Sample records for microscopy surface analysis

  1. Computational microscopy for sample analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikoma, Hayato

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational microscopy is an emerging technology which extends the capabilities of optical microscopy with the help of computation. One of the notable example is super resolution fluorescence microscopy which achieves ...

  2. Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of Surfaces and Porosity in a Plate-Like ?-Al2O3. Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of...

  3. Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) provides information on the crystallographic structure of a sample, while scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) provides information on its electrical properties. The advantage of these techniques is their high spatial resolution, which cannot be attained with any other techniques. However, because these techniques analyze the top layers of the sample, surface or cross section features directly influence the results of the measurements, and sample preparation is a main step in the analysis. In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe films. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

  4. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  5. Infrared thermometry and interferential microscopy for analysis of crater formation at the surface of fused silica under CO{sub 2} laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin, Lucile; Cormont, Philippe; Hebert, David; Mainfray, Christelle; Rullier, Jean-Luc [CEA Cesta, Le Barp, F-33114 France (France); Combis, Patrick [CEA DAM Ile-de-France, Arpajon Cedex, 91297 France (France); Gallais, Laurent [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Marseille, 13013 France (France)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ spatial and temporal temperature measurements of a fused silica surface heated by a 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser were performed using an infrared camera. These measurements were derived from heat flux emission of the fused silica. High temperature measurements--in the range 400-2500 K--were performed at the surface of a semi-transparent media with a high spatial resolution. Particular attention was given to the experimental conception and to the calibration of the infrared device. Moreover, both conventional and interferential microscopes were used to characterize the silica surfaces after CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. By associating these results with thermal camera measurements we identified the major surface temperature levels of silica transformation when heated during 250 ms. Surface deformation of silica is observed for temperatures <2000 K. This is consistent with other recent work using CO{sub 2} laser heating. At higher temperatures, matter ejection, as deduced from microscope observations, occurs at temperatures that are still much lower than the standard boiling point. Such evaporation is described by a thermodynamical approach, and calculations show very good agreement with experiment.

  6. Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

  7. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M., E-mail: roverney@u.washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1750 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  8. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  9. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  10. Surface Science Letters Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the anatase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    understand, and ultimately im- prove, the performance of TiO2 as a gas sensor or heterogeneous catalyst and as a photo-active ma- terial. TiO2 exists in three crystallographic poly- morphs. These are: anatase promise as a more photo-active material than rutile [2], but relatively few surface studies have been

  11. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling propargylglycine unnatural functional groups 20 Å apart and an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold-terminated surfaces were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a low tunneling current of 10 p

  12. Investigation of fly ash carbon by thermal analysis and optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R. [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Rathbone, R.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previous study investigated various fly ashes that had comparable loss on ignition values, but significant differences with respect to air entrainment performance. Thermal analysis data suggested that a poorly performing fly ash, with respect to air entrainment, contained a higher proportion of carbon that gasifies (oxidizes) at comparatively low temperatures. A relatively high abundance of isotropic carbon was identified in the poor-performing ash using optical microscopy. The present investigation examined a larger collection of fly ash samples to determine if thermal analysis could be used as a prognostic tool for fly ash performance. An attempt was made to correlate mortar air and foam index values for each sample with differential thermal analysis (DTA) data. Optical microscopy and BET surface area analysis were used as supportive techniques. No clear relationship could be established with the thermal or optical methods, although fly ash performance did correlate well with BET surface area. A low temperature component of the DTA exotherms was considered to be a function of inorganic catalytic species that reside on the carbon surface and lower the ignition temperature.

  13. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansåker, Pia C., E-mail: pia.lansaker@angstrom.uu.se; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Hallén, Anders [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Elektrum 229, Kista, SE-164 40 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness d{sub g}—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for d{sub g} were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  14. Electrical transport and mechanical properties of alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers on silicon surfaces probed by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jeong Young; Qi, Yabing; Ashby, Paul D.; Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The correlation between molecular conductivity and mechanical properties (molecular deformation and frictional responses) of hexadecylsilane self-assembled monolayers was studied with conductive probe atomic force microscopy/friction force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Current and friction were measured as a function of applied pressure, simultaneously, while imaging the topography of self-assembled monolayer molecule islands and silicon surfaces covered with a thin oxide layer. Friction images reveal lower friction over the molecules forming islands than over the bare silicon surface, indicating the lubricating functionality of alkylsilane molecules. By measuring the tunneling current change due to changing of the height of the molecular islands by tilting the molecules under pressure from the tip, we obtained an effective conductance decay constant ({beta}) of 0.52/{angstrom}.

  15. Phase states of water near the surface of a polymer membrane. Phase microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N. F., E-mail: nbunkin@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorelik, V. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Kozlov, V. A., E-mail: v.kozlov@hotmail.com; Shkirin, A. V., E-mail: avshkirin@mephi.ru; Suyazov, N. V., E-mail: nvs@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase microscopy is used to show that the refractive index in the near-surface layer of water at the surface of a polymer Nafion membrane increases by a factor of 1.1 as compared to bulk water. Moreover, this layer exhibits birefringence. Experiments on UV irradiation of dry (anhydrous) and water-soaked Nafion are performed in grazing-incidence geometry to study their stimulated luminescence spectra. These spectra are found to be identical in both cases. For dry Nafion, luminescence can only be excited if probing radiation illuminates the polymer surface. The luminescence of water-soaked Nafion can also be excited if the distance between the optical axis and the surface is several hundred micrometers.

  16. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISO/TC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Chemical Analysis- Characterization of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO Technical Report (TR) 14187 provides an introduction to (and examples of) the information that can be obtained about nanostructured materials using surface-analysis tools. In addition, both general issues and challenges associated with characterising nanostructured materials and the specific opportunities and challenges associated with individual analytical methods are identified. As the size of objects or components of materials approaches a few nanometres, the distinctions among 'bulk', 'surface' and 'particle' analysis blur. This Technical Report focuses on issues specifically relevant to surface chemical analysis of nanostructured materials. The report considers a variety of analysis methods but focuses on techniques that are in the domain of ISO/TC 201 including Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning probe microscopy. Measurements of nanoparticle surface properties such as surface potential that are often made in a solution are not discussed.

  17. Direct determination of exact charge states of surface point defects using scanning tunneling microscopy: As vacancies on GaAs ,,110...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    microscopy: As vacancies on GaAs ,,110... Kuo-Jen Chao, Arthur R. Smith, and Chih-Kang Shih* Department of the charge state of surface As vacancies on p-type GaAs 110 using scanning tunneling microscopy. This method utilizes the compensation between the local band bending result- ing from the As vacancy and the p

  18. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  19. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. Abstract: This paper examines the types of...

  20. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISOTC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISOTC 201...

  1. Proximity heater for elevated temperature in situ vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy of metal surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    surfaces T. P. Pearl and S. J. Sibenera) The James Franck Institute and the Department of Chemistry, as well as thermally activated inter- facial chemistry. In this article, we will present a simple. The chamber is pumped by a 220 L/s D-I ion pump, cryoshroud and titanium sublimation pump as well as a 55 L

  2. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the surface in order to minimize the total surface energy. With an understanding of the structural and environmental parameters which govern polymer surface structure, SFG is then used to explore the effects of surface hydrophobicity and solvent polarity on the orientation and ordering of amphiphilic neutral polymers adsorbed at the solid/liquid interface. SFG spectra show that poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adsorb with their hydrophobic moieties preferentially oriented toward hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. These same moieties, however, disorder when adsorbed onto a hydrophilic silica/water interface. Water is identified as a critical factor for mediating the orientation and ordering of hydrophobic moieties in polymers adsorbed at hydrophobic interfaces. The role of bulk water content and water vapor, as they influence hydrogel surface structure and mechanics, continues to be explored in the next series of experiments. A method was developed to probe the surface viscoelastic properties of hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based contact lens materials by analyzing AFM force-distance curves. AFM analysis indicates that the interfacial region is dehydrated, relative to the bulk. Experiments performed on poly(HEMA+MA) (MA = methacrylic acid), a more hydrophilic copolymer with greater bulk water content, show even greater water depletion at the surface. SFG spectra, as well as surface energy arguments, suggest that the more hydrophilic polymer component (such as MA) is not favored at the air interface; this may explain anomalies in water retention at the hydrogel surface. Adsorption of lysozyme onto poly(HEMA+MA) was found to further reduce near-surface viscous behavior, suggesting lower surface water content. Lastly, protein adsorption is studied using a model polymer system of polystyrene covalently bound with a monolayer of bovine serum albumin. SFG results indicate that some amino acid residues in proteins adopt preferred orientations. SFG spectra also show that the phenyl rings of the bare polystyrene substrate in contact with air or

  3. Repository surface design site layout analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montalvo, H.R.

    1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

  4. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity.

  5. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  6. Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained Electron Beam Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Zhu, Zihua; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Hannon, Fay; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hess, Wayne P.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Several photocathode degradation processes are suspected, including defect formation by ion back bombardment, photochemistry of surface adsorbed species and irradiation-induced surface defect formation. To better understand the mechanisms of photocathode degradation, we have conducted surface and bulk analysis studies of two GaAs photocathodes removed from the FEL photoinjector after delivering electron beam for a few years. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, strained super-lattice GaAs photocathode samples, removed from the CEBAF photoinjector were analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. This analysis of photocathode degradation during nominal photoinjector operating conditions represents first steps towards developing robust new photocathode designs necessary for generating sub-micron emittance electron beams required for both fourth generation light sources and intense polarized CW electron beams for nuclear and high energy physics facilities.

  7. Improving Surface Analysis Methods for Characterization of Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    useful information from a variety of different analysis tools. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Committee TC 201 on Surface Chemical Analysis and ASTM...

  8. Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

  9. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  10. Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu [Department 'Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public, Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Wegmann, Urs [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Maier, Urs [Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel [SPECS Zurich GmbH, Technoparkstr. 1, CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

  11. NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction Building and Fire Research Institute of Standards and Technology #12;NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface This report addresses the task of meshing point clouds by triangulated elevated surfaces referred to as TIN

  12. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  13. Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden, Steven Smith, Bruce McNamara, Edgar Buck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium Analysis with X-ray Microscopy Research Team: Andrew Duffin, Jesse Ward, Gregory Eiden Chemical fingerprinting of anthropogenic and mineral uranium leading to chemical age dating of reactive uranium samples Develop x-ray and/or electron microscopy protocol for non- destructive uranium sample

  14. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

  15. Functional Surfaces for Microfluidics in Proteomic Analysis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jokinen, Ville

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Microchips for use in biomolecular analysis show a lot of promise for medical diagnostics and biomedical basic research. Among the potential advantages are more sensitive… (more)

  16. Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

  17. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stastna, A., E-mail: astastna@gmail.com [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Leichmann, J. [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  18. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  19. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    .4 Fourier transformation 1.5 Scattering factor and charge density function 1.6 Single scattering theory 1 Historical background Scope of the book Chapter 1. Kinematical electron diffraction 1.1 Electron wavelength 1.7 Reciprocal space and reciprocal lattice vector 1.8 Bragg's law and Ewald sphere 1.9 Abbe's imaging theory 1

  20. Surface Analysis and Computer Technology Optics and Power Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    Surface Analysis and Computer Technology Optics and Power Supplies ErLEED User Manual 1.2 #12;All for this manual: 78000144. SPECS GmbH Voltastr. 5 13355 Berlin Germany phone +49 30 467824-0, fax +49 30 4642083 determination of thin films and of clean and adsorbate covered crystal surfaces. In addition, LEED is used

  1. Scanning tuneeling microscopy studies of fivefold surfaces of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals and of thin silver films on those surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Baris

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work in this dissertation mainly focuses on the clean fivefold surfaces of i-Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals as well as the nucleation and growth of Ag films on these surfaces. In addition, Ag film growth on NiAl(110) has been explored in the frame of this dissertation. First, we have investigated the equilibration of a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal at 900-915 K and 925-950 K, using Omicron variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Annealing at low temperatures resulted in many voids on some terraces while the others were almost void-free. After annealing at 925-950K, void-rich terraces became much rarer. Our STM images suggest that through growth and coalescence of the voids, a different termination becomes exposed on host terraces. All of these observations in our study indicate that even after the quasicrystalline terrace-step structure appears, it evolves with time and temperature. More specifically, based on the STM observations, we conclude that during the annealing a wide range of energetically similar layers nucleate as surface terminations, however, with increasing temperature (and time) this distribution gets narrower via elimination of the metastable void-rich terraces. Next, we have examined the bulk structural models of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal in terms of the densities, compositions and interplanar spacings for the fivefold planes that might represent physical surface terminations. In our analyses, we mainly have focused on four deterministic models which have no partial or mixed occupancy but we have made some comparisons with an undeterministic model. We have compared the models with each other and also with the available experimental data including STM, LEED-IV, XPD and LEIS. In all deterministic models, there are two different families of layers (a pair of planes), and the nondeterministic model contains similar group of planes. These two families differ in terms of the chemical decoration of their top planes. Hence, we name them as Pd+(with Pd) and Pd-(without Pd). Based on their planer structure and the step height, it can be said that these two families can be viable surface terminations. However, besides the Pd content, these two sets differ in terms of relative densities of their top planes as well as the gap separating the layer from the nearest atomic plane. The experimental data and other arguments lead to the conclusion that the Pd- family is favored over the Pd+. This has an important implication on the interpretation of local motifs seen in the high resolution STM images. In other words, the dark stars are not formed by cut-Bergmans rather they are formed by cut-Mackays.

  2. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  3. The application of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis to the study of dusts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 500,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is generated each year in the US. The mineralogy and characterization of this dust is being studied to determine the phases and relationships of the valuable zinc, the hazardous lead, cadmium, and chromium, and the deleterious chlorine and fluorine. EAF dust averages 15--20% zinc and is therefore a potential source for 100,000 tons of zinc per year. The major mineralogical phases of EAF dust are franklinite (ZnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), magnetite (FeFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), jacobsite (MnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), solid solutions between franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite, and zincite (ZnO). Franklinite, magnetite, and jacobsite solid solutions commonly are cruciform or dendritic crystals in a Ca-Fe-Si matrix and contain up to 5% chromium. Magnetite also occurs as spheres partially oxidized to hematite (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) along its octahedral planes. The dust particles are predominantly in the form of spheres and broken spheres, ranging in size from 200 [mu]m to less than 1 [mu]m. Although many spheres are in the size ranges of 40--50 [mu]m and 10--20 [mu]m, most are less than 1 [mu]m in diameter. Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) probed 118 particles in search of chlorine phases. Chlorine-bearing lime (CaO) was identified by that SEM study. In addition, chlorine is present as hydrophylite (CaCl[sub 2]) and sylvite (KCl). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to sputter the outer 180[angstrom] layer of the dust particles to search for the possible presence of cotunnite (PbCl[sub 2]) coatings, but none were detected. Minor phases detected include chalcopyrite (CuFeS[sub 2]), sphalerite (ZnS), pyrite (FeS[sub 2]), and coke.

  4. Characterization of Cell Surface and EPS Remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis-like 1 Signal Transduction Pathway mutants by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billings, Amanda N [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Bible, Amber [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alexandre, Gladys [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must quickly sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the modulation of multiple cellular responses, including motility, EPS production, and cell-to-cell interactions. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from Azospirillum brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation. In A. brasilense, cell surface properties, including EPS production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have detected distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains that are absent in the wild type strain. Whereas the wild type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition and lectin-binding assays suggest that the composition of EPS components in the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that mutations in the Che1 pathway that result in increased flocculation are correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix structure produced by the mutants, including likely changes in the EPS structure and/or composition.

  5. Laser Measurement of SAM Bulk and Surface Wave Amplitudes for Material Microstructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken L. Telschow; Chiaki Miyasaka; David L. Cottle

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) at ultra high frequencies has proven to be a useful tool for investigating materials on the scale of individual grains. This technique is normally performed in a reflection mode from one side of a sample surface. Information about the generation and transmission of bulk acoustic waves into the material is inferred from the reflection signal amplitude. We present an adaptation to the SAM method whereby the acoustic bulk waves are directly visualized through laser acoustic detection. Ultrasonic waves were emitted from a nominal 200 MHz point focus acoustic lens into a thin silicon plate (thickness 75ìm) coupled with distilled water. A scanned laser beam detected the bulk and surface acoustic waves at the opposite surface of the thin silicon plate. Distinct amplitude patterns exhibiting the expected symmetry for Silicon were observed that alter in predictable ways as the acoustic focal point was moved throughout the plate. Predictions of the acoustic wave fields generated by the acoustic lens within and at the surface of the Silicon are being investigated through the angular spectrum of plane waves approach. Results shall be presented for plates with (100) and (111) orientations followed by discussion of applications of the technique for material microstructure analysis.

