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1

Book Review published by Analysis, 1997: Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis, By Zhong Lin Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review published by Analysis, 1997: Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis, By Zhong Lin Wang Professor John F. Watts University of Surrey The book describes, but the author is considerate enough to define them all in the early pages of his book. The dust-cover notes

Wang, Zhong L.

2

Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Surface Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Surface Analysis group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use surface analytical techniques help to determine the chemical, elemental, and molecular composition, and electronic structure of material surfaces and interfaces. The properties of the surface and outer few micrometers of a material often control the electrical, chemical, or mechanical properties of that material--hence, this region is of extreme importance. Our techniques use ions, electrons, and X-ray or ultraviolet photons in high vacuum to probe surfaces and interfaces of a material. We map the elemental and chemical composition of specimens, study impurities and grain boundaries, gather bonding and chemical-state information, measure surface electronic properties, and perform depth profiles to determine doping and elemental distributions. We have analyzed a wide range of materials, including photovoltaics, microelectronics, polymers, and biological specimens. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet describes our major technique capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Home Staff Only Microscopy Group Staff InstrumentationCapabilities The Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) Microscopy User Centers: MAUC SHaRE Research Highlights...

5

Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

7

Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break down as the MWF corrodes. The importance of localized corrosion should also be determined.

Dietz, N. L.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Failure Analysis of a Rupture Disk Assembly by Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Charles R. Morin Memorial Symposium on Failure Analysis and ... Tools for Failure Event Database Management and Probability Risk Analysis for ...

9

NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) Analysis: Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Analysis Graphs NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) Analysis: Graphics Time Series Graphs of Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Anomalies Graphics...

10

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

11

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 8C45832E2AA310DD11A6FEA4BDB93C6B Press Downloadable pdf...

12

High-Speed Vibrational Imaging and Spectral Analysis of Lipid Bodies by Compound Raman Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the in vivo fat contains much more unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) than the fat formed via de novo synthesis imaging and spectral analysis capability renders compound Raman microscopy an indispensible analytical allowed the transcriptional regulation of fat cell differentiation to be elucidated.4,5 In recent years

Cheng, Ji-Xin

13

Electrical transport and mechanical properties of alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers on silicon surfaces probed by atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between molecular conductivity and mechanical properties (molecular deformation and frictional responses) of hexadecylsilane self-assembled monolayers was studied with conductive probe atomic force microscopy/friction force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Current and friction were measured as a function of applied pressure, simultaneously, while imaging the topography of self-assembled monolayer molecule islands and silicon surfaces covered with a thin oxide layer. Friction images reveal lower friction over the molecules forming islands than over the bare silicon surface, indicating the lubricating functionality of alkylsilane molecules. By measuring the tunneling current change due to changing of the height of the molecular islands by tilting the molecules under pressure from the tip, we obtained an effective conductance decay constant ({beta}) of 0.52/{angstrom}.

Park, Jeong Young; Qi, Yabing; Ashby, Paul D.; Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Principal Component Analysis of Spectroscopic Imaging Data in Scanning Probe Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The approach for data analysis in band excitation family of scanning probe microscopies based on principal component analysis (PCA) is explored. PCA utilizes the similarity between spectra within the image to select the relevant response components. For small signal variations within the image, the PCA components coincide with the results of deconvolution using simple harmonic oscillator model. For strong signal variations, the PCA allows effective approach to rapidly process, de-noise and compress the data. The extension of PCA for correlation function analysis is demonstrated. The prospects of PCA as a universal tool for data analysis and representation in multidimensional SPMs are discussed.

Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) Analysis NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.001 Graphics Graphics data Data Contributors Hansen, J.E.,1 R. Ruedy,2 M. Sato,3 and K. Lo2 1National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2SGT, Inc., 3Columbia University, Center for Climate Systems Research, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA Period of Record 1880-2012 (Anomalies are relative to the 1951-80 base period means.) Methods The NASA GISS Surface Temperature (GISTEMP) analysis provides a measure of the changing global surface temperature with monthly resolution for the period since 1880, when a reasonably global distribution of meteorological stations was established. The input data Hansen et al. use for the analysis, collected by many national meteorological services around the

16

Low Temperature Scanning Force Microscopy of the Si(111)-( 7x7) Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low temperature scanning force microscope (SFM) operating in a dynamic mode in ultrahigh vacuum was used to study the Si(111)-(7x7) surface at 7.2 K. Not only the twelve adatoms but also the six rest atoms of the unit cell are clearly resolved for the first time with SFM. In addition, the first measurements of the short range chemical bonding forces above specific atomic sites are presented. The data are in good agreement with first principles computations and indicate that the nearest atoms in the tip and sample relax significantly when the tip is within a few Angstrom of the surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Lantz, M. A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Hug, H. J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Schendel, P. J. A. van [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Hoffmann, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Martin, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Baratoff, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Abdurixit, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Guentherodt, H.-J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Gerber, Ch. [IBM Research Division, Zuerich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon, (Switzerland)

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the surface in order to minimize the total surface energy. With an understanding of the structural and environmental parameters which govern polymer surface structure, SFG is then used to explore the effects of surface hydrophobicity and solvent polarity on the orientation and ordering of amphiphilic neutral polymers adsorbed at the solid/liquid interface. SFG spectra show that poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adsorb with their hydrophobic moieties preferentially oriented toward hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. These same moieties, however, disorder when adsorbed onto a hydrophilic silica/water interface. Water is identified as a critical factor for mediating the orientation and ordering of hydrophobic moieties in polymers adsorbed at hydrophobic interfaces. The role of bulk water content and water vapor, as they influence hydrogel surface structure and mechanics, continues to be explored in the next series of experiments. A method was developed to probe the surface viscoelastic properties of hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based contact lens materials by analyzing AFM force-distance curves. AFM analysis indicates that the interfacial region is dehydrated, relative to the bulk. Experiments performed on poly(HEMA+MA) (MA = methacrylic acid), a more hydrophilic copolymer with greater bulk water content, show even greater water depletion at the surface. SFG spectra, as well as surface energy arguments, suggest that the more hydrophilic polymer component (such as MA) is not favored at the air interface; this may explain anomalies in water retention at the hydrogel surface. Adsorption of lysozyme onto poly(HEMA+MA) was found to further reduce near-surface viscous behavior, suggesting lower surface water content. Lastly, protein adsorption is studied using a model polymer system of polystyrene covalently bound with a monolayer of bovine serum albumin. SFG results indicate that some amino acid residues in proteins adopt preferred orientations. SFG spectra also show that the phenyl rings of the bare polystyrene substrate in contact with air or

Koffas, Telly Stelianos

2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Repository surface design site layout analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

Montalvo, H.R.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the surfaces of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a detailed description of the experimental complexities encountered in developing scanning tunneling microscope (STM) probing of atomic structure on the surface of freshly-grown hydrogenated-amorphous semiconductors. It also contains a speculative microscopic film-growth model that explains differences between the disorder in CVD grown a-Ge:H versus a-Si:H films. This model is derived from prior results obtained in the chemical analysis of GeH{sub 4} plasmas, combined with surface reaction and thermodynamic considerations. The neutral radical fragments of silane, disilane and germane dissociation in discharges, which dominate the vapor and film-growth reactions, have been deduced from detailed analysis of prior data and are reported. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Gallagher, A.; Ostrom, R.; Tannenbaum, D. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

Behrens, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu [Department 'Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public, Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Wegmann, Urs [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Maier, Urs [Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel [SPECS Zurich GmbH, Technoparkstr. 1, CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Recent Advances in Electron Microscopy, Spectral Imaging, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as adhesion performance, corrosion resistance, electrical and magnetic ... and surface analysis techniques for probing the composition and structure of ... microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM/STEM/EDS); ...

25

Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cortical Surface-Based Analysis I. Segmentation and Surface Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and flattening the cortical surface are described in a companion paper. These procedures allow for the routine and reprint requests should be ad- dressed. Fax: (617) 726-7422. E-mail: dale@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu. Neuro to preserve edges (Whitaker and Gerig, 1994), gray/white matter segmen- tation (Gerig and Kikinis, 1990; Gerig

Sereno, Martin

27

A Comparative Analysis of Two Land Surface Heterogeneity Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two contrasting representations of land surface variability used in general circulation models (GCMS) are compared through an analysis of their corresponding surface energy balance equations. In one representation (the “mixture” approach), ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analysis of replication factories in human cells by super-resolution light microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

against two key components, PCNA and RPA. RPA is a heterotrimeric single stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein that associates with the template strands produced at replication forks by the action of the replicative helicase. It is important for strand... in these STED images, cannot be detected if the confocal mode is used (table 1), demon- strating that the increase in resolution obtained with STED microscopy can give better insight into biological processes in vivo. the replicative helicase is not inhibited...

Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Schwarz, Ulf; Green, Catherine M

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microscopy Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST has worked extensively with microscope manufacturers such as FEI ... Electron microscopy methods have been used to characterize potential ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Proposed Method of Surface Map Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Present surface frontal analyses suffer from the defect that frontal positions are typically not collocated with zones of intense temperature contrast. Further, individuals typically do not agree as to the existence, type, and location of fronts.

Frederick Sanders

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analytical Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Polyestimate: instantaneous open source surface code analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface code is highly practical, enabling arbitrarily reliable quantum computation given a 2-D nearest-neighbor coupled array of qubits with gate error rates below approximately 1%. We describe an open source library, Polyestimate, enabling a user with no knowledge of the surface code to specify realistic physical quantum gate error models and obtain logical error rate estimates. Functions allowing the user to specify simple depolarizing error rates for each gate have also been included. Every effort has been made to make this library user-friendly.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction  

SciTech Connect

Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

Stastna, A., E-mail: astastna@gmail.com [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Leichmann, J. [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium windows  

SciTech Connect

It is known that various crystalline and liquid compounds form on the downstream surfaces of beryllium windows exposed to air. It is also known that the integrity of such windows may be compromised resulting in leaks through the window. The purpose of this report is to document the occurrences described as they pertain to the NSLS and to analyze, where possible, the various substances formed.

Gmur, N.F.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties  

SciTech Connect

Experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal were developed. A computer program was developed to compute equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal with experimental data. Developments of experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on coal were attempted, but not finalized. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal will be conducted to investigate surface properties of this coal in the presence of water.

Kwon, K.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois 16 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed. The additives include n-propanol, n-butanol, 2-butanol, phenol, 2-naphthol, o-cresol and cyclohexanol. Equilibrium adsorption loadings of normal alcohols on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal increase with increased numbers of carbons in their molecular formulas. Normal alcohols are more adsorbed on the coal than their branched alcohols. Adsorption loadings of single-ring compound phenol on the coal is higher than that of cyclohexanol. Adsorption loadings of double-ring compound 2-naphthol on the coal is much higher than that of single-ring compound phenol. The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Computation of Ground Surface Conduction Heat Flux by Fourier Analysis of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for computing the ground surface heat flux density is tested at two places in West Africa during the rainy season and during the dry season. This method is based upon the Fourier analysis of the experimental ground surface temperature. ...

Guy Cautenet; Michel Legrand; Yaya Coulibaly; Christian Boutin

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Surface detection, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect

New techniques are presented for the detection and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we introduce here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code, and is much less expensive than other techniques such as the solvent-accessible surface.

Dupuy, L M; Rudd, R E

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis Dataset Summary Description The Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis (GLSEA2) is a digital map of the Great Lakes surface water temperature and ice cover which is produced daily at the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) in Ann Arbor, Michigan through the NOAA CoastWatch program. The GLSEA is stored as a 1024x1024 pixel map in PNG or ASCII format, suitable for viewing on PCs and workstations with readily available software. The lake surface temperatures are derived from NOAA polar-orbiting satellite imagery obtained through the Great Lakes CoastWatch program. The addition of ice cover information was implemented in early 1999, using data provided by the National Ice Center (NIC). Lake surface temperatures are updated daily with information from the cloud-free portions of the previous day's satellite imagery. If no imagery is available, a smoothing algorithm is applied to the previous day's map. Ice information will then be added, using the most recent Great Lakes Ice Analysis produced by NIC, currently daily during the ice season. GLERL is currently receiving a product suite of an average of 108 enhanced digital images including satellite-derived surface temperature (Fig. 1.1), visible and near-infrared reflectance, brightness temperatures, cloud masks, and satellite/solar zenith angle data from the NOAA/AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer).

40

Analysis of Near-Surface Atmospheric Variables: Validation of the SAFRAN Analysis over France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Système d’analyse fournissant des renseignements atmosphériques à la neige (SAFRAN) is a mesoscale atmospheric analysis system for surface variables. It produces an analysis at the hourly time step using ground data observations. One of SAFRAN’s ...

P. Quintana-Seguí; P. Le Moigne; Y. Durand; E. Martin; F. Habets; M. Baillon; C. Canellas; L. Franchisteguy; S. Morel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Open-loop Band excitation Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multidimensional scanning probe microscopy approach for quantitative, cross-talk free mapping of surface electrostatic properties is demonstrated. Open-loop band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (OL BE KPFM) probes the full response-frequency-potential surface at each pixel at standard imaging rates. The subsequent analysis reconstructs work function, tip surface capacitance gradient and resonant frequency maps, obviating feedback-related artifacts. OL BE KPFM imaging is demonstrated for several materials systems with topographic, potential and combined contrast. This approach combines the features of both frequency and amplitude KPFM and allows complete decoupling of topographic and voltage contributions to the KPFM signal.

Guo, Senli [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Positron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global monthly sea surface temperature analysis is described which uses real-lime in situ (ship and buoy) and satellite data. The method combines the advantages of both types of data: the ground truth of in situ data and the improved coverage ...

Richard W. Reynolds

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Experimental thin film deposition and surface analysis techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An attempt has been made to present some of the thin-film deposition and surface analysis techniques which may be useful in growing superionic conducting materials. Emphasis is made on the importance of being careful in selecting process parameters and materials in order to produce films with properties outlined in this article. Also, special care should be given to proper consideration of grain boundary effects.

Collins, W.E.; Rambabu, B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Skin Deep: Highlights of NREL Surface Analysis PV Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Surface Analysis project provides measurement support and leadership for collaborative research activities involving surface chemistry and physics in all areas of the PV program. Significant results from the past fiscal year include the following: i) in-situ XPS, UPS, and AES studies of chemical-bath exposure of CIGS surfaces demonstrated that Group-III elements are preferentially removed from the surface, that type conversion of the surface occurs, and that the addition of a surfactant improves CdS deposition and thus device performance; ii) XPS studies of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) candidate backsheet materials have shown that plasma exposure prior to oxide-barrier deposition results in the formation of low-molecular-weight fragments that result in the formation of a weak interfacial layer that fails during damp-heat exposure; iii) an empirical relation was derived for the source geometry that leads to optimal film-thickness uniformity in rotating-substrate physical-vapor deposition (PVD) systems; and iv) PVD flux-distribution calculations were performed to develop a novel method for combinatorial thin-film synthesis.

Asher, S.; Pankow, J.; Perkins, C.; Reedy, R.; Teeter, G.; Young, M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Depth Charge: Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Study ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... right circumstances, surface science instruments such ... Electric force microscopy can be used to ... superior strength and electrical conductance, added ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many building owners and facility managers are deeply interested in both operation and maintenance costs related to a building's life cycle. Optimizing energy consumption and obtaining long equipment activity requires sophisticated management. If the data needed for this management are unavailable, then measures must be taken to augment them. We were able to lower power consumption in heat source equipment by ap-proximately 12% by means of analysis and evaluations as well as using optimum measurement features that al-low measuring operation data without stopping opera-tion of surface measurement equipment. More cost-effective renewal plans and designs were achieved by proposing equipment specifications based on the cooling and heating load during operation.

Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

50

Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

4 days ago ... The Ohio State University Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis ... There are also two X-ray diffractometer (XRD) systems, facilities for ...

51

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

52

Analysis of aircraft surface motion at Boston Logan International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to examine the nature of aircraft surface motion on the airport surface during normal operations. Twelve hours of radar data, gathered by MIT Lincoln Laboratories from Logan airport in Boston, ...

Alhanatis, Robert Elias

53

The Analysis of Sea Surface Imagery for Whitecap Kinematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible sea surface images are analyzed to determine the distribution of the average length of breaking crests per unit sea surface area per unit speed increment ?(c). The ?(c) distribution offers a scale-dependent description of wave breaking ...

Jessica M. Kleiss; W. Kendall Melville

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Comparative analysis of surface power system architectures for human Mars exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides a comprehensive analysis of surface power generation and energy storage architectures for human Mars surface missions, including tracking and non-tracking photovoltaic power generation, nuclear fission ...

Cooper, Chase Allen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Improvements to NOAA’s Historical Merged Land–Ocean Surface Temperature Analysis (1880–2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of sea surface and land–near-surface merged temperature anomalies are used to monitor climate variations and to evaluate climate simulations; therefore, it is important to make analyses of these data as accurate as possible. Analysis ...

Thomas M. Smith; Richard W. Reynolds; Thomas C. Peterson; Jay Lawrimore

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelet multiresolution analysis was used to examine the variation in dominant length scales determined from remotely sensed airborne- and satellite-derived surface energy flux data. The wavelet cospectra are computed between surface radiometric ...

Nathaniel A. Brunsell; Robert R. Gillies

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mesoscale Surface Analysis System for the Australian Domain: Design Issues, Development Status, and System Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational surface analysis system for the continent of Australia is presented. The system is specifically designed to mitigate problems that arise when analyzing surface data with a highly inhomogeneous distribution. Hourly analyses of ...

Tomasz J. Glowacki; Yi Xiao; Peter Steinle

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Scaling Analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the data of optimum interpolation sea surface temperature (OISST), the temporal correlations of the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) in the South China Sea (SCS) are studied by using the rescaled range analysis (R/S) and detrended ...

Zijun Gan; Youfang Yan; Yiquan Qi

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis for sulfur forms in coal and on coal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A review and critical evaluation of all available literature on the determination of sulfur and sulfur forms in coal and on coal and pyrite surfaces is being performed. Approximately 200 citations through 1984 have been catalogued and reviewed, and approximately 100 additional citations since 1984 have been identified. Work is nearing completion on the collection and critical evaluation of the more recent literature. A few articles requested through the interlibrary loan system still need to be received and analyzed, and several articles in unusual foreign languages need to be evaluated. Methods used for sampling, sample preparation, and analysis of sulfur and sulfur forms in samples arising from the spherical oil agglomeration process have been reviewed. Recommendations are being made for assessing the quality of analyses provided by commercial laboratories, for assuring that preparation procedures do not alter sulfur forms in samples, and for determining the ability of sampling procedures to obtain representative samples. Several concerns about the applicability of the ASTM procedure for the determination of pyrite sulfur in micronized coal and oil-agglomerated samples have been raised. 5 refs., 1 tab.

Markuszewski, R.; Chriswell, C.D.; Norton, G.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study  

SciTech Connect

The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Physically-Intuitive Method for Calculation of the Local Lattice Constant from a High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Image by Fourier Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a physically-intuitive method to calculate the local lattice constant as a function of position in a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image by performing a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. We apply a Gaussian filter with appropriate spatial full-width-half-max (FWHM) bandwidth to the image centered at the desired location to calculate the local lattice constant (as opposed to the average lattice constant). Fourier analysis of the filtered image yields the vertical and horizontal lattice constants at this location. The process is repeated by stepping the Gaussian filter across the image to produce a set of local lattice constants in the vertical and horizontal direction as a function of position in the image. The method has been implemented in a freely available tool on nanoHUB.

Teherani, James T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined.

Gmur, N.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NIST: Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Summary: Ultraviolet photoemission electron microscopy is used to study ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Empirical Orthogonal Function Analysis of Ocean Surface Currents Using Complex and Real-Vector Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis has been widely used in meteorology and oceanography to extract dominant modes of behavior in scalar and vector datasets. For analysis of two-dimensional vector fields, such as surface winds or ...

James M. Kaihatu; Robert A. Handler; George O. Marmorino; Lynn K. Shay

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Isentropic Meso?-Scale Analysis System and Its Sensitivity to Aircraft and Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis scheme for meteorological variables on constant potential temperature surfaces is presented. The analysis uses a form of multivariate statistical interpolation and is designed th retain mesoscale detail in disparate ...

