the copper lattice with atomic resolution. Density functional theory calculations confirm an unexpected adsorption geometry of the PEDOT oligomers, which stand on the sulphur atom of the thiophene ring rather than lying flat. This polymerization approach can be extended to many other halogen-terminated molecules to produce epitaxially aligned conjugated polymers. Such systems might be of central importance to develop future electronic and optoelectronic devices with high quality active materials, besides representing model systems for basic science investigations.

Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Rosei, Federico [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec; Lipton-Duffin, J.A. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec; Miwa, J.A. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec; Kondratenko, M. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Cicoira, F. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec; Perepichka, D.F. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing of the Arctic Surface: The Influence of Cloud Cloud Radiative Forcing of the Arctic Surface: The Influence of Cloud Properties, Surface Albedo, and Solar Zenith Angle Shupe, M.D. and Intrieri, J.M., NOAA - Environmental Technology Laboratory Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An annual cycle of cloud and radiation measurements made as part of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic program are utilized to determine which properties of Arctic clouds control the surface radiation balance. Surface cloud radiative forcing (CF), defined as the difference between the all-sky net surface radiative flux and the clear sky net surface flux, was calculated from measurements of broadband fluxes and results from a clear sky model. Longwave cloud forcing (CFLW) is shown to be a function of cloud

438

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Winter Surface Radiative Energy Exchange at NSA: Cloudy vs. Clear Sky Winter Surface Radiative Energy Exchange at NSA: Cloudy vs. Clear Sky Stramler, K.(a), Del Genio, A.D.(b), and Rossow, W.(b), Columbia University (a), NASA/GISS (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM measurements at Point Barrow, Alaska show that atmospheric emission drives the winter variability of the surface radiative energy exchange, as the incursion of air masses of differing properties alternately warm and cool the snow surface and the snow-ground interface. The magnitude of the surface radiative energy exchange, however, appears to be in part dictated by the more slowly varying sub-surface temperatures. This is most evident when observing the inter-annual variability of clear-sky surface net longwave radiation at NSA; winter cloudy-sky surface net longwave radiation

439

Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geyling, F. [SEMATECH, Austin, TX (United States)

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Near-field microwave microscopy of high-? oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100?nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

Tselev, Alexander, E-mail: tseleva@ornl.gov; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quantitative determination of local potential values in inhomogeneously doped semiconductors by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Local potential changes arising from nanoscale three-dimensional spatial fluctuations in the dopant distribution in Zn-doped GaAs were investigated quantitatively by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at (110) cleavage surfaces. Tunneling spectra measured in areas with different local doping concentration show apparent shifts of the valence band edge and apparent changes of the band gap. A quantitative analysis, combined with band bending and tunnel current simulations, demonstrates that these effects arise from tip-induced band bending that modulates the real potential changes. It is illustrated how exact potential changes between locally high and low doped areas can be determined. It is found that the local potential fluctuations in three-dimensionally doped semiconductors are approximately one order of magnitude smaller that those observed in two-dimensionally doped semiconductors.

P. H. Weidlich, R. E. Dunin-Borkowski, and Ph. Ebert

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Applied Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sciences Geological Sciences Atomic-scale structure of the orthoclase (001)-water interface measured with high-resolution x-ray reflectivity P. Fenter, H. Teng, P. Geissbühler, J.M. Hanchar, K.L. Nagy, and N.C. Sturchio Chemical analysis of individual interplanetary dust particles G.J. Flynn, S.R. Sutton, M. Rivers, P. Eng, and M. Newville Diffusion-limited biotransformation of metal contaminants in soils/sediments: chromium T. Tokunaga, J. Wan, D. Joyner, T. Hazen, M. Firestone, E. Schwartz, S. Sutton, and M. Newville Investigation of meteorite porosity by computed microtomography G.J. Flynn, M. Rivers, and S.R. Sutton Microscale imaging of pore structure in hydrothermal sulfide chimneys using synchrotron x-ray computed tomography P. O'Day, J. Muccino, S. Thompson, M.Jew, and J. Holloway