  6. Structural defects in epitaxial graphene layers synthesized on C-terminated 4H-SiC (0001{sup ¯}) surface—Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysiuk, J., E-mail: jolanta.borysiuk@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); So?tys, J.; Piechota, J. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, University of Warsaw, Pawi?skiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Krukowski, S. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, University of Warsaw, Pawi?skiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Soko?owska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Baranowski, J. M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczy?ska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); St?pniewski, R. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal structural defects in graphene multilayers synthesized on the carbon-terminated face of a 4H-SiC (0001{sup ¯}) substrate were investigated using the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The analyzed systems include a wide variety of defected structures such as edge dislocations, rotational multilayers, and grain boundaries. It was shown that graphene layers are composed of grains of the size of several nanometres or larger; they differ in a relative rotation by large angles, close to 30°. The structure of graphene multilayers results from the synthesis on a SiC (0001{sup ¯}) surface, which proceeds via intensive nucleation of new graphene layers that coalesce under various angles creating an immense orientational disorder. Structural defects are associated with a built-in strain resulting from a lattice mismatch between the SiC substrate and the graphene layers. The density functional theory data show that the high-angular disorder of AB stacked bi-layers is not restoring the hexagonal symmetry of the lattice.

  7. Microscopy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells InDioxideusingMicroscopy

  8. Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

  9. Neon time-of-flight backscattering spectrometry for surface analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Richard Michael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 2001 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering NEON TIME-OF-FLIGHT BACKSCATTERING SPECTROMETRY FOR SURFACE ANALYSIS A Thesis by RICHARD MICHAEL GARCIA Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Ron R. Hart (Chair of Committee) Frederick R. Best (Member) Richard B. Gri fin (Member) Alan E. Waltar (Head of Department) August 2001 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering...

  10. Cryoelectron Microscopy as a Functional Instrument for Systems Biology, Structural Analysis & Experimental Manipulations with Living Cells. A comprehensive review of the current works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg V. Gradov; Margaret A. Gradova

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to give an introductory review of the cryoelectron microscopy as a complex data source for the most of the system biology branches, including the most perspective non-local approaches known as "localomics" and "dynamomics". A brief summary of various cryoelectron mi-croscopy methods and corresponding system biological ap-proaches is given in the text. The above classification can be considered as a useful framework for the primary comprehen-sions about cryoelectron microscopy aims and instrumental tools. We do not discuss any of these concepts in details, but merely point out that their methodological complexity follows only from the structure-functional complexity of biological systems which are investigated in this manner. We also postu-late that one can employ some of the cryoelectron microscopic techniques not only for observation, but also for modification and structural refunctionalization of some biological and similar soft matter objects and microscopic samples. In other worlds, we start with the cryoelectron microscopy as a tool for the sys-tem biology and progress to its applying as an instrument for system biology and functional biomimetics; i.e. "system cryobi-ology" goes over into "synthetic cryobiology" or "cryogenic biomimetics". All these conclusions can be deduced from the most recent works of the latest years, including just submitted foreign papers. This article provides an up-to-date description of the conceptual basis for the novel view on the computational cryoelectron microscopy (in silico) approaches and the data mining principles which lie at the very foundation of modern structural analysis and reconstruction.

  11. Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus Ocean: Boyer, T. P., and S. Levitus, Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity, J. Geophys. Res

  12. Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2...

  13. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  14. Microscopy (XSD-MIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1 Micropulse Lidar TheMicroscopy

  15. Surface Functions during Mitosis. III. Quantitative Analysis of Ligand-receptor Movement into the Cleavage Furrow: Diffusion vs. Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ABSTRACT The surface distribution of concanavalin A (Con A) bound to cell membrane receptors varies dramatically as a function of mitotic phase. The lectin is distributed diffusely on cells labeled and observed between mid-prophase and early anaphase, whereas cells observed in late anaphase or telophase demonstrate a marked accumulation of Con A-receptor complexes over the developing cleavage furrow (Berlin, Oliver, and Walter. 1978. Cell. 15:327-341). In this report, we first use a system based on video intensification fluorescence microscopy to describe the simultaneous changes in cell shape and in lectin-receptor complex topography during progression of single cells through the mitotic cycle. The video analysis establishes that fluorescein succinyl Con A (F-S Con A)-receptor complex redistribution begins coincident with the first appearance of the cleavage furrow and is essentially complete within 2-3 min. This remarkable redistribution of surface fluorescence occurs during only a modest change in cell shape from a sphere to a belted cylinder. It reflects the translocation of complexes and not the accumulation of excess labeled membrane in the cleavage furrow: first, bound fluorescent cholera toxin which faithfully outlines the plasma membrane is not accumulated in the cleavage furrow, and, second, electron microscopy of peroxidase-Con A labeled cells undergoing

  16. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF SILICON ISLANDS AND LINE STRUC-TURES FORMED ON SCREEN-PRINTED AL-DOPED P+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    silicon wafers are mainly used as back surface field (BSF) in p-type crystalline silicon solar cells [1,2] and as rear side emitter in screen-printed back junction n-type crystalline silicon solar cells [3]. From dop in an infrared conveyor belt furnace at 900°C for 13 seconds. In order to investigate the p + surface

  17. Evaluation of flyash surface phenomena and the application of surface analysis technology. Summary report: Phase I. [44 elements; 86 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.D.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors governing the formation of flyash surfaces during and following coal combustion are reviewed. The competing chemical and physical processes during the evolution of inorganic material in coal during combustion into flyash are described with respect to various surface segregation processes. Two mechanisms leading to surface enrichment are volatilization-condensation processes and diffusion processes within individual flyash particles. The experimental evidence for each of these processes is reviewed. It is shown that the volatilization-condensation process is the major factor leading to trace element enrichment in smaller flyash particles. Evidence also exists from surface analyses of flyash and representative mineral matter that diffusion processes may lead to surface enrichment of elements not volatilized or cause transport of surface-condensed elements into the flyash matrix. The semiquantitative determination of the relative importance of these two processes can be determined by comparison of concentration versus particle size profiles with surface-depth profiles obtained using surface analysis techniques. A brief description of organic transformations on flyash surfaces is also presented. The various surface analytical techniques are reviewed and the relatively new technique of Static-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy is suggested as having significant advantages in studies of surfaces and diffusion processes in model systems. Several recommendations are made for research relevant to flyash formation and processes occurring on flyash surfaces.

  18. Analysis of Airport Performance using Surface Surveillance Data: A Case Study of BOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    Detailed surface surveillance datasets from sources such as the Airport Surface Detection Equipment, Model-X (ASDE-X) have the potential to be used for analysis of airport operations, in addition to their primary purpose ...

  19. Comparative analysis of surface power system architectures for human Mars exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Chase Allen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis provides a comprehensive analysis of surface power generation and energy storage architectures for human Mars surface missions, including tracking and non-tracking photovoltaic power generation, nuclear fission ...

  20. Exploring the nature of surface barriers on MOF Zn(tbip) by applying IR microscopy in high temporal and spatial resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    (propane) profiles in nanoporous materials (MOF Zn(tbip)) during transient sorption experiments, are found to exhibit notably reduced surface resistances while, with increasing time of storage under

  1. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  2. Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

  3. Study of hard disk and slider surfaces using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.; Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States). Almaden Research Center; Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to study the properties of amorphous hard carbon overcoats on disks and sliders, and the properties of the lubricant. The modification of lubricants after performing thermal desorption studies was measured by NEXAFS, and the results are compared to the thermal desorption data. The study of lubricant degradation in wear tracks is described. Sliders were investigated before and after wear test, and the modification of the slider coating as well as the transfer of lubricant to the slider was studied. The studies show that the lubricant is altered chemically during the wear. Fluorine is removed and carboxyl groups are formed.

  4. Physical properties and surface/interface analysis of nanocrystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and surfaceinterface analysis of nanocrystalline WO3 films grown under variable oxygen gas flow rates. Physical properties and surfaceinterface analysis of nanocrystalline...

  5. Global analysis of Fo rster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy exploiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Global analysis of Fo¨ rster resonance energy transfer in live cells measured by fluorescence of Fo¨ rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells using the rise time of acceptor fluorescence those molecules that are involved in the energy-transfer process are monitored. This contrasts

  6. Exploration, Registration, and Analysis of High-Throughput 3D Microscopy Data from the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Chul

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    connectivity analysis; (2) the size of the uncompressed KESM data exceeds a few terabytes and to compare and combine with other data sets from different imaging modalities, the KESM data must be registered to a standard coordinate space; and (3) quantitative...

  7. Analysis of the surface of tricalcium silicate during the induction period by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellmann, F., E-mail: frank.bellmann@uni-weimar.de [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Sowoidnich, T.; Ludwig, H.-M. [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany)] [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Damidot, D. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, BP 10838, 59508 Doua cedex (France)] [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, BP 10838, 59508 Doua cedex (France)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy allows the analysis of surface layers with a thickness of a few nanometers. The method is sensitive to the chemical environment of the atoms since the binding energy of the electrons depends on the chemical bonds to neighboring atoms. It has been applied to the hydration of tricalcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}, C{sub 3}S) by analyzing a sample after 30 min of hydration. Also two references have been investigated namely anhydrous C{sub 3}S and intermediate phase in order to enable a quantitative evaluation of the experimental data. In the hydrated C{sub 3}S sample, the analyzed volume (0.2 mm{sup 2} surface by 13 nm depth) contained approximately 44 wt.% of C{sub 3}S and 56 wt.% of intermediate phase whereas C-S-H was not detected. Scanning Electron Microscopy data and geometric considerations indicate that the intermediate phase forms a thin layer having a thickness of approximately 2 nm and covers the complete surface instead of forming isolated clusters.

  8. SURFACE AND INTERFACE ANALYSIS Surf. Interface Anal. 2004; 36: 7782

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    -oxidized surface upon annealing under reducing conditions appears to be due to diffusion of Ti interstitials to the surface. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: MIES; UPS; oxygen; titanium oxide; oxygen, bonding in composites, etc. Moreover, when metal particles are deposited on reducible metal oxides

  9. XPS analysis of lithium surface and modification of surface state for uniform deposition of lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanamura, K.; Shiraishi, S.; Takehara, Z. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface modification of lithium deposited at various current densities in propylene carbonate containing 1.0 ml dm{sup {minus}3} LiClO{sub 4} was performed by addition of various amounts of HF into the electrolyte, in order to investigate the effect of the HF addition on the surface reaction of lithium. XPS and SEM analyses showed that the surface state of lithium was influenced by the concentration of HF and the electrodeposition current. These two parameters are related to the chemical reaction rate of the lithium surface with HF and the electrodeposition rate of lithium, respectively. The surface modification was highly effective in suppressing lithium dendrite formation when the chemical reaction rate with HF was greater than the electrochemical deposition rate of lithium.

  10. Structure, defects, and impurities at the rutile TiO2(011)-(2 1) surface: A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    Available online 21 July 2006 Abstract The titanium dioxide rutile (011) (equivalent to (101)) surface boundaries 1. Introduction Titanium dioxide is a versatile material that finds appli- cations in a wide range) structure are active adsorption sites. Segregation of calcium impurities from the bulk results in an ordered

  11. Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied temperature are reported. The slow dynamic behavior of vacancies and As adatoms can be resolved within a time scale of about one minute, The vacancies and As adatoms are observed to move preferably along the [110

  12. Design of a robust superhydrophobic surface: thermodynamic and kinetic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anjishnu Sarkar; Anne-Marie Kietzig

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a robust superhydrophobic surface is a widely pursued topic.While many investigations are limited to applications with high impact velocities (for raindrops of the order of a few m/s), the essence of robustness is yet to be analyzed for applications involving quasi-static liquid transfer.To achieve robustness with high impact velocities, the surface parameters (geometrical details, chemistry) have to be selected from a narrow range of permissible values, which often entail additional manufacturing costs.From the dual perspectives of thermodynamics and mechanics, we analyze the significance of robustness for quasi-static drop impact, and present the range of permissible surface characteristics.For surfaces with a Youngs contact angle greater than 90{\\deg} and square micropillar geometry, we show that robustness can be enforced when an intermediate wetting state (sagged state) impedes transition to a wetted state (Wenzel state).From the standpoint of mechanics, we use available scientific data to prove that a surface with any topology must withstand a pressure of 117 Pa to be robust.Finally, permissible values of surface characteristics are determined, which ensure robustness with thermodynamics (formation of sagged state) and mechanics (withstanding 117 Pa).

  13. Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, B.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

  14. Analysis of the Scattering by an Unbounded Rough Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    solution, in the form of an infinite series, is deduced by using a boundary perturbation ... with the mathematical analysis of the solution for an acoustic wave scat-.

  15. OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF SURFACES BY SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    additives, commonly used in the lubricant industry, whose effect derives from surface adsorption. Moreover of possible experiments that could obtain information, in particular, on the working principle of those oil In the last years, within the physics community the study of friction and lubrication has been experiencing

  16. Advanced spectroscopic analysis of coal surfaces during beneficiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, J.F.; Oh, J.S.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary FTIR spectra are reported on coals undergoing flotation where enhanced recovery was achieved by ultrasonic or chemical treatments. The spectra of sonicated coals indicate that ultrasonic treatment (10 kHz Swen Sonic) reduces the surface oxidation of heavily oxidized coal. Spectra of chemically treated coal indicate that a higher mineral concentration is present on or near the surface of float coal suggesting that a slime might be present. Spectra are reported for coal-, mineral-, and crystal-derived pyrite which show a strong absorbance band at 420 cm{sup {minus}1}. Spectra of eight Argonne Premium Coal Library specimens have been examined in the 420 cm{sup {minus}1} spectral region and are found to have numerous overlapping bands. 4 figs.

  17. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wavelet multiresolution analysis was used to examine the variation in dominant length scales determined from remotely sensed airborne- and satellite-derived surface energy flux data. The wavelet cospectra are computed between ...

  18. An integrated traverse planner and analysis tool for future lunar surface exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Aaron William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the Surface Exploration Traverse Analysis and Navigation Tool (SEXTANT), a system designed to help maximize productivity, scientific return, and safety on future lunar and planetary explorations,. The ...

  19. Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry T. Schenkel,1 A high vacuum (10^8 torr). In posi- tive polarity, HCI can be decelerated to an impact energy of $1 ke in the interaction of slow (u highly charged ions (e.g., Au69+ ) with solid surfaces increases secondary

  20. Efficient Representation of Cortical Convolutions for the Analysis of Brain Surface Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanz, Volker

    Efficient Representation of Cortical Convolutions for the Analysis of Brain Surface Topology Peter of the brain in MR and CT clearly con- veying the whole surface topology. For the comparison of the provided with direct volume rendering. Considering brain information exclusively, and ensuring a standardized

  1. Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

  2. Surface sediment analysis of five carbonate banks on the Texas continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Susanne E

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF A Thesis by Susanne E. Cunningham Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AcM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... Member Member December 1977 ABSTRACT SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF (December 1977) Susanne E. Cunningham, B, S. , Indiana University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Bryant The five...

  3. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  4. SURFACE AND INTERFACE ANALYSIS Surf. Interface Anal. 2002; 33: 478486

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Roger P.

    spectrometry; ion implantation; dosimetry; standards; silicon energy loss INTRODUCTION Ion implantation recoil spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and particle-induced x-ray emission--but of these only RBS for this standards work. In this work we are aiming to establish the instrumen- tation for dosimetry on our ion

  5. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  6. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  7. Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Flye

    2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  8. Methods, computer readable media, and graphical user interfaces for analysis of frequency selective surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID) [Shelley, ID; Rohrbaugh, David T. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency selective surface (FSS) and associated methods for modeling, analyzing and designing the FSS are disclosed. The FSS includes a pattern of conductive material formed on a substrate to form an array of resonance elements. At least one aspect of the frequency selective surface is determined by defining a frequency range including multiple frequency values, determining a frequency dependent permittivity across the frequency range for the substrate, determining a frequency dependent conductivity across the frequency range for the conductive material, and analyzing the frequency selective surface using a method of moments analysis at each of the multiple frequency values for an incident electromagnetic energy impinging on the frequency selective surface. The frequency dependent permittivity and the frequency dependent conductivity are included in the method of moments analysis.