Stanley G. Benjamin

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Real-time scanning tunneling microscopy observations of the oxidation of a Ti/Pt(111)-(2x2) surface alloy using O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to study the nascent oxidation of an ordered Ti/Pt(111)-(2x2) surface alloy exposed to oxygen (O{sub 2}) or nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The Ti/Pt(111)-(2x2) surface alloy was formed by depositing an ultrathin Ti film on Pt(111) and annealing to 1050 K. This produces an alloy film in which the surface layer is pure Pt and the second layer contains Ti atoms in a (2x2) structure, which causes the pattern observed by STM and LEED. Real-time imaging of the surface at 300 K was carried out by continuously scanning with the STM while either O{sub 2} or NO{sub 2} was introduced into the chamber. O{sub 2} exposures did not cause any gross structural changes; however oxygen was detected on the surface afterward using AES. Annealing this surface to 950 K resulted in the formation of an ordered TiO{sub x} overlayer as characterized by both LEED and STM. In contrast, NO{sub 2} exposures caused definite changes in the surface morphology at 300 K, and the root-mean-square roughness increased from 3.5 to 7.1 A after a large NO{sub 2} exposure. No ordered structures were produced by this treatment, but annealing the surface to 950 K formed an ordered pattern in LEED and corresponding clear, well-resolved structures in STM images. We account for these observations on the disruption or reconstruction of the Ti/Pt(111)-(2x2) surface alloy by arguments recalling that Ti oxidation is an activated process. The energetic barrier to TiO{sub x} formation cannot be surmounted at room temperature at low oxygen coverages, and annealing the surface was necessary to initiate this reaction. However, the higher oxygen coverages obtained using the more reactive oxidant NO{sub 2} lowered the chemical potential in the system sufficiently to overcome the activation barrier to extract Ti from the alloy at room temperature and form a disordered TiO{sub x} film. These results illustrate the importance of the surface oxygen coverage in nucleating the room temperature oxidation of the Pt-Ti surface alloys and further show the ability of NO{sub 2} in ultrahigh vacuum studies for probing the chemistry that will occur at higher O{sub 2} pressure.

Hsieh Shuchen; Liu, G. F.; Koel, Bruce E. [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015-3172 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

68

MML Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MML Electron Microscopy Facility consists of three transmission electron microscopes (TEM), three scanning electron microscopes (SEM), a ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Diabatically Driven Discrete Propagation of Surface Fronts: A Numerical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete frontal propagation has been identified as a process whereby a surface front discontinuously moves forward, without evidence of frontal passage across a mesoscale region. Numerical simulations are employed to examine the upper-level ...

George H. Bryan; J. Michael Fritsch

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Validation and Error Analysis of OSCAR Sea Surface Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons of OSCAR satellite-derived sea surface currents with in situ data from moored current meters, drifters, and shipboard current profilers indicate that OSCAR presently provides accurate time means of zonal and meridional currents, and ...

Eric S. Johnson; Fabrice Bonjean; Gary S. E. Lagerloef; John T. Gunn; Gary T. Mitchum

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Inversion of Marine Radar Images for Surface Wave Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate sea surface elevation maps from marine radar image sequences is presented. This method is the extension of an existing inverse modeling technique to derive wave spectra from marine radar images, which assumes linear wave ...

JoséC. Nieto Borge; Germán RodrÍguez RodrÍguez; Katrin Hessner; Paloma Izquierdo González

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Stochastic Analysis of Southern and Pacific Ocean Sea Surface Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows that the synoptic variability of zonal and meridional midlatitude Pacific and Southern Ocean sea surface winds can be well described by a univariate stochastic dynamical system directly derived from data. The method used to ...

Philip Sura

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has

74

Homogenised limit analysis of masonry walls, Part I: Failure surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple micro-mechanical model for the homogenised limit analysis of in-plane loaded masonry is proposed. Assuming brickwork under plane stress condition and adopting a polynomial expansion for the 2D stress field, a linear optimisation problem is derived ... Keywords: Composite behaviour, Homogenisation, Limit analysis, Masonry, Micro-mechanics

G. Milani; P. B. Lourenço; A. Tralli

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Surface Analysis Over the Oceans—Searching for Sea Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the Atlantic storms in ERICA IOP 1–5, NMC operational surface analyses, both manual and automated, were compared with two sets of research analyses prepared later. The positions of cyclone centers agreed within 100 km on average only between ...

Frederick Sanders

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Metrology Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrology Electron Microscopy. Technical Contact: Joseph (Joe) Fu. 301-975-3795. Figure 1. SRM 484f Sample and its Micrograph. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

BNL | CFN: Electron Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and chemistry at the atomic scale is crucial to modern materials science and nanotechnology. Advanced electron microscopy can provide the fundamental knowledge that will...

78

The Land Surface Analysis in the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) uses the NASA Land Information System (LIS) to create its land surface analysis: the NCEP Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Comparing to the previous two generations of NCEP global ...

Jesse Meng; Rongqian Yang; Helin Wei; Michael Ek; George Gayno; Pingping Xie; Kenneth Mitchell

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An integrated traverse planner and analysis tool for future lunar surface exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the Surface Exploration Traverse Analysis and Navigation Tool (SEXTANT), a system designed to help maximize productivity, scientific return, and safety on future lunar and planetary explorations,. The ...

Johnson, Aaron William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Mesoscale Analysis Method for Surface Potential Temperature in Mountainous and Coastal Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is developed to anisotropically spread surface observations in steep valleys. The goal is to create an improved objective analysis for the lowest, terrain-following numerical weather prediction (NWP) model level in mountainous ...

Xingxiu Deng; Roland Stull

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

Polly, David

83

Principal component analysis based on wavelet characteristics applied to automated surface defect inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated visual inspection, a crucial manufacturing step, has been replacing the more time-consuming and less accurate human inspection. This research explores automated visual inspection of surface defects in a light-emitting diode (LED) chip. Commonly ... Keywords: hotelling statistic, machine vision system, principal component analysis, surface defect inspection, wavelet characteristics

Hong-Dar Lin; Chung-Yu Chung; Wan-Ting Lin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spectroscopical Analysis of Mechano-chemically Activated Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechano-chemical activation is fundamentally different than chemical activation in that energy is added to alter the state of bond energy instead of exciting electrons to produce a chemical reaction. Mechano-chemical activation has demonstrated to alter the chemical reaction and rates. There remains no development of a model to quantify the changes in reactions due to mechano-chemical activation. This research aims in expanding our understanding of the influence of mechanochemical activation methods. The dynamics and kinetics of mechano-chemically activated surfaces will be studied using x-ray spectroscopy methods. Mechano-chemical interactions can be quantified through the study of electron energies. X-ray spectroscopy is a useful method of analyzing and quantifying electron energy states. X-ray absorbance is used to study the valence state electron shells of iron undergone activation through sliding friction of naturally produced wax. In-situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy is employed to instantaneously characterize single crystal tantalum samples of each principal crystallographic orientation during oxidation. Sliding friction of the naturally produced wax resulted in a reduction in the binding energy of the iron 2p electrons by approximately one electron-volt. This reduction in binding energy is attributed to ferrocene which is an organo-metallic alloy, Fe(C5H5)2. Mechanical strain of the crystal lattices of tantalum resulted in altered activation energies. Activation energy increased with the application of lattice strain. At increasing strain, oxide properties become more dependent on the lattice strain than the crystal orientation and temperature. A model system is developed incorporating mechanical strain into the prediction of activation energy and rates.

Cooper, Rodrigo

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Hercules, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1 Mary C. Brady,1 Hai C. Tang,1 Anne L. Plant2 * Abstract The analysis of fluorescence microscopy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUS

Bernal, Javier

88

Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nonlinear vibrational microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMM SAMM EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Sub-Ã…ngstrom Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility In order to meet the scientific challenges of the future, the EMC has built a new state-of-the-art laboratory space for advanced electron microscopy. The new building has been designed to provide next- generation science with an operating environment that cannot be attained by renovating existing facilities. The EMC staff learned as much as possible from similar efforts around the world, including the SuperSTEM building at Daresbury, the Triebenberg Special Laboratory, the AML at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the new NIST building, and various facilities for nanoscience.

91

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Acknowledgment EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Acknowledgment Please acknowledge your use of the EMC in your publications and presentations with the following acknowledgment statement: The electron microscopy was accomplished at the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 by UChicago Argonne, LLC.

92

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Workshops and Seminars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upcoming Seminars Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 11am Matthew Mecklenburg Center for Electron Microscopy and MicroAnalysis, University of Southern California 2D crystals are...

93

An Analysis of the Effect of Local Heat Advection on Evaporation over Wet and Dry Surface Strips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of local advection on evaporation and Bowen ratio over alternating crosswind infinite dry-warm and wet-cool surface strips (patches), by redistribution of surface heat, is analysed. The analysis shows that evaporation over the region ...

Ya Guo; Peter H. Schuepp

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Neural network characterization of scanning electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a sophisticated equipment employed for fine imaging of processed film surfaces. In this study, a prediction model of scanning electron microscopy was constructed by using a generalized regression neural network ... Keywords: generalized regression neural network, genetic algorithm, model, scanning electron microscope, statistical experiment

Sanghee Kwon; Donghwan Kim; Byungwhan Kim

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Laboratory Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

96

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

97

Satellite-Model Coupled Analysis of Convective Potential in Florida with VAS Water Vapor and Surface Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for time-continuous mesoscale weather analysis is applied to a study of convective cloud development in central Florida. The analysis system incorporates water vapor concentrations and surface temperatures retrieved from infrared VISSR (...

Alan E. Lipton; George D. Modica; Scot T. Heckman; Arthur J. Jackson

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Office of Science User Facility An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

100

Electron Microscopy Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Electron Microscopy Lab Electron Microscopy Lab Focusing on the study of microstructures with electron and ion beam instruments, including crystallographic and chemical techniques. April 12, 2012 Transmission electron microscope Rob Dickerson examines a multiphase oxide scale using the FEI Titan 80-300 transmission electron microscope. Contact Rob Dickerson (505) 667-6337 Email Rod McCabe (505) 606-1649 Email Pat Dickerson (505) 665-3036 Email Tom Wynn (505) 665-6861 Email Dedicated to the characterization of materials through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures in support of Basic Energy Science, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, DoD, DOE, Work for Others, nuclear energy, and weapons programs. Go to full website »

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101

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Training EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers User Training Prior Training in Electron Microscopy: People who wish to operate TEMs must have at least one college-level course in TEM with a lab component or previous TEM experience. The college course can't be one in which TEM was just one of many topics. For researchers who lack academic training and/or practical experience in electron microscopy, we suggest the short courses in TEM at the Hooke College of Applied Sciences, and the hands-on TEM courses at Northwestern University or the University of Chicago or Northern Illinois University.

102

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The mission of the Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is to: Conduct materials research using advanced microstructural characterization methods; Maintain unique resources and facilities for scientific research for the both the Argonne National Laboratory and national scientific community. Develop and expand the frontiers of microanalysis by fostering the evolution of synergistic state-of-the-art resources in instrumentation, techniques and scientific expertise; The staff members of the EMC carry out their own research as well as participate in collaborative programs with other scientists at Argonne National Laboratory as well as researchers, educators and students worldwide. The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff perform collaborative research with members of other Divisions at Argonne National Laboratory and with collaborators from universities and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

103

SURFACE GENERATION ANALYSIS IN MICRO END-MILLING CONSIDERING THE INFLUENCES OF GRAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro end-milling method is a universal micro manufacturing method, which can be used to fabricating complex 3D structures and parts with many materials. But compared with their micrometer order size, their surface roughness quality is not satisfied. In this paper, the different metal phase grains influences are researched, and the micro end-milling process is described while the material is anisotropic. In this paper, the physical characteristics of different grains, especially friction coefficient ? and elastic module E, are very critical to determine the chip formation process and surface generation. The chip is often discontinues because of the grain boundary effect. Through the micro end-milling experiment, the bottom surface results correlate very well with the theory analysis. 1.

Jinsheng Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dynamics of Plasma-Surface Interactions using In-situ Ion Beam Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this proposal was to develop an innovative experimental facility that would allow for the measurement of real-time response of a material surface to plasma bombardment by employing in-situ high-energy ion beam analysis. This facility was successfully developed and deployed at U. Wisconsin-Madison and was named DIONISOS (Dynamics of IONic Implantation & Sputtering on Surfaces). There were several major highlights to the DIONISOS research which we will briefly highlight below. The full technical details of the DIONISOS development, deployment and research results are contained in the Appendices which contain several peer-reviewed publications and a PhD thesis devoted to DIONISOS. The DIONISOS results on deuterium retention in molybdenum were chosen as an invited talk at the 2008 International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Toledo, Spain.

D.G. Whyte

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Surface analysis of mixed-conducting ferrite membranes by the conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis of iron surface states in the dense ceramic membranes made of {sup 57}Fe-enriched SrFe{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}O{sub 3-{delta}} perovskite, shows no traces of reductive decomposition or carbide formation in the interfacial layers after operation under air/CH{sub 4} gradient at 1173 K, within the limits of experimental uncertainty. The predominant trivalent state of iron cations at the membrane permeate-side surface exposed to flowing dry methane provides evidence of the kinetic stabilization mechanism, which is only possible due to slow oxygen-exchange kinetics and enables long-term operation of the ferrite-based ceramic reactors for natural gas conversion. At the membrane feed-side surface exposed to air, the fractions of Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+} are close to those in the powder equilibrated at atmospheric oxygen pressure, suggesting that the exchange limitations to oxygen transport are essentially localized at the partially reduced surface. - Graphical Abstract: Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis of dense ceramic membranes made of {sup 57}Fe-enriched SrFe{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}O{sub 3-{delta}} perovskite, shows no reductive decomposition in thin interfacial layers after testing under air/CH{sub 4} gradient, enabling stable operation of the ferrite-based ceramic reactors for partial oxidation of methane. Highlights: > Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for mixed-conducting membranes. > No decomposition is detected in the membrane surface layers under air/CH{sub 4} gradient. > Due to kinetic stabilization, Fe{sup 3+} states prevail at the surface exposed to methane. > Transmission Moessbauer spectra show perovskite decomposition on equlibration in CH{sub 4}. > Ferrite-based ceramic reactors can stably operate under air/CH{sub 4} gradient.

Waerenborgh, J.C.; Tsipis, E.V. [Chemistry Department, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, CFMC-UL, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Yaremchenko, A.A. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kharton, V.V., E-mail: kharton@ua.pt [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Novel Microscopy Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Atomic Imaging of Surface and Bulk with an Aberration Corrected Scanning Electron Microscope: Yimei Zhu1; 1Brookhaven National ...

107

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

position: 1.5 mm Users' research interests (examples): Radiation effects (fissionfusion reactor materials), radioactive waste storage, ion-beam processing (surface...

108

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

109

Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy. Sponsorship, MS&T ...

110

Accuracy Analysis of a Robotic Radionuclide Inspection and Mapping System for Surface Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mapping of localized regions of radionuclide contamination in a building can be a time consuming and costly task. Humans moving hand-held radiation detectors over the target areas are subject to fatigue. A contamination map based on manual surveys can contain significant operator-induced inaccuracies. A Fanuc M16i light industrial robot has been configured for installation on a mobile aerial work platform, such as a tall forklift. When positioned in front of a wall or floor surface, the robot can map the radiation levels over a surface area of up to 3 m by 3 m. The robot's end effector is a commercial alpha-beta radiation sensor, augmented with range and collision avoidance sensors to ensure operational safety as well as to maintain a constant gap between surface and radiation sensors. The accuracy and repeatability of the robotically conducted contamination surveys is directly influenced by the sensors and other hardware employed. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of various non-contact sensors for gap measurement, and the means to compensate for predicted systematic errors that arise during the area survey scans. The range sensor should maintain a constant gap between the radiation counter and the surface being inspected. The inspection robot scans the wall surface horizontally, moving down at predefined vertical intervals after each scan in a meandering pattern. A number of non-contact range sensors can be employed for the measurement of the gap between the robot end effector and the wall. The nominal gap width was specified as 10 mm, with variations during a single scan not to exceed {+-} 2 mm. Unfinished masonry or concrete walls typically exhibit irregularities, such as holes, gaps, or indentations in mortar joints. These irregularities can be sufficiently large to indicate a change of the wall contour. The responses of different sensor types to the wall irregularities vary, depending on their underlying principles of operation. We explored capacitive, ultrasound, and optical Laser range sensors. The unshielded capacitive range sensors were found to be influenced by objects in their vicinity, and to have comparatively low sensitivity. Therefore they were not used for gap measurement. We did, however, use them successfully to detect obstacles in the field of motion of the sensor head. The four sensors pointing diagonally from four corners of the sensor head are capacitive range sensors, which stop the robot motion any time a pre-set threshold signal level is exceeded. Ultrasound range sensors were found to have good resolution. The ultrasound beam was frequently deflected sideways by the wall's roughness, resulting in a spurious signal peaks. On the other hand, ultrasound signals are inherently insensitive to variations of the optical surface properties. Laser range sensing proved to be generally less noisy than ultrasound measurements. The aforementioned sensitivity to the target surface's optical properties was not evident on grey, non-reflective surfaces. On such surfaces, laser range sensing was found to be superior to ultrasound measurements. Occasionally, however, surface reflectivity and specularity caused erroneous measurements. The computational burden of measuring and filtering the sensor data in real time made it impractical to control the robot directly based on sensor feedback. The robot performs a first horizontal surface range scan merely to gage the surface profile. During the subsequent passes, the robot records the radiation measurements, while recording the range data for the next pass, with the range sensor positioned below the radiation sensor. The decoupling of measurements from robot control prevents the robot controller from responding to spurious sensor signals, ensuring steadier and safer radiation surveying. The controller is configured to accept either optical or ultrasound range signals, so as to respond better to user-specific requirements. A detailed analysis of non-contact range sensors and control for the automated mapping of surface contamination has been presented. The C

Mauer, Georg F.; Kawa, Chris [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4027 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Novel Approaches to Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Using Highly Charged Ions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Complex problems in materials science require very sensitive, high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) determination of chemical (molecular) structures in near-surface volumes. Slow, highly charged ions (HCIs) provide a new, unique tool for probing chemical structure on a nanometer scale. The authors have explored the potential of these new highly charged ion based techniques in studies of materials with programmatic significance such as high explosives and actinide surfaces. Specifically the are studying HCI based surface analysis techniques (such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS) that are capable of achieving sensitivity of less than 10{sup 9} atoms/cm{sup 2}. In addition, this technique can determine chemical structure and hydrogen concentration. These attributes make this technique especially important to Laboratory missions in enhanced surveillance and nonproliferation. The unique advantage of HCIs over singly charged ions is the extreme energy density that is deposited into a nanometer-sized near-surface volume at the impact of a single HCI. For example, a Au{sup 69+} ion deposits about 0.5 MJ/cm{sup 3}. This high energy density causes the emission of a large number of secondary particles (electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and clusters) from surfaces. The emitted particles act as probes of the energy dissipation mechanism, and their yields are of technological significance. The HCI-emission microscope concept they developed uniquely combines all three aspects, high spatial resolution with highly sensitive compositional analysis and chemical structure determination. The experiments have shown that individual HCI impacts lead to copious electron emission, over 200 electrons per incident highly charged ion. In addition, highly charged ion induced secondary ion mass spectrometry (HCI-SIMS) provides considerably more information per ion impact than conventional SIMS. Combining these two phenomena provides a unique tool to study important materials issues necessary for the laboratory to accomplish its missions.

Hamza, A.; Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A.; Schneider, D.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U.(DOE-Molecular Biology Institute)

113

Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

Tone, Shigenobu [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan)], E-mail: tone@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Kenji [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Biology, Division of Bioscience and Informatics, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tanda, Kazue [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo [Electron Microscope Center, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Kanouchi, Hiroaki [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Samejima, Kumiko [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Minatogawa, Yohsuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Earnshaw, William C. [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bill.Earnshaw@ed.ac.uk

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Analysis of Intracellular State Based on Controlled 3D Nanostructures Mediated Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technique for analyzing the chemical composition within a single living cell at unprecedented resolution. However, current SERS methods employing uncontrollable colloidal metal particles or non-uniformly distributed metal particles on a substrate as SERS-active sites show relatively low reliability and reproducibility. Here, we report a highly-ordered SERS-active surface that is provided by a gold nano-dots array based on thermal evaporation of gold onto an ITO surface through a nanoporous alumina mask. This new combined technique showed a broader distribution of hot spots and a higher signal-to-noise ratio than current SERS techniques due to the highly reproducible and uniform geometrical structures over a large area. This SERS-active surface was applied as cell culture system to study living cells in situ within their culture environment without any external preparation processes. We applied this newly developed method to cell-based research to differentiate cell lines, cells at different cell cycle stages, and live/dead cells. The enhanced Raman signals achieved from each cell, which represent the changes in biochemical compositions, enabled differentiation of each state and the conditions of the cells. This SERS technique employing a tightly controlled nanostructure array can potentially be applied to single cell analysis, early cancer diagnosis and cell physiology research.

Waleed Ahmed El-said; Tae-hyung Kim; Hyuncheol Kim; Jeong-woo Choi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The scanning electron microscope provides a valuable combination of high resolution imaging, elemental analysis, and recently, crystallographic analysis: Imaging of features as small as sim 10 nm or less, roughly 100 times smaller than can be seen with...

117

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Becoming a User Becoming a User EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Procedure to Become a User at the EMC 1. Summary All users have to fulfill certain requirements before access to the EMC can be granted. The following list provides short descriptions of the requirements. Details can be found on this page and via the relevant links at the left. Register for access to Argonne's scientific user facilities (or update your user registration information).

118

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submit an EMC Proposal Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Proposal Submission Deadline Dates for FY2014: November 1, 2013 March 7, 2014 July 11, 2014 Is your proposal a multi-facility proposal? In other words, do you intend to submit proposals to EMC and APS or CNM for your research project? If your answer is "yes," go now to the Proposal Gateway.