443

Science Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Science Highlights Science highlights feature research conducted by staff and users at the ALS. If a Power Point summary slide or a PDF handout of the highlight is available, you will find it linked beneath the highlight listing and on the highlight's page. You may also print a version of a highlight by clicking the print icon associated with each highlight. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 ALS research has shown how the scales of a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin can literally re-orient themselves in real time to resist force, in essence creating an adaptable body armor. Read more... New Research on Jamming Behavior Expands Understanding Print Tuesday, 22 October 2013 00:00 Recent ALS research has revealed that even magnetic domains behave very much like other granular material systems, and their dynamical behavior mimics the universal characteristics of several jammed systems.

444

Applied Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

445

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

Barrash, Warren

446

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

Barrash, Warren

447

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

Barrash, Warren

448

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

242 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science,including American politics and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

449

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Chair T. Clifton Morgan Professors John S.D. Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

450

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American politics and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

451

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

264 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American politics and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

452

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

235 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Chair T. Clifton Morgan Professors John S.D. Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

453

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Political Science The School of Social Sciences Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American politics and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

454

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

242 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Chair T. Clifton Morgan Professors Earl Black.D. Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

455

Political Science The School of Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

253 Political Science The School of Social Sciences Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Students majoring in political science are encouraged to achieve both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of one or more aspects of political science, including American politics and comparative politics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

456

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Indexed fixed points Andres Löh Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center GP meeting, 21 November 2008 #12;[Faculty of Science Information

Löh, Andres

457

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic diff Andres Löh joint work with Eelco Lempsink and Sean Leather Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University IFIP WG 2.1 meeting #64, Weltenburg, April 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

Löh, Andres

458

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with fixed points Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center September 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information

Löh, Andres

459

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with the multirec. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands Web pages: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wiki/Center May 15, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

Löh, Andres

460

NREL: Energy Sciences - Jie Ma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jie Ma Jie Ma Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Jie Ma Phone: (303) 384-6511 Email: jie.ma@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2010 Dr. Ma graduated from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2004 and received a Ph.D. degree from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2009. Jie joined the Computational Materials Science Team at NREL as a postdoctoral researcher in March, 2010. He is currently working on computational design and characterization of nanoscale materials for doping, water splitting, and solar cells, using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Research Interests Low-dimensional systems (quantum dots, nanotube and nanowires, and surfaces) Doping in semiconductors. Solar cell and water splitting.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EMSL: Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Science Science FAQ Search EMSL Home About EMSL Science Capabilities User Access Publications News Contacts Back Pause Slideshow Slide 1 Next Biofuel breakdown A collaborative study shows that Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 can multitask quite successfully: degrade lignin as both a food source and for breathing - the first soil bacterium to demonstrate this dual capability. Research Highlights Watch a virtual tour of EMSL The hidden ties that bind EMSL scientists took advantage of advanced instrumental capabilities, a specially designed experimental cell and theoretical modeling to successfully deduce the how molecules of carboxylic acid- a common organic acid found in nature - bind to ceria nanoparticle surfaces. Research Highlights Watch a virtual tour of EMSL Ditch the dirt

462

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

463

Expanding Science and Energy Literacy with America's Science...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expanding Science and Energy Literacy with America's Science and Technology Centers Expanding Science and Energy Literacy with America's Science and Technology Centers October 20,...

464

CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electron Microscopy Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Building 735 This COSA form must be completed for all experimenters working in the CFN and must be submitted to the CFN User Office for badge access. CFN Safety Awareness Policy: Each user must be instructed in the safe procedures in CFN related activities. CFN Facility Laboratory personnel shall keep readily available all relevant instructions and safety literature. Employee/Guest Name Life/Guest Number Department/Division ES&H Coordinator/Ext. Facility Manager COSA Trainer Guest User Staff USER ADMINISTRATION Checked in at User Administration and has valid BNL ID badge Safety Approval Form (SAF) approved. Training requirements completed (Indicate additional training specified in SAF or ESR in lines provided below):

465

Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality.

Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Acoustic microscopy for characterization of high?temperature superconducting tape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although material scientists constantly discover superconducting compounds with higher critical temperatures (T c s) manufacturing of the high?temperature superconductors(HTS) remains a problem and long lengths (>1 mile) have yet to be produced. In an effort to produce long length superconductors manufacturing steps for HTS tape production have been critically looked at to find their effects in producing tape with the desired characteristics. In support of determining superconducting tapecharacteristics acoustic microscopy offers the potential for internal microstructural material characterization. This research will ultimately support in?process monitoring of HTSmanufacturing as part of an advanced sensing system to determine the presence of defects and/or the effects of process variables on the HTS tape. This presentation will overview scanning acoustic microscopy and present images of HTS tape at several frequencies ranging from 50 to 500 MHz. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of determining the Ag/ceramic interface location and the general integrity of the constituents.

Chiaki Miyasaka; Chris Cobucci; Bernhard Tittmann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

On Acoustic Transmission in Ocean-Surface Waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface. The bubble layer acts as a waveguide for sound in the audio frequency range, above 2 kHz, although transmission may be severely...extend access to Philosophical Transactions: Physical Sciences and Engineering. www.jstor.org

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Local specification of surface subdivision Colin Smith, Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz, and Faramarz Samavati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local specification of surface subdivision algorithms Colin Smith, Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz software. Reference C. Smith, P. Prusinkiewicz, F. Samavati: Relational specification of subdivision in Computer Science 3062, pp. 313-327 #12;Local Specification of Surface Subdivision Algorithms Colin Smith

Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

471

Estimating ocean wave directional spreading from an Eulerian surface elevation time history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an Eulerian surface elevation time history T. A. A. Adcock * P. H. Taylor...st-peters.oxon.org ). Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford...information available is the time history of free surface elevation at a single...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Ethics in science: Recombinant problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethics in science: Recombinant problems ... Dealing with the pedagogical problems of science in ethics and ethics in science. ... Ethics ...

Robert P. McArthur; Wayne L. Smith

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy.

Florian M. Lauer; Elke Kaemmerer; Tobias Meckel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Near-field microscopy: throwing light on the nanoworld  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...instrumentation methods Nanotechnology instrumentation methods...tial for drug discovery, medicine and nanotechnology, while the development...in the life sciences and nanotechnology, and I believe we are now...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Cross-Linked ZnO nanowalls immobilized onto bamboo surface and their use as recyclable photocatalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel recyclable photocatalyst was fabricated by hydrothermal method to immobilize the cross-linked ZnO nanowalls on the bamboo surface. The resultant samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ...

Chunde Jin, Jingpeng Li, Jin Wang, Shenjie Han, Zhe Wang, Qingfeng Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Roughening of a Si(100) surface induced by the adsorption of oxygen near the solid-oxide nucleation threshold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation of the processes on a Si(100) surface interacting with oxygen near the solid-oxide nucleation threshold using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic-force microscopy is described. The nuclea...

V. D. Borman; Yu. Yu. Lebedinskii

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Investigation of short-range surface forces to develop self-organizing devices by Steven M. Tobias.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Force spectra from atomic force microscopy were used to verify surface energy components of indium tin oxide and mesocarbon microbeads. These materials were selected based on spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters to ...

Tobias, Steven M., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Supercomputing | Computer Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resilience Engineering of Scientific Software Translation Quantum Computing Machine Learning Information Retrieval Content Tagging Visual Analytics Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Research Areas | Computer Science SHARE Computer Science Computer Science at ORNL involves extreme scale scientific simulations through research and engineering efforts advancing the state of the art in algorithms, programming environments, tools, and system software. ORNL's work is strongly motivated by, and often carried out in direct

480

Magnetic nanoworms Systematic Surface Engineering of Magnetic Nanoworms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic nanoworms Systematic Surface Engineering of Magnetic Nanoworms for in vivo Tumor Targeting and nanoparticle chemistry for tumor targeting. full papers [?] Prof. M. J. Sailor, J.-H. Park Materials Science, Dr. T. J. Harris Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Massachusetts Institute