  9. Cryoelectron Microscopy as a Functional Instrument for Systems Biology, Structural Analysis & Experimental Manipulations with Living Cells. A comprehensive review of the current works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradov, Oleg V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to give an introductory review of the cryoelectron microscopy as a complex data source for the most of the system biology branches, including the most perspective non-local approaches known as "localomics" and "dynamomics". A brief summary of various cryoelectron mi-croscopy methods and corresponding system biological ap-proaches is given in the text. The above classification can be considered as a useful framework for the primary comprehen-sions about cryoelectron microscopy aims and instrumental tools. We do not discuss any of these concepts in details, but merely point out that their methodological complexity follows only from the structure-functional complexity of biological systems which are investigated in this manner. We also postu-late that one can employ some of the cryoelectron microscopic techniques not only for observation, but also for modification and structural refunctionalization of some biological and similar soft matter objects and microscopic samples. In other world...

  10. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  11. Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain MSc to rainstorms. In north-east Spain, sediment from rapidly eroding badlands has significantly reduced reservoir-funded research consortium (SESAM II) with partners at the University of Lleida, Spain

  12. A FREEWARE PROGRAM FOR PRECISE OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FRONT SURFACE OF A SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A FREEWARE PROGRAM FOR PRECISE OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FRONT SURFACE OF A SOLAR CELL Simeon C. Baker-Finch and Keith R. McIntosh Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA Tel: +61-2-6125-8966, Fax: +61-2-6125-8873, Email: simeon

  13. Surface Analysis of Silica Gel Particles after Mechanical Dry Coating with Magnesium Stearate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Surface Analysis of Silica Gel Particles after Mechanical Dry Coating with Magnesium Stearate particles (d50 = 55 µm) by coating with different mass ratios of magnesium stearate - MgSt2 (d50 = 4.6 µm Group). Keywords: AFM phase imaging, adhesion force, dry coating, silica, magnesium stearate. 1

  14. LASER SCANNING AND NOISE REDUCTION APPLIED TO 3D ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    LASER SCANNING AND NOISE REDUCTION APPLIED TO 3D ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS Thorsten Schulz and Hilmar, EAWAG Email: michele.steiner@eawag.ch Abstract: Terrestrial laser scanning was applied to acquire 3D the catchment area of a road with respect to a pilot plant. As laser scanning requires only a few minutes

  15. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

  16. Preliminary analysis of surface mining options for Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was undertaken to determine the economic viability of surface mining to exploit the reserves. It is based on resource information already developed for NOSR 1 and conceptual designs of mining systems compatible with this resource. Environmental considerations as they relate to surface mining have been addressed qualitatively. The conclusions on economic viability were based primarily on mining costs projected from other industries using surface mining. An analysis of surface mining for the NOSR 1 resource was performed based on its particular overburden thickness, oil shale thickness, oil shale grade, and topography. This evaluation considered reclamation of the surface as part of its design and cost estimate. The capital costs for mining 25 GPT and 30 GPT shale and the operating costs for mining 25 GPT, 30 GPT, and 35 GPT shale are presented. The relationship between operating cost and stripping ratio, and the break-even stripping ratio (BESR) for surface mining to be competitive with room-and-pillar mining, are shown. Identification of potential environmental impacts shows that environmental control procedures for surface mining are more difficult to implement than those for underground mining. The following three areas are of prime concern: maintenance of air quality standards by disruption, movement, and placement of large quantities of overburden; disruption or cutting of aquifers during the mining process which affect area water supplies; and potential mineral leaching from spent shales into the aquifers. Although it is an operational benefit to place spent shale in the open pit, leaching of the spent shales and contamination of the water is detrimental. It is therefore concluded that surface mining on NOSR 1 currently is neither economically desirable nor environmentally safe. Stringent mitigation measures would have to be implemented to overcome some of the potential environmental hazards.

  17. Surface Plasmon mediated near-field imaging and optical addressing in nanoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drezet, A; Krenn, J R; Brun, M; Huant, S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent progress in plasmonics. We focus our study on the observation and excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with optical near-field microscopy. We discuss in particular recent applications of photon scanning tunnelling microscope (PSTM) for imaging of SPP propagating in metal and dielectric wave guides. We show how near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) can be used to optically and actively address remotely nano-objects such as quantum dots. Additionally we compare results obtained with near-field microscopy to those obtained with other optical far-field methods of analysis such as leakage radiation microscopy (LRM).

  18. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U.(DOE-Molecular Biology Institute)

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  19. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera-Fierro, P.; Masuko, M.; Jones, W.R. Jr.; Pepper, S.V.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R[sub f]COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  20. Detailed Surface Analysis Of Incremental Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) Of Single-Crystal Niobium Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palczewski, Ari D.; Hui Tian; Trofimova, Olga; Reece, Charles E.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on single crystal niobium samples/coupons housed in a stainless steel sample holder following the polishing recipe developed at Fermi Lab (FNAL) in 2011 \\cite{C. A. Cooper 2011}. Post CBP, the sample coupons were analyzed for surface roughness, crystal composition and structure, and particle contamination. Following the initial analysis each coupon was high pressure rinsed (HRP) and analyzed for the effectiveness of contamination removal. We were able to obtain the mirror like surface finish after the final stage of tumbling, although some defects and embedded particles remained. In addition, standard HPR appears to have little effect on removing embedded particles which remain after each tumbling step, although final polishing media removal was partially affected by standard/extended HPR.

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated U–Mo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and Al–Si Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U–7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al–2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U–7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U–7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with Al–Si matrices.

  2. Land surface skin temperatures from a combined analysis of microwave and infrared satellite observations for an all-weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are homogeneous over large scales, with nearly constant albe- dos, high heat capacity, and infinite moisture supply. In contrast, land surfaces are highly variable in space, have lower heat capacity and limited vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor

  3. Ring diagram analysis of near-surface flows in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; S. C. Tripathy

    1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from MDI data is carried out to study the velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model which has a Lorentzian profile in frequency and which includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows, to obtain the two components of the sub-surface flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using OLA and RLS methods to infer the variation in horizontal flow velocity with depth. The average rotation velocity at different latitudes obtained by this technique agrees reasonably with helioseismic estimates made using frequency splitting data. The shear layer just below the solar surface appears to consist of two parts with the outer part up to a depth of 4 Mm, where the velocity gradient does not show any reversal up to a latitude of 60 degrees. In the deeper part the velocity gradient shows reversal in sign around a latitude of 55 degrees. The zonal flow velocities inferred in the outermost layers appears to be similar to those obtained by other measurements. A meridional flow from equator polewards is found. It has a maximum amplitude of about 30 m/s near the surface and the amplitude is nearly constant in the outer shear layer.

  4. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  5. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Introduction to Photoelectron Emission Microscopy: Principles and Applications. Abstract: In the...

  6. ANALYSIS OF PASSIVATED SURFACES FOR MASS SPECTROMETER INLET SYSTEMS BY AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo, H.; Clark, E.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel coupons approximately 0.5' in diameter and 0.125' thick were passivated with five different surface treatments and an untreated coupon was left as a control. These surface treatments are being explored for use in tritium storage containers. These coupons were made to allow surface analysis of the surface treatments using well-know surface analysis techniques. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on these coupons to characterize the surface and near surface regions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were collected as well. All of the surface treatments studied here appear to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7-0.9 nm thick) as well as the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E's silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  7. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  8. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  9. Surface Structures of Black Phosphorus Investigated with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy C. D. Zhang, J. C. Lian, W. Yi, Y. H. Jiang, L. W. Liu, H. Hu, W. D. Xiao, S. X. Du,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    perpendicular to the surface, which causes the atoms to take two types of positions (P1 and P2) with a contrast of structural phase transformations was found in the system,11,12 and the Tc of its superconductivity can even, nitrocellulose was dropped on the surface. After solidification, it was peeled off in dry nitrogen gas

  10. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Jiri, E-mail: jiri.kula@tul.cz; Linka, Ales, E-mail: ales.linka@tul.cz; Tunak, Maros, E-mail: maros.tunak@tul.cz [Department of Textile Evaluation, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic); Lukas, David, E-mail: david.lukas@tul.cz [Department of Nonwoven and Nanofibrous Materials, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic); Centre for Nanomaterials Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  11. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  12. Micelle microscopy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovation Portalarticles oftheEvaluateMiamiMicelle

  13. An Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Lineaments and Fractures for Oil and Gas Exploration in the Mid-Continent Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Genliang; and George, S.A.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive literature search was conducted and geological and mathematical analyses were performed to investigate the significance of using surface lineaments and fractures for delineating oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Tremendous amount of data were acquired including surface lineaments, surface major fracture zones, surface fracture traces, gravity and magnetic lineaments, and Precambrian basement fault systems. An orientation analysis of these surface and subsurface linear features was performed to detect the basic structural grains of the region. The correlation between surface linear features and subsurface oil and gas traps was assessed, and the implication of using surface lineament and fracture analysis for delineating hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region discussed. It was observed that the surface linear features were extremely consistent in orientation with the gravity and magnetic lineaments and the basement faults in the Mid-Continent region. They all consist of two major sets bending northeast and northwest, representing, therefore, the basic structural grains of the region. This consistency in orientation between the surface and subsurface linear features suggests that the systematic fault systems at the basement in the Mid-Continent region have probably been reactivated many times and have propagated upward all the way to the surface. They may have acted as the loci for the development of other geological structures, including oil and gas traps. Also observed was a strong association both in orientation and position between the surface linear features and the subsurface reservoirs in various parts of the region. As a result, surface lineament and fracture analysis can be used for delineating additional oil and gas reserves in the Mid-Continent region. The results presented in this paper prove the validity and indicate the significance of using surface linear features for inferring subsurface oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Any new potential oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region, if they exist, will be likely associated with the northeast- and northwest-trending surface lineaments and fracture traces in the region.

  14. The application of soft X-ray microscopy to the in-situ analysis of sporopollenin/sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wirick, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft X-ray imaging and carbon near edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS) has been used for the in-situ analysis of sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments extending from recent up to high volatile A bituminous coal. The acquisition of chemically based images (contrast based on the 1s - 1{pi}* transition of unsaturated carbon), revealed a homogeneous chemical structure in the spore exine. C-NEXAFS microanalysis indicates chemical structural evolution in sporopollenin/sporinite with increases in maturation. The most significant change in the C-NEXAFS spectrum is an increase in unsaturated carbon, presumably aromatic, with rank. The rate of aromatization in sporinite exceeds that of the surrounding vitrinite. Increases in the concentration of unsaturated carbon are compensated by losses of aliphatic and hydroxylated aliphatic carbon components. Carboxyl groups are present in low and variable concentrations. Absorption due to carboxyl persists in the most mature specimen in this series, a high volatile A rank coal. The reactions which drive sporopollenin chemical structural evolution during diagenesis presumably involve dehydration, Diels-Alder cyclo-addition, and dehydrogenation reactions which ultimately lead to a progressively aromatized bio/geopolymer.

  15. A new approach to nuclear microscopy: The ion-electron emission microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Senftinger, B. [Staib Instrumente GmbH, Langenbach (Germany); Mellon, M. [Quantar Technologies Inc., Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multidimensional high lateral resolution ion beam analysis technique, Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy or IEEM is described. Using MeV energy ions, IEEM is shown to be capable of Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) measurements in semiconductors. IEEM should also be capable of microscopically and multidimensionally mapping the surface and bulk composition of solids. As such, IIEM has nearly identical capabilities as traditional nuclear microprobe analysis, with the advantage that the ion beam does not have to be focused. The technique is based on determining the position where an individual ion enters the surface of the sample by projection secondary electron emission microscopy. The x-y origination point of a secondary electron, and hence the impact coordinates of the corresponding incident ion, is recorded with a position sensitive detector connected to a standard photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). These signals are then used to establish coincidence with IBICC, atomic, or nuclear reaction induced ion beam analysis signals simultaneously caused by the incident ion.

  16. Threshold detection of radar signals off the sea surface in non-Gaussian clutter and deterministic interference: II - statistical analysis of ROI surface data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, D.

    1996-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to motivate and outline a program of data analysis, for data obtained from radar returns from ocean surfaces perturbed by internal waves and wind-wave interactions. The ultimate aims of this analysis are to provide the appropriate statistics of the signals returned from these ocean surfaces for: (1) use in implementing and evaluating optimum and near-optimum signal processing procedures for detecting and evaluating (i.e., measuring) these internal wave effects and, (2) to provide quantitative physical insight into both the surface scatter and subsurface mechanisms which determine the received radar signals. Here the focus is initially on the needed statistics of the radar returns. These are primarily: (i) the (instantaneous) amplitude and envelope probability densities, (pdf`s) and distributions (PDFS) of the returns and, (ii) analogous statistics for the intensities (associated with the pixel data). Also required are: (iii) space-time covariance data of the returns, for further improvement of detection capabilities. Preliminary evidence and earlier experiments suggest that these data [(i), (ii)] are nongaussian and strongly so at times. This in turn, if not properly taken into account, can greatly degrade signal detection in the usual weak-signal regimes [1],[2].

  17. Instrument Series: Microscopy Aberration-Corrected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and material defects Chemistry ­ understanding particle surface interactions, atomic-level structure-tilt Crystallographic and Tomographic Analysis Ì Silicon-Lithium [Si(Li)] X-ray EDS Ì Cryogenic Imaging Capability Ì

  18. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Cell Deformation of Twophase Flow with Discontinuous Viscosity and Nonlinear Surface Tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­linear Surface Tension Zhilin Li and Sharon Lubkin Center For Research in Scientific Computation & Department equations, cell deformation, non­linear surface tension, jump conditions, interface, discontinuous and non boundary separating two fluids that have equal or different viscosity and non­linear surface tension

  20. Constrained Parameterization of the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves Approach with Application at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwenk, Jacob Tyler

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    used to study Vs. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is used for Rayleigh-wave Vs estimations (Miller et al., 1999a). MASW employs a linear line of low frequency (e.g., Tyler Schwenk B.S., University of Kansas, 2009 Submitted to the graduate degree program...

  1. ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    865.574.7308 ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites in batteries ORNL electron microscopy captured the first real-time nanoscale images of the nucleation and...

  2. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Optical Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of materials (such as this metallic superlattice) are produced in Optical Microscopy. Web-based Education This department runs four microscopy Web sites that together comprise...

  3. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy...

  4. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Ryan C., E-mail: ryan.tung@nist.gov; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  5. Formation of Ti-B surface alloys by excimer laser mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jervis, T.R.; Nastasi, M.; Hirvonen, J.P.; Zocco, T.G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have formed a surface Ti-B alloy by excimer laser mixing of a single B layer on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy indicates a uniform B:Ti ratio of approximately 0.7 in the surface layer. A Boron layer 60 nm thick resulted in an alloy layer approximately 200 nm thick. There is little indication, by either Auger electron spectroscopy or nuclear reaction analysis, of substantial oxygen incorporation in the surface alloy despite the fact that the processing was done in air. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface alloy shows a completely amorphous surface layer underlain by a martensitic structure.

  6. Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface water resources in China are rather abundant and it can be use as the heat or cool source for heat pump. The winter surface water temperatures of 17 typical cities are investigated in December, and they are all distributed in the interval...

  7. Molecular surface electrostatic potentials in the analysis of non-hydrogen-bonding noncovalent interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.S.; Paulsen, K.; Politzer, P.

    1993-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic potentials computed on molecular surfaces are used to analyze some noncovalent interactions that are not in the category of hydrogen bonding, e.g. halogen bonding. The systems examined include halogenated methanes, substituted benzenes, s-tetrazine and 1,3-bisphenylurea. The data were obtained by ab initio SCF calculations. Electrostatic potentials, Non-hydrogen-bonding noncovalent interactions, Molecular surfaces.

  8. Analysis of the eect of the coastal discontinuity on near-surface ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , IN 47405, USA Fax: +1 812 855 1661; e-mail: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Department of Wind Energy and Atmospheric, stability, and surface roughness changes on wind speeds in the coastal zone. Using data from an oshore wind the surface, dierences in wind speed distribu- tions from onshore and oshore masts are statistically signi

  9. Duplex stainless steel fracture surface analysis using X-ray fractography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajanna, K.; Pathiraj, B.; Kolster, B.H. [Foundation for Advanced Metals Science, Hengelo (Netherlands)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fatigue fracture surface of a duplex stainless steel was analyzed using x-ray fractography. A lower than average austenite content was observed at the fracture surface due to the transformation of austenite into deformation-induced martensite. The influence of fatigue cycling on the transformation was confined to a depth of about 30 {micro}m below the fracture surface. X-ray analyses of both the ferrite-martensite and the austenite phases indicated residual stresses ({sigma}{sub r}) increasing with depth from the fracture surface and reaching a maximum some tens of microns below the fracture surface. The lower {sigma}{sub r} observed at the fracture surface has been attributed to the stress relaxation effects caused by the new fracture surfaces created in the crack growth process. The observed decrease in full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the ferrite-martensite phase was presumed to be due to the dynamic recovery effect that was likely to occur within the material close to the crack tip as a consequence of fatigue cycling.