119

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMC Users Committee EMC Users Committee EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers EMC Users Committee An EMC Users Committee has been organized to enhance communication between the user community and the EMC. While the EMC relies on and encourages strong interaction among its users and between its staff and users, the Users Committee provides an additional formal mechanism for user input into EMC planning and operations to ensure that users' needs and concerns are addressed.

120

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

End-of-Proposal Report End-of-Proposal Report EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÃ…MM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers End-of-Proposal Report In accordance with the User Agreement, please provide the EMC with the following information when your proposal expires (one year after its acceptance date or when the experiments end, whichever is sooner). A research summary/progress report using these two templates:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

122

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory, Center for Materials Research Brookhaven National Laboratory, Electron Microscopy Program Sites of Interest to the Microscopy Community The Microscopy...

123

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Mesurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Measurements Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Radiation measurements have been widely employed for evaluating cloud parameterization schemes and model simulation results. As the most comprehensive program aiming to improve cloud parameteri- zation schemes, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has an essential goal to make observations on the scale of a general circulation model gridbox, so as to define the physics underlying some of the important parameterizations in the general circulation models used in climate change

124

Error Estimates for Ocean Surface Winds: Applying Desroziers Diagnostics to the Cross-Calibrated, Multiplatform Analysis of Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desroziers diagnostics (DD) are applied to the cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind data sets to estimate wind speed errors of the ECMWF background, the microwave satellite observations and the resulting CCMP analysis. ...

Ross N. Hoffman; Joseph V. Ardizzone; S. Mark Leidner; Deborah K. Smith; Robert Atlas

125

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Information for EMC Users General Information for EMC Users The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory. It is one of three scientific user facilities for electron beam microcharacterization and one of several National User Facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory. As a scientific user facility, the EMC supports user-accessible instruments (Resources) for high spatial resolution microanalysis, field imaging, nanoscale structural characterization, nanoscale fabrication and manipulation, and unique in situ studies of materials under the influence of ion-beam irradiation. These capabilities are used in a diverse variety of research areas to address grand challenge scientific questions encompassing, for example, energy-related studies, biology, astrophysics, archaeology, superconductivity, nanotechnology, environmental engineering, tribology, and ferroelectricity. The research is performed both by users and by EMC staff. While many users work independently, the most challenging research activities require extensive contributions from EMC staff.

126

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Life Sciences Microscopy Center Facilities Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis; instrument maintenance and technical support; usage management; maintaining the facility web site or training in a higher-education environment; expertise in both light microscopy and electron microscopy

California at Santa Cruz, University of

129

Vector potential photoelectron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 14 John Street, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Data fusion analysis of a surface direct-current resistivity and well pick data set  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked with testing, debugging, and refining the Hanford Site data fusion workstation (DFW), with the assistance of Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), before delivering the DFW to the environmental restoration client at the Hanford Site. Data fusion is the mathematical combination (or fusion) of disparate data sets into a single interpretation. The data fusion software used in this study was developed by CRC. This report discusses the results of evaluating a surface direct-current (dc) resistivity and well-pick data set using two methods: data fusion technology and commercially available software (i.e., RESIX Plus from Interpex Ltd., Golden, Colorado), the conventional method of analysis. The report compares the two technologies; describes the survey, procedures, and results; and includes conclusions and recommendations. The surface dc resistivity and well-pick data set had been acquired by PNL from a study performed in May 1993 at Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska. The resistivity survey data were acquired to map the top of permafrost in support of a hydrogeologic study. This data set provided an excellent opportunity to test and refine the dc resistivity capabilities of the DFW; previously, the data fusion software was untested on dc resistivity data. The DFW was used to evaluate the dc resistivity survey data and to produce a 3-dimensional earth model of the study area.

Clayton, E.A.; Lewis, R.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Instrument Series: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quanta 3D FEG Quanta 3D FEG This instrument is now available in EMSL's Radiochemistry Annex. The Quanta 3D FEG is the most versatile high-resolution, low vacuum SEM/FIB for 2D and 3D material characterization and analysis. Featuring three imaging modes - high vacuum, low vacuum and ESEM - it accommodates the widest range of samples of any SEM system. The Quanta 3D FEG's novel, field-emission electron source delivers clear and sharp electron imaging and increased electron beam current enhances EDS and EBSP analysis. This system also offers the capability for in situ study of the dynamic behavior of materials at different humidity levels (up to 100% RH) and temperatures (up to 1500 °C). Quanta 3D FEG's unprecedented high- current FIB enables fast material removal.

132

Electron Microscopy Study of Tin Whisker Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of tin whiskers formed on sputtered tin layers deposited on brass was studied using electron microscopy. The occurrence of whiskers appeared to be largely independent of the macroscopic stress state in the film; rather it was microscopic compressive stresses arising from the formation of an intermetallic phase that appeared to be the necessary precursor. Whisker morphology was a result of whether nucleation had occurred on single grains or on multiple grains. In the latter case, the whiskers had a fluted or striated surface. The formation of whiskers on electron transparent samples was demonstrated. These samples showed the whiskers were monocrystalline and defect free, and that the growth direction could be determined.

Norton, Murray G. (Washington State University); Lebret, Joel (8392)

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Graphene formation on metal surfaces investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturing high-quality graphene has remained a challenge. To date, most of the high-quality graphene of the original area. The growth of graphene stopped after the whole island had become two layers high. Image size density deriving from equilibrium with the graphene islands on the surface. The point where the black line

Frenken, J.W.M.

134

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources The EMC currently operates and administers seven full-time user instruments together with support facilities that include specimen preparation, image analysis and computational resources. The instruments are grouped below according to their function and capabilities. Detailed information about the capabilities of each user-accessible resource is available via the underlined links below. The major-capability instruments are generally available by allocated access while the core instruments are generally available by continuous access. Instrument Access Type User Status Separate Proposal? ACAT Allocated Assisted yes IVEM Allocated Assisted yes FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM Continuous or Allocated User or Assisted Any or all of these instruments may be requested in one proposal.

135

Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

An Observational Analysis and Evaluation of Land Surface Model Accuracy in the Nebraska Sand Hills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of subsurface water on the energy budget components of three locations with heterogeneous land surfaces in the Nebraska Sand Hills are examined through observations and use of the Noah land surface model (LSM). ...

David B. Radell; Clinton M. Rowe

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analysis of Soil Moisture from Near-Surface Parameters: A Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that it is possible to estimate soil moisture from the evolution of atmospheric parameters near the surface (temperature and relative humidity) if a realistic surface transfer model is available. ...

Jean-François Mahfouf

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Feed Microscopy using microscopic examination of animal feed samples and AAFCO terminology. Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Micr

139

Advanced Digital Microscopy is Revolutionizing Failure Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of lighting options, like the High Dynamic Range (HDR) function, make digital microscopes ideal systems for imaging low-contrast and reflective targets. ... Incipient SCC Damage in Primary Loop Piping Using Fiber Optic Strain Gages.

140

In-situ Microscopy and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation, I will present our recent in-situ deformation transmission .... and propagation of crack lines upon the application of mechanical stresses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurement and analysis of the surface energy budget for ARM field experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to conduct experiments to investigate the scaling properties of surface-atmosphere interactions and feedbacks as they relate to regional fluxes of heat and water vapor. This is part of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. To achieve this objective, two field campaigns were conducted in northeastern Oregon during June 1991 and June 1992. Analysis of the data collected during these campaigns revealed the following: (1) fluxes over a dry, semi-arid grass/brush area show only small spatial heterogeneity; (2) fluxes over an irrigated farm were dependent on crop type and stage of development. In particular, fluxes over row crops such as potatoes and corn were very similar to each other, but somewhat different than fluxes over wheat and alfalfa. In general, higher latent and lower sensible heat fluxes were experienced over wheat and alfalfa compared to corn and potatoes; (3) meteorological factors had a major influence on fluxes. In particular, significantly higher latent heat fluxes were experienced on days with moderate winds compared to days with light winds over the irrigated farm. This was presumably due to the advection of sensible heat from the surrounding dry rangeland.

Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nano structuring of GaAs(100) surface using low energy ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructuring of semi insulating GaAs (100) has been observed after irradiation of 50 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam in a wide angular range of 0 deg. to 60 deg. with respect to surface normal. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis shows the formation of nano dots at smaller angle of irradiation. At higher angle of irradiation, self organized ripples were developed on the surface. The rms roughness estimated from the AFM analysis shows exponential growth with angle of irradiation. In the high frequency regime, PSD analysis suggests that surface morphology of the irradiated samples is governed by the surface diffusion and mass transport dominated processes.

Kumar, Tanuj; Khan, S. A.; Verma, S.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter-university Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Surface Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period at the ARM SGP Site in august 2002: Results, Analysis, and Future Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period at the ARM SGP Site in August 2002: Results, Analysis, and Future Plans A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada M. C. Cribb and Z. Li University of Maryland College Park, Maryland K. Hamm University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction A surface spectral albedo Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site was conducted during August 14-19, 2002, to meet the ARM Program need in a detailed knowledge of surface boundary conditions for atmospheric radiation studies. We measured surface spectral albedos/reflectances for several representative surface types and made a survey of landcover types over an area of approximately 10 km x 10 km centered

144

Electron microscopy of ceramic superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The critical current Jc is at least as important as Tc (transition temperature) for applications in superconducting materials. Jc is strongly dependent on microstructure and, in consequence, electron microscopy will continue to be important in the development of practical ceramic superconductors. We will review the progress that has been made over the past year or so in studying the superconductors by electron microscopy techniques of all kinds--conventional, high resolution, analytical, etc. A thorough review is impossible but a bibliography is available, as well as two special issues of Journals. 25 refs., 9 figs.

Mitchell, T.E.; Roy, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Biodiesel Deposits Formed on a Hot Metal Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims to investigate the formation of deposits from thermally degraded biodiesel on a hot metal surface under the influence of sodium or… (more)

Westberg, Emilie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPIE Conference 2012. SPIE Conference 2012. ... Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012. Sound interesting? ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wave- and Anemometer-Based Sea Surface Wind (WASWind) for Climate Change Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ship-based measurements of sea surface wind speed display a spurious upward trend due to increases in anemometer height. To correct this bias, the authors constructed a new sea surface wind dataset from ship observations of wind speed and wind ...

Hiroki Tokinaga; Shang-Ping Xie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The modified Beckmann-Kirchhoff scattering theory for rough surface analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focusses on how reflectance models based on scattering theory and reported in the physics literature can be used for making estimates of surface roughness parameters using reflectance measurements obtained with a digital camera. We commence ... Keywords: BRDF measurements, Beckmann model, Physics-based reflectance models, Rough surface scattering, Roughness estimation

Hossein Ragheb; Edwin R. Hancock

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microstructure of Ocean Surface Roughness: A Study of Spatial Measurement and Laboratory Investigation of Modulation Analysis*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique to measure the spatial structure of short capillary–gravity waves on the water surface. The method is based on optical refraction of a single laser beam crossing the air–water interface to derive the surface slope ...

Paul A. Hwang

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present results of a combined two-photon photoemission and scanning electron microscopy investigation to determine the electromagnetic enhancement factors of silver-coated spherical nanoparticles deposited on an atomically flat mica substrate. Femtosecond laser excitation, of the nanoparticles, produces intense photoemission, attributed to near-resonant excitation of localized surface plasmons. Enhancement factors are determined by comparing the respective two-photon photoemission yield measured for equal areas between single nanoparticles to that of the surrounding flat surface. For s-polarized, 400 nm (~ 3.1 eV) femtosecond radiation a distribution of enhancement factors are found with a large percentage (77%) of the nanoparticles falling within a median range. A correlated scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the nanoparticles typifying the median of the distribution were characterized by ideal spherical shapes and defect-free morphologies. The single largest enhancement factors were in contrast produced by a very small percentage (8%) of the total, for which evidence of silver defect anomalies were found that contributed to the overall structure of the nanoparticle. Comparisons are made between the experimentally measured enhancement factors and previously reported theoretical predictions of the localized surface plasmon near-field intensities for isolated nanometer-sized silver spheres.

Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface water resources in China are rather abundant and it can be use as the heat or cool source for heat pump. The winter surface water temperatures of 17 typical cities are investigated in December, and they are all distributed in the interval of 2~5?. The critical technical issue in the surface water heat pump is how to extract the freezing latent heat. The urban surface water supplying areas of 102 large or median cities in China are measured and counted. The supply area ratio, and mean heating or cooling need index are calculated separately and the 102 cities are classified by the three parameters. The data indicate that surface water can supply heat and cool source for 42.1% of the urban waterside buildings in China.

Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 MST-6 Home Home In the MSL FEI Tecnai F30 Analytical TEM/STEM JEOL 6300FXV High Resolution SEM JEOL 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Philips XL30 F Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System Phillips CM30 Transmission Electron Microscope In the Sigma Building JEOL 840 EPMA with Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM FEI XL30 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System CONTACTS Bob Field 665.3938 Pat Dickerson 665.3036 Rob Dickerson 667.6337 Rod McCabe 606.1649 The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML) is part of MST-6, the Materials Technology - Metallurgy Group within the Materials Science and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is a facility dedicated to the characterization of materials primarily through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures with several electron and ion beam instruments. Accessory characterization techniques and equipment include energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS), wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

154

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile technique that can image a variety of materials including metals, semiconductors and even insulators. Under favorable conditions the most advanced aberration corrected instruments have a spatial resolution approaching 2 nm. Although PEEM cannot compete with transmission or scanning electron microscopies for ultimate resolution, the technique is much more gentle and has the unique advantage of imaging structure as well as electronic and magnetic states on the nanoscale. Since the image contrast is derived from spatial variations in electron photoemission intensity, PEEM is ideal for interrogating both static and dynamic electronic properties of complex nanostructured materials. PEEM can be performed using a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs laser excitation enables time-resolved imaging for study of ultrafast dynamics of surface intermediate states while tunable synchrotron sources allow chemically specific excitation. Even more detail can be extracted from energy resolved PEEM. Here, we review the key principles and contrast mechanisms of PEEM and briefly summarize materials applications of PEEM with examples of a thermally-induced structural phase transformation in barium titanate, inter-diffusion between thin metal copper and ruthenium layers, and multiphoton imaging of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silver coated substrate.

Xiong, Gang; Shao, Rui; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Duchene, J.; Wang, J. Y.; Wei, Wei

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of Spurious Surface Temperature at the Atmosphere–Land Interface and a New Method to Solve the Surface Energy Balance Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solving the surface energy balance equation is the most important task when combining an atmospheric model and a land surface model. However, while the surface energy balance equation determines the interface temperature between the models, this ...

Hirofumi Tomita

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon through CMAP, ERS-WSC, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon monsoon. Citation: Philippon, N., E. Mougin, L. Jarlan, and P.-L. Frison (2005), Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon through CMAP, ERS-WSC, and NOAA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Nonlinear Principal Component Analysis: Tropical Indo–Pacific Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Level Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear principal component analysis (NLPCA) is a generalization of traditional principal component analysis (PCA) that allows for the detection and characterization of low-dimensional nonlinear structure in multivariate datasets. The authors ...

Adam Hugh Monahan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

LES Analysis of the Aerodynamic Surface Properties for Turbulent Flows over Building Arrays with Various Geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes aerodynamic roughness properties for turbulent flows over various building arrays that represent realistic urban surface geometries. First, building morphological characteristics such as roughness density ?f and building ...

Hiromasa Nakayama; Tetsuya Takemi; Haruyasu Nagai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Tropical Cyclone Wind Retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit: Application to Surface Wind Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal winds at 850 hPa from tropical cyclones retrieved using the nonlinear balance equation, where the mass field was determined from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) temperature soundings, are compared with the surface wind fields ...

Kotaro Bessho; Mark DeMaria; John A. Knaff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surface Weather Analysis at the National Meteorological Center: Current Procedures and Future Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preparation of surface weather analyses at the National Meteorological Center (NMC) is currently under review. The availability of advanced graphics workstations and consideration of revisions to conceptual models of cyclogenesis and frontal ...

Paul J. Kocin; David A. Olson; Arthur C. Wick; Robert D. Harner

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Equatorial Long Waves in Geostationary Satellite Observations and in a Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellite observations of a zonally oriented sea surface temperature front in the eastern equatorial Pacific were made between 1975 and 1981. Long waves appeared along the front mainly during the summer and fall, except during 1976, ...

Richard Legeckis; William Pichel; George Nesterczuk

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Automated, Objective, Multiple-Satellite-Platform Tropical Cyclone Surface Wind Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate objectively the surface wind fields associated with tropical cyclones using only data from multiple satellite platforms and satellite-based wind retrieval techniques is described. The analyses are computed on a polar grid ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Debra A. Molenar; Charles R. Sampson; Matthew G. Seybold

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dynamical Analysis of the Boundary Layer and Surface Wind Responses to Mesoscale SST Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical response of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) to mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) perturbations is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current during winter from a 1-month, high-resolution, three-dimensional ...

Larry W. O’Neill; Steven K. Esbensen; Nicolai Thum; Roger M. Samelson; Dudley B. Chelton

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Analysis of spatial distribution in tropospheric and sea surface temperature trends .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Regional patterns in tropospheric and sea surface temperature (SST) trends are examined for the period 1979 ??01 using MSU, NCEP-NCAR, ECMWF ERA-40 reanalyses, NOAA OI… (more)

Agudelo, Paula A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar in Finescale Surface Analysis of Synoptic-Scale Fronts at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a tool for finescale marine meteorological surface analyses of synoptic-scale fronts is demonstrated. In particular, it is shown that SAR can reveal the presence of, and the mesoscale and ...

G. S. Young; T. N. Sikora; N. S. Winstead

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Linking Boundary-Layer Circulations and Surface Processes during FIFE 89. Part I: Observational Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface, aircraft, and satellite observations are analyzed for the 21-day 1989 intensive field campaign of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) to determine the effect of precipitation, vegetation, and soil moisture distributions on the ...

Eric A. Smith; Mickey M-K. Wai; Harry J. Cooper; Michael T. Rubes; Ann Hsu

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Surface Wind Regionalization over Complex Terrain: Evaluation and Analysis of a High-Resolution WRF Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the daily-mean surface wind variability over an area characterized by complex topography through comparing observations and a 2-km-spatial-resolution simulation performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model ...

Pedro A. Jiménez; J. Fidel González-Rouco; Elena García-Bustamante; Jorge Navarro; Juan P. Montávez; Jordi Vilà-Guerau de Arellano; Jimy Dudhia; Antonio Muñoz-Roldan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Directional Wavelet Analysis of Inhomogeneity in the Surface Wave Field from Aerial Laser Scanning Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern measurement techniques such as aerial laser scanning allow for rapid determination of the spatial variation of sea surface elevation. Wave fields obtained from such data show spatial inhomogeneity associated with the presence of wave ...

Richard M. Gorman; D. Murray Hicks

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Retrieval of Surface Solar Radiation Budget under Ice Cloud Sky: Uncertainty Analysis and Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates and accounts for the influence of various ice cloud parameters on the retrieval of the surface solar radiation budget (SSRB) from reflected flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The optical properties of ice clouds ...

Ying Zhang; Zhanqing Li; Andreas Macke

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of Surface Wind and Its Gradient In a Mesoscale Wind Observation Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface wind is analysed with an optimum interpolation method. Covariances and long-term averages of wind observations are parameterized from data in the fairly dense synoptic wind observation network in the Netherlands.

G. J. Cats

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Multifractal Analysis of Line-Source Plume Concentration Fluctuations in Surface-Layer Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A codimension multifractal methodology was used to analyze and to model scalar concentration fluctuations within sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas plumes from a line source in atmospheric surface-layer flows. Correspondence was exhibited between the ...

D. Finn; B. Lamb; M. Y. Leclerc; S. Lovejoy; S. Pecknold; D. Schertzer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development of legged, wheeled, and hybrid rover mobility models to facilitate planetary surface exploration mission analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work discusses the Mars Surface Exploration (MSE) tool and its adaptation to model rovers featuring legged, wheeled, and hybrid mobility. MSE is a MATLAB based systems engineering tool that is capable of rapidly ...