Bhatia, Sangeeta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Investigation of the deformed fermi surfaces mechanism for pairing of two species of fermions with mismatched fermi surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF THE DEFORMED FERMI SURFACES MECHANISM FOR PAIRING OF TWO SPECIES OF FERMIONS WITH MISMATCHED FERMI SURFACES A Thesis by JIANXU LU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Physics INVESTIGATION OF THE DEFORMED FERMI SURFACES MECHANISM FOR PAIRING OF TWO SPECIES OF FERMIONS WITH MISMATCHED FERMI SURFACES A Thesis by JIANXU LU Submitted to the Office...

Lu, Jianxu

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cognitive Science (Humanities)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive Science (Humanities) The University of Edinburgh College of Humanities and Social Science: Cognitive Science (Humanities) BSc Honours in: Cognitive Science Please see separate information sheets the disciplines that contribute to the study of human cognition. The Cognitive Science programme at Edinburgh

Schnaufer, Achim

483

Probing the electronic structure of graphene sheets with various thicknesses by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of an aggregation of graphene sheets with various thicknesses was probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. A uniform oxidation of the graphene sheets in the flat area was observed regardless of the thickness, while in the folded area the result could be strongly affected by the geometry. Moreover, thick parts of the aggregation showed strong angle-dependence to the incident X-ray, while thin parts showed less angle-dependence, which might be related to the surface wrinkles and ripples. The electronic structure differences due to the geometry and thickness suggest a complicated situation in the aggregation of graphene sheets.

Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)] [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

484

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improved Surface Emissivities Derived from Multispectral Satellite Data Improved Surface Emissivities Derived from Multispectral Satellite Data Over the ARM SGP Smith, W.L., Jr., Minnis, P., and Young, D.F., NASA Langley Research Center Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Surface emissivity is an important parameter for many remote sensing applications but is difficult to determine because it requires an accurate specification of the surface skin temperature. Because of this, laboratory estimates of the emissivity of pure surfaces are often relied on which generally do not adequately simulate the Earth's natural surfaces as seen from a satellite imager in space. A technique has been developed to derive surface emissivity from clear-sky, multispectral satellite data for three infrared channels (3.9 or 3.7, 10.8 and 12.0 um) common to many of today's

485

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation of the Annual Cycle of Surface Albedo for SHEBA Simulation of the Annual Cycle of Surface Albedo for SHEBA Schramm, J.L., and Curry, J.A., University of Colorado Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A single-column ice thickness distribution model is used to simulate the annual cycle of sea ice, snow and surface radiation characteristics over the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA). The model is forced using surface flux data obtained at SHEBA. This poster focuses on the simulated surface albedo and the principal factors that determine it (snow and melt ponds). By comparing the model simulations with SHEBA observations, an assessment of our current parameterizations of snow, melt ponds and surface albedo is given. Some improvements to our model parameterizations have already been made based upon the comparison with

486

FORENSIC SCIENCE The bachelor of science in forensic science at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORENSIC SCIENCE The bachelor of science in forensic science at Wichita State University is designed to meet an increasing demand for trained forensic scientists and technicians. No other university with this degree can be assigned to virtually any aspect of a forensic investigation with less pre-service training

487

Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

Fujimoto, James G.

489

Comparison between direct methods for determination of microbial cell volume: electron microscopy and electronic particle sizing.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than those processed for electronic particle sizing, reflecting...Electron Microscopy and Electronic Particle Sizing E. MONTESINOS...ofMicrobiology and Institute for Fundamental Biology, Autonomous University...transmission electron microscopy and electronic particle sizing. Statistically...

E Montesinos; I Esteve; R Guerrero

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00...