  10. Development of legged, wheeled, and hybrid rover mobility models to facilitate planetary surface exploration mission analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCloskey, Scott H. (Scott Haddon)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses the Mars Surface Exploration (MSE) tool and its adaptation to model rovers featuring legged, wheeled, and hybrid mobility. MSE is a MATLAB based systems engineering tool that is capable of rapidly ...

  11. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, September--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

  12. Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mingolo, N., E-mail: nmingol@fi.uba.ar; Martínez, O. E. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

  13. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  14. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  15. Half-harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy with transfer function correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Senli [ORNL] [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for surface potential imaging based on half-harmonic band excitation (BE) in Kelvin probe force microscopy is demonstrated. Using linear and half-harmonic BE enables quantitative correction of the cantilever transfer function. Half-harmonic band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (HBE KPFM) thus allows quantitative separation of surface potential and topographic contributions to the signal, obviating the primary sources of topographic cross-talk. HBE KPFM imaging and voltage spectroscopy methods are illustrated for several model systems.

  16. North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.M. Ruonavaara

    1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

  17. Fractional Snow-Cover Mapping Through Artificial Neural Network Analysis of MODIS Surface Reflectance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobreva, Iliyana D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    are especially applicable to mapping snow-cover extent in forested areas where spatial mixing of surface components is nonlinear. This study developed an ANN approach to snow-fraction mapping. A feed-forward ANN was trained with backpropagation to estimate FSC...

  18. Statistical analysis of surface lineaments and fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Genliang; George, S.A.; Lindsey, R.P.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-six sets of surface lineaments and fractures mapped from satellite images and/or aerial photos from parts of the Mid-continent and Colorado Plateau regions were collected, digitized, and statistically analyzed in order to obtain the probability distribution functions of natural fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs. The orientations and lengths of the surface linear features were calculated using the digitized coordinates of the two end points of each individual linear feature. The spacing data of the surface linear features within an individual set were, obtained using a new analytical sampling technique. Statistical analyses were then performed to find the best-fit probability distribution functions for the orientation, length, and spacing of each data set. Twenty-five hypothesized probability distribution functions were used to fit each data set. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test was used to rank the significance of each fit. A distribution which provides the lowest chi-square goodness-of-fit value was considered the best-fit distribution. The orientations of surface linear features were best-fitted by triangular, normal, or logistic distributions; the lengths were best-fitted by PearsonVI, PearsonV, lognormal2, or extreme-value distributions; and the spacing data were best-fitted by lognormal2, PearsonVI, or lognormal distributions. These probability functions can be used to stochastically characterize naturally fractured reservoirs.

  19. Monte Carlo analysis of a monolithic interconnected module with a back surface reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, C.T.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Murray, C.S. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the photon Monte Carlo code, RACER-X, was modified to include wave-length dependent absorption coefficients and indices of refraction. This work was done in an effort to increase the code`s capabilities to be more applicable to a wider range of problems. These new features make RACER-X useful for analyzing devices like monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) which have etched surface features and incorporates a back surface reflector (BSR) for spectral control. A series of calculations were performed on various MIM structures to determine the impact that surface features and component reflectivities have on spectral utilization. The traditional concern of cavity photonics is replaced with intra-cell photonics in the MIM design. Like the cavity photonic problems previously discussed, small changes in optical properties and/or geometry can lead to large changes in spectral utilization. The calculations show that seemingly innocuous surface features (e.g., trenches and grid lines) can significantly reduce the spectral utilization due to the non-normal incident photon flux. Photons that enter the device through a trench edge are refracted onto a trajectory where they will not escape. This leads to a reduction in the number of reflected below bandgap photons that return to the radiator and reduce the spectral utilization. In addition, trenches expose a lateral conduction layer in this particular series of calculations which increase the absorption of above bandgap photons in inactive material.

  20. COMBINED ANALYSIS OF THORIUM AND FAST NEUTRON DATA AT THE LUNAR SURFACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. GASNAULT; W. FELDMAN; ET AL

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global distribution of the radioactive elements (U, K, Th) at the lunar surface is an important parameter for an understanding of lunar evolution, because they have provided continuous heat over the lifetime of the Moon. Today, only the thorium distribution is available for the whole lunar surface [1]. Another key parameter that characterize the surface of the Moon is the presence of mare basalts. These basalts are concentrated on the nearside and are represented by materials with high-Fe content, sometimes associated with high-Ti. We demonstrated elsewhere that the fast neutron measurement made by Lunar Prospector is representative of the average soil atomic mass [2]. is primarily dominated by Fe and Ti in basaltic terranes, and therefore the map of the fast neutrons provides a good delineation of mare basalts. We focus here on the correlated variations of thorium abundances and fast neutron fluxes averaged over areas of 360 km in diameter, in an attempt to provide a better understanding of the thorium emplacement on the surface of the Moon.

  1. Surface deformation analysis over a hydrocarbon reservoir using InSAR with ALOS-PALSAR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?ahin, Sedar Cihan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InSAR has been developed to estimate the temporal change on the surface of Earth by combining multiple SAR images acquired over the same area at different times. In the last two decades, in addition to conventional InSAR, ...

  2. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. B. Beringer, W. M. Roach, C. Clavero, C. E. Reece, R. A. Lukaszew

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ?50??MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [ Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 012511 (2006)] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  3. Electrostrictive and electrostatic responses in contact mode voltage modulated Scanning Probe Microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Ievlev, Anton [ORNL] [ORNL; Balke, Nina [ORNL] [ORNL; Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL] [ORNL; Tselev, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromechanical response of solids underpins image formation mechanism of several scanning probe microscopy techniques including the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). While the theory of linear piezoelectric and ionic responses are well developed, the contributions of quadratic effects including electrostriction and capacitive tip-surface forces to measured signal remain poorly understood. Here we analyze the electrostrictive and capacitive contributions to the PFM and ESM signals and discuss the implications of the dielectric tip-surface gap on these interactions.

  4. Second order classical perturbation theory for atom surface scattering: Analysis of asymmetry in the angular distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yun, E-mail: zhou.yun.x@gmail.com; Pollak, Eli, E-mail: eli.pollak@weizmann.ac.il [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)] [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Miret-Artés, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed and applied to elastic atom corrugated surface scattering. The resulting theory accounts for experimentally observed asymmetry in the final angular distributions. These include qualitative features, such as reduction of the asymmetry in the intensity of the rainbow peaks with increased incidence energy as well as the asymmetry in the location of the rainbow peaks with respect to the specular scattering angle. The theory is especially applicable to “soft” corrugated potentials. Expressions for the angular distribution are derived for the exponential repulsive and Morse potential models. The theory is implemented numerically to a simplified model of the scattering of an Ar atom from a LiF(100) surface.

  5. Surface Localization Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi Lipoproteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumru, Ozan

    2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    these virulence factors reach the spirochetal surface. We observed in previous studies that monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fused to specifically mutated outer surface protein A (OspA) lipopeptides could be detected by epifluorescence microscopy...

  6. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  7. Scanning probe microscopy: Sulfate minerals in scales and cements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are illustrated with examples from oilfield mineralogy, particularly emphasizing sulfate minerals involved in scale formation and cement hydration chemistry. The topography of the (010) cleavage surface of gypsum observed by atomic force microscopy shows atomically flat terraces separated by shallow steps often only one unit cell high. SPM allows direct observation of processes on mineral surfaces while they are in contact with solutions. The dissolution etching and crystal growth of gypsum and barite are discussed and rates of step migration estimated. The orientation of steps is related to the crystallographic axes. The action of phosphonate crystal growth inhibitor on gypsum and of a chelating scale solvent on barite are also shown. The multiphase microstructure of an oilwell cement clinker is described in relation to its hydration chemistry in contact with water and its reaction with sulfate ions.

  8. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fining Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  9. Characterization of Dynamic Surface Processes by Atomic Force Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jingru

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen terminated as synthesized but may slowly become oxidized to oxygen termi- nated under long time storage

  10. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy...

  11. Tool path generation and 3D tolerance analysis for free-form surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Young Keun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 2. Approximation of Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 IV IMPLEMENTATION : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 62 A. Experiment and Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 B. 3D Tolerance Analysis... and manufacturing. De- sign information can be translated into manufacturing language only through process planning. Today both computer-aided design (CAD) and manufacturing (CAM) have been implemented. Integrating, or bridging, these functions requires automated...

  12. Full-wave analysis of superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates using equivalent surface impedance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, L.H.; Lyons, W.G.; Orlando, T.P.; Ali, S.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Lyons, W.G. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.); Withers, R.S. (Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computationally efficient full-wave technique is developed to analyze single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates. The optic axis of the dielectric is in the plane of the substrate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the propagation direction. A dyadic Green's function for layered, anisotropic media is used to formulate an integral equation for the current in the strips. To increase the efficiency of the method, the superconducting strips are replaced by equivalent surface impedances which account for the loss and kinetic inductance of the superconductors. The validity of this equivalent surface impedance (ESI) approach is verified by comparing the calculated complex propagation constant and characteristic impedance for superconducting microstrip lines on an isotropic substrate to measured results, and to numerical results by the more rigorous volume-integral equation method. The results calculated using the ESI approach for perfectly conducting coupled lines on an anisotropic substrate agree with the results by the finite-difference time-domain method. This efficient ESI technique is then used to study the effects of the optic axis orientation and the strip width on the characteristics of single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on M-plane sapphire. The effects of the line separation and operating temperature on the coupled lines are also investigated.

  13. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  14. Theoretical Analysis of the Adsorption of Late Transition Metal Atoms on the (001) Surface of Early Transition Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gómez, T.; Florez, E.; Illas, F.

    2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of atoms of Groups 9, 10, and 11 with the (001) surface of TiC, ZrC, VC, and {delta}-MoC has been studied by means of periodic density functional calculations using slab models. The calculated values of the adsorption energy are rather large, especially for Groups 9 and 10 elements (E{sub ads} = 3-6 eV), but without clear trends along the series. Nevertheless, the analysis of the interaction at different sites indicates that the adsorbed atoms will be relatively mobile. Many of the admetals are electronically perturbed upon interaction with the carbide surfaces. Co, Ni, Cu, and Rh adatoms get positively or negatively charged, depending on the nature of the carbide substrate. Ir, Pd, Pt, and Au adatoms are always negatively charged. An analysis of the Bader charges for the most stable sites provides strong evidence that the most negative charge on the adatoms corresponds to the interaction with ZrC, followed by TiC. In the case of VC and {delta}-MoC, the charge on the adsorbed atoms may be slightly positive and of the same order for both carbides. The effect of the underlying carbide is large, with ZrC and TiC being predicted as the supports with the largest effect on the electronic structure of the adsorbed atoms with direct implications for the use of these systems in catalysis.

  15. 3D-FRET Microscopy 0 This un-edited manuscript has been accepted for publication in Biophysical Journal and is freely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    3D-FRET Microscopy 0 This un-edited manuscript has been accepted for publication in Biophysical of the paper may be found at http://www.biophysj.org. 3D-FRET Reconstruction Microscopy for Analysis of Dynamic.1529/biophysj.107.125385 Copyright 2008 by The Biophysical Society. #12;3D-FRET Microscopy 1 Abstract Analysis

  16. Numerical analysis of binary solid-liquid phase change with buoyancy and surface tension driven convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incropera, F.P.; Engel, A.H.H. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). Heat Transfer Lab.); Bennon, W.D. (Alcoa Technical Center, Alcoa Center, PA (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of thermo/diffusocapillary convection on the solidification of aqueous NH{sub 4}Cl in a rectangular cavity have been simulated numerically using a newly developed continuum model. Diffusocapillary convection is negligible relative to thermocapillary convection, and for a 20 {times} 20 mm cavity in a one-gravity environment, thermocapillary effects are most pronounced during the early stages of solidification, when flow conditions are characterized by three major cells. One cell, driven by solutal buoyancy forces, extends from the mush region to the melt and separates top and bottom melt region cells driven primarily by surface tension and buoyancy forces, respectively. With increasing time, however, the top cell strengthens and eventually envelops the entire melt. In terms of the strength of the flow, the liquidus front morphology, and the amount of solid formed, final conditions differ only slightly from those predicted for pure thermal/solutal convection.

  17. Method And Apparatus For Two Dimensional Surface Property Analysis Based On Boundary Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining properties of a conductive film is disclosed. A plurality of probe locations selected around a periphery of the conductive film define a plurality of measurement lines between each probe location and all other probe locations. Electrical resistance may be measured along each of the measurement lines. A lumped parameter model may be developed based on the measured values of electrical resistance. The lumped parameter model may be used to estimate resistivity at one or more selected locations encompassed by the plurality of probe locations. The resistivity may be extrapolated to other physical properties if the conductive film includes a correlation between resistivity and the other physical properties. A profile of the conductive film may be developed by determining resistivity at a plurality of locations. The conductive film may be applied to a structure such that resistivity may be estimated and profiled for the structure's surface.

  18. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  19. Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

  20. Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 deg C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ~ 1n{Omega} and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ~ 5×10{sup 10} at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q{sub 0}-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of ?all Nb? cavities.

  1. Fracture mechanics analysis of cast duplex stainless steel elbows containing a surface crack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delliou, P.A. le; Semete, P. [Electricite de France, Moret Sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Ignaccolo, S. [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France). Direction de l`Equipement

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Some components of the primary loop of a PWR are made of cast duplex stainless steel. This kind of steel may age even at relatively low temperatures, (below 400 C, which is within the temperature range of PWR service conditions), leading to a significant decrease of its toughness. This is why a large research program was initiated on the fracture behavior of aged duplex stainless steel elbows in France. The main task of this program was to test three 2/3-scale models of aged PWR primary loop elbows. The first two tests (called SEM1 and SEM2) were conducted under in-plane closure bending at 320 C; the third (called SEM3) was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane closure bending at 60 C. The first two elbows contained a semi-elliptical notch machined into the outer surface of one flank, oriented either longitudinally (SEM1 test) or circumferentially (SEM2 test); the third elbow contained both notches described above, one on each flank. This paper presents the results of the experiments, the finite element calculations and the ductile fracture mechanics analyses that were performed.

  2. Systematic analysis of Persson's contact mechanics theory of randomly rough elastic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf B. Dapp; Nikolay Prodanov; Martin H. Müser

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically check explicit and implicit assumptions of Persson's contact mechanics theory. It casts the evolution of the pressure distribution ${\\rm Pr}(p)$ with increasing resolution of surface roughness as a diffusive process, in which resolution plays the role of time. The tested key assumptions of the theory are: (a) the diffusion coefficient is independent of pressure $p$, (b) the diffusion process is drift-free at any value of $p$, (c) the point $p=0$ acts as an absorbing barrier, i.e., once a point falls out of contact, it never reenters again, (d) the Fourier component of the elastic energy is only populated if the appropriate wave vector is resolved, and (e) it no longer changes when even smaller wavelengths are resolved. Using high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify deviations from these approximations and find quite significant discrepancies in some cases. For example, the drift becomes substantial for small values of $p$, which typically represent points in real space close to a contact line. On the other hand, there is a significant flux of points reentering contact. These and other identified deviations cancel each other to a large degree, resulting in an overall excellent description for contact area, contact geometry, and gap distribution functions. Similar fortuitous error cancellations cannot be guaranteed under different circumstances, for instance when investigating rubber friction. The results of the simulations may provide guidelines for a systematic improvement of the theory.