McCloskey, Scott H. (Scott Haddon)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Assessment of the Surface Source Approach in 3-D Fusion Neutronics Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Analysis & Experiments / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

T. D. Bohm; B. Smith; M. E. Sawan; P. P. H. Wilson

174

Monitoring charge storage processes in nanoscale oxides using electrochemical scanning probe microscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in electrochemical energy storage science require the development of new or the refinement of existing in situ probes that can be used to establish structure - activity relationships for technologically relevant materials. The drive to develop reversible, high capacity electrodes from nanoscale building blocks creates an additional requirement for high spatial resolution probes to yield information of local structural, compositional, and electronic property changes as a function of the storage state of a material. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing a lithium ion battery positive electrode into its basic constituents of ion insertion host particles and a carbon current collector. This model system is then probed in an electrochemical environment using a combination of atomic force microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy to correlate local activity with morphological and electronic configurational changes. Cubic spinel Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are grown on graphite surfaces using vacuum deposition methods. The structure and composition of these particles are determined using transmission electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis. The response of these particles to initial de-lithiation, along with subsequent electrochemical cycling, is tracked using scanning probe microscopy techniques in polar aprotic electrolytes (lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate:diethylcarbonate). The relationship between nanoparticle size and reversible ion insertion activity will be a specific focus of this paper.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Lu, Ping; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optical Microscopy Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Improving Performance of a Solar Fuel Catalyst. ... Path for Tracking Fluorescent Nanoparticles Using a ... Surface and Nanostructure Metrology Group. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Yang, Nan [ORNL; Doria, Sandra [ORNL; Tebano, Antonello [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modeling of multiple three phase contact lines of liquid droplets on geometrically patterned surfaces: continuum and mesoscopic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By solving the Young Laplace equation of capillary hydrostatics one can accurately determine equilibrium shapes of droplets on relatively smooth solid surfaces. The solution, however of the Young Laplace equation becomes tricky when a droplet is sitting on a geometrically patterned surface and multiple, and unknown a priori, three phase contact lines have not been accounted for, since air pockets are trapped beneath the liquid droplet. In this work, we propose an augmented Young-Laplace equation, in which a unified formulation for the liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interfaces is adopted, incorporating microscale interactions. This way, we bypass the implementation of the Young's contact angle boundary condition at each three phase contact line. We demonstrate the method's efficiency by computing equilibrium wetting states of entire droplets sitting on geometrically structured surfaces, and compare the results with those of the mesoscopic Lattice Boltzmann simulations. The application of well-established parameter continuation techniques enables the tracing of stable and unstable equilibrium solutions if necessary for the determination of energy barriers separating co-existing stable wettign states. Since energy barriers determine whether a surface facilitates or inhibits certain wetting transitions, their computation is important for many technical applications. Our continuum-level analysis can readily be applied to patterned surfaces with increased and unstructured geometric complexity, having a significant computational advantage, as compared to the computationally demanding mesoscopic simulations that are usually employed for the same task.

Nikolaos T. Chamakos; Michail E. Kavousanakis; Athanasios G. Papathanasiou

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI films has been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry. Surface

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

179

SEY and Surface Analysis Measurements on FNAL Main Injector Ring S/S Beam Chamber Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Material was provided by Dr. Weiren Chou, FNAL. Both mildly-activated used, and new sections of stainless steel (type 316L) beam chamber were measured. Centimeter-sized coupons were cleanly dry-cut from the large flat surface (called ''flat side'' in the plots) and from the ID end (inside diameter of the ring, in the case of the used material) and narrow end (in the case of the new material). The unused material was ultra-soniced in acetone (to remove storage residue), then rinsed with ethanol and blown dry with filtered N{sub 2}-gas, to simulate new chamber installation final rinse. Used material was installed, as cut. Surface chemistry was measured using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sometimes called ''ESCA''). With this technique, soft x-rays (1486 eV) illuminate the sample, penetrating into the surface ten microns. Photoelectrons are generated from energy levels of the constituent compounds/elements present. Those electrons, within 5 nm or so of the surface, escape without energy loss and preserve valence information about the atomic levels from which they were generated. An electron energy analyzer, of good energy resolution, measures the photoelectron energy, thereby yielding both valence (chemical) information and relative atomic abundances in the top 5 nm of surface. Using appropriate sensitivity factors, these intensities are converted to a semi-quantitative (surface atom %) concentration in the analyzed layer. As a benchmark, the limit for carbon contamination on vacuum components for UHV use at SLAC is 50 at%. That corresponds to about 8-10 monolayers of elemental carbon. XPS does not detect hydrogen because it has no electrons after bonding. Generally, hydrides do not show evidence of ''chemical shift'' of the binding energy of the metal lines.

Kirby, Robert E.; /SLAC

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Book Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Isotopic Analysis (Lewicki & Oldenburg) LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Modeling-Computer Simulations (Lewicki & Oldenburg)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM  

SciTech Connect

GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

GSWP-2: Multimodel Analysis and Implications for Our Perception of the Land Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) is an initiative to compare and evaluate 10-year simulations by a broad range of land surface models under controlled conditions. A major product of GSWP-2 is the first global gridded multimodel ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Xiang Gao; Mei Zhao; Zhichang Guo; Taikan Oki; Naota Hanasaki

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Analysis of a Surface Front during the Early Summer Rainy Season over Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of a relatively dry front during TAMEX IOP-4 is presented. At 0000 UTC 27 May, the broad cloud band extended from the China plain and southern Japan to east of 150°E, along and north of the surface front. This front possessed ...

Yi-Leng Chen; Yu-Xia Zhang; Norman B-F. Hui

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Surface deformation analysis over a hydrocarbon reservoir using InSAR with ALOS-PALSAR data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InSAR has been developed to estimate the temporal change on the surface of Earth by combining multiple SAR images acquired over the same area at different times. In the last two decades, in addition to conventional InSAR, ...

?ahin, Sedar Cihan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Monte Carlo analysis of a monolithic interconnected module with a back surface reflector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, the photon Monte Carlo code, RACER-X, was modified to include wave-length dependent absorption coefficients and indices of refraction. This work was done in an effort to increase the code`s capabilities to be more applicable to a wider range of problems. These new features make RACER-X useful for analyzing devices like monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) which have etched surface features and incorporates a back surface reflector (BSR) for spectral control. A series of calculations were performed on various MIM structures to determine the impact that surface features and component reflectivities have on spectral utilization. The traditional concern of cavity photonics is replaced with intra-cell photonics in the MIM design. Like the cavity photonic problems previously discussed, small changes in optical properties and/or geometry can lead to large changes in spectral utilization. The calculations show that seemingly innocuous surface features (e.g., trenches and grid lines) can significantly reduce the spectral utilization due to the non-normal incident photon flux. Photons that enter the device through a trench edge are refracted onto a trajectory where they will not escape. This leads to a reduction in the number of reflected below bandgap photons that return to the radiator and reduce the spectral utilization. In addition, trenches expose a lateral conduction layer in this particular series of calculations which increase the absorption of above bandgap photons in inactive material.

Ballinger, C.T.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Murray, C.S. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Homogenization and Trend Analysis of Canadian Near-Surface Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface wind speeds recorded at 117 stations in Canada for the period from 1953 to 2006 were analyzed in this study. First, metadata and a logarithmic wind profile were used to adjust hourly wind speeds measured at nonstandard anemometer ...

Hui Wan; Xiaolan L. Wang; Val R. Swail

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an Oxide ... Line Dislocation Dynamics Simulation of fundamental dislocation properties in ...

189

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry Develop 3-D Components. From NIST Tech Beat: June 25, 2013. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Lithium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Nanomaterials. Presentation Title, Transmission Electron Microscopy ...

191

Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

Volk, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wolff, C. H.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part II: Analysis of Spatial Heterogeneity and Its Scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiscale atmospheric forcing data at 1-, 5-, and 10-km scales from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) were used to drive three uncoupled land surface models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research Land ...

David N. Yates; Fei Chen; Haruyasu Nagai

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on coal surface properties. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various probe compounds on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh{number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed during the January--March period. The probe compounds include m-cresol, p-cresol, n-octanol, n-heptanol, n-butanol, phenol and toluene.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal were developed. A computer program was developed to compute equilibrium adsorption of probe compounds on coal with experimental data. Developments of experimental procedures of obtaining experimental data on dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on coal were attempted, but not finalized. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal will be conducted to investigate surface properties of this coal in the presence of water.

Kwon, K.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois 16 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed. The additives include n-propanol, n-butanol, 2-butanol, phenol, 2-naphthol, o-cresol and cyclohexanol. Equilibrium adsorption loadings of normal alcohols on 60 - 200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal increase with increased numbers of carbons in their molecular formulas. Normal alcohols are more adsorbed on the coal than their branched alcohols. Adsorption loadings of single-ring compound phenol on the coal is higher than that of cyclohexanol. Adsorption loadings of double-ring compound 2-naphthol on the coal is much higher than that of single-ring compound phenol. The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals.

Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Surface Treatment of Carbon Fibers by Continuous Gaseous System  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical performance of carbon fiber-polymer composites strongly depends on interfacial adhesion, which is function of types of carbon fiber, surface chemistry, physical and chemical interactions, and mechanical interlocking. Untreated and unsized high strength carbon fibers were oxidized by continuous thermochemical and atmospheric plasma treatment. Surface properties were investigated before and after treatment (chemistry, topography), as well as their mechanical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a significant increase of the oxygen atomic content from 3% to around 20% and the analysis of the carbon peak showed that carboxylic acid functionalities and hydroxyl groups were generated. An observation of the fiber surface by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any dramatic change of the fiber morphology and surface topography. A Raman spectroscopy analysis exhibited that the weak boundary layers and debris remaining at the surface of untreated fibers were removed. No significant damage of the mechanical properties (tensile strength) was noticed. The influence of the changes of the surface properties on interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber-epoxy and -vinyl ester matrix was evaluated using 90 flexural and short beam shear tests with unidirectional coupons. A significant increase of the 90 flexural and short beam shear strength showed that the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins was improved. The observation of the fracture profile by scanning electron microcopy confirmed those results, as the rupture of the coupons after surface treatment was more cohesive.

Vautard, Frederic [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix L [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens Thomas Taubner,1 * Dmitriy Korobkin,2 Yaroslav of the slab (4­6). In our experiment, we placed a SiC superlens (7) between the scan- ning probe tip-crystalline SiC membrane coated on both sides with 220-nm-thick SiO2 layers (7). The two surfaces of the sandwich

Shvets, Gennady

198

Tracking granules at the Sun's surface and reconstructing velocity fields. II. Error analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determination of horizontal velocity fields at the solar surface is crucial to understanding the dynamics and magnetism of the convection zone of the sun. These measurements can be done by tracking granules. Tracking granules from ground-based observations, however, suffers from the Earth's atmospheric turbulence, which induces image distortion. The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of this noise on the maps of velocity fields. We use the coherent structure tracking algorithm developed recently and apply it to two independent series of images that contain the same solar signal. We first show that a k-\\omega filtering of the times series of images is highly recommended as a pre-processing to decrease the noise, while, in contrast, using destretching should be avoided. We also demonstrate that the lifetime of granules has a strong influence on the error bars of velocities and that a threshold on the lifetime should be imposed to minimize errors. Finally, although solar flow patterns are easily recognizable and image quality is very good, it turns out that a time sampling of two images every 21 s is not frequent enough, since image distortion still pollutes velocity fields at a 30% level on the 2500 km scale, i.e. the scale on which granules start to behave like passive scalars. The coherent structure tracking algorithm is a useful tool for noise control on the measurement of surface horizontal solar velocity fields when at least two independent series are available.

R. Tkaczuk; M. Rieutord; N. Meunier; T. Roudier

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

Atkinson, R.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods Z.epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy,establish their quality. Transmission electron microscopy (

Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum, J.; Anderson, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method And Apparatus For Two Dimensional Surface Property Analysis Based On Boundary Measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining properties of a conductive film is disclosed. A plurality of probe locations selected around a periphery of the conductive film define a plurality of measurement lines between each probe location and all other probe locations. Electrical resistance may be measured along each of the measurement lines. A lumped parameter model may be developed based on the measured values of electrical resistance. The lumped parameter model may be used to estimate resistivity at one or more selected locations encompassed by the plurality of probe locations. The resistivity may be extrapolated to other physical properties if the conductive film includes a correlation between resistivity and the other physical properties. A profile of the conductive film may be developed by determining resistivity at a plurality of locations. The conductive film may be applied to a structure such that resistivity may be estimated and profiled for the structure's surface.

Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Observation of Localized Corrosion of Ni-Based Alloys Using Coupled Orientation Imaging Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a method for assessing the relative vulnerabilities of distinct classes of grain boundaries to localized corrosion. Orientation imaging microscopy provides a spatial map which identifies and classifies grain boundaries at a metal surface. Once the microstructure of a region of a sample surface has been characterized, a sample can be exposed to repeated cycles of exposure to a corrosive environment alternating with topographic measurement by an atomic force microscope in the same region in which the microstructure had been mapped. When this procedure is applied to Ni and Ni-based alloys, we observe enhanced attack at random grain boundaries relative to special boundaries and twins in a variety of environments.

Bedrossian, P.J.

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy This facility consists of four top-of-the line transmission electron microscopes, two of which are highly specialized instruments capable of extreme levels of resolution, achieved through spherical aberration correction. The facility is also equipped with extensive sample-preparation capabilities. The scientific interests of the staff focus on understanding the microscopic origin of the physical and chemical behavior of materials, with specific emphasis on in-situ studies of materials in native, functional environments. Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with energy dispersive x-ray

208

Frontiers of In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... significance and versatility of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has ... applied stimulus is observed as it happens inside the microscope. ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Maximizing fluorescence collection efficiency in multiphoton microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-depth limit in two-photon microscopy," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23(12), 3139­3149 (2006). 9. D. Kobat, M. E. Durst

Levene, Michael J.

210

Automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus usable to generate mesh in a finite element analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus is provided for automatically discretizing a geometric region without decomposing the region. The automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus automatically generates a mesh of all quadrilateral elements which is particularly useful in finite element analysis. The generated mesh of all quadrilateral elements is boundary sensitive, orientation insensitive and has few irregular nodes on the boundary. A permanent boundary of the geometric region is input and rows are iteratively layered toward the interior of the geometric region. Also, an exterior permanent boundary and an interior permanent boundary for a geometric region may be input and the rows are iteratively layered inward from the exterior boundary in a first counter clockwise direction while the rows are iteratively layered from the interior permanent boundary toward the exterior of the region in a second clockwise direction. As a result, a high quality mesh for an arbitrary geometry may be generated with a technique that is robust and fast for complex geometric regions and extreme mesh gradations.

Blacker, Teddy D. (12205 Kashmir, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a rib grit roughened surface solar air heater using CFD  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the study of fluid flow and heat transfer in a solar air heater by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which reduces time and cost. Lower side of collector plate is made rough with metal ribs of circular, square and triangular cross-section, having 60 inclinations to the air flow. The grit rib elements are fixed on the surface in staggered manner to form defined grid. The system and operating parameters studied are: e/D{sub h} = 0.044, p/e = 17.5 and l/s = 1.72, for the Reynolds number range 3600-17,000. To validate CFD results, experimental investigations were carried out in the laboratory. It is found that experimental and CFD analysis results give the good agreement. The optimization of rib geometry and its angle of attack is also done. The square cross-section ribs with 58 angle of attack give maximum heat transfer. The percentage enhancement in the heat transfer for square plate over smooth surface is 30%. (author)

Karmare, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College Engineering, Karad 415 124, Maharashtra (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India); Tikekar, A.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Walchand College of Engineering, Sangli (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Review and analysis of oil shale technologies. Volume IV. Aboveground or surface technology  

SciTech Connect

A technical description and evaluation of retorting methods and scale-up scenarios of four representative methods are presented. The methods described and evaluated include the processes developed by the Bureau of Mines (BOM), the Union Oil Company ''B,'' Petrosix, Paraho, TOSCO II, and the Superior Oil Company. For a future economic analysis, scale-up (ranging from 55,000- to 58,000-bbl/day production rate) scenarios are presented for BOM's Gas Combustion retort (GCR), Union ''B,'' Paraho, and TOSCO II retorting processes. In general, the six aboveground processes selected are in an advanced stage of development as compared with in situ processes and several of them are ready for commercial-scale demonstration. There are, however, a few areas that still need further research and development before demonstration can be undertaken. Specific areas of research cannot be defined at this time because process information needed to identify these areas is mostly proprietary. The technical evaluation reveals that the aboveground retorting processes are viable with high scale oil recovery yields. The processes, however, have been tested only at the pilot or semiworks scale and need to be demonstrated on full-scale modules. The scale-up scenarios of the representative processes reveal that the logistics of the mining-to-processing operation will be a major problem at high production rates. For example, a nominal crude shale oil production rate of about 50,000 bbl/day will require mining at a rate exceeding present large-scale mining rates. The TOSCO II retorting process is the most energy intensive among Paraho, Union ''B,'' and BOM's GCR because of its complexity, which annuls the benefit of less mining. The TOSCO II process, however, is still an attractive process, providing the technique is used with another technique to enhance resource utilization.

Jee, C.K.; White, J.D.; Bhatia, S.K.; Nicholson, D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2010 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2010 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2010 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2010) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specimen Preparation Specimen Preparation Preparation of samples with large transparent areas and flat surfaces is a key element of electron microscopy. In particular, the interpretation of lattice or holographic images is often limited by the sample's geometry and surface roughness. These parameters are largely determined by a particular sample preparation procedure. The increasing demand for microscopes with a spatial resolution of better than 1Ã… increases the need for improved sample preparation techniques. A substantial effort at NCEM is devoted to the development of reliable and specialized thinning techniques. Current programs explore the application of chemicals to shape the surfaces of thin films, the use of nanospheres for observation of small particles, and the

217

Development testing of the chemical analysis automation polychlorinated biphenyl standard analysis method during surface soils sampling at the David Witherspoon 1630 site  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) project is developing standardized, software-driven, site-deployable robotic laboratory systems with the objective of lowering the per-sample analysis cost, decreasing sample turnaround time, and minimizing human exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials associated with DOE remediation projects. The first integrated system developed by the CAA project is designed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) content in soil matrices. A demonstration and development testing of this system was conducted in conjuction with surface soil characterization activities at the David Witherspoon 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The PCB system consists of five hardware standard laboratory modules (SLMs), one software SLM, the task sequence controller (TSC), and the human-computer interface (HCI). Four of the hardware SLMs included a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentrator, a column cleanup, and a gas chromatograph. These SLMs performed the sample preparation and measurement steps within the total analysis protocol. The fifth hardware module was a robot that transports samples between the SLMs and the required consumable supplies to the SLMs. The software SLM is an automated data interpretation module that receives raw data from the gas chromatograph SLM and analyzes the data to yield the analyte information. The TSC is a software system that provides the scheduling, management of system resources, and the coordination of all SLM activities. The HCI is a graphical user interface that presents the automated laboratory to the analyst in terms of the analytical procedures and methods. Human control of the automated laboratory is accomplished via the HCI. Sample information required for processing by the automated laboratory is entered through the HCI. Information related to the sample and the system status is presented to the analyst via graphical icons.

Hunt, M.A.; Klatt, L.N.; Thompson, D.H. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Sixth International Conference on X-ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

More than 180 participants from around the world crowded the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from August 1-6, 1999 for the Sixth International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM99). Held every three years since 1983, the XRM conferences have become the primary international forum for the presentation and discussion of advances in high-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging and applications (including the use of x-ray spectroscopic and analytical techniques) in biological and medical sciences, environmental and soil sciences, and materials and surface sciences.

Robinson, Arthur L.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Toward an Integrated Land–Ocean Surface Skin Temperature Analysis from the Variational Assimilation of Infrared Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-East and -West window channel radiances are directly assimilated using a 1D variational technique, providing surface skin temperature (Ts) estimates over all surface types (land, water, or ...

Louis Garand

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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221

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of...

222

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications | SXSPM Related Book Chapters V. Rose, J.W. Freeland, S.K. Streiffer, "New Capabilities at the Interface of X-rays and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy", in Scanning...

223

Transition of the Large-Scale Atmospheric and Land Surface Conditions from the Dry to the Wet Season over Amazonia as Diagnosed by the ECMWF Re-Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 15-yr instantaneous European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA) data, the authors have examined the large-scale atmospheric conditions and the local surface fluxes through the transition periods from the dry to wet ...

Wenhong Li; Rong Fu

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report  

SciTech Connect

A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics  

SciTech Connect

During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

Doyle, F.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage.

Simmons, Joseph H.

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Scanning probe microscopy in the superconductor industry  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature superconductivity and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have much in common. Both revolutionized their scientific fields and earned Nobel prizes for the original researchers. Both represent small-scale table-top research. Finally, both have emerged from research laboratories into growing industries. Applications of scanning probe microscopy to the superconductor industry range from the straightforward to the exotic. The superior three-dimensional resolution of scanning probe microscopes makes them ideal for routine topographic imaging and profilometry of substrates and thin films. On the other hand, the more esoteric applications of SPM include spectroscopic investigations of various electromagnetic properties of superconductors above and below the critical temperature.

Howland, R.S.; Kirk, M.D. (Park Scientific Instruments (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Novel Protein Crystal Growth Electrochemical Cell For Applications in X-ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new crystal growth cell based on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-electrodes for electrochemically assisted protein crystallization allows for reduced nucleation and crystal quality enhancement. The crystallization behavior of lysozyme and ferritin was monitored as a function of the electric current applied to the growth cell. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that for specific currents, the crystal quality is substantially improved. No conformational changes were observed in the 3D crystallographic structures determined for crystals grown under different electric current regimes. Finally, the strong crystal adhesion on the surface of ITO electrode because of the electroadhesion allows a sufficiently strong fixing of the protein crystals, to undergo atomic force microscopy investigations in a fluid cell.