491

NREL: Energy Sciences - Theoretical Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Science Solid-State Theory Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Theoretical Materials Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. Using modern computational techniques, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, applies quantum mechanics to complex materials, yielding quantitative predictions to guide and interact with experimental explorations. Current research focuses on the following efforts: Design new photovoltaic materials that can improve solar cell efficiency and reduce its cost. Explain the underlying physics of new

492

Curvature Minimization for Surface Reconstruction with Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. {shij0004,wanm0003}@e.ntu.edu.sg, {xctai,desheng}@ntu indicate the robustness and effectiveness of the method. 1 Introduction Reconstructing a surface from in [35] and its variants prove the effectiveness of this methodology. The most popular regularization #12

Soatto, Stefano

493

Biological Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Science Biological Science A unique zinc-binding site revealed by the high-resolution x-ray structure of homotrimeric Apo2L/TRAIL S.G. Hymowitz, M.P. O'Connell, M.H. Ultsch, A. Hurst, K. Totpal, A. Ashkenazi, R.F. Kelley, and A.M. de Vos b-carbonic anhydrase active site architecture is a mirror image of a-carbonic anhydrases E.F. Pai and M.S. Kimber Binding of Cd ions to the cell wall of B. Subtilis - an EXAFS study M. Boyanov, D. Fowle, K. Kemner, B. Bunker, and J. Fein Crystallographic evidence for Try157 functioning as the active site base in human UDP-galactose 4-epimerase J.B. Thoden, T.M. Wohlers, J.L. Fridovich-Keil, and H.M. Holden Crystallographic studies of dsDNA phage HK97 structure and maturation W.R. Wikoff, Z. Che, W. Schildkamp, L. Liljas, R.L. Duda, R.W. Hendrix, and

494

Ion beam induced surface and interface engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The injection of material into a target specimen in the form of an accelerated ion beam offers a most valuable tool for altering its physical, chemical, structural, surface and interface properties in a controlled manner and tailoring new materials for basic and applied research for science and technology. The present review describes experimental, theoretical and recent aspects of ion beam modifications at various solids, thin films, and multilayered systems covering wider energy ranges including the older basic concepts which are now of interest. These results reveal that the ionsolid interaction physics provides a unique way for controlling the produced defects of the desired type at a desired location. These interests have been stimulated by the possibilities of synthesizing novel materials with potential applications in the field of thin films, surfaces and interface science. Many applications of ion induced engineering are being developed for various sciences of high technological interest for future aspects.

I.P. Jain; Garima Agarwal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Towards automatic cell identi cation in DIC microscopy , C.A. Glasbey2y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998. Journal of Microscopy, 192, 186-193. #12;a b c Figure 1: DIC microscope images: a Chlorella algal

Stone, J. V.

496

Atomic structure of the high-temperature O/W(001)-(21) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface reconstruction of the W(001) surface in the presence of oxygen has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. A two-domain (21) structure with domain size ?30 was observed after the oxygen-covered surface was annealed at >1000 C for <1 min. Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy results support the missing-row model for the (21) structure; the preferred location for adsorbed oxygen is either the threefold-hollow site or a site on top of a W atom in the second layer.

J. A. Meyer; Y. Kuk; P. J. Estrup; P. J. Silverman

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Z .Thin Solid Films 391 2001 143 148 Submicrosecond range surface heating and temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Thin Solid Films 391 2001 143 148 Submicrosecond range surface heating and temperature; accepted 22 March 2001 Abstract A method for submicrosecond heating of sensor surfaces and simultaneous as well as photo thermal and scanning force microscopy measurements were performed to optimize the heating

Moritz, Werner

498

Structural observation of Pd silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEM/STM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEMSTM Miyoko Tanaka Masaki Takeguchi...microscopyscanning tunnelling microscopy (UHV-TEMSTM) combined system to clarify the...silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEM/STM Miyoko Tanaka * , Masaki Takeguchi......

Miyoko Tanaka; Masaki Takeguchi; Hidehiro Yasuda; Kazuo Furuya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Communicating Evolution as Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):14515. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

Thanukos, Anastasia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

E-Science Day  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on December 6, 2011, E-Science Day was a day-long event,regional librarians in e-science, and to expose regionalthe initiation of e-science support projects within their

Abad, Raquel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z