  3. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2000 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant that will be managed by tie Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2000 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at the Y-12 Plant: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of the Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant GWPP during CY 2000 will comply with: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation regulations governing detection monitoring at nonhazardous Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (SWDF); and DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring. Some of the data collected for these monitoring drivers also will be used to meet monitoring requirements of the Integrated Water Quality Program, which is managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC. Data from five wells that are monitored for SWDF purposes in the Chestnut Ridge Regime will be used to comply with requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act post closure permit regarding corrective action monitoring. Modifications to the CY 2000 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in regulatory or programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 Plant GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  5. Using EOF Analysis to Identify Important Surface Wind Patterns in Mountain Valleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, F. L.; Horel, John D.; Whiteman, Charles D.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) have been determined for three wind data sets from stations in valleys south of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Two of the data sets were for summer months, with individual days selected from the MesoWest archive to represent conditions conducive to well-developed thermally driven flows. The remaining data set was for the month of October 2000 and was derived from a combination of MesoWest data and data collected during intensive observation periods of the Vertical Transport and Mixing eXperiment (VTMX) conducted in the Salt Lake area in October 2000. This experiment investigated stable atmospheric conditions in the complex urban terrain around Salt Lake City, Utah. In all three data sets, the primary EOFs represented flows that were directed predominantly along valley axes and were caused by channeled or thermally driven flow. Diurnal variations in EOF intensity showed that thermal effects were the most common causal mechanism. These along-valley EOFs accounted for 43 to 58 percent of the variance in the wind component data sets (8 or 10 stations each). The second EOFs accounted for 13 to 18 percent of the variance. In the summer data sets, the second EOF appeared to represent day-night transition periods; there was evidence of side canyon flows and day-night transitional effects in the October data set. The EOF approach has promise for classifying wind patterns and selecting cases for simulation or for further detailed analysis.

  6. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramírez-Salgado, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A., E-mail: madoming@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Castro-Domínguez, B. [University of Tokyo, Department of Chemical System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Bldg. 5, 7F 722, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan); Hernández-Hernández, P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Newman, R.C. [University of Toronto, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, 200 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  7. Synthesis and structure of Al clusters supported on TiO2,,110...: A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Synthesis and structure of Al clusters supported on TiO2,,110...: A scanning tunneling microscopy, Texas 77843-3255 Received 14 October 1997; accepted 6 April 1998 Al clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy. Al interacts strongly with the TiO2(110) surface

  8. Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes Teri Wang Odom1 , Jason H. Hafner1 relationship between Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) atomic structure and electronic properties, (2, properties and application of carbon nanotube probe microscopy tips to ultrahigh resolution and chemically

  9. Faculty Position in Materials Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Faculty Position in Materials Electron Microscopy at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in electron microscopy of materials within its Institute of Materials. We seek exceptional individuals who community. Top-level applications are invited from candidates at the cutting edge of electron microscopic

  10. Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson-Prior, Linda

    Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents Siavash Yazdanfar,a, * Chulmin Joo,a Chun limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared NIR fluorescent Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3420209 Keywords: two-photon microscopy; ultrafast fiber lasers; near-infrared

  11. Nonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    /20/2010 Published on Web: 11/16/2010 FIGURE 1. Illustration of the nonlinear dark-field imaging method. Two incidentNonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan, Stefano Palomba, Jan Renger, Romain Quidant Dark-field microscopy is a background-free imaging method that provides high sensitivity and a large

  12. Eigenmodes of surface energies for shape analysis Klaus Hildebrandt, Christian Schulz, Christoph von Tycowicz, and Konrad Polthier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polthier, Konrad

    of a flat plate (Chladni plates). For curved surfaces more elaborate models are required to describe

  13. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. The monitoring frequency and selection criteria for each sampling location is in Appendix C. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix D. If issued, addenda to this plan will be inserted in Appendix E, and Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix F. Guidance for managing purged groundwater is provided in Appendix G.

  14. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  15. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  16. In-situ scanning probe microscopy of electrodeposited nickel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James J.; Dibble, Dean C.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance characteristics and material properties such as stress, microstructure, and composition of nickel coatings and electroformed components can be controlled over a wide range by the addition of small amounts of surface-active compounds to the electroplating bath. Saccharin is one compound that is widely utilized for its ability to reduce tensile stress and refine grain size in electrodeposited nickel. While the effects of saccharin on nickel electrodeposition have been studied by many authors in the past, there is still uncertainty over saccharin's mechanisms of incorporation, stress reduction, and grain refinement. In-situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a tool that can be used to directly image the nucleation and growth of thin nickel films at nanometer length scales to help elucidate saccharin's role in the development and evolution of grain structure. In this study, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques are used to investigate the effects of saccharin on the morphological evolution of thin nickel films. By observing mono-atomic height nickel island growth with and without saccharin present we conclude that saccharin has little effect on the nickel surface mobility during deposition at low overpotentials where the growth occurs in a layer-by-layer mode. Saccharin was imaged on Au(l11) terraces as condensed patches without resolved packing structure. AFM measurements of the roughness evolution of nickel films up to 1200 nm thick on polycrystalline gold indicate that saccharin initially increases the roughness and surface skewness of the deposit that at greater thickness becomes smoother than films deposited without saccharin. Faceting of the deposit morphology decreases as saccharin concentration increases even for the thinnest films that have 3-D growth.

  17. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  18. Microscopy with Slow Electrons: From LEEM to XPEEM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1 Micropulse Lidar TheMicroscopy

  19. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  20. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

  1. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Center for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vanstreels, K. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  2. Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasarao, Mohan

    Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals Mohan Srinivasarao* and Richard S:photon tunnellingmicroscopy;single crystals; polyethylene) INTRODUCTION The study of morphology of polymers is an area

  3. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from...

  4. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. • Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. • Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. • The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. • Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

  5. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  6. Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoram

    conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

  7. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

  8. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

  9. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage...

  10. Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and transport measurements on adsorbate-induced two-dimensional electron systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masutomi, Ryuichi; Triyama, Naotaka; Okamoto, Tohru [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed not only magnetotransport measurements on two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs) formed at the cleaved surfaces of p-InAs but also observations of the surface morphology of the adsorbate atoms, which induced the 2DES at the surfaces of narrow band-gap semiconductors, with use of a scanning tunneling microscopy. The electron density of the 2DESs is compared to the atomic density of the isolated Ag adatoms on InAs surfaces.

  11. Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

  12. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Juliet

    Click Here for Full Article Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage., and S. McNutt (2010), Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok at Okmok volcano and continuing until the start of the 2008 eruption, magma accumulated in a storage zone

  13. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  14. Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular defect production efficiencies obtained by FIM are a consequence of a surface effect, which greatly enhances defect production compared to that in the crystal interior. Comparison of clustering of vacancies

  15. Potential applications of microscopy for steam coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVanney, K.F.; Clarkson, R.J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy has been an extremely useful tool for many industrial sectors in the past. This paper introduces some of the potential applications of using coal and fly ash carbon microscopy for the combustion process and steam coal industry. Coal and fly ash carbon microscopic classification criteria are described. Plant sample data are presented which demonstrate that these techniques can be useful for coal selection and for problem solving in the coal-fired power plant environment. Practical recommendations for further study are proposed.

  16. Specific adhesion of peptides on semiconductor surfaces in experiment and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachmann, Michael

    with distilled water and drying in air, sample surfaces have been investigated by atomic-force microscopy (AFM phases of peptides on inorganic semiconductor surfaces. The peptide-covered surface fraction can differ

  17. SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF PAN-BASED CARBON FIBERS USING XPS, SIMS, AND AFM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF PAN-BASED CARBON FIBERS USING XPS, SIMS, AND AFM by Kris Anne Battleson on Carbon Fiber Surfaces.....................................17 Atomic Force Microscopy on Carbon Fiber Surfaces.....................................21 Numerical Methods...........................................................................

  18. Summary of ISO/TC 201 Standard: ISO 29081: 2010, Surface Chemical Analysis - Auger Electron Spectroscopy - Reporting of Methods Used for Charge Control and Charge Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This international standard specifies the minimum amount of information required for describing the methods of charge control in measurements of Auger electron transitions from insulating specimens by electron-stimulated Auger electron spectroscopy to be reported with the analytical results. Information is provided in an Annex on methods that have been found useful for charge control prior to or during AES analysis. The Annex also includes a summary table of methods or approaches, ordered by simplicity of approach. A similar international standard has been published for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ISO 19318: 2003(E), Surface chemical analysis - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Reporting of methods used for charge control and charge correction).

  19. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  20. DeepView: A collaborative framework for distributed microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parvin, B.; Taylor, J.; Cong, G.

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the motivation, requirements, and architecture of a collaborative framework for distributed virtual microscopy. In this context, the requirements are specified in terms of (1) functionality, (2) scalability, (3) interactivity, and (4) safety and security. Functionality refers to what and how an instrument does something. Scalability refers to the number of instruments, vendor-specific desktop workstations, analysis programs, and collaborators that can be accessed. Interactivity refers to how well the system can be steered either for static or dynamic experiments. Safety and security refers to safe operation of an instrument coupled with user authentication, privacy, and integrity of data communication. To meet these requirements, we introduce three types of services in the architecture: Instrument Services (IS), Exchange Services (ES), and Computational Services (CS). These services may reside on any host in the distributed system. The IS provide an abstraction for manipulating different types of microscopes; the ES provide common services that are required between different resources; and the CS provide analytical capabilities for data analysis and simulation. These services are brought together through CORBA and its enabling services, e.g., Event Services, Time Services, Naming Services, and Security Services. Two unique applications have been introduced into the CS for analyzing scientific images either for instrument control or recovery of a model for objects of interest. These include: in-situ electron microscopy and recovery of 3D shape from holographic microscopy. The first application provides a near real-time processing of the video-stream for on-line quantitative analysis and the use of that information for closed-loop servo control. The second application reconstructs a 3D representation of an inclusion (a crystal structure in a matrix) from multiple views through holographic electron microscopy. These application require steering external stimuli or computational parameters for a particular result. In a sense, ''computational instruments'' (symmetric multiprocessors) interact closely with data generated from ''experimental instruments'' (unique microscopes) to conduct new experiments and bring new functionalities to these instruments. Both of these features exploit high-performance computing and low-latency networks to bring novel functionalities to unique scientific imaging instruments.

  1. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

  2. Bonding Structure of Phenylacetylene on Hydrogen-Terminated Si(111) and Si(100): Surface Photoelectron Spectroscopy Analysis and Ab Initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Kondo; T Mates; D Fischer; F Wudl; E Kramer

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between phenylacetylene (PA) monolayers and two silicon surfaces, Si(111) and Si(100), are probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and the results are analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The monolayer systems are prepared via the surface hydrosilylation reaction between PA and hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. The following spectral features are obtained for both of the PA-Si(111) and PA-Si(100) systems: a broad {pi}-{pi}* shakeup peak at 292 eV (XPS), a broad first ionization peak at 3.8 eV (UPS), and a low-energy C 1s {yields} {pi}* resonance peak at 284.3 eV (NEXAFS). These findings are ascribed to a styrene-like {pi}-conjugated molecular structure at the PA-Si interface by comparing the experimental data with theoretical analysis results. A conclusion is drawn that the vinyl group can keep its {pi}-conjugation character on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) [H:Si(100)] surface composed of the dihydride (SiH{sub 2}) groups as well as on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) having the monohydride (SiH) group. The formation mechanism of the PA-Si(100) interface is investigated within cluster ab initio calculations, and the possible structure of the H:Si(100) surface is discussed based on available data.

  3. Spatial resolution in vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)] [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental spatial resolution of vector potential photoelectron microscopy is found to be much higher than expected because of the cancellation of one of the expected contributions to the point spread function. We present a new calculation of the spatial resolution with support from finite element ray tracing, and experimental results.

  4. Analysis of strained surface layers of ZnO single crystals after irradiation with intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Andreas; Sebald, Kathrin; Voss, Tobias [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Wolverson, Daniel [Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Bath, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom)] [Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Bath, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom); Hodges, Chris; Kuball, Martin [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)] [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural modifications of ZnO single crystals that were created by the irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at fluences far above the ablation threshold were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. After light-matter interaction on the femtosecond time scale, rapid cooling and the pronounced thermal expansion anisotropy of ZnO are likely to cause residual strains of up to 1.8% and also result in the formation of surface cracks. This process relaxes the strain only partially and a strained surface layer remains. Our findings demonstrate the significant role of thermoelastic effects for the irradiation of solids with intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  5. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  6. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  7. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  8. Artificial Neural Networks and quadratic Response Surfaces for the functional failure analysis of a thermal-hydraulic passive system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    decay heat removal system of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Keywords: epistemic uncertainties, passive) and quadratic Response Surface (RS) empirical regression models are used as fast-running surrogates of a thermal reactor concepts make use of passive safety features [1], which do not need external input (especially

  9. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  10. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Baldwin, Charles; Cheng, Guangfeng; Flood, Roger; Jordan, Kevin; Kneisel, Peter; Morrone, Michael; Nemes, George; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  11. Laser Ablation Sampling of Materials Directly into the Formed Liquid Microjunction of a Continuous Flow Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Ionization Emitter for Mass Spectral Analysis and Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission geometry laser ablation directly into a formed liquid microjunction of a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization emitter was utilized for molecular and elemental detection and mass spectrometry imaging. The ability to efficiently capture and ionize ablated material was demonstrated by the detection of various small soluble n-mers of polyaniline and silver ion solvent clusters formed from laser ablation of electropolymerized polyaniline and silver thin films, respectively. In addition, analysis of surfaces that contain soluble components was accomplished by coating or laminating the sample with an insoluble film to enable liquid junction formation without directly extracting material from the surface. The ability to perform mass spectrometry imaging at a spatial resolution of about 50 m was illustrated by using laminated inked patterns on a microscope slide. In general, these data demonstrate at least an order of magnitude signal enhancement compared to the non-contact, laser ablation droplet capture-based surface sampling/ionization approaches that have been previously presented.

  12. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A., E-mail: dbristow@mst.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  13. Single particle microscopy with nanometer resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Jacob; Karin Groot-Berning; Sebastian Wolf; Stefan Ulm; Luc Couturier; Ulrich G. Poschinger; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate nanoscopic transmission microscopy relying on a deterministic single particle source. This increases the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to conventional microscopy methods, which employ Poissonian particle sources. We use laser-cooled ions extracted from a Paul trap, and demonstrate remote imaging of transmissive objects with a resolution of 8.6 $\\pm$ 2.0nm and a minimum two-sample deviation of the beam position of 1.5nm. Detector dark counts can be suppressed by 6 orders of magnitudes through gating by the extraction event. The deterministic nature of our source enables an information-gain driven approach to imaging. We demonstrate this by performing efficient beam characterization based on a Bayes experiment design method.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys surface enhanced Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    piston alloys at elevated temperature Summary: C. Optical microscopy of sectioned fracture surfaces for alloy A indicated that at low values of DK... and illustrates how the...

  15. Effect of the surface preparation techniques on the EBSD analysis of a friction stir welded AA1100-B{sub 4}C metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J., E-mail: junfeng.guo@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 2B1 (Canada); Aluminium Technology Centre, National Research Council Canada, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 8C3 (Canada); Amira, S.; Gougeon, P. [Aluminium Technology Centre, National Research Council Canada, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 8C3 (Canada); Chen, X.-G. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been used in various automobile, aerospace and military industries. Yet characterization of the microstructure in these materials remains a challenge. In the present work, the grain structure in the matrix of B{sub 4}C particulate reinforced MMCs and their friction stir welds is characterized by using optical metallography and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Optical metallography can partially reveal the grain structure in the matrix of AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C composite. The EBSD technique has been successfully applied to characterize the grain structure in the AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C friction stir welds, which provides a powerful tool to follow the microstructural evolution of MMC materials during friction stir welding (FSW). Both mechanical polishing and ion beam polishing are used for the EBSD sample preparation. The effect of the sample preparation on the EBSD data acquisition quality is studied. Some typical examples, such as the identification of grains and subgrains, grain size distribution, deformation fields and the texture components are given. - Highlights: {yields} EBSD has been used to characterize the grain structure of Al-B{sub 4}C MMCs. {yields} Mechanical and ion beam polishing are compared for EBSD sample preparation of MMCs. {yields} EBSD shows great advantages over optical microscopy for microtexture analysis of MMCs.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: scanning tunneling microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskiteremoving thereversetunneling microscopy

  17. Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, Chad [Ames Laboratory

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

  18. Dynamical analysis of a weakly coupled nonlinear dielectric waveguide -- surface-plasmon model as a new type of Josephson Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ek?io?lu, Yasa; Güven, Kaan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that a weakly-coupled nonlinear dielectric waveguide -- surface-plasmon system can be formulated as a new type of Josephson junction. Such a system can be realized along a metal - dielectric interface where the dielectric medium hosts a nonlinear waveguide (e.g. fiber) for soliton propagation. We demonstrate that the system is in close analogy to the bosonic Josephson-Junction (BJJ) of atomic condensates at very low temperatures, yet exhibits different dynamical features. In particular, the inherently dynamic coupling parameter between soliton and surface-plasmon generates self-trapped oscillatory states at nonzero fractional populations with zero and $\\pi$ time averaged phase difference. The salient features of the dynamics are presented in the phase space.