G Gil-Alvaradejo; R Ruiz-Arellano; C Owen; A Rodriguez-Romero; E Rudino-Pinera; M Antwi; V Stojanoff; A Moreno

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures in the Twentieth Century: An Evolution-Centric Analysis of Variability and Trend  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consistent analysis of natural variability and secular trend in Pacific SSTs in the twentieth century is presented. By focusing on spatial and temporal recurrence, but without imposition of periodicity constraints, this single analysis ...

Bin Guan; Sumant Nigam

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electron Microscopy (EM, TEM, SEM, STEM) Information at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron holography. Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Multimodel Analysis of Energy and Water Fluxes: Intercomparisons between Operational Analyses, a Land Surface Model, and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from seven global model operational analyses (OA), one land surface model, and various remote sensing retrievals, the energy and water fluxes over global land areas are intercompared for 2003/04. Remote sensing estimates of ...

Raghuveer K. Vinukollu; Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Michael G. Bosilovich; David Mocko

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Impact of Land Surface Initialisation Approach on Sub–seasonal Forecast Skill: A Regional Analysis in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use a sophisticated coupled land–atmosphere modelling system for a Southern Hemisphere sub–domain centred over South East Australia to evaluate differences in simulation skill from two different land surface initialisation approaches. The first ...

Annette L. Hirsch; Jatin Kala; Andy J. Pitman; Claire Carouge; Jason P. Evans; Vanessa Haverd; David Mocko

236

Assimilation of Satellite Imager Data and Surface Observations to Improve Analysis of Circulations Forced by Cloud Shading Contrasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assimilation system that performs continuous assimilation of satellite imager data and intermittent assimilation of hourly surface observations is described. The system was applied to a case study of the southeast United States that was ...

Frank H. Ruggiero; George D. Modica; Alan E. Lipton

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Water Vapor, Surface Temperature, and the Greenhouse Effect—A Statistical Analysis of Tropical-Mean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor feedback is one of the important factors that determine the response of the atmosphere to surface warming. To take into account the compensating drying effects in downdraft regions, averaging over the whole Tropics is necessary. ...

Hu Yang; Ka Kit Tung

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Three-Way Error Analysis between AATSR, AMSR-E, and In Situ Sea Surface Temperature Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using collocations of three different observation types of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) gives enough information to enable the standard deviation of error on each observation type to be derived. SSTs derived from the Advanced Along-Track ...

Anne G. O’Carroll; John R. Eyre; Roger W. Saunders

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of Turbulence Structure in the Surface Layer with a Modified Similarity Formulation for Near Neutral Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a recent detailed surface layer experiment are critically examined in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget and the other second order moment budgets formed by the three velocity components and temperature. In moderately unstable ...

Ulf Högström

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Basin-Scale, High-Wavenumber Sea Surface Wind Fields from a Multiresolution Analysis of Scatterometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical technique sensitive to both spectral and spatial aspects of sea surface wind measurements is introduced to transform the irregularly sampled satellite-based scatterometer data into regularly gridded wind fields. To capture the ...

Toshio M. Chin; Ralph F. Milliff; William G. Large

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Analysis of General Circulation Model Sea-Surface Temperature Anomaly Simulations Using a Linear Model. Part I: Forced Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments are presented which indicate that many features of the response of a general circulation model to sea-surface temperature anomalies in the equatorial Pacific east of the dateline can be reproduced with a linear nondivergent barotropic ...

Grant Branstator

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analysis of the GISS GCM Response to a Subtropical Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly Using a Linear Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GISS general circulation model (GCM) is used to investigate the influence of a positive sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly in the subtropical North Pacific on the Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation. As the set of model data is ...

Claude Frankignoul; Antoine Molin

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Potential contributions of noncontact atomic force microscopy for the future Casimir force measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface electric noise, i.e., the non-uniform distribution of charges and potentials on a surface, poses a great experimental challenge in modern precision force measurements. Such a challenge is encountered in a number of different experimental circumstances. The scientists employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) have long focused their efforts to understand the surface-related noise issues via variants of AFM techniques, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy or electric force microscopy. Recently, the physicists investigating quantum vacuum fluctuation phenomena between two closely-spaced objects have also begun to collect experimental evidence indicating a presence of surface effects neglected in their previous analyses. It now appears that the two seemingly disparate science communities are encountering effects rooted in the same surface phenomena. In this report, we suggest specific experimental tasks to be performed in the near future that are crucial not only for fostering needed collaborations between the two communities, but also for providing valuable data on the surface effects in order to draw the most realistic conclusion about the actual contribution of the Casimir force (or van der Waals force) between a pair of real materials.

W. J. Kim; U. D. Schwarz

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Title Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li Journal Electrochemical Solid-State Letters Volume 14 Start Page A61 Issue 5 Pagination A61-A63 Date Published 02/2001 Keywords Electrochemistry, elemental semiconductors, etching, lithium, nanoparticles, secondary cells, silicon, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra Abstract This study characterizes the native oxide layer of Si nanoparticles and evaluates its effect on their performance for Li-ion batteries. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to identify the chemical state and morphology of the native oxide layer. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis were used to estimate the oxide content for the Si samples. Hydrofluoric acid was used to reduce the oxide layer. A correlation between etching time and oxide content was established. The initial electrochemical performances indicate that the reversible capacity of etched Si nanoparticles was enhanced significantly compared with that of the as-received Si sample.

247

Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A statistical analysis of the effect of PECVD deposition parameters on surface and bulk recombination in silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment using response surface methodology to determine the optimum deposition and anneal conditions for PECVD silicon-oxide and silicon-nitride films on Si solar cells. Our process includes a unique in situ hydrogen plasma treatment to promote bulk defect passivation independently of surface effects. Our goal has been to define a process to optimize cell performance by minimizing recombination while also providing an effective antireflection coating. Our initial results show that excellent emitter-surface passivation, approaching that of the best thermally grown oxides, can be obtained using a single-layer nitride coating whose refractive index is optimized for antireflection purposes. Use of the PECVD-nitride instead of a TiO{sub 2} ARC resulted in an 11% increase in output power.

Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilbanks, W.L.; Fleddermann, C.B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM 200 FEG CM 200 FEG AEME The Philips CM200/FEG is a versatile instrument that is designed for analysis of the physical, chemical and magnetic microstructure at high spatial resolution. In addition to high resolution imaging capability, the machine is optimized for analytical electron microscopy and Lorentz imaging, under normal as well as dynamic conditions of variable temperature (77K - 1250K) and applied magnetic fields. Spatially resolved compositional analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy (Z > 5), local electronic structure measurements by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (Z > 2), convergent beam electron diffraction for three-dimensional structure information, and energy-filtered imaging at the nanometer scale are some of the techniques available on this instrument. In addition, a TEM differential phase

250

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS APS SXSPM News Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne (November 27, 2013) Cummings presents invited talk at magnetism meeting (November 11, 2013) Invited talk at ACSIN-12 & ICSPM21 in Japan (November 11, 2013) Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University (November 01, 2013) Scientists study old photos for new solutions to corrosion (October 21, 2013) More News Featured Image Recent Publications Kangkang Wang, Daniel Rosenmann, Martin Holt, Robert Winarski, Saw-Wai Hla, and Volker Rose, "An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 063704 (2013). More SXSPM Publications Upcoming Presentations V. Rose, 41st Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces (PCSI-41) (Invited Speaker)

251

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPLEEM SPLEEM Publications Imaging Spin Reorientation Transitions in Consecutive Atomic Co layers, Farid El Gabaly, Silvia Gallego, M. Carmen Munoz, Laszlo Szunyogh, Peter Weinberger, Kevin F. McCarty, Christof Klein, Andreas K. Schmid, Juan de la Figuera, submitted Direct imaging of spin-reorientation transitions in ultra-thin Ni films by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, C. Klein, A. K. Schmid, R. Ramchal, and M. Farle, submitted Controlling the kinetic order of spin-reorientation transitions in Ni/Cu(100) films by tuning the substrate step-structure, C. Klein, R. Ramchal, A.K. Schmid, M. Farle, submitted Self-organization and magnetic domain microstructure of Fe nanowire arrays, N. Rougemaille and A.K. Schmid, submitted Self-Assembled Nanofold Network Formation on Layered Crystal Surfaces

252

Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

TecDEM: A MATLAB based toolbox for tectonic geomorphology, Part 2: Surface dynamics and basin analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the analytical capability of TecDEM, a MATLAB toolbox used in conjunction with Global DEMs for the extraction of tectonic geomorphologic information. TecDEM includes a suite of algorithms to analyze topography, extracted drainage networks ... Keywords: Basin tilting, Hypsometry, Isobase map, Surface roughness, Tectonics

Faisal Shahzad; Richard Gloaguen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Artificial Neural Networks and quadratic Response Surfaces for the functional failure analysis of a thermal-hydraulic passive system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with an application to a gas-cooled reactor", Nuclear Engineering and Design, 238(1), pp. 217-228, (2008). [8] G surface with an application to the flexible conversion ratio reactor", Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239 Institute of Technology, Nuclear Science and Engineering Dept., Cambridge, USA b Politecnico di Milano

256

Analysis of Surface Fluxes in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer in the Vicinity of Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mooring with a surface buoy was deployed about 300 km southeast of Nova Scotia during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) in an attempt to obtain long-term, high-quality measurements of meteorological and ...

Gennaro H. Crescenti; Robert A. Weller

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Combined use of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging and X-ray fluorescence microscopy for sub-cellular metal quantification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined use of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging and X-ray fluorescence microscopy for subSurface Science Laboratory at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France Abstract Hard X of the details of cells are undetectable in hard X-ray microscopy due to the weak absorption contrast between

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Study of Lignocellulosic Material Degradation with CARS Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program of research undertaken by our Harvard group, in collaboration with Dr. Ding at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, seeks to introduce, validate and apply a new analytical technique to study the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. This conversion process has been the subject of intense interest over the past few years because of its potential to provide a clean, renewable source of energy to meet increasing global demand. During the funding period, we have clearly demonstrated visualization of lignin and cellulose using intrinsic vibrational contrast with simulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, developed at Harvard. Our approach offers high spatial resolution and time resolution that is sufficient to capture the kinetics of a pre?treatment process. This is reflected by the publications listed below, as well as the use of SRS microscopy at NREL as a routine analysis tool for research on lignocellulosic biomass. In our original proposal, we envisioned moving to near?field CARS imaging in order to perform chemical mapping at the nanoscale. However, given the dramatic progress made by our group in SRS imaging, we concentrated our efforts on using multi?component SRS (lignin, cellulose, lipid, water, protein, deuterated metabolites, etc.) to quantitatively understand the spatially dispersed kinetics in a variety of plant samples under a variety of conditions. In addition, we built a next generation laser system based on fiber laser technology that allowed rugged and portable instrumentation for SRS microscopy. We also pursued new imaging approaches to improve the acquisition speed of SRS imaging of lignocellulose without sacrificing signal?to?noise ratio. This allowed us to image larger volumes of tissue with higher time resolution to get a more comprehensive picture of the heterogeneity of this chemical process from the submicron up to the centimeter scale.

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Ding, Shi-You

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

Doyle, F.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multivariate Statistical Analysis of a Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly Experiment with the GISS General Circulation Model I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multivariate statistical analysis of sensitivity experiments with atmospheric GCMs is difficult because the sample size is always much smaller than the dimensionality of the GCM fields. Thus, Hasselmann has suggested using a hypothesis ...

Gerhard Hannoschöck; Claude Frabkignoul

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group. Summary: Reliable standards are needed to test, maintain, and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of Nanoscale ...

265

Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization. Presentation Title, Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials ...

266

Virtual Electrochemical Strain Microscopy of Polycrystalline LiCoO2 Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently developed technique, electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), utilizes the strong coupling between ionic current and anisotropic volumetric chemical expansion of lithium-ion electrode materials to dynamically probe the sub-one-hundred? nm inter-facial kinetic intercalation properties. A numerical technique based on the finite element method was developed to analyze the underlying physics that govern the ESM signal generation and establish relations to battery performance. The performed analysis demonstrates that the diffusion path within a thin film is tortuous and the extent of lithium diffusion into the electrode is dependent on the SPM-tip-imposed overpotential frequency. The detected surface actuation gives rise to the development of an electromechanical hysteresis loop whose shape is dependent on grain size and overpotential frequency. Shape and tilting angle of the loop are classified into low and high frequency regimes, separated by a transition frequency which is also a function of lithium diffusivity and grain size, f{sub T} = D//{sup 2}. Research shows that the crystallographic orientation of the surface actuated grain has a significant impact on the shape of the loop. The polycrystalline crystallographic orientation of the grains induces a diffusion path network in the electrode which impacts on the mechanical reliability of the battery. Simulations demonstrate that continuous battery cycling results in a cumulative capacity loss as a result of the hysteric non-reversible lithium intercalation. Furthermore, results suggest that ESM has the capability to infer the local out-of-plane lithium diffusivity and the out-of-plane contribution to Vegard tensor.

Chung, Ding-wen [Purdue University; Balke, Nina [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Garcia, R. Edwin [Purdue University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

Yuen, Chad [Ames Laboratory

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower than the present levels. Conceptually, the topographic surface above the repository foot-print would be re-contoured to make it more suitable for placement of unconsolidated materials (e.g., alluvium). Figure 1 shows the region of the surface modification in relation to the location of the repository foot-print. The surface contours in this region after modification are shown in the plot presented in Figure 2. Basically, the surface modification would be accomplished by applying cuts to the ridges slopes on the east flank of Yucca Mountain to produce a relatively uniform slope of about 10%. The alluvium would be covered with rock fragments (to imitate the desert pavement) to reduce erosion. This report documents the modeling assumptions and performance analysis conducted to estimate the long-term performance for Feature 23a. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories for the new design feature to those of the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O 1998a).

N. Erb

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface  

SciTech Connect

Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research has developed a computer simulation of the production facilities model of the Waskom Field in order to analyze existing and future production methods. The Waskom Field, located in East Texas, is a redeveloped reservoir sequence that produces primarily natural gas with minor amounts of oil and gas-condensate from the Upper and Lower Cotton Valley Sands as well as Sands in the Travis Peak sequence. The present gas production at Waskom Field averages about 12,000 Mcf/D. We have used data and the current production history to create a model of the surface production facilities, and we will simulate field performance by using a computer simulation package. In particular, all of the field facilities as well as the production history are included in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor capabilities than it requires. A simulation was performed where by the rental compressor in the Reuben Pierce lease was removed. The computer simulation showed that we can lower the last line pressure to 200 psig from 450 psig (which the operator was eventually able to negotiate) and the remaining compressors can sufficiently compress all of the gas currently produced in the field. Our few additional recommendations are to clean the separators, remove dual separator layouts, and remove several constricting valves that were identified from the simulation.

Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

272

In-situ spectro-microscopy on organic films: Mn-Phthalocyanine on Ag(100)  

SciTech Connect

Metal phthalocyanines are attracting significant attention, owing to their potential for applications in chemical sensors, solar cells and organic magnets. As the electronic properties of molecular films are determined by their crystallinity and molecular packing, the optimization of film quality is important for improving the performance of organic devices. Here, we present the results of in situ low-energy electron microscopy / photoemission electron microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) studies of incorporation-limited growth [1] of manganese-phthalocyanine (MnPc) on Ag(100) surfaces. MnPc thin films were grown on both, bulk Ag(100) surface and thin Ag(100)/Fe(100) films, where substrate spin-polarized electronic states can be modified through tuning the thickness of the Ag film [2]. We also discuss the electronic structure and magnetic ordering in MnPc thin films, investigated by angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

Al-Mahboob A.; Vescovo, E.; Sadowski, J.T.

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: SPLEEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPLEEM The Spin-Polarized Low-Energy Electron Microscope is a unique low-voltage electron microscope for the study of surfaces and interfaces. The instrument is very sensitive to...

274

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

275

Analytical electron microscopy examination of solid reaction products in long-term test of SRL 200 waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

Alteration phases, found on the leached surfaces and present as colloids in the leachates of 200-based frit (fully active and simulated) nuclear waste glass, reacted under static test conditions, at a surface area to leachate volume ratio of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} for 15 days to 728 days, have been examined by analytical electron microscopy. The compositions of the secondary phases were determined using x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and structural analysis was accomplished by electron diffraction. Long-term samples of simulated glass, which had undergone an acceleration of reaction after 182 days, possessed a number of silicate secondary phases, including; smectite (iron silicate and potassium iron alumina-silicate, weeksite (uranium silicate), zeolite (calcium potassium alumino-silicate), tobermorite (calcium silicate), and a pure silica phase. However, uranium silicates and smectite have also been observed in tests, which have not undergone the acceleration of reaction, in both the leachate and leached layer, suggesting that these phases are not responsible for the acceleration of reaction.

Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.; Dietz, N.L.; Bradley, C.R.; Tani, B.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Loss tangent imaging: Theory and simulations of repulsive-mode tapping atomic force microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expression for loss tangent measurement of a surface in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is derived using only the cantilever phase and the normalized cantilever amplitude. This provides a direct measurement of substrate compositional information that only requires tuning of the cantilever resonance to provide quantitative information. Furthermore, the loss tangent expression incorporates both the lost and stored energy into one term that represents a fundamental interpretation of the phase signal in amplitude modulation imaging. Numerical solutions of a cantilever tip interacting with a simple Voigt modeled surface agree with the derived loss tangent to within a few percent.

Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Yablon, Dalia G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, Annandale, New Jersey (United States)

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

277

Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Investigation of wettability by NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wettability of reservoir rock has an important impact on the efficiency of oil recovery processes and the distribution of oil and water within the reservoir. One of the potentially useful tools for wettability measurements is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spin-lattice relaxation. More recently using NMR microscopy NIPER has developed the capability of imaging one- and two-phase fluid systems in reservoir rock at resolutions to 25 microns. Effects seen in the images of fluids within the pore space of rocks near the rock grain surfaces hinted at the possibility of using NMR microscopy to map the wettability variations at grain sites within the pore space. Investigations were begun using NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation time measurements on rock/fluid systems and on well-defined fractional wet model systems to study these effects. Relaxation data has been modelled using the stretched exponential relationship recently introduced. Comparisons of the NMR microscopy results of the model system with the rock results indicate that the observed effects probably do not reflect actual wettability variations within the pore space. The results of the relaxation time measurements reveal that even in the simple model studied, the behavior of two phases is somewhat ambiguous and much more complex and requires more study.

Doughty, D.A.; Tomutsa, Liviu

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Demonstration of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy / Spectroscopy on the Au/Si (001) system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) have been verified. BEEM is used to analyze the characteristics of buried energy barriers and was developed as an extension of scanning tunneling microscopy; hence, the analytical capabilities of BEEM are on a manometer scale. To use BEEM, low-noise Au/Si (001) Schottky diodes have been fabricated. The diodes were macroscopically tested for their electrical properties using conventional current-voltage (I-V) techniques. The same diodes were then placed in an ultra-high vacuum STM system and analyzed with BEEM. The ballistic electron emission microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy showed some correlation with the topography of the evaporated gold surface. The barrier heights of the diodes were extracted from the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy with the use of a simple one dimensional BEEM current model. Comparison between the barrier heights obtained with BEEM and conventional I-V techniques showed the localized barrier heights to be higher than the macroscopic barrier heights.

Drummond, Mary Alyssa

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in ...  

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in liquid or gas. Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ultrasonic-Based Mode-Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy  

In a single run and without damaging the sample, ORNL’s mode-synthesizingatomic force microscopy (MSAFM), along with mode-synthesizing sensing, ...

282

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: NCEM Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) offers a program that gives participants the opportunity to conduct...

283

Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Material Characterization II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... By measuring the phase of the SHG, it provides information about the relative ... We combined interferometry to SHG microscopy to retrieve the ...

284

Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy ... of lithium ion batteries provides an important route to reducing the lifetime costs of ...

285

High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The APS 1-ID beamline is dedicated to high-energy diffraction and the status of the ... High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source 1-ID ...

286

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanocompression testing, we ... Ab Initio DFT Modeling of the Dislocation and Its Mobility in TiN Ceramic.

287

Determining Mechanical Properties of Carbon Microcoils Using Lateral Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of amorphous carbon microcoil (CMC) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition method were examined in compression and tension tests, using the lateral force mode of atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM cantilever tip was ... Keywords: Atomic force microscopy (AFM), atomic force microscopy, carbon microcoil, shear modulus, spring constant

Neng-Kai Chang; Shuo-Hung Chang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy D. Nikezic, J.P.Y. Ho, C.W.Y. Yip, V.S.Y. Koo, K.N. Yu * Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong July 2002 Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to investigate characteristics

Yu, K.N.

289

Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang Department of Physics. Ohtani, R.J. Wilson, S. Chiang, and C.M. Mate, "Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzene. V.M. Hallmark, S. Chiang, J.F. Rabolt, J.D. Swalen, and R.J. Wilson, "Observation of Atomic

Chiang, Shirley

290

Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy: A new ``looking glass`` into coal chemical structure  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the use of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy to spatially map the chemistry of aromatic and aliphatic carbon functionalities in coal to a resolution of less than 0.1 {mu}m. Localized x-ray absorption spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K absorption edge was also used to facilitate analysis of variations in fundamental chemistry at maceral interfaces and within maceral boundaries.

Botto, R.E.; Cody, G.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemical Speciation of Engineered Nanoparticle Surface ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... evaluation of API sources Page 3. API-MS Surface Analysis Methodologies ... Page 4. Why API-MS • Fast analysis – high sample throughput ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Southern Oscillation in Surface Circulation and Climate over the Tropical Atlantic, Eastern Pacific, and Indian Oceans as Captured by Cluster Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clusters of sea level pressure (SLP), surface wind, cloudiness, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the domain of the tropical Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and Indian Oceans are introduced and discussed in terms of general circulation and climate. ...

Klaus Wolter

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Use of Satellite Imagery and Surface Pressure-Gradient Analysis Modified for Sloping Terrain to Analyze the Mesoscale Events Preceding the Severe Hailstorms of 2 August 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conditions leading up to an outbreak of severe hailstorms in northeast Colorado are examined using satellite and surface data. A persistent mesoscale ridge of surface-high pressure, caused by outflow from a mesoscale- convective system, is seen ...

John F. Weaver; James J. Toth

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Instrument Series: Microscopy Atom Probe The LEAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Atom Probe The LEAP ® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first- ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies of low electrical conductivity materials, such as ceramics, semiconductors and oxides. The LEAP capability is assisting EMSL's efforts to further scientific advancements in interface analysis and microstructural characterization, providing a new tool for understanding the relationship between the nanoscale structure of materials and their macroscopic properties. Research Applications Geochemistry - Studying chemical processes that compose rocks and soils has long been used to determine matter cycles and transport in the environment, which supports critical EMSL research in areas including bioremediation.

299

Detailed Characterization of the Zn/Pd Dilute near Surface Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and synchrotron x-ray ...

300

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-spatial-resolution Raman microscopy of stress in shallow-trench-isolated Si structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress in single and periodic shallow-trench-isolated Si structures was examined by 364 nm excitation confocal resonance Raman microscopy, laser penetration being restricted to the near-surface region. Using a 1.3 numerical aperture microobjective lens with a theoretical {approx}140 nm spatial resolution, the authors show that the configuration with both incident and scattered lights polarized parallel to each other and perpendicular to Si stripes is favorable for stress detection in the middle of the stripes, suppressing contributions from their edges. The stresses located in different areas of the structures were identified and analyzed.

Poborchii, Vladimir; Tada, Tetsuya; Kanayama, Toshihiko [MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

303

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Becoming an NCEM User  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Research New Research Gallery Microscopy Links Becoming an NCEM User Step 1: Submit a proposal Step 2: Before you begin your research Step 3: Instrument qualification Step 4: Accessing NCEM facilities and performing research Step 1: Submit a proposal Deadlines for new proposals are March 15, June 15, September 15, December 15. Access to NCEM facilities is granted to researchers whose proposals are accepted by the NCEM proposal review committee. NCEM users are expected to have a strong background in transmission electron microscopy, and submitted proposals should include evidence of prior electron microscopy experience by the intended operator. Researchers who do not have sufficient experience in electron microscopy may be able to use NCEM facilities through a collaborative project.

304

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Contact NCEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Contact Jane Cavlina National Center for Electron Microscopy, MS 72-150 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Tel.: (510) 486-6036 Fax: (510) 486-5888...

305

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

306

Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Estimating Geometric Dislocation Densities in Polycrystalline Materialsfrom Orientation Imaging Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein we consider polycrystalline materials which can be taken as statistically homogeneous and whose grains can be adequately modeled as rigid-plastic. Our objective is to obtain, from orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), estimates of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities.

Man, Chi-Sing [University of Kentucky; Gao, Xiang [University of Kentucky; Godefroy, Scott [University of Kentucky; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Stuck with the bill, but why? : an analysis of the Portuguese public finance system with respect to surface transportation policy and investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite decentralization progress in other sectors, the Portuguese central government maintains significant administrative and fiscal power over national and sub-national surface transportation operations and infrastructure. ...

Nelson, Joshua S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Interactions between self-assembled monolayers and an organophosphonate: A detailed study using surface acoustic wave-based mass analysis, polarization modulation-FTIR spectroscopy, and ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having surfaces terminated in the following functional groups: -CH{sub 3}, -OH, -COOH, and (COO{sup -}){sub 2}Cu{sup 2+} (MUA-Cu{sup 2+}) have been prepared and examined as potential chemically sensitive interfaces. Mass measurements made using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices indicate that these surfaces display different degrees of selectivity and sensitivity to a range of analytes. The response of the MUA-Cu{sup 2+} SAM to the nerve-agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) is particularly intriguing. Exposure of this surface to 50%-of-saturation DIMP yields a surface concentration equivalent to about 20 DIMP monolayers. Such a high surface concentration in equilibrium with a much lower-than-saturation vapor pressure has not previously been observed. Newly developed analytical tools have made it possible to measure the infrared spectrum of the chemically receptive surface during analyte dosing. Coupled with in-situ SAW/ellipsometry measurements, which permit simultaneous measurement of mass and thickness with nanogram and Angstrom resolution, respectively, it has been possibly to develop a model for the surface chemistry leading to the unusual behavior of this system. The results indicate that DIMP interacts strongly with surface-confined Cu{sup 2+} adduct that nucleates growth of semi-ordered crystallites having substantially lower vapor pressure than the liquid.

Crooks, R.M.; Yang, H.C.; McEllistrem, L.J. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept of Chemistry] [and others

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

X-ray spectro-microscopy of complex materials and surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detailed understanding of complex materials used in information technology requires the use of state-of-the-art experimental techniques that provide information on the electronic and magnetic properties of the materials. The increasing miniaturization ...

J. Stöhr; S. Anders

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

Beauboeuf, Daniel P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Surface Science Opportunities in the Electronic Structure of ZnO (A Perspective on the Article, "Quantitative Analysis of Surface Donors in ZnO", by D.C. Look)  

SciTech Connect

ZnO is a wide-gap oxide semiconductor of considerable current interest for electronics, optoelectronics, and, possibly, semiconductor spintronics. Through selective electronic doping, ZnO can be a transparent conducting oxide [1], a UV light emitter [2,3], and, when alloyed with a few to several atomic percent of Co, Mn or other transition metals with unpaired d electrons, is squarely at the center of controversy in the field of high-Tc ferromagnetic semiconductors [4]. Despite this range of interests, fundamental aspects of electronic doping in ZnO remain poorly understood. For instance, theoretical calculations suggest that H at either interstitial or substitutional sites is responsible for the persistent n-type conductivity that frustrates efforts to achieve p-type behavior, an essential requirement for the fabrication of pn light emitting diodes and hole-mediated ferromagnetic coupling of Mn dopants [5,6]. Yet, experimental studies do not in general align with this prediction. Another interesting aspect of n-type conduction in ZnO is the appearance of a near-surface conducting channel that appears to be present in bulk crystals [7,8]. Although it has been a few years since the original observation of this phenomenon was described, detailed understanding is lacking. In this paper, David Look presents a transport study aimed at gaining insight into the phenomenon of near-surface conductivity in bulk ZnO. All samples investigated were unintentionally n-type, as is typical. The measured Hall data were interpreted using a two-layer conduction model based on standard charge balance equations. Look fit the temperature dependence of the electron mobility and carrier concentration and extracted the thicknesses of the surface conducting layer, which dominates at lower temperatures, for bulk crystals synthesized by different methods and marketed by different companies. By making reasonable assumptions about the surface acceptor density, the lower limit of the surface conducting layer thickness was extracted from the transport data. From a surface science perspective, two aspects of the investigation are of particular interest: (i) the donor concentration was enhanced by annealing in forming gas, which is 5% H2, and, (ii) despite relatively weak variation in the sheet carrier concentration, the surface conducting layer thickness (dsurf) varied from as large as 28 nm to as small as 1.5 nm, depending on the method of preparation and supplier. The ongoing exploration of this phenomenon begs for the kind of experiments that practitioners of surface, interface and thin-film science can readily conduct. In bulk crystals, is H doping really the cause? Answering this question represents a major challenge because the donor concentration is in the 1017-1018 cm-3 range. Determining the donor identity in this concentration range is a major experimental hurdle. How does dsurf depend on crystallographic orientation? How does the phenomenon depend on the extent of band bending? Does persistent photoconductivity come into play? Can the effect be modified by band bending modification via surface photovoltage effects? All of the above questions pertain to epitaxial films as well, but other questions also arise. How do the film thickness and strain state affect dsurf? Can the surface conduction effect be enhanced by judicious design and growth of quantum well structures made from ZnO, MgxZn1-xO, and/or CdxZn1-xO? Answering these and other questions that arise will expand our understanding of this fascinating and potentially important material, as well as pave the way for device applications.

Chambers, Scott A.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Three-dimensional structure of human chromatin accessibility complex hCHRAC by electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes modulate the dynamic assembly and remodeling of chromatin involved in DNA transcription, replication, and repair. There is little structural detail known about these important multiple-subunit enzymes that catalyze chromatin remodeling processes. Here we report a three-dimensional structure of the human chromatin accessibility complex, hCHRAC, using single particle reconstruction by negative stain electron microscopy. This structure shows an asymmetric 15 x 10 x 12 nm disk shape with several lobes protruding out of its surfaces. Based on the factors of larger contact area, smaller steric hindrance, and direct involvement of hCHRAC in interactions with the nucleosome, we propose that four lobes on one side form a multiple-site contact surface 10 nm in diameter for nucleosome binding. This work provides the first determination of the three-dimensional structure of the ISWI-family of chromatin remodeling complexes.

Hu, M.; Hainfeld, J.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Qian, L.; Brinas, R. P.; Kuznetsova, L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Surface Integrity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...inclusions introduced Plastically deformed debris as a result of grinding Voids, pits, burrs, or foreign material inclusions in surface Metallurgical Transformation of phases Grain size and distribution Precipitate size and distribution Foreign inclusions in material Twinning Recrystallization...

316

Programmable surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, [March--May 1992  

SciTech Connect

during the seventh quarter, electrokinetic, humic acid extraction and film flotation tests were done on oxidized samples of Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number_sign} 2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis was done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal, oxidized coal after extraction of humic acids and humic acid extracted from oxidized coal. In addition, electrochemical studies were done on electrodes prepared from coal pyrite samples.

Doyle, F.M.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

Ahsen, Osman Oguz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacks with HfO2 dielectrics and TiN electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacksEELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy were usedWe use scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)

Agustin, Melody P.; Fonseca, Leo R. C.; Hooker, Jacob C.; Stemmer, Susanne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Atmosphere–Land Surface Interactions over the Southern Great Plains: Characterization from Pentad Analysis of DOE ARM Field Observations and NARR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site data are analyzed to provide insight into atmosphere–land surface interactions generating summertime precipitation variability. Pentad-...

Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas; Sumant Nigam

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CART Decision-Tree Statistical Analysis and Prediction of Summer Season Maximum Surface Ozone for the Vancouver, Montreal, and Atlantic Regions of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of daily maximum surface ozone (O3) concentration was begun by Environment Canada in the spring of 1993 for the Vancouver, Montreal, and Atlantic regions in order to advise the public of expected air quality. Forecasts have been issued ...

William R. Burrows; Mario Benjamin; Stephen Beauchamp; Edward R. Lord; Douglas McCollor; Bruce Thomson

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons which have interact inelastically with the potentials of the atoms in the specimen and therefore resembles the better known Z2 (Z is atomic number) Rutherford scattering. One class of important catalysts consists of bronzes based on pentagonal {Mo6O21} building units; these include Mo5O14 and Mo17O47. In the last 20 years, new materials doped with

323

Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of disilane adsorption and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2x1)  

SciTech Connect

Scanning tunneling microscopy has been employed to study the adsorption of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2{times}1) at various temperatures. Room-temperature exposures result in a random distribution of dissociation fragments on the surface. Formation of anisotropic monohydride islands and denuded zones as well as island coarsening is observed at higher temperatures. The results are strikingly similar to those reported for growth by molecular-beam epitaxy using pure Si, even though different surface reactions are involved in these two growth processes.

Lin, D.; Hirschorn, E.S.; Chiang, T. (Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)); Tsu, R.; Lubben, D.; Greene, J.E. (Department of Materials Science, Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis of Short-Bunch Production with the APS Booster and a Bunch Compressor Michael Borland, AOD/OAG ∗ August 8, 2003 1 Abstract There is significant interest among x-ray scientists in short-pulse x-rays. The x-rays from the APS ring, although very bright, are produced by an electron bunch with an rms length of more than 30 ps. Typically, it is only a linear accelerator that can produce a very short bunch. An idea was brought to my attention by Glenn Decker that might allow us to produce a short bunch using the APS booster. This idea involves extracting the beam from the booster at 3 to 4 GeV, while it is still relatively short, then compressing it with a magnetic bunch compressor. In this note, we present a preliminary analysis of this idea, along with the related idea of using a nonequilibrium beam from the APS photoinjector. 2 Background We will begin with an examination of the ideal result

325

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

Highly uniform step and terrace structures on SiC(0001) surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly uniform step and termination structures on 4H- and 6H-SiC(0001) surfaces have been prepared via moderate annealing in disilane. Atomic force microscopy and dark-field low-energy electron microscopy imaging indicate single-phase terminations separated ...

J. Sun; J. B. Hannon; R. M. Tromp; K. Pohl

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

Teague, L.; Duff, M.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

An atomic view of surface diffusion on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of surface diffusion and cluster nucleation by field ion microscopy have provided a considerable amount of physical insight concerning the fundamental interactions that control dynamical processes on surfaces. The investigations rely not only on the FIM`s ability to resolve and track individual atoms on a surface, but also its ability to manipulate the number of adatoms and the size of clusters by the process of field desorption. Results of the investigations are surprising. Whereas metal atom diffusion was once thought to be a simple hopping process, FIM experiments have revealed new mechanisms for atom transport. Whereas cluster nucleation was once thought to be an aggregation process dependent only upon pairwise interactions between atoms, FIM investigations have shown that long-range and many body interactions can make non-negligible contributions to the overall process. By providing a brief overview of the experimental methods used in FIM surface diffusion studies and discussing a few selected applications, I hope to have conveyed some of the rich history as well as the current excitement associated with FIM investigations of dynamical processes on surfaces.

Kellogg, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration ­ Uses up part of dynamic range · Solution: ­ Soft x-rays: Back side Illumination ­ Hard xPhase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector Benjamin Hornberger ­ Phase Contrast 101 · A Segmented Detector for Hard X-ray Microprobes ­ Segmented Silicon Chip ­ Charge

Homes, Christopher C.

331

Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the earth’s surface are investigated by use of the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget Dataset. Principal component analysis is used to quantify ...

Pamela E. Mlynczak; G. Louis Smith; Anne C. Wilber; Paul W. Stackhouse

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance-Part I: Analysis of roofing product databases Title Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect...

333

Ecosystem Feedbacks to Climate Change in California: Development, Testing, and Analysis Using a Coupled Regional Atmosphere and Land Surface Model (WRF3–CLM3.5)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future ...

Z. M. Subin; W. J. Riley; J. Jin; D. S. Christianson; M. S. Torn; L. M. Kueppers

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Environmental Controls on the Surface Energy Budget over a Large Southern Inland Water in the United States: An Analysis of One-Year Eddy Covariance Flux Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyzed the surface energy fluxes that were measured by an eddy covariance system over the Ross Barnett Reservoir in Mississippi for a 1-yr period in 2008. On a monthly basis over the course of the year, positive vertical temperature ...

Heping Liu; Qianyu Zhang; Gordon Dowler

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effect of Surface Roughness of 45S Bioactive Glass on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Their adhesion and proliferation are determined by fluorescent microscopy. ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on 316L Stainless

336

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies on the structure and stability of model catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An atomic level understanding of the structure and stability of model catalysts is essential for surface science studies in heterogeneous catalysis. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can operate both in UHV and under realistic pressure conditions with a wide temperature span while providing atomic resolution images. Taking advantage of the ability of STM, our research focuses on 1) investigating the structure and stability of supported Au catalysts, especially under CO oxidation conditions, and 2) synthesizing and characterizing a series of alloy model catalysts for future model catalytic studies. In our study, Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been used to model supported Au catalysts. Our STM studies in UHV reveal surface structures of TiO2(110) and show undercoordinated Ti cations play a critical role in the nucleation and stabilization of Au clusters on TiO2(110). Exposing the TiO2(110) surface to water vapor causes the formation of surface hydroxyl groups and subsequently alters the growth kinetics of Au clusters on TiO2(110). STM studies on Au/TiO2(110) during CO oxidation demonstrate the real surface of a working catalyst. Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) sinter rapidly during CO oxidation, but are mostly stable in the single component reactant gas, either CO or O2. The sintering kinetics of supported Au clusters has been measured during CO oxidation and gives an activation energy, which supports the mechanism of CO oxidation induced sintering. CO oxidation was also found to accelerate the surface diffusion of Rh(110). Our results show a direct correlation between the reaction rate of CO oxidation and the diffusion rate of surface metal atoms. Synthesis of alloy model catalysts have also been attempted in our study with their structures successfully characterized. Planar Au-Pd alloy films has been prepared on a Rh(100) surface with surface Au and Pd atoms distinguished by STM. The growth of Au-Ag alloy clusters have been studied by in-situ STM on a cluster-to-cluster basis. Moreover, the atomic structure of a solution-prepared Ru3Sn3 cluster has been resolved on an ultra-thin silica film surface. The atomic structure and adsorption sites of the ultrathin silica film have also been well characterized in our study.

Yang, Fan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Origin of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of 4,4' -Biphenyldicarboxylate on Silver Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and tools of computational chemistry to investigate the origin of Raman scattering of 4,4’-biphenyldicarboxylic acid adsorbed as 4,4’-biphenyldicarboxylate on two different silver substrates. The first consists of a 100 nm deep cylindrical aperture embedded in an array of cylindrical nano-holes featuring an average diameter of 350 nm and a periodicity of 700 nm. The second is a nano-junction formed by a 100 nm silver nano-particle coated with the adsorbate and a flat silver surface. We find that the underlying background signal in the SERS spectra collected from the former strongly resemble the SERS spectra of the nano-sphere-featuring substrate, engineered to operate in the charge transfer plasmon limit. Our analysis of a series of SERS spectra consecutively collected from one nano-cylinder suggests that the optical response of a single molecule can be extracted, its brightest Raman active mode enhanced by a factor of 7.4 x 106.

El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hu, Dehong; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

Relative free energies of Si surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cavities are formed by ion implanting (001) Si with He and annealing at 800?°C to enlarge and to remove the He. Subsequent annealing at 600?°C results in cavities with well?defined facets as seen in [110] cross section with transmission electron microscopy. The most frequently observed facets are {111} planes. A rounded surface is seen about the [001] direction of all cavities

D. M. Follstaedt

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wavelet Analysis of Seasonal Rainfall Variability of the Upper Blue Nile Basin, its Teleconnection to Global Sea Surface Temperature, and its Forecasting by an Artificial Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall is the primary driver of basin hydrologic processes. This article developed a rainfall predictive tool that combines the wavelet principal component analysis (WPCA), artificial neural networks–genetic algorithm (ANN–GA), statistical ...

Mohamed Helmy Elsanabary; Thian Yew Gan

340

A Frequent-Updating Analysis System Based on Radar, Surface, and Mesoscale Model Data for the Beijing 2008 Forecast Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS) was implemented in Beijing, China, and contributed to the Beijing 2008 Forecast Demonstration Project (B08FDP) in support of the Beijing Summer Olympics. VDRAS is a four-dimensional ...

Juanzhen Sun; Mingxuan Chen; Yingchun Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Bowdle, South Dakota, Cyclic Tornadic Supercell of 22 May 2010: Surface Analysis of Rear-Flank Downdraft Evolution and Multiple Internal Surges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile mesonet sampling in the hook echo/rear-flank downdraft (RFD) region of a tornadic supercell near Bowdle, South Dakota, provided the opportunity to examine RFD thermodynamic and kinematic attributes and evolution. Focused analysis of the ...

Bruce D. Lee; Catherine A. Finley; Christopher D. Karstens

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Variable- Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phase transitions, chemisorption, diffusion, and desorption Surface characterization of advanced materials - studying elemental and compound semiconductors, layered materials...