  19. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  20. Dynamical analysis of a weakly coupled nonlinear dielectric waveguide: Surface-plasmon model as another type of Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eksioglu, Yasa; Muestecaplioglu, Oezguer E.; Gueven, Kaan [Department of Physics, Koc University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that a weakly coupled nonlinear dielectric waveguide surface-plasmon system can be formulated as another type of Josephson junction. Such a system can be realized along a metal-dielectric interface where the dielectric medium hosts a nonlinear waveguide (e.g., fiber) for soliton propagation. We demonstrate that the system is in close analogy to the bosonic Josephson junction of atomic condensates at very low temperatures, yet exhibits different dynamical features. In particular, the inherently dynamic coupling parameter between soliton and surface plasmon generates self-trapped oscillatory states at nonzero fractional populations with zero and {pi} time-averaged phase difference. The salient features of the dynamics are presented in the phase space.

  1. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  2. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Drew F., E-mail: Drew.Parsons@anu.edu.au; Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  3. TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211 The. The EMC houses two field emission SEM's, a Hitachi cold-field SEM (S-4700) and a FEI thermal FE SEM imaging and chemical analysis from their SEM/EDS systems. AdditionalSupportby: FormoreInformationortoregistergoto:http://www.emc

  4. Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeskind, Benjamin J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

  5. New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology** By Zhong Lin Wang* 1. Electron Microscopy and Nanotechnology Nanotechnology, as an international initiative for science manufacturing are the foundation of nanotechnology. Tracking the historical background of why nanotechnology

  6. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with...

  7. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

  8. 11/8/09 2:31 PMPrincipal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: al..... (DOI: 10.1039/b913802a) Page 1 of 16http://www.rsc.org.proxy.uchicago.edu/delivery/_ArticleLinking/Artic...?JournalCode=CP&Year=2009&ManuscriptID=b913802a&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    11/8/09 2:31 PMPrincipal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: al Chemical Physics Principal component analysis of potential energy surfaces of large clusters: allowing The analysis of the potential energy surfaces (PES) of clusters has proven to be a useful tool in theoretical

  9. Analysis of confocal microscopy under ultrashort light-pulse illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M.; Rudolph, W. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resolution of confocal laser scanning microscopes is analyzed if they are used in measurements that are to combine high spatial and high temporal resoltuion. A generalized Fourier-optical treatment is developed in which the system characteristics contain all necessary information regarding the optical arrangement and the illuminating light pulses. Coherent and incoherent imaging are considered in detail. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Interference microscopy and Fourier fringe analysis applied to measuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribak, Erez

    in Fig. 1. It forms an image of the experimental cell that interferes with a plane wave, the two being (Peltier) coolers; 5,

  11. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF WEAKLY DEFORMED ALKALI HALIDE CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    377 TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF WEAKLY DEFORMED ALKALI HALIDE CRYSTALS H. STRUNK Max'importance croissante du durcissement de la solution solide. Abstract. 2014 Transmission electron microscopy (TEM Abstracts 7j66 - 7 I' 1. Introduction. - It is only some years ago that transmission electron microscopy

  12. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  13. Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoringand Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential for CO2 monitoring in thenear-surface environment as an approach to exploration for hiddengeothermal systems. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration from a modelhidden geothermal system show that CO2 concentrations can reach highlevels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low CO2 fluxes.Therefore, subsurface measurements offer an advantage over above-groundmeasurements which are affected by winds that rapidly disperse CO2. Tomeet the challenge of detecting geothermal CO2 emissions within thenatural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach thatintegrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statisticalanalysis and modeling.

  14. SURFACE OXIDATION OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER IN PRESENCE OF O3 +NOX: NEW TD/GC/MS ANALYSIS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    in the atmosphere. TD-GC-MS ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY A thermal desorption (TD) injection device (M. Ezrin, 1991. Valve Spindle 10. Carrier Gas Inlet 11. Inlet Assembly 12. Injection Port Insert PAH standard Solution, 1ppm, 1µL injection Alkanes Standard Solution, 0.1ppm, 1µL injection FUTURE EXPERIMENTS Verify PM

  15. Chemistry on the Edge: A Microscopic Analysis of the Intercalation, Exfoliation, Edge Functionalization, and Monolayer Surface Tiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry on the Edge: A Microscopic Analysis of the Intercalation, Exfoliation, EdgeVed May 29, 1998 Abstract: The intercalation and exfoliation reactions of R-zirconium phosphate, Zr(HPO4-assembled aperiodic multilayers.3 The exfoliation of clays, alkali transition metal oxides, metal phosphates, graphite

  16. Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis, Indiana University School of Medicine Digital whole slide imaging is the technique of digitizing a microscope slide at the highest resolution to produce a "digital virtual microscope slide". This digital

  17. Electron microscopy of phase and structural transformations in soft magnetic nanocrystalline Fe-Zr-N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhigalina, O. M., E-mail: zhigal@ns.crys.ras.ru; Khmelenin, D. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Sheftel', E. N.; Usmanova, G. Sh. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Carlsson, A. [FEI Company (Netherlands)] [FEI Company (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of deposition conditions (film thickness) on the structure of soft magnetic Fe{sub 80-78}Zr{sub 10}N{sub 10-12} films formed by reactive magnetron deposition on a heat-resistant glass substrate has been investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy, and diffraction analysis. The processes of evolution of the phase and structural state of films and the film-substrate interface upon annealing in the temperature range of 200-650 Degree-Sign C have been analyzed taking into account the thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural factors and the specific features of the nanocrystalline state.

  18. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  19. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  20. Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the‹ See allElectrochemicalElectron Microscopy

  1. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Analytical Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResultsGeothermalAnalytical Microscopy

  2. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  3. Analysis, comparison, and modeling of radar interferometry, date of surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Phase I: underground explosions, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Vincent, P; Walter, W

    1999-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously presented simple elastic deformation modeling results for three classes of seismic events of concern in monitoring the CTBT--underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Those results explored the theoretical detectability of each event type using synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) based on commercially available satellite data. In those studies we identified and compared the characteristics of synthetic interferograms that distinguish each event type, as well the ability of the interferograms to constrain source parameters. These idealized modeling results, together with preliminary analysis of InSAR data for the 1995 mb 5.2 Solvay mine collapse in southwestern Wyoming, suggested that InSAR data used in conjunction with regional seismic monitoring holds great potential for CTBT discrimination and seismic source analysis, as well as providing accurate ground truth parameters for regional calibration events. In this paper we further examine the detectability and ''discriminating'' power of InSAR by presenting results from InSAR data processing, analysis and modeling of the surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions. Specifically, we present results of a detailed study of coseismic and postseismic surface deformation signals associated with underground nuclear and chemical explosion tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Several interferograms were formed from raw ERS-1/2 radar data covering different time spans and epochs beginning just prior to the last U.S. nuclear tests in 1992 and ending in 1996. These interferograms have yielded information about the nature and duration of the source processes that produced the surface deformations associated with these events. A critical result of this study is that significant post-event surface deformation associated with underground nuclear explosions detonated at depths in excess of 600 meters can be detected using differential radar interferometry. An immediate implication of this finding is that underground nuclear explosions may not need to be captured coseismically by radar images acquired before and after an event in order to be detectable. This has obvious advantages in CTBT monitoring since suspect seismic events--which usually can be located within a 100 km by 100 km area of an ERS-1/2 satellite frame by established seismic methods-can be imaged after the event has been identified and located by existing regional seismic networks. Key Words: InSAR, SLC images, interferogram, synthetic interferogram, ERS-1/2 frame, phase unwrapping, DEM, coseismic, postseismic, source parameters.

  4. Theoretical Analysis of the Adsorption of Late Transition-Metal Atoms on the (001) Surface of Early Transition-Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, T.; Florez, E; Rodriguez, J; Illas, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of atoms of Groups 9, 10, and 11 with the (001) surface of TiC, ZrC, VC, and {delta}-MoC has been studied by means of periodic density functional calculations using slab models. The calculated values of the adsorption energy are rather large, especially for Groups 9 and 10 elements (E{sub ads} = 3-6 eV), but without clear trends along the series. Nevertheless, the analysis of the interaction at different sites indicates that the adsorbed atoms will be relatively mobile. Many of the admetals are electronically perturbed upon interaction with the carbide surfaces. Co, Ni, Cu, and Rh adatoms get positively or negatively charged, depending on the nature of the carbide substrate. Ir, Pd, Pt, and Au adatoms are always negatively charged. An analysis of the Bader charges for the most stable sites provides strong evidence that the most negative charge on the adatoms corresponds to the interaction with ZrC, followed by TiC. In the case of VC and {delta}-MoC, the charge on the adsorbed atoms may be slightly positive and of the same order for both carbides. The effect of the underlying carbide is large, with ZrC and TiC being predicted as the supports with the largest effect on the electronic structure of the adsorbed atoms with direct implications for the use of these systems in catalysis.

  5. In-situ spectro-microscopy on organic films: Mn-Phthalocyanine on Ag(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Mahboob A.; Vescovo, E.; Sadowski, J.T.

    2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal phthalocyanines are attracting significant attention, owing to their potential for applications in chemical sensors, solar cells and organic magnets. As the electronic properties of molecular films are determined by their crystallinity and molecular packing, the optimization of film quality is important for improving the performance of organic devices. Here, we present the results of in situ low-energy electron microscopy / photoemission electron microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) studies of incorporation-limited growth [1] of manganese-phthalocyanine (MnPc) on Ag(100) surfaces. MnPc thin films were grown on both, bulk Ag(100) surface and thin Ag(100)/Fe(100) films, where substrate spin-polarized electronic states can be modified through tuning the thickness of the Ag film [2]. We also discuss the electronic structure and magnetic ordering in MnPc thin films, investigated by angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  6. Analytical electron microscopy examination of solid reaction products in long-term test of SRL 200 waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.; Dietz, N.L.; Bradley, C.R.; Tani, B.S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Alteration phases, found on the leached surfaces and present as colloids in the leachates of 200-based frit (fully active and simulated) nuclear waste glass, reacted under static test conditions, at a surface area to leachate volume ratio of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} for 15 days to 728 days, have been examined by analytical electron microscopy. The compositions of the secondary phases were determined using x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and structural analysis was accomplished by electron diffraction. Long-term samples of simulated glass, which had undergone an acceleration of reaction after 182 days, possessed a number of silicate secondary phases, including; smectite (iron silicate and potassium iron alumina-silicate, weeksite (uranium silicate), zeolite (calcium potassium alumino-silicate), tobermorite (calcium silicate), and a pure silica phase. However, uranium silicates and smectite have also been observed in tests, which have not undergone the acceleration of reaction, in both the leachate and leached layer, suggesting that these phases are not responsible for the acceleration of reaction.

  7. Hazard analysis of long term viewing of visible laser light off of fluorescent diffuse reflective surfaces (post-it).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser hazard analysis is performed to evaluate if the use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors to view incident laser beams (Coherent Verdi 10W) present a hazard based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. The use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors in the alignment process does not pose an increased hazard because of the fluorescence at a different wavelength than that of the incident laser.

  8. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to find the 3D orientation of stationary metallic anisotropic nanoparticles utilizing only long-axis SPR enhancement. The polarization direction of the illuminating light was rotated causing the relative intensity of p-polarized and s-polarized light within the evanescent field to change. The interaction of the evanescent field with the particles is dependent on the orientation of the particle producing an intensity curve. This curve and the in-plane angle can be compared with simulations to accurately determine the 3D orientation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is another non-invasive far-field technique based upon interferometry that does not rely on staining or other contrast enhancing techniques. In addition, high numerical aperture condensers and objectives can be used to give a very narrow depth of field allowing for the optical tomography of samples, which makes it an ideal candidate to study biological systems. DIC microscopy has also proven itself in determining the orientation of gold nanorods in both engineered environments and within cells. Many types of nanoparticles and nanostructures have been synthesized using lithographic techniques on silicon wafer substrates. Traditionally, reflective mode DIC microscopes have been developed and applied to the topographical study of reflective substrates and the imaging of chips on silicon wafers. Herein, a laser-illuminated reflected-mode DIC was developed for studying nanoparticles on reflective surfaces.

  9. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    density analysis of forming samples using advanced characterization techniques Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: SurfaceSub-surface dislocation density...

  10. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  11. Investigation of microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness properties of PtIr films by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chao-Te; Liu, Bo-Heng; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yu-Wei [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pt{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x} films with x varying from 22.76 to 63.25 at. % are deposited on (100) Si wafer substrates at 400 deg. C by magnetron sputtering deposition. The effects of the Ir concentration on the microstructure, morphology, and hardness of PtIr films are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation system. The columnar structures are observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that PtIr films have preferred orientation along Pt(111) when the Ir concentration is below 50.84 at. %. When the Ir content is more than 50.84 at. %, the PtIr film shifts to another preferred orientation, Ir(111). The surface morphology is analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The roughness of the PtIr films decreases with increasing Ir content. The hardness of all the PtIr films is below 20 GPa. The maximum hardness of the PtIr films is about 14.9 GPa when the Ir concentration is 57.9 at. %.

  12. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  13. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, G. Ribeill

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  14. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in colloidal ensembles levitated above macroscopic surfaces. TIRM and VM are well established optical microscopy techniques for measuring normal and lateral colloidal excursions near macroscopic planar surfaces. The interactions between particle-particle...

  15. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40°N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40°N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  16. Automated fit of high-dimensional potential energy surfaces using cluster analysis and interpolation over descriptors of chemical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, René, E-mail: renef@yorku.ca; Orel, Slava [Department of Chemistry, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for fitting high-dimensional potential energy surfaces that is almost fully automated, can be applied to systems with various chemical compositions, and involves no particular choice of function form. We tested it on four systems: Ag{sub 20}, Sn{sub 6}Pb{sub 6}, Si{sub 10}, and Li{sub 8}. The cost for energy evaluation is smaller than the cost of a density functional theory (DFT) energy evaluation by a factor of 1500 for Li{sub 8}, and 60 000 for Ag{sub 20}. We achieved intermediate accuracy (errors of 0.4 to 0.8 eV on atomization energies, or, 1% to 3% on cohesive energies) with rather small datasets (between 240 and 1400 configurations). We demonstrate that this accuracy is sufficient to correctly screen the configurations with lowest DFT energy, making this function potentially very useful in a hybrid global optimization strategy. We show that, as expected, the accuracy of the function improves with an increase in the size of the fitting dataset.

  17. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques based on superconducting scanning probes. In periods 1--3 of this grant, which we now close at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and restart at Stanford University where our new lab is being built, we have demonstrated the ability to rapidly create Rb BECs and trap them within microns of a surface ina cryostat. Period 4 of this grant, to be performed at Stanford, will demonstrate the feasibility of using atom chips with a BEC to image transport features on a cryogenically cooled surface. Successful demonstration, in future funding cycles, will lead directly to the use of system for studies of transport in exotic and technologically relevant materials such as cuprate superconductors and topological insulators.

  18. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  20. 3D Hydrodynamical Simulations of Surface Convection in Red Giant Stars. Impact on spectral line formation and abundance analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remo Collet; Martin Asplund; Regner Trampedach

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the impact of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres of red giant stars at different metallicities on the formation of spectral lines of a number of ions and molecules. We carry out realistic 3D simulations of surface convection in red giant stars with varying stellar parameters. We use the simulations as time-dependent hydrodynamical model stellar atmospheres to compute atomic (Li, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Fe) and molecular (CH, NH, OH) spectral lines under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We compare the line strengths computed in 3D with the results of analogous line formation calculations for 1D, hydrostatic, plane-parallel MARCS model atmospheres in order to estimate the impact of 3D models on the derivation of elemental abundances. The temperature and density inhomogeneities and correlated velocities in 3D models, as well as the differences between the 1D and mean 3D structures significantly affect the predicted line strengths. Under the assumption of LTE, the low atmospheric temperatures of very metal-poor 3D model atmospheres cause the lines from neutral species and molecules to appear stronger than in 1D. Therefore, elemental abundances derived from these lines using 3D models are significantly lower than according to 1D analyses. Differences between 3D and 1D abundances of C, N, and O derived from CH, NH, and OH weak low-excitation lines are found to be in the range -0.5 dex to -1.0 dex for the the red giant stars at [Fe/H]=-3 considered here. At this metallicity, large negative corrections (about -0.8 dex) are also found for weak low-excitation Fe I lines. We caution, however, that departures from LTE might be significant for these and other elements and comparable to the effects due to stellar granulation.