343

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: About NCEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCEM NCEM The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) is one of the world's foremost centers for electron microscopy and microcharacterization. It is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Located adjacent to the University of California, Berkeley, NCEM was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron-optical characterization of materials with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. As a national user facility, NCEM is open to scientists from universities, government and industrial laboratories. The center provides cutting-edge instrumentation, techniques and expertise for advanced electron beam microcharacterization of materials at high spatial

344

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

345

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

346

Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging (XMI) Imaging (XMI) About XMI Science and Research Beamlines Highlights Software and Tools Intranet Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts FAQs Beamlines News Publications APS Email Portal APS Intranet APS Phonebook APS Quick Links for Users APS Safety and Training Welcome to the X-ray Microscopy and Imaging group (XMI)! X-ray Microscopy and Imaging is part of the X-ray Science Division at the Advanced Photon Source. We develop and support a diverse and multidisciplinary user research program at Sectors 2 and 32 of the APS, with the overall goal to image and study materials structures at spatial and temporal resolutions that are most scientifically relevant to the cutting-edge advances in materials, biological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. To achieve this goal, we actively engage in various research activities including

348

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

349

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

350

CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electron Microscopy Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Building 735 This COSA form must be completed for all experimenters working in the CFN and must be submitted to the CFN User Office for badge access. CFN Safety Awareness Policy: Each user must be instructed in the safe procedures in CFN related activities. CFN Facility Laboratory personnel shall keep readily available all relevant instructions and safety literature. Employee/Guest Name Life/Guest Number Department/Division ES&H Coordinator/Ext. Facility Manager COSA Trainer Guest User Staff USER ADMINISTRATION Checked in at User Administration and has valid BNL ID badge Safety Approval Form (SAF) approved. Training requirements completed (Indicate additional training specified in SAF or ESR in lines provided below):

351

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

352

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

353

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

354

Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geyling, F. [SEMATECH, Austin, TX (United States)

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Interactive Case Study in Composite Failure Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the case study, the audience will be presented with the failure scenario and key ... Advanced Digital Microscopy is Revolutionizing Failure Analysis.

356

System for measuring the coordinates of tire surfaces in transient conditions when rolling over obstacles: Description of the system and performance analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a system for measuring surface coordinates (commonly known as ''shape measurements'') which is able to give the temporal evolution of the position of the tire sidewall in transient conditions (such as during braking, when there are potholes or when the road surface is uneven) which may or may not be reproducible. The system is based on the well-known technique of projecting and observing structured light using a digital camera with an optical axis which is slanted with respect to the axis of the projector. The transient nature of the phenomenon has led to the development of specific innovative solutions as regards image processing algorithms. This paper briefly describes the components which make up the measuring system and presents the results of the measurements carried out on the drum bench. It then analyses the performance of the measuring system and the sources of uncertainty which led to the development of the system for a specific dynamic application: impact with an obstacle (cleat test). The measuring system guaranteed a measurement uncertainty of 0.28 mm along the Z axis (the axial direction of the tire) with a measurement range of 250(X)x80(Y)x25(Z) mm{sup 3}, with the tire rolling at a speed of up to 30 km/h.

Castellini, Paolo; Di Giuseppe, Andrea [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy to Study Subsurface Defects ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... surface (found during periodic inspections during the course of the experiments). ... Scanning—A Review," Proceedings of the IEEE, 67 (8) (August 1979), pp.

358

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Surface and Interface Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Carlos Gutierrez Carlos Gutierrez Manager Resources Department Folder 01114 Sharepoint Visit Our Labs Grest Group Nanorheology Research (514 KB PDF) Interfacial Force Microscopy Group (701 KB PDF) Research Image Gallery (3,698 KB PDF) Surface Imaging Laboratory Technology - Metals for tomorrow Tina Nenoff Departments Surface and Interface Sciences The Surface and Interface Sciences Department is engaged in a diverse portfolio of leading-edge research projects related to the understanding

359

Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microscopy for Sub-Ångstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. O’Microscopy for Sub-Ångstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. O’what we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. R. et al. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy: A newwith the scanning transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY II.T. et al. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging of

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition Title Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

362

Wavelength swept spectrally encoded confocal microscopy for biological and clinical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a technique that facilitates the incorporation of confocal microscopy into small, portable clinical instruments. This would allow in vivo evaluation of cellular and sub-cellular ...

Boudoux, Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Automated position control of a surface array relative to a liquid microjunction surface sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method utilizes an image analysis approach for controlling the probe-to-surface distance of a liquid junction-based surface sampling system for use with mass spectrometric detection. Such an approach enables a hands-free formation of the liquid microjunction used to sample solution composition from the surface and for re-optimization, as necessary, of the microjunction thickness during a surface scan to achieve a fully automated surface sampling system.

Van Berkel, Gary J. (Clinton, TN); Kertesz, Vilmos (Knoxville, TN); Ford, Michael James (Little Rock, AR)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Determination of laser-evaporated uranium dioxide by neutron activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require information about the loss of fuel which may occur at high temperatures. In this study, the surface of a uranium dioxide target was heated rapidly by a laser. The uranium surface was vaporized into a vacuum. The uranium bearing species condensed on a graphite disk placed in the pathway of the expanding uranium vapor. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis showed very little droplet ejection directly from the laser target surface. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the amount of uranium deposited. The surface temperature was measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperature ranged from 2400 to 3700/sup 0/K. The Hertz-Langmuir formula, in conjunction with the measured surface temperature transient, was used to calculate the theoretical amount of uranium deposited. There was good agreement between theory and experiment above the melting point of 3120/sup 0/K. Below the melting point much more uranium was collected than was expected theoretically. This was attributed to oxidation of the surface. 29 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Allred, R.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

366

Investigation of short-range surface forces to develop self-organizing devices by Steven M. Tobias.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force spectra from atomic force microscopy were used to verify surface energy components of indium tin oxide and mesocarbon microbeads. These materials were selected based on spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters to ...

Tobias, Steven M., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Atom probe microscopy of three-dimensional distribution of silicon isotopes in {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices with sub-nanometer spatial resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-assisted atom probe microscopy of 2 nm period {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices (SLs) is reported. Three-dimensional distributions of {sup 28}Si and {sup 30}Si stable isotopes are obtained with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The depth resolution of the present atom probe analysis is much higher than that of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) even when SIMS is performed with a great care to reduce the artifact due to atomic mixing. Outlook of Si isotope SLs as ideal depth scales for SIMS and three-dimensional position standards for atom probe microscopy is discussed.

Shimizu, Yasuo; Kawamura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tomita, Mitsuhiro [Corporate Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Sasaki, Mikio; Uchida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru [Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 1 Komukai Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8583 (Japan)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna  

SciTech Connect

Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

Weber, J. [Institute of Art and Technology, Conservation Sciences, University of Applied Arts Vienna. A-1013 Vienna, Salzgries 14/1 (Austria)], E-mail: johannes.weber@uni-ak.ac.at; Beseler, S. [Institute of Conservation and Restoration, University of Applied Arts Vienna A-1013 Vienna, Salzgries 14/4 (Austria); Sterflinger, K. [Institute for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna A-1190 Vienna, Muthgasse 18 (Austria)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Surface profiling interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27.2013 27.2013 Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne Synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy will soon also be developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In order to establish collaboration between the two National Laboratories, Drs. Evgeny Nazaretski and Hui Yan fom BNL visited Argonne to learn more about recent progress made in the SXSPM project. During the 2-day visit the teams discussed mutual scientific goals and strategies to achieve them. NSLS-II will be a new state-of-the-art, medium-energy electron storage ring at BNL designed to deliver high intensity and brightness. Construction of the NSLS-II's ring building began in March 2009. The new facility will begin operating in 2014

372

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01.2013 01.2013 Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University On November 1, 2013, Volker Rose was invited to present the Nanoscience Seminar at the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo. In his seminar he discussed the physical principles of Synchrotron X-ray Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SXSTM) as well as the recent progress made by his team at the Advanced Photon Source. He was invited by Prof. Yukio Hasegawa, who himself conducts SXSTM experiment at the Photon Factory in Tsukuba, Japan. The ISSP serves as the central laboratory of materials science in Japan equipped with state-of-art facilities. It was relocated to the new campus in Kashiwa of the University of Tokyo in 2000 after the 43 years of activities at the Roppongi campus in downtown Tokyo. Here ISSP is focusing

373

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by adopting an in-line type hologram, a webcam, a high power RGB light emitting diode (LED), and a pinhole. It cost less than 20,000 yen (approximately 250 US dollars at 80 yen/dollar), and was approximately 120 mm x 80 mm x 55 mm in size. In addition, by adjusting the recording-distance of a hologram, the lateral resolution power at the most suitable distance was 17.5 um. Furthermore, this DHM was developed for use in open source libraries, and is therefore low-cost and can be easily developed by anyone. In this research, it is the feature to cut down cost and size and to improve the lateral resolution power further rather than existing reports. This DHM will be a useful application in fieldwork, education, and so forth.

Shiraki, Atsushi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Definition: Composition Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composition Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Composition Analysis Composition analysis is used to relate surface fluid properties and geologic data to geothermal...

377

High Energy X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Tracking of Internal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements are carried out at the Advanced Photon Source; analysis uses high performance computing to extract micron scale resolution structures spanning ...

378

Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy applied to indium arsenide quantum dot structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The technique of Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy (STORM) has been investigated for use on nanostructures. It has been demonstrated as a viable technique to… (more)

Byrnes, Daniel P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using electron scattering and microscopy and scanning probe techniques. The research includes experiments and theory to understand the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures of materials.

383

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Illustrating surfaces in volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel framework for illustrating surfaces in a volume. Surfaces are illustrated by drawing only feature lines, such as silhouettes, valleys, ridges, and surface hatching strokes, and are embedded in volume renderings. This framework ...

Xiaoru Yuan; Baoquan Chen

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Failure Analysis and Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following topics are of special interest: fatigue & fracture, tools & techniques for failure analysis, aerospace, aging Infrastructure/bridges, oil and gas, surface ...

386

The Russian Surface Temperature Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Russian group, under the initial leadership of M. I. Budyko, has produced the first comprehensive analysis of monthly average surface temperature (January 1891 through May 1980) for the Northern Hemisphere on a 5°×10° latitude-longitude grid. ...

Alan Robock

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Southern Ocean Surface Characteristics from FGGE Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this analysis of satellite-tracked drifting surface buoys released in the Southern Ocean, buoy velocities are averaged along trajectories for 90 days to determine the mean circulation, and eddy kinetic energy is computed using perturbations ...

Mark Andrew Johnson

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Surface Properties of Biomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 29, 2011 ... Surface charge and surface energy measurements ... The Multiple Uses of Carbon Nanotubes in Regenerative Medicine · The Role of Bacterial ...

389

On the Parameterization of Surface Roughness at Regional Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization for surface roughness and blending height at regional scales, under neutral atmospheric stability, is studied and tested. The analysis is based on a suite of large-eddy simulations (LES) over surfaces with varying roughness ...

Elie Bou-Zeid; Marc B. Parlange; Charles Meneveau

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ocean Surface Pressure Fields from Satellite-Sensed Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Washington's planetary boundary layer model is inverted to use remotely sensed satellite scatterometer-derived surface winds as input to calculate maritime surface pressure fields. The analysis of three different synoptic storm ...

Robert A. Brown; Gad Levy

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

LANL: Facility Focus, MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

07-018 Spring 2007 07-018 Spring 2007 T he MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory is home to a one-of-a-kind integrated instrument for surface science and materials research, allowing scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory the unique opportunity to perform coordinated research using ultra-high vacuum surface measurements, in situ reactions, and materials synthesis tools. Housed in the Materials Science Laboratory, the surface science instrument features an ultra-clean integrated system for surface analysis and in situ surface modification, thin film deposition, and surface gas reactions. This integrated system is used for analytical surface science; materials electronic

392

Computational image analysis of subcellular dynamics in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of image segmentation and motion tracking algorithms was adapted for analyzing time-lapse data of cells with fluorescently labeled protein. Performance metrics were devised and algorithm parameters were matched to ...

Huang, Austin V., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An early frog embryo,imaged at high-reso-lution using surface imaging microscopy,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on electric cars, oil and gas exploration, nanomechanics for biological structures, and space exploration

394

Transmission electron microscopy characterization of electrically stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices has been investigated using step-stress testing, and representative samples of undegraded, source-side-degraded, and drain-side-degraded devices were examined using electron microscopy and microanalysis. An unstressed reference sample was also examined. All tested devices and their corresponding transmission electron microscopy samples originated from the same wafer and thus received nominally identical processing. Step-stressing was performed on each device and the corresponding current voltage characteristics were generated. Degradation in electrical performance, specifically greatly increased gate leakage current, was shown to be correlated with the presence of crystal defects near the gate edges. However, the drain-side-degraded device showed a surface pit on the source side, and another region of the same device showed no evidence of damage. Moreover, significant metal diffusion into the barrier layer from the gate contacts was also observed, as well as thin amorphous oxide layers below the gate metal contacts, even in the unstressed sample. Overall, these observations emphasize that gate-edge defects provide only a partial explanation for device failure.

Johnson, Michael [Arizona State University; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Liu, Lu [University of Florida; Kang, Tsung Sheng [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Chang, C. Y. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Jang, Soohwan [University of Florida, Gainesville; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Smith, David J [Arizona State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A stochastic kinematic model of class averaging in single-particle electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-particle electron microscopy is an experimental technique that is used to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biological macromolecules and the complexes that they form. In general, image processing techniques and reconstruction ... Keywords: Class average, convolution, image alignment, single-particle electron microscopy

Wooram Park; Charles R Midgett; Dean R Madden; Gregory S Chirikjian

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Serial Section Registration of Axonal Confocal Microscopy Datasets for Long-Range Neural Circuit Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fluorescence con- focal microscopy. We are targeting neurons in a 12 mm-deep re- gion of interest and work, immunohistochemically stained, and placed on its own microscope slide for fluorescence confocal imaging. view). The histological techniques used to image neurons of interest in fluorescence confocal microscopy impose digital

Paiva, António R. C.

398

Batch fabrication of cantilever array aperture probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel batch fabrication process for cantilever array aperture probes used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The array probes, consisting of 16 parallel cantilevers with each tip having an identical aperture, are proposed ... Keywords: Cantilever probes, Nanofabrication, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)

Y. Zhang; K. E. Docherty; J. M. R. Weaver

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector A Dissertation Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector by Benjamin Hornberger Doctor. In the hard x-ray range (multi-keV), the main focus lies on trace ele- ment mapping by x-ray fluorescence

400

Computer aided surface representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

Barnhill, R.E.

1990-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10{sup -6} torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non-volatile components. Equilibrium is lost, and the surface builds up a layer of carbon-based gunk.

Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can provide nanometer resolution of thin tissue slices. Hard X-ray transmission microscopy has provided the first 3D view of bone structure within individual trabeculae on the nanoscale. figure 1 Figure 1 Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM; center and right) can reveal localized details of osteocyte lacunae and their processes.

403

Investigation of proximity effects in electron microscopy and lithography  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental challenge in lithographic and microscopic techniques employing focused electron beams are so-called proximity effects due to unintended electron emission and scattering in the sample. Herein, we apply a method that allows for visualizing electron induced surface modifications on a SiN substrate covered with a thin native oxide layer by means of iron deposits. Conventional wisdom holds that by using thin membranes proximity effects can be effectively reduced. We demonstrate that, contrary to the expectation, these can be indeed larger on a 200 nm SiN-membrane than on the respective bulk substrate due to charging effects.

Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Rietzler, F.; Schirmer, M.; Steinrueck, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Microscopy and spectroscopy of lithium nickel oxide based particles used in high-power lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural and electronic investigations were conducted on lithium nickel oxide-based particles used in positive electrodes of 18650-type high-power Li-ion cells. K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed trivalent Ni and Co ions in the bulk LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} powder used to prepare the high power electrode laminates. Using oxygen K-edge XAS, high resolution electron microscopy, nanoprobe diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we identified a <5 nm thick modified layer on the surface of the oxide particles, which results from the loss of Ni and Li ordering in the layered R{bar 3}m structure. This structural change was accompanied by oxygen loss and a lowering of the Ni- and Co-oxidation states in the surface layer. Growth of this surface layer may contribute to the impedance rise observed during accelerated aging of these Li-ion cells.

Abraham, D. P.; Twesten, R. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Fischer, D.; McBreen, J.; Petrov, I.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Illinois; BNL; NIST

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Growth mechanism and surface atomic structure of AgInSe{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of (112)A-oriented AgInSe{sub 2} on GaAs (111)A and its surface reconstruction were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and other techniques. Films were grown by a sputtering and evaporation method. Topographic STM images reveal that the film grew by atomic incorporation into surface steps resulting from screw dislocations on the surface. The screw dislocation density was {approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup 2}. Atomically resolved images also show that the surface atomic arrangement appears to be similar to that of the bulk, with a spacing of 0.35-0.41 nm. There is no observable reconstruction, which is unexpected for a polar semiconductor surface.

Pena Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Lyding, Joseph [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 N. Matthews St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization techniques, the real time study of property-structure correlations in nanomaterials becomes possible. This dissertation reports the direct observations of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod structures using the in situ TEM nanoindentation tool. The combined in situ movies with quantitative loading-unloading curves reveal the deformation mechanism of the above nanomaterial systems. At room temperature, in situ dynamic deformation studies show that the AZM nanocomposites undergo the deformation mainly through the grain-boundary sliding and rotation of small grains, i.e., ZrO2 grains, and some of the large grains, i.e., MgAl2O4 grains. We observed both plastic and elastic deformations in different sample regions in these multi-phase ceramic nanocomposites at room temperature. Both ex situ (conventional) and in situ nanoindentation were conducted to reveal the deformation of YBCO films from the directions perpendicular and parallel to the twin interfaces. Hardness measured perpendicular to twin interfaces is ~50% and 40% higher than that measured parallel to twin interfaces, by ex situ and in situ, respectively. By using an in situ nanoindentation tool inside TEM, dynamic work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel was directly observed. During stain hardening stage, abundant Lomer-Cottrell (L-C) locks formed both within nanograins and against twin boundaries. Two major mechanisms were identified during interactions between L-C locks and twin boundaries. Quantitative nanoindentation experiments recorded during in situ experiments show an increase of yield strength from 1.64 to 2.29 GPa during multiple loading-unloading cycles. In situ TEM nanoindentation has been conducted to explore the size dependent deformation behavior of two different types (type I: ~ 0.51 of width/length ratio and type II: ~ 088 ratio) of AZO nanorods. During the indentation on type I nanord structure, annihilation of defects has been observed which is caused by limitation of the defect activities by relatively small size of the width. On the other hand, type II nanorod shows dislocation activities which enhanced the grain rotation under the external force applied on more isotropic direction through type II nanorod.

Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A survey of fractured SrTiO{sub 3} surfaces : from the micro-meter to nano-meter scale.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy was utilized to study fractured perovskite oxide surfaces. It was found that for the non-cleavable perovskite oxide, SrTiO{sub 3}, atomically flat terraces could be routinely created with a controlled fracturing procedure. Optical, scanning electron and scanning tunneling microscopies, and a profilometer were used to obtain information from submillimeter to submicrometer scales of the fractured surface topography.

Chien, T. Y.; Guisinger, N. P.; Freeland, J. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( XSD)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction: Tools for Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Surface Analysis Tools for Surface Analysis This information is provided through the cooperation of EMSL and the ASTM E42 committee. This page provides information about terminology, analysis guides, recommended practices, reference data, reference materials and standards, and other tools that enable accurate analysis of surfaces. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee E42 on Surface Analysis was established in 1976 to help improve and advance the quality of surface analysis. Through the development of terminology, conducting round robin (interlaboratory) comparison studies, and the development of recommended practices and standards, the E42 Committee has worked to advance the concepts and analysis approaches that have significantly improved the ability to obtain accurate reproducible and quantitative

409

Semi-Automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images  

SciTech Connect

Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes.

Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Scanning tunneling microscopy observation of Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557) are investigated by low-energy-electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using an indirect heating method, we have succeeded in obtaining almost perfect single-domain LEED patterns of one-dimensional wire (chain) structures, so called {alpha}x2 and {beta}x2 phases. Careful LEED analysis and STM investigation reveal that these phases are formed on the (223) and (112) facets, respectively. The {alpha}x2 phase has regular bundles of triple wires at low annealing temperature but wider bundles through step bunching after a higher temperature annealing. Along the wires of the {alpha}x2 phase, which was recently reported to exhibit a transition between one-dimensional (1D) metallic and 2D semiconducting conductance, a clear commensurate x2 modulation is observed at 78-120 K in contrast to the incommensurate and disordered structure reported previously. A tentative atomic structure model of the {alpha}x2 phase is proposed based on the dense Pb overlayers on (111) and (223) facets. The details of the STM images of the {beta}x2 phase are discussed.

Morikawa, Harumo; Kim, Keun Su; Jung, Duk Yong; Yeom, Han Woong [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics and Center for Atomic Wires and Layers, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sequencing single molecules using surface-enhanced Raman ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; ... Events; Sequencing single molecules using surface-enhanced Raman ...

412

Modification of fracture surfaces by dissolution. Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study focuses upon how and to what extent dissolution related fluid/rock interactions modify the morphology and roughness of surfaces on Sioux Quartzite. Dissolution experiments consisted of reacting small discs of Sioux Quartzite in sealed gold capsules containing either distilled water or 0.05 N to 4.0 N aqueous solutions of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Samples were reacted at 200/sup 0/C and 20 to 30 MPa fluid pressures for 2 to 5 days. Two markedly different starting surface textures were used: polished, optically flat surfaces and tensile fracture surfaces. An exploratory experiment also was performed to assess the occurrence of a pressure solution phenomenon on a polished quartzite surface at contact regions of indenting quartz sand grains. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicate progressive increases in the amount of dissolution produced significant changes of surface roughness for both initial surface textures. Surface roughness increased measurably, with the initially polished surfaces exhibiting the more dramatic changes. The pressure solution experiments did not produce definite results, but several surface features are suggestive of dissolution enhancement at load carrying contacts. 9 refs., 10 figs.

Johnson, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO {yields} 1/2 N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was also studied by STM on Rh(111) and Pt(111). Poisoning was found to coincide with decreased adsorbate mobility. Under ethylene hydrogenation conditions, no order is detected by STM at 300 K, as hydrogen and ethylidyne, the surface species formed by gas-phase ethylene, are too mobile. When CO is introduced, the reaction stops, and ordered structures appear on the surface. For Rh(111), the structure is predominantly a mixed c(4 x 2), though there are some areas of (2 x 2). For Pt(111), the structure is hexagonal and resembles the Moire pattern seen when Pt(111) is exposed to pure CO. From these studies it is concluded that CO poisons by stopping adsorbate mobility. This lack of adsorbate mobility prevents the adsorption of ethylene from the gas phase by hindering the creation of adsorption sites.

Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low- Temperature Scanning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low- Low- Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM, is the preeminent system dedicated to surface chemistry and physics at low temperatures down to 5 K. Operating at low temperatures provides high mechanical stability, superior vacuum conditions, and negligible drift for long-term experiments. With thermal diffusion being entirely suppressed, stable imaging becomes possible even for weakly bound species. The system is primarily used for probing single-site chemical reactivity, while the combination with a hyperthermal molecular beam allows the study of important chemical processes at energies corresponding to the operational temperatures well beyond typical UHV studies. The LT SPM provides

416

Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives  

SciTech Connect

Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

In-situ raman microscopy of individual LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 particles in the Li-ion battery composite cathode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kinetic characteristics of Li{sup +} intercalation/deintercalation into/from individual LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} particles in a composite cathode were studied in-situ using Raman microscopy during electrochemical charge-discharge in 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6}, ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl-methyl carbonate (EMC), 3:7 by volume. Spectroscopic analysis of a cathode that was removed from a tested high-power Li-ion cell, which suffered substantial power and capacity loss, showed that the state of charge (SOC) of oxide particles on the cathode surface was highly non-uniform despite deep discharge of the Li-ion cell at the end of the test. In-situ monitoring of the SOC of selected oxide particles in the composite cathode in a sealed spectro-electrochemical cell revealed that the rate at which particles charge and discharge varied with time and location. The inconsistent kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles was attributed to degradation of the electronically conducting matrix in the composite cathode upon testing. These local micro-phenomena are responsible for the overall impedance rise of the cathode and contribute to the mechanism of lithium-ion cell failure.

Lei, Jinglei; McLarnon, Frank; Kostecki, Robert

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

419

Biomaterial Surfaces II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofilm produced by microbes is a structure formed on material surface containing water ... In this work, both dense and porous silica and niobium oxide coatings were ... environments and their surface and interfacial breakdown was examined.

420

Nanoscale Surface Modifications I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique utilizing methane/hydrogen/nitrogen chemistry. The surface modifications are characterized by ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surface Processing & Mechanics Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Directory Staff Ceramic Machining Composites Coatings Powder Metallurgy Thermodynamics Tribology Related Links HTML Comments Welcome to the Surface Processing &...

422

Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

Simultaneous forward and epi-CARS microscopy with a single detector by time-correlated single photon counting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy," Proc Natl Acadenables separation of CARS microscopy data from multiphoton-overlap of the F and E-CARS signals. Due to traveling an

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Development of high-speed two-photon microscopy for biological and medical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-photon microscopy (TPM) is one of the most powerful microscopic technologies for in-vivo 3D tissue imaging up to a few hundred micrometers. It has been finding important applications in neuronal imaging, tumor physiology ...

Kim, Ki Hean

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

426

Schmahl, Kirz Receive Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Image of Compton Award The Advanced Photon Source (APS) and APS Users Organization (APSUO) are very pleased to announce that the 2005 Arthur H. Compton Award was given to Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz for pioneering and developing the field of x-ray microscopy using Fresnel zone plates. Because of their leadership over the last 30 years, x-ray microscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the study of nanoscale structures and phenomena in many areas of science. Their achievements have opened up productive research avenues in biology, polymers, electronic nanostructures, magnetic materials, meteoritics, and environmental sciences. " Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz have created a

427

Development of multiplexing strategies for electron and super-resolution optical microscopy/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to increase the multiplexing capabilities of electron and super resolution optical microscopy. This will be done through the development of molecular-scale barcodes that can be resolved in one of ...

Tillberg, Paul W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Biological image restoration in optical-sectioning microscopy using prototype image constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deconvolution of images obtained by means of optical-sectioning widefield fluorescence microscopy, is a relevant problem in biological applications. Several methods have been proposed in the last few years, with different degrees of success, to improve ...

M. R. P. Homem; N. D. A. Mascarenhas; L. F. Costa; C. Preza

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

Chung, Euiheon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surface Temperature of IGUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

117 117 Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith, Daniel Türler, and Dariush Arasteh Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Fax: 510-486-6046, email: D_Arasteh@lbl.gov Abstract Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions

432

Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIBRA LIBRA The 200kV Zeiss monochromated LIBRA 200MC is designed to produce high contrast imaging for TEM and STEM and either convergent beam or parallel beam diffraction using Koehler illumination.In addition, the incorporation of a monochromator into the field emission gun enables energy resolution of ~0.15eV for electron energy loss spectroscopy. The dedicated in-column Omega Filter implemented in this microscope also can be used for both spectroscopic analysis and energy-filtered imaging with a 2048x2048 CCD camera. The high tilt capability of the stage and pole piece accepts various types of analytical holders.This microscope is optimized for soft materials applications that require either the high contrast imaging performance or analytical methods such as EF-TEM and STEM.( Instrument

434

Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment N. Srivastavaa , Guowei-face, graphene, interface structure, low energy electron microscopy, disilane Abstract. The formation of epitaxial graphene on SiC( 1000 ) in a disilane environment is studied. The higher graphitization

Feenstra, Randall

435

Formation and evolution of self-organized Au nanorings on indium-tin-oxide surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work reports on the formation of Au nanoclusters and on their evolution in nanoring structures on indium-tin-oxide surface by sputtering deposition and annealing processes. The quantification of the characteristics of the nanorings (surface density, depth, height, and width) is performed by atomic force microscopy. The possibility to control these characteristics by tuning annealing temperature and time is demonstrated establishing relations which allow to set the process parameters to obtain nanostructures of desired morphological properties for various technological applications.

Ruffino, F.; Simone, F.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Crupi, I. [MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

Icelandic Coastal Sea Surface Temperature Records Constructed: Putting the Pulse on Air–Sea–Climate Interactions in the Northern North Atlantic. Part I: Comparison with HadISST1 Open-Ocean Surface Temperatures and Preliminary Analysis of Long-Term Patterns and Anomalies of SSTs around Iceland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new comprehensive record of long-term Icelandic sea surface temperature measurements, which have been updated and filled in with reference to air temperature records, is presented. The new SST series reveal important features of the variability ...

Edward Hanna; Trausti Jónsson; Jon Ólafsson; Hedinn Valdimarsson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ARM - Measurement - Surface condition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condition condition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface condition State of the surface, including vegetation, land use, surface type, roughness, and such; often provided in model output. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NAV : Navigational Location and Attitude SURFLOG : SGP Surface Conditions Observations by Site Technicians S-TABLE : Stabilized Platform MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

438

Surface modification to waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Surface modification to waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

440

Beneath the Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beneath the Surface is a collection of seven individual literary nonfiction essays. Five of the essays are personal essays, and three come from the author's… (more)

Dienes, Susanna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Operations - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis (CTA) conducts research in support of enhancing the performance of surface transportation systems. The staff has considerable experience in modeling traffic...

442

({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. and ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. reconstructions of the polar SrTiO{sub 3} (111) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (111) samples are annealed in UHV at 850 deg. C for 30 min and investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that both ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. and ({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. reconstructions coexist on the surface. Step heights of 0.21{+-}0.02 nm on the surface are equivalent to the d{sub 111} lattice parameter, which is the distance between two adjacent, similar (111) planes in the bulk crystal. The calculated LEED pattern for this co-reconstruction corresponds to the observed LEED pattern, which resembles a six-petal flower. AES analysis indicates no detectable impurities, and shows the surface to be Ti and Sr enriched and O deficient compared to the bulk stoichiometry. This change in surface composition is proposed to provide the stability for the polar surface.

Russell, Bruce C.; Castell, Martin R. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Precision surface machining  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precision finishing apparatus utilizing line contact polishing to produce optical quality parts. A rotatable cylinder is horizontally disposed above a workpiece which is mounted on a rotatable, and horizontally and vertically adjustable chuck. Predetermined surfaces can be cut into the surface of the cylinder to produce figures of revolution, such as aspheres,, when the workpiece is being rotated.

Lazazzera, V.J.; Schmell, R.A.

1991-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tritium Surface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and of tritium form, HT/T2 and HTO. The relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup time was also investigated.

Sienkiewicz, Charles J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Solar absorption surface panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

Santala, Teuvo J. (Attleboro, MA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Morphable Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a novel automatic technique for finding a dense correspondence between a pair of n-dimensional surfaces with arbitrary topologies. This method employs a different formulation than previous correspondence algorithms (such as optical ... Keywords: computer vision, correspondence, learning, morphable models, surface matching

Christian R. Shelton

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Atom-probe field-ion-microscopy study of Fe-Ti alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A newly developed high-performance atom-probe (field ion microscope) was employed for the composition analysis of Fe-Ti alloys and their interactions with ambient gas, such as H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. With a mass resolution (m/..delta..m) better than 2000 and a spatial resolution of a few A, all isotopes of Fe and Ti and their hydrides and other compounds are clearly resolved during the depth profile study. Some of our findings are: (1) Titanium segregated on the surface and grain boundaries upon heating (greater than or equal to 900/sup 0/C), in the form of oxides, and (2) some Ti in the bulk forms clusters of various sizes with C, O, and/or N as nuclei.

Pickering, H.W.; Kuk, Y.; Sakurai, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy Home Researchers Publications Science Highlights Department of Energy Office of Science Search form Search Search TXM Search Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities Full-field TXM is an excellent method to examine nanoscale heterogeneties in many materials, including complex hierarchical systems such as catalysts, fuel cells and battery electrodes, and biological and environmental samples, at 30 nm resolution.The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography, as well as spectroscopic imaging for 2D and 3D elemental mapping and chemical mapping over tens of microns (up to mm in 2D). The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but mosaic images can be collected to

450

Influence of Polarization Setting on Gold Nanorod Signal at Nonplasmonic Wavelengths Under Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Researchers rely on a variety of microscopic techniques for observing and tracking anisotropic nanoparticles in real time experiments. This technical note focuses on the optical behavior exhibited by gold nanorods at nonplasmonic wavelengths under differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC). Intense diffraction patterns appear at nonplasmonic wavelengths, and the behavior of these patterns can be altered by adjusting the surrounding medium or the polarizer setting. Such patterns are absent when linear and crossed polarizations are utilized. Making polarization adjustments is important in DIC microscopy, because it affects bias retardation and image contrast. The nonplasmonic diffraction bands that were observed could potentially be exploited for rotational tracking, but more importantly, researchers should exhibit care in selecting a nanorod sample and the polarization setting when working with DIC microscopy.

Stender, Anthony S.; Augspurgert, Ashley E.; Wang, Gufeng: Fang, Ning

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Single-spin measurements for quantum computation using magnetic resonance force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The quantum theory of a singlespin measurements using a magnetic resonance force microscopy is presented. We use an oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals technique. The frequency shift of the cantilever vibrations is estimated. We show that the frequency shift causes the formation of the Schroedinger cat state for the cantilever. The interaction between the cantilever and the environment quickly destroys the coherence between the two cantilever trajectories. It is shown that using partial adiabatic reversals one can obtain a significant increase in the frequency shift. We discuss the possibility of sub-magneton spin density detection in molecules using magnetic resonance force microscopy.

Berman, G. P. (Gennady P.); Borgonovi, F.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Tsifrinovich, V. I. (Vladimir I.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

High resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure study of the (533) silicide structure on Cu(001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, we have studied the first steps of silicon adsorption onto Cu (001) single crystal substrate. For low coverage (~ 0.5 ML) and after annealing at 100{\\deg}C, STM images and LEED patterns reveal the formation of an ordered quasi commensurate superstructure. From a quantitative analysis of XAS data, we extract the Si-Cu distance and detail the local atomic arrangement of the structure.

B. Lalmi; M. Chorro; R. Belkhou

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Surface-Initiated Titanium-Mediated Coordination Polymerization from Catalyst-Functionalized Single and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single (SWNTs) and multiwalled (MWNTs) carbon nanotubes were functionalized with a titanium alkoxide catalyst through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The catalyst-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used for the surface initiated titanium-mediated coordination polymerizations of L-lactide (L-LA), -caprolactone (-CL) and n-hexyl isocyanate (HIC) employing the grafting from technique. 1H NMR, IR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor catalyst was successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNTs surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) content could be controlled with time. The final polymer-grafted CNTs were readily dissolved in organic solvents as compared to the insoluble pristine and catalyst-functionalized CNTs. The presence of thick layers of polymers around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the PLLA are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while PLLA R-helix conformation remains intact, as revealed by the circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Petzetakis, Nikolaos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Pitsikalis, Marinos [ORNL; Baskaran, Durairaj [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ARM - Measurement - Surface albedo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

albedo albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface albedo The fraction of incoming solar radiation at a surface (i.e. land, cloud top) that is effectively reflected by that surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer External Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

457

Entropy and surfaceness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The layer of the Earth's atmosphere which contains clouds and weather systems is a thin thermoregulatory surface. It maintains an exact energy budget between the Earth and the Sun. Recent work in theoretical physics is ...

Casper, James Kyle

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Bespoke Materials Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bespoke Materials Surfaces Bespoke Materials Surfaces Background The Department of Energy (DOE) has established performance and efficiency goals for power generation systems which will improve the ability of the U.S. energy sector to produce electricity efficiently with less impact to the environment. Power systems showing the most promise for reaching these goals require corrosion resistance alloys able to perform at very high pressures and temperatures. Increasing both the

459

Method for determining surface properties of microparticles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Second harmonic generation (SHG), sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) can be used for surface analysis or characterization of microparticles having a non-metallic surface feature. The microparticles can be centrosymmetric or such that non-metallic molecules of interest are centrosymmetrically distributed inside and outside the microparticles but not at the surface of the microparticles where the asymmetry aligns the molecules. The signal is quadratic in incident laser intensity or proportional to the product of two incident laser intensities for SFG, it is sharply peaked at the second harmonic wavelength, quadratic in the density of molecules adsorbed onto the microparticle surface, and linear in microparticles density. In medical or pharmacological applications, molecules of interest may be of drugs or toxins, for example.

Eisenthal, Kenneth B. (Ridgewood, NJ)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Surface studies of hydrogen etched 3C-SiC(001) on Si(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The morphology and structure of 3C-SiC(001) surfaces, grown on Si(001) and prepared via hydrogen etching, are studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). On the etched samples, flat surfaces with large terraces and atomic steps are revealed by AFM. In ultrahigh vacuum a sharp LEED pattern with an approximate (5x1) periodicity is observed. AES studies reveal a ''bulklike'' composition up to the near surface region and indicate that an overlayer consisting of a weakly bound silicon oxide monolayer is present.

Coletti, C.; Frewin, C. L.; Saddow, S. E.; Hetzel, M.; Virojanadara, C.; Starke, U. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopy surface analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aspects of surface generation in orthogonal ultraprecision machining  

SciTech Connect

The depth of the plastically deformed layer at the workpiece surface which resulted in the orthogonal ultraprecision machining of Cu over the range of uncut chip thicknesses of 0.01-10 {mu}m was investigated. Two tools with the same nominal geometry but with differing edge geometries were used to machine both Te-Cu and fine grain Cu. Tool edge geometries were characterized by atomic force microscopy, taking into account the AFM cantilever tip radius. Magnitudes of the measured depths appear to be consistent with values reported in the literature and those arrived at by simple analyses.

Lucca, D.A.; Seo, Y.W. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Rhorer, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Visualizing fusion of pseudotyped HIV-1 particles in real time by live cell microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Results We generated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) particles pseudotyped with the envelope (Env) protein of ecotropic murine leukemia virus eMLV to study retrovirus entry at the plasma membrane using live-cell microscopy. This Env protein mediates...

Koch, Peter; Lampe, Marko; Godinez, William J; Muller, Barbara; Rohr, Karl; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Lehmann, Maik J

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, The Clean Air Act mandates a specific analytical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sample analyzed separately, and the layer data combined to yield an estimate of the asbestos con tent75 KEY WORDS Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, NESHAP ABSTRACT The Clean Air Act the asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). The method re quires

Ahmad, Sajjad

464

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

Ma, Chi

465

Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy monitoring and gating purposes. The fiber-optic stethoscope system offers a novel approach to measuring) small enough for use on rats and mice. METHODS Fiber-Optic Stethoscope System Design As shown in the MR

466

Investigating physical and chemical changes in high-k gate stacks using nanoanalytical electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal budget involved in processing high-k gate stacks can cause undesirable physical and chemical changes which limit device performance. The transmission electron microscope and associated analytical techniques provide a way of investigating ... Keywords: Electron energy loss near edge structure, Electron energy loss spectroscopy, High-k dielectrics, Nanoanalytical electron microscopy

A. J. Craven; M. MacKenzie; D. W. McComb; F. T. Docherty

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass implicated in recalcitrance is important for utili- zation of lignocellulosic biomass in the world new technologies to explore the ultrastructure of biomass at nanoscale.4 Mode-synthesizing atomic

468

Silicon Fresnel zone plates for high heat load X-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to produce diffractive X-ray lenses optimized for high heat load applications is demonstrated. The lenses are made from single crystal silicon membranes, which have uniform thermal conductivity and homogeneous thermal expansion. Silicon Fresnel ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Fresnel zone plate, Reactive ion etching, X-ray microscopy

J. Vila-Comamala; K. Jefimovs; J. Raabe; B. Kaulich; C. David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electrical passivation and chemical functionalization of SiC surfaces by chlorine termination  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a straightforward plasma-based method which yields chlorine-terminated n-type 6H-SiC surfaces. Atomic force microscopy shows that the surface roughness is not affected by the plasma processing. Additionally, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a significant reduction in oxygen, and a corresponding rise of chlorine core level intensities, following halogen termination. Contact potential difference and surface photovoltage measurements show formation of negative surface dipoles and approximately flat band surface potentials after chlorine termination of (0001) n-type 6H-SiC (built-in voltage V{sub bi}<20 meV). Starting from halogenated surfaces, we demonstrate both ultraviolet light-induced and thermally-induced functionalization with alkene-derived self-assembled organic monolayers.

Schoell, S. J.; Howgate, J.; Hoeb, M.; Auernhammer, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.; Sharp, I. D. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

470

Effect of Surface Sublayer on Surface Skin Temperature and Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface sublayer is the layer of air adjacent to the surface where the transfer of momentum and heat by molecular motion becomes important. Equations are derived to incorporate this surface sublayer (or the variable ratio of the roughness ...

Xubin Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nanometer-scale striped surface terminations on fractured SrTiO{sub 3} surfaces.  

SciTech Connect

Using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy on in situ fractured SrTiO{sub 3}, one of the most commonly used substrates for the growth of complex oxide thin films and superlattices, atomically smooth terraces have been observed on (001) surfaces. Furthermore, it was discovered that fracturing this material at room temperature results in the formation of stripe patterned domains having characteristic widths ({approx}10 to {approx}20 nm) of alternating surface terminations that extend over a long range. Spatial characterization utilizing spectroscopy techniques revealed a strong contrast in the electronic structure of the two domains. Combining these results with topographic data, we are able to assign both TiO{sub 2} and SrO terminations to their respective domains. The results of this experiment reveal that fracturing this material leads to reproducibly flat surfaces that can be characterized at the atomic-scale and suggest that this technique can be utilized for the study of technologically relevant complex oxide interfaces.

Guisinger, N. P.; Santos, T. S.; Guest, J. R.; Chien, T.-Y; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeland, J. W.; Bode, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Performance characteristics of open-flow liquid desiccant solar collector/regenerator for solar cooling applications. Part I: two dimensional analysis of heat and mass transfer for open flow over rough inclined surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work presents an analytical approach to simulate the combined heat and mass transfer on the interface between wetted collector surface and ambient air. Emphasis was placed on the development of a mathematical model of turbulent natural convection on an inclined rough plate. The effect of surface velocity is also considered. The systems of partial differential equations governing fluid motion, heat and mass transfer along an inclined flat plate were formulated in terms of vorticity transport and stream function equations. One-equation model of turbulence was used to compute the turbulent viscosity. The length scale used in this model was expressed algebraically in terms of the mixing length. A length scale modified function was derived to take into account the bouyancy effects on turbulence. The effect of surface roughness was taken into a account by introducing a characteristic roughness length. A computational technique was developed to solve the resulting elliptic partial differential equations. T