  1. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the recalcitrant nature of biomass feedstocks and the performance of techniques to deconstruct biomass NREL of biomass feedstocks. BSCL imaging capabilities include: · Confocal microscopy and Raman microscopy

  2. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  3. Investigation of wettability by NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, D.A.; Tomutsa, Liviu

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wettability of reservoir rock has an important impact on the efficiency of oil recovery processes and the distribution of oil and water within the reservoir. One of the potentially useful tools for wettability measurements is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spin-lattice relaxation. More recently using NMR microscopy NIPER has developed the capability of imaging one- and two-phase fluid systems in reservoir rock at resolutions to 25 microns. Effects seen in the images of fluids within the pore space of rocks near the rock grain surfaces hinted at the possibility of using NMR microscopy to map the wettability variations at grain sites within the pore space. Investigations were begun using NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation time measurements on rock/fluid systems and on well-defined fractional wet model systems to study these effects. Relaxation data has been modelled using the stretched exponential relationship recently introduced. Comparisons of the NMR microscopy results of the model system with the rock results indicate that the observed effects probably do not reflect actual wettability variations within the pore space. The results of the relaxation time measurements reveal that even in the simple model studied, the behavior of two phases is somewhat ambiguous and much more complex and requires more study.

  4. Surface Topography of 'Hotspot' Regions from a Single Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin Zhao, Gianluigi Ciovati, Charles Reece, Andy Wu

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of SRF cavities are limited by non-linear localized effects. The variation of local material characters between "hot" and "cold" spots is thus of intense interest. Such locations were identified in a BCP-etched large-grain single-cell cavity and removed for examination by high resolution electron microscopy (SEM), electron-back scattering diffraction microscopy (EBSD), optical microscopy, and 3D profilometry. Pits with clearly discernable crystal facets were observed in both "hotspot" and "coldspot" specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bi-crystal boundaries, and on tri-crystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by surface crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All "coldspots" examined had qualitatively low density of etching pits or very shallow tri-crystal boundary junction. EBSD revealed the crystal structure surrounding the pits via crystal phase orientation mapping, while 3D profilometry gave information on the depth and size of the pits. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) did not show any significant contamination of the samples surface.

  5. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  6. Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

  7. NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SENSOR RESEARCH (NCSR) Research Engineer Fluorescence Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    manuals, prepare standard operating procedures and ensure documentation is maintained. · Manage online projects. · Undertake the commissioning and maintenance of microscopy equipment. · Collate operations

  8. Quantitative analysis of in situ optical diagnostics for inferring particle/aggregate parameters in flames: Implications for soot surface growth and total emissivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeylue, U.O. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ particulate diagnostic/analysis technique is outlined based on the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans polydisperse fractal aggregate (RDG/PFA) scattering interpretation of absolute angular light scattering and extinction measurements. Using proper particle refractive index, the proposed data analysis method can quantitatively yield all aggregate parameters (particle volume fraction, f{sub v}, fractal dimension, D{sub f}, primary particle diameter, d{sub p}, particle number density, n{sub p}, and aggregate size distribution, pdf(N)) without any prior knowledge about the particle-laden environment. The present optical diagnostic/interpretation technique was applied to two different soot-containing laminar and turbulent ethylene/air nonpremixed flames in order to assess its reliability. The aggregate interpretation of optical measurements yielded D{sub f}, d{sub p}, and pdf(N) that are in excellent agreement with ex situ thermophoretic sampling/transmission electron microscope (TS/TEM) observations within experimental uncertainties. However, volume-equivalent single particle models (Rayleigh/Mie) overestimated d{sub p} by about a factor of 3, causing an order of magnitude underestimation in n{sub p}. Consequently, soot surface areas and growth rates were in error by a factor of 3, emphasizing that aggregation effects need to be taken into account when using optical diagnostics for a reliable understanding of soot formation/evolution mechanism in flames. The results also indicated that total soot emissivities were generally underestimated using Rayleigh analysis (up to 50%), mainly due to the uncertainties in soot refractive indices at infrared wavelengths. This suggests that aggregate considerations may not be essential for reasonable radiation heat transfer predictions from luminous flames because of fortuitous error cancellation, resulting in typically a 10 to 30% net effect.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of intestinal villous structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    briefly in running water for 30 minutes and were dehydrated through graded ethanol series (1 hour each in 50, 70, 80, 95 and 100 %). Dehydrated specimens were dried in a carbon dioxide critical point drier to avoid exposure of the specimens to any surface tension forces when drying. The dried specimens were

  10. Instrument Series: Microscopy Helium Ion Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the nature of nanostructure and chemical functionality Energy ­ studying surface/interface characteristics charge for insulating samples based on line or frame scans Small beam size ­ provides stable beam energy Novel features ­ offers EMSL users an additional 4.5-inch center port and two 2.75-inch ports for other

  11. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  12. Building Cellular Models with Light Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayberry, Marty

    with Light What we now know about image analysis for adult fly brain imaging: * Can trace individual neurons. PNAS (2008) Released Sept. 2012 #12;Several Lines In "Atlas" Vaa3D: hanchuan.peng.googlepages.com16 #12

  13. Video Article Three-dimensional Optical-resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    of optical microscopy optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM)1, where the optical irradiation © 2011 Journal of Visualized Experiments 1. Optical irradiation 1. Optical irradiation source: a diode for ultrasonic detection, which is aligned coaxially with the diffraction-limited optical irradiation. 3

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo Arie Krumholz Sarah J. Van microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo Arie Krumholz,a Sarah J. VanVickle-Chavez,b Junjie Yao for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical res

  15. Infrared near-field microscopy of materials motivation: ,,chemical nanoscope"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infrared near-field microscopy of materials motivation: ,,chemical nanoscope" scattering principle) topography s-SNOM infrared: = 9.7 µm visible: = 633 nm #12; Ein Near-field interaction is nonlinear in z resolution /2000000 !! 700 MHz 7 MHz #12;Apertureless near-field microscopy chances wavelength

  16. Geometric Analysis and General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Andersson

    2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses methods of geometric analysis in general relativity, with special focus on the role of "critical surfaces" such as minimal surfaces, marginal surface, maximal surfaces and null surfaces.

  17. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Carpentier; Mario S. Rodrigues; Luca Costa; Miguel V. Vitorino; Elisabeth Charlaix; Joel Chevrier

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which explains this behavior.

  18. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca; Vitorino, Miguel V; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which expla...

  19. Microrheological Studies of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Solution by Video Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghu A; Somashekar R; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out studies on the rheological properties of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) solution using video microscopy. The degummed silk from the Bombyx mori silkworm was used to prepare RSF solution by dissolving it in calcium nitrate tetrahydrate-methanol solvent. Measurements were carried out by tracking the position of an embedded micron-sized polystyrene bead within the RSF solution through video imaging. The time dependent mean squared displacement (MSD) of the bead in solution and hence, the complex shear modulus of this solution was calculated from the bead's position information. An optical tweezer was used to transport and locate the bead at any desired site within the micro-volume of the sample, to facilitate the subsequent free-bead video analysis. We present here the results of rheological measurements of the silk polymer network in solution over a frequency range, whose upper limit is the frame capture rate of our camera, at full resolution. By examining the distribution of MSD of beads at different locations within the sample volume, we demonstrate that this probe technique enables us to detect local inhomogeneties at micrometer length scales, not detectable either by a rheometer or from diffusing wave spectroscopy.

  20. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  1. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  2. 1996, Journal of Microscopy 181, 225-237 (and vol 182, p 240.) Multimodal microscopy by digital image processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, J. V.

    , Blakistone and Kyryk 1990 compared applications of polarised light, bright eld, DIC and scanning electron microscopy SEM in the paper industry. Fluorescence microscopy adds further possible imaging modes to light. 1 #12;1 Introduction Di erent imaging modes with the light microscope convey complementary infor

  3. Tools for Surface Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina ButlerToday in Energy TodayTony

  4. Direct Analysis of Reversed-Phase HPTLC Separated Tryptic Protein Digests using a Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe/ESI-MS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emory, Joshua F [ORNL; Walworth, Matthew J [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Schulz, Michael [Merck Research Laboratories; Minarik, susanne [Merck Research Laboratories

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sampling, ionization and detection of tryptic peptides separated in one-dimension on reversed phase HPTLC plates was performed using liquid microjunction surface sampling probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Tryptic digests of five proteins (cytochrome c., myoglobin, beta-casein, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin) were spotted on reversed phase HPTLC RP-8 F254s and HPTLC RP-18 F254s plates. The plates were then developed using 70/30 methanol/water with 0.1 M ammonium acetate. A dual purpose extraction/electrospray solution containing 70/30/0.1 water/methanol/formic acid was infused through the sampling probe during analysis of the developed lanes. Both full scan mass spectra and data dependent tandem mass spectra were acquired for each development lane to detect and verify the peptide distributions. Data dependent tandem mass spectra provided both protein identification and sequence coverage information. Highest sequence coverages were achieved for cytochrome c. and myoglobin (62.5% and 58.3%, respectively) on reversed phase RP-8 plates. While the tryptic peptides were separated enough for identification, the peptide bands did show some overlap with most peptides located in the lower half of the development lane. Proteins whose peptides were more separated gave higher sequence coverage. Larger proteins such as beta-casein and BSA which were spotted in lower relative amounts gave much lower sequence coverage than the smaller proteins.

  5. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86

  6. Sub-microsecond-resolution probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginger, David; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Moore, David; Rayermann, Glennis; Reid, Obadiah

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are provided herein for time-resolved analysis of the effect of a perturbation (e.g., a light or voltage pulse) on a sample. By operating in the time domain, the provided method enables sub-microsecond time-resolved measurement of transient, or time-varying, forces acting on a cantilever.

  7. Analysis of output surface damage resulting from single 351 nm, 3 ns pulses on sub-nanosecond laser conditioned KD2PO4 crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarboe, J; Adams, J J; Hackel, R

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that by conditioning DKDP using 500 ps laser pulses, the bulk damage threshold becomes essentially equivalent to the surface damage threshold. We report here the findings of our study of laser initiated output surface damage on 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP for test pulses at 351 nm, 3 ns. The relation between surface damage density and damaging fluence (r(f)) is presented for the first time and the morphologies of the surface sites are discussed. The results of this study suggest a surface conditioning effect resulting from exposure to 500 ps laser pulses.

  8. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  9. Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

  10. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

  11. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

  12. Doppler optical coherence microscopy for studies of cochlear mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Stanley S.

    The possibility of measuring subnanometer motions with micron scale spatial resolution in the intact mammalian cochlea using Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) is demonstrated. A novel DOCM system is described ...

  13. Estimating Geometric Dislocation Densities in Polycrystalline Materialsfrom Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man, Chi-Sing [University of Kentucky; Gao, Xiang [University of Kentucky; Godefroy, Scott [University of Kentucky; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we consider polycrystalline materials which can be taken as statistically homogeneous and whose grains can be adequately modeled as rigid-plastic. Our objective is to obtain, from orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), estimates of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities.

  14. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

  15. Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

  16. Theoretical Studies of Energy and Momentum Exchange in Atomic and Molecular Scattering from Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph R. Manson

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The contributions that we have made during the grant period of DE-FG02-98ER45704 can be placed into six different categories: (1) advances in the Theory of Molecule-Surface Scattering, (2) advances in the Theory of Atom-Surface Scattering, (3) utilization of scattering theory to Extract Physical Information about Surfaces, (4) Gas-Surface Interactions, (5) Ion Scattering from surfaces and (6) Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). These six topics are discussed below as individual listings under the title 'IV. Detailed description of research accomplishments'. These advances show that we have made significant progress on several scientific problems in atomic and molecular surface scattering during the course of this grant as well as contributions to other areas. It is also noted that this work, although fundamentally theoretical, is marked by its strong motivation to explain current experimental measurements. This was an important secondary goal in the proposed work. We have developed theory that is useful to experimentalists in the explanation and analysis of their experimental data.

  17. Effects of surface voids on burning rate measurements of pulverized coal at diffusion-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayless, D.J.; Schroeder, A.R.; Peters, J.E.; Buckius, R.O. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the effects of voids (pores on the particle surface that are deeper than their surface radius) on burning area at diffusion-limited combustion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and digital processing of images of quenched particles were used to quantify surface void area, perimeter, and reacting void wall area for voids with diameters larger than 1 {micro}m. After careful analysis, the most accurate determination of particle burning area at diffusion-limited conditions was achieved by measuring particle surface area using the technique of discrete revolution, subtracting surface void area, and adding reacting void wall area. In situ measurements of reacting coal particle temperatures and images were taken for three coals and spherocarb particles at conditions that limit the formation of CO{sub 2} from reacting carbon under various oxygen concentrations and heating rates. The results of these experiments indicate that correcting the measured surface area for void area and reacting void wall area produces calculated burning rates closely matching diffusion-limited burning rates for all conditions and all coals investigated. These results suggest that void area effects should be included for accurate determination of burning area at diffusion-limited conditions.

  18. Stuck with the bill, but why? : an analysis of the Portuguese public finance system with respect to surface transportation policy and investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Joshua S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite decentralization progress in other sectors, the Portuguese central government maintains significant administrative and fiscal power over national and sub-national surface transportation operations and infrastructure. ...

  19. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Matthew S. [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Long, Rong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Feng, Xinzeng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, YuLing [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hui, Chung-Yuen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu, Mingming, E-mail: mw272@cornell.edu [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  20. Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  1. Effect of surface tension on swell-induced surface instability of substrate-confined hydrogel layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    , the physics of surface instability may be harnessed in the design of responsive ``smart'' surfaces for novel with Biot's periodic surface wave analysis. Several theoretical models have also been proposed for swelling due to inhomogeneous transient state of swelling.16,17 Second, the effect of surface energy or surface

  2. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

  3. Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauboeuf, Daniel P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

  4. Sub-surface characterization and three dimensional profiling of semiconductors by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, P.C.; Moore, G.; Roukes, M.; Zhenyong Zhang

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project successfully developed a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) instrument to mechanically detect magnetic resonance signals. This technique provides an intrinsically subsurface, chemical-species-specific probe of structure, constituent density and other properties of materials. As in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an applied magnetic field gradient selects a well defined volume of the sample for study. However mechanical detection allows much greater sensitivity, and this in turn allows the reduction of the size of the minimum resolvable volume. This requires building an instrument designed to achieve nanometer-scale resolution at buried semiconductor interfaces. High-resolution, three-dimensional depth profiling of semiconductors is critical in the development and fabrication of semiconductor devices. Currently, there is no capability for direct, high-resolution observation and characterization of dopant density, and other critical features of semiconductors. The successful development of MRFM in conjunction with modifications to improve resolution will enable for the first time detailed structural and electronic studies in doped semiconductors and multilayered nanoelectronic devices, greatly accelerating the current pace of research and development.

  5. Confocal microscopy studies of colloidal assembly on microfabricated physically templated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sumit

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .2.1 Materials................................................................................. 52 4.2.2 Substrate preparation procedure ............................................. 53 4.2.3 PMMA machining... substrates.................................................... 74 5.3.2 Imaging of PMMA substrates................................................ 79 5.4 Conclusions...

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the TiO2 anatase ,,101... surface Wilhelm Hebenstreit,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    of tunneling sites in STM. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a versatile material that finds uses as a promoter. Fourfold-coordinated Ti atoms at step edges are preferred adsorption sites and allow the identification

  7. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase...

  8. Tomography and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Study of Surfaces and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A:decisional. 1 B OTom D'AgostinoTomstudy

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microscopy techniques Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy techniques and their practice in relationship to materials structure characterization... of Microscopy", Edited by P.W. Hawkes and J.C.H. Spence, Springer, 2006 (An...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic force microscopy-based Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrochemical strain microscopy... -ion kinetics without changing the charging state of the battery. An atomic force microscopy tip in contact Source: Pint, Bruce A. -...

  11. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

  12. Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsen, Osman Oguz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alloying xrd analysis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    also be observed. This microstructure analysis can be supported by XRD pattern... transition is the transformation from fcc() to hcp(). Analysis of the optical microscopy and...

  14. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  15. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

  16. Atomic and electronic structure of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001)(3 3) : a scanning tunneling microscopy study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Atomic and electronic structure of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001)(3 × 3) : a scanning tunneling of the atomic and electronic structure of graphene monolayer islands on the 6H-SiC(0001)(3×3) (SiC(3×3)) surface reconstruction using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). The orientation of the graphene

  17. Continuous Flow Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Connected On-line with HPLC/MS for Spatially Resolved Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RATIONALE: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe extracts soluble material from surfaces for direct ionization and detection by MS. Demonstrated here is the on-line coupling of such a probe with HPLC/MS enabling extraction, separation and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces in a spatially resolved (~0.5 mm diameter spots) manner. Methods: A continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe was connected to a 6-port, 2-position valve for extract collection and injection to an HPLC column. A QTRAP 5500 hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap equipped with a Turbo V ion source operated in positive ESI mode was used for all experiments. System operation was tested with extraction, separation and detection of propranolol and associated metabolites from drug dosed tissues and proteins from dried sheep blood spots on paper. Results: Confirmed in the tissue were the parent drug and two different hydroxypropranolol glucuronides. The mass spectrometric response for these compounds from different locations in the liver showed an increase with increasing extraction time (5, 20 and 40 s extractions). For on-line separation and detection/identification of extracted proteins from dried sheep blood spots, two major protein peaks dominated the chromatogram and could be correlated with the expected masses for the hemoglobin and chains. Conclusions: Spatially resolved sampling, separation, and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces can be accomplished using a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe coupled on-line with HPLC/MS detection.

  18. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  19. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, R.M.; Vary, A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress versus strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns), yielding and elastic modulus of 401 and 466.8 GPa, respectively.

  20. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, R.M.; Vary, A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress vs strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns). 8 refs.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  2. Determination and Characterization of Ice Propagation Mechanisms on Surfaces Undergoing Dropwise Condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Jeffrey B.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms responsible for ice propagation on surfaces undergoing dropwise condensation have been determined and characterized. Based on experimental data acquired non-invasively with high speed quantitative microscopy, the freezing process...

  3. Study of the Effects of Surface Morphology and Droplet Growth Dynamics on Condensation Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Chun-Wei

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    system 2 on Sample 3 (50??m micropillar spacing hybrid surface) ............................................................................................... 66 Figure 24. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) time- sequence images... tension gradients to promote and induce a droplet removal mechanism. They concluded that their gradient surface exhibited a higher heat transfer coefficient than a hydrophobic silane based surface. More recently, environmental scanning electron...

  4. Laser Desorption Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Desorption Analysis Laser Desorption Analysis EMSL offers a suite of instrumentation dedicated to understanding photoreactivity in the condensed phase, on surfaces, and at...

  5. 3D rotational diffusion microrheology using 2D video microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémy Colin; Minhao Yan; Loudjy Chevry; Jean-François Berret; Bérengère Abou

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple way to perform three-dimensional (3D) rotational microrheology using two-dimensional (2D) video microscopy. The 3D rotational brownian motion of micrometric wires in a viscous fluid is deduced from their projection on the focal plane of an optical microscope objective. The rotational diffusion coefficient of the wires of length between 1-100 \\mu m is extracted, as well as their diameter distribution in good agreement with electron microscopy measurements. This is a promising way to characterize soft visco-elastic materials, and probe the dimensions of anisotropic objects.

  6. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  7. Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    an information bridge between super-resolution microscopy and structural biology by using generative models

  8. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light fluxes does result in a progressive and significant increase in the amount of near-surface oxygen concentration at about the same level regardless of bituminous coal rank. These incremental changes in oxygen concentration appear to lower the hydrophobicity as shown by contact angle measurements on polished surfaces. Although this influence diminished as coal rank increased, the level of oxygen uptake was about the same, suggesting that the type of oxygen functionality formed during oxidation may be of great importance in modifying surface hydrophobicity. Changes in functional-group chemistry, measured by a variety of near-surface techniques, showed a general increase in the concentration of carbonyl-containing groups while those of CH{sub 2} groups decreased. All of these observations follow the trends observed in previous investigations of naturally weathered coals. The photo-oxidation technique also resulted in the development of phenolic, ester and anhydride moieties instead of the expected emplacement of carboxylic acid groups which are normally associated with naturally weathered coals. The importance of this observation is that esters and anhydrides would result in a more hydrophobic surface in comparison to the more hydrophilic surface resulting from acid functionality. This observation is consistent with the results of film flotation of UV-irradiated powdered vitrain in which floatability was generally observed to increase with increasing photo- oxidation.

  9. Summary of ISO/TC 201 Standard: XVIII, ISO 19318: 2004 - Surface...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XVIII, ISO 19318: 2004 - Surface Chemical Analysis - X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy - Summary of ISOTC 201 Standard: XVIII, ISO 19318: 2004 - Surface Chemical Analysis - X-Ray...

  10. Summary of ISO/TC 201 Standard: ISO 29081: 2010, Surface Chemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISO 29081: 2010, Surface Chemical Analysis - Auger Electron Spectroscopy - Reporting of Methods Summary of ISOTC 201 Standard: ISO 29081: 2010, Surface Chemical Analysis - Auger...

  11. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?°C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  12. Sample heating in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Elizabeth S.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating near the aperture of aluminumcoated,fiber opticnear-field scanning optical microscopy probes was studied as a function of input and output powers. Using the shear-force feedback method, near-field probes were positioned nanometers above a...

  13. Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

  14. Laser scanning third-harmonic-generation microscopy in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silberberg, Yaron

    . Denk, J. H. Stricker and W. W. Webb, "Two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy," Science 248, 73-76 (1990). 3. S. Maiti, J. B. Shear, R. M. Williams, W. R. Zipfel and W. W. Webb, "Measuring-214 (1996). 6. R. Hellwarth and P. Christensen, "Nonlinear optical microscopic examination of structure

  15. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  16. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Coupled with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a commercially available autosampler was adapted to perform direct liquid microjunction (LMJ) surface sampling followed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the extract components and detection with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). To illustrate the utility of coupling a separation with this direct liquid extraction based surface sampling approach, four different organs (brain, lung, kidney, and liver) from whole-body thin tissue sections of propranolol dosed and control mice were examined. The parent drug was observed in the chromatograms of the surface sampling extracts from all the organs of the dosed mouse examined. In addition, two isomeric phase II metabolites of propranolol (an aliphatic and an aromatic hydroxypropranolol glucuronide) were observed in the chromatograms of the extracts from lung, kidney, and liver. Confirming the presence of one or the other or both of these glucuronides in the extract from the various organs was not possible without the separation. These drug and metabolite data obtained using the LMJ surface sampling/HPLC-MS method and the results achieved by analyzing similar samples by conventional extraction of the tissues and subsequent HPLC-MS analysis were consistent.

  17. Domain switching by electron beam irradiation of Z{sup +}-polar surface in Mg-doped lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Chezganov, D. S.; Smirnov, M. M.; Alikin, D. O.; Neradovskiy, M. M.; Kuznetsov, D. K. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of the static domains with depth above 200??m in the bulk of MgO-doped lithium niobate single crystals as a result of focused electron beam irradiation of Z{sup +}-polar surface was demonstrated. The created domain patterns were visualized by high-resolution methods including piezoresponse force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy. The main stages of the domain structure formation were revealed and explained in terms of the original model.

  18. Stationary free surface viscous flows without surface tension in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Stationary free surface viscous flows without surface tension in three dimensions Frederic Abergel dimensional channel. In the absence of surface tension, we prove the existence of a unique stationary solution is not elliptic when surface tension is neglected. Hence, analysis such as that made in [4] or [17] fails

  19. Stationary free surface viscous ows without surface tension in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stationary free surface viscous ows without surface tension in three dimensions Frederic Abergel owing down a three dimensional channel. In the absence of surface tension, we prove the existence is not elliptic when surface tension is neglected. Hence, analysis such as that made in [4] or [17] fails

  20. Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

  1. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-? oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tselev, Alexander, E-mail: tseleva@ornl.gov; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100?nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  2. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  3. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  4. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; Sayre, D.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  5. Scanning Probe Laser Terahertz Emission Microscopy System Ryotaro INOUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    is irradiated from the vicinity of the surface by an optical-fiber probe. The large numerical aperture pulse is irradiated to the sample surface by a commercial optical-fiber probe (LWP-LEN-SM, Cascade the sample surface, and terahertz emission from the locally photoexcited area is obtained. Using an optical-fiber

  6. Scanning acoustic microscopy for mapping the microstructure of soft materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustics provides a powerful modality with which to 'see' the mechanical properties of a wide range of elastic materials. It is particularly adept at probing soft materials where excellent contrast and propagation distance can be achieved. We have constructed a scanning acoustic microscope capable of mapping the microstructure of such materials. We review the general principles of scanning acoustic microscopy and present new examples of its application in imaging biological matter, industrial materials and particulate systems.

  7. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A., E-mail: arun-nair-in@yahoo.com; Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V. [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India)] [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India); Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W. [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dubey, S. K. [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India)] [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India); Javidi, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  8. Numerical analysis of hypersonic continuum and rarefied gas flows near blunt probes is presented under conditions of intensive gas blowing from the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    1 Abstract Numerical analysis of hypersonic continuum and rarefied gas flows near blunt probes injection, hydrogen combustion, hypersonic flow, exponential box-scheme, direct-simulation Monte-Carlo method. 1 Introduction Numerical and experimental studies [1, 2] of aerothermodynamics of hypersonic

  9. Automated position control of a surface array relative to a liquid microjunction surface sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J. (Clinton, TN); Kertesz, Vilmos (Knoxville, TN); Ford, Michael James (Little Rock, AR)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method utilizes an image analysis approach for controlling the probe-to-surface distance of a liquid junction-based surface sampling system for use with mass spectrometric detection. Such an approach enables a hands-free formation of the liquid microjunction used to sample solution composition from the surface and for re-optimization, as necessary, of the microjunction thickness during a surface scan to achieve a fully automated surface sampling system.

  10. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  11. Probing the electronic structure of graphene sheets with various thicknesses by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)] [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of an aggregation of graphene sheets with various thicknesses was probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. A uniform oxidation of the graphene sheets in the flat area was observed regardless of the thickness, while in the folded area the result could be strongly affected by the geometry. Moreover, thick parts of the aggregation showed strong angle-dependence to the incident X-ray, while thin parts showed less angle-dependence, which might be related to the surface wrinkles and ripples. The electronic structure differences due to the geometry and thickness suggest a complicated situation in the aggregation of graphene sheets.

  12. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  13. High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Heejin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

  14. Wavelength swept spectrally encoded confocal microscopy for biological and clinical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudoux, Caroline

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a technique that facilitates the incorporation of confocal microscopy into small, portable clinical instruments. This would allow in vivo evaluation of cellular and sub-cellular ...

  15. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00...

  16. Towards automatic cell identi cation in DIC microscopy , C.A. Glasbey2y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, J. V.

    1998. Journal of Microscopy, 192, 186-193. #12;a b c Figure 1: DIC microscope images: a Chlorella algal

  17. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain)] [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  18. Application of surface energy measurements to evaluate moisture susceptibility of asphalt and aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollinger, Corey James

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    is assessed using surface energy measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Surface energy is defined as the energy needed to create a new unit surface area of material in vacuum condition. Surface energy measurements are used to compute the adhesive...

  19. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  20. Z .Thin Solid Films 391 2001 143 148 Submicrosecond range surface heating and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    Z .Thin Solid Films 391 2001 143 148 Submicrosecond range surface heating and temperature; accepted 22 March 2001 Abstract A method for submicrosecond heating of sensor surfaces and simultaneous as well as photo thermal and scanning force microscopy measurements were performed to optimize the heating

  1. Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

  2. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Guangyong, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  3. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  4. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecent SREL Reprints BackRecord-Setting Microscopy

  5. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  6. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. We show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

  7. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  8. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the morphology and chemistry of a PdCl{sub 2}/SnCl{sub 2} electroless plating catalysis system adsorbed onto shape memory alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvain, J.F.; Fouassier, O.; Lescaux, S. [Institut de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux (ICMCB) - CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 87 Avenue du Dr A. Schweitzer, F-33608 PESSAC (France); Veeco, Z.I. de la Gaudree, 11 Rue Marie Poussepin, F-91412 Dourdain (France)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the different stages of the electroless deposition of copper on micronic NiTi shape memory alloy particles activated by one-step and two-step methods has been conducted from both a chemical and a morphological point of view. The combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has allowed detection of the distribution of the formed compounds and depth quantification and estimation of the surface topographic parameters. For the two-step method, at the sensitization of the early stages, it is observed by AFM that Sn is absorbed in form of clusters that tend to completely cover the surface and form a continuous film. XPS analysis have shown that Sn and Pd are first absorbed in form of oxide (SnO{sub 2} and PdO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 4}]. After the entire sensitization step, the NiTi substrate is covered with Sn-based compounds. After the sensitization and the activation steps the powder roughness increases. Behavior of the Sn and Pd growth for the one-step method does not follow the behavior found for the two-step method. Indeed, XPS analysis shows a three-dimensional (3D) growth of Pd clusters on top of a mixture of metallic tin, oxide (SnO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 2}]. These Pd clusters are covered with a thin layer of Pd-oxide contamination induced by the electroless process. The mean roughness for the one-step and two-step processes are equivalent. After copper deposition, the decrease of mean roughness is attributed to a filling of surface valleys, observed after the Sn-Pd coating step.

  9. Advanced analysis of metal distributions in human hair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Skinner, William M. (U. South Australia)

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of techniques (secondary electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence) were utilized to distinguish metal contamination occurring in hair arising from endogenous uptake from an individual exposed to a polluted environment, in this case a lead smelter. Evidence was sought for elements less affected by contamination and potentially indicative of biogenic activity. The unique combination of surface sensitivity, spatial resolution, and detection limits used here has provided new insight regarding hair analysis. Metals such as Ca, Fe, and Pb appeared to have little representative value of endogenous uptake and were mainly due to contamination. Cu and Zn, however, demonstrate behaviors worthy of further investigation into relating hair concentrations to endogenous function.

  10. Comparative analysis of the high-order harmonic generation in the laser ablation plasmas prepared on the surfaces of complex and atomic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A. [Scientific Association Akadempribor, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, Akademgorodok, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed high-order harmonic generation from the plasma plumes prepared on the surfaces of complex targets. The studies of In-Ag targets showed that the characteristics of the high-order harmonics from the double-target plume were the same as those from the single-target plasmas. For the chromium-tellurium plasma, the enhancements of the 29th and 27th harmonics were obtained, thus indicating the appearance of the enhancement properties from both components of the double-target plasma. These comparative studies also showed higher enhancement of a single harmonic in the case of atomic plasma (Sb) with regard to the molecular one (InSb). The additional component can only decrease the enhancement factor of the medium, due to the change of the oscillator strength and spectral distribution of the transitions involved in the resonance enhancement of the specific harmonic order. The theoretical calculations have shown the enhancement of specific harmonics for the Sb, Te, and Cr plasmas in the double-target configurations.

  11. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D{sub 0}?=?0.53(×2.1±1) cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1} that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  12. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  13. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  14. Effect of flux addition on the microstructure and hardness of TiC-reinforced ferrous surface composite layers fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, S.H.; Lee, S.; Kwon, S.J.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface composites reinforced with TiC particulates were fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation. In order to investigate the effects of flux addition on the TiC dispersion in surface composite layers, four kinds of powder mixtures were made by mixing TiC with 5, 10, 20, and 40 wt% of the flux components (MgO-CaO). To fabricate TiC-reinforced surface composites, the TiC-flux mixtures were deposited evenly on a plain carbon steel substrate, which was subjected to electron-beam irradiation. Microstructural analysis was conducted using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of the surface composites was composed of a melted region, an interfacial region, a coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ), a fine-grained HAZ, and an unaltered original substrate region. TiC agglomerates and residual pores were found in the melted region of materials processed without flux, but the number of agglomerates and pores are significantly decreased in materials processed with a considerable amount of flux. As a result of irradiation, TiC particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the melted region of 2.5 mm in thickness, whose hardness was greatly increased. The optimum flux amount, which resulted in surface composites containing homogeneously dispersed TiC particles, was found to be in the range of 10 to 20% to obtain excellent surface composites.

  15. Genesis and evolution of surface species during Pt atomic layer deposition on oxide supports characterized by in-situ XAFS analysis and water-gas shift reaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setthapun, W.; Williams, W.; Kim, S.; Feng, H.; Elam, J.; Rabuffetti, F.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Stair, P.; Stach, E.; Ribeiro, F.; Miller, J.; Marshall, C.; Northwestern Univ.; Purdue Univ.

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Platinum atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} was employed to prepare high loadings of uniform-sized, 1-2 nm Pt nanoparticles on high surface area Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and SrTiO{sub 3} supports. X-ray absorption fine structure was utilized to monitor the changes in the Pt species during each step of the synthesis. The temperature, precursor exposure time, treatment gas, and number of ALD cycles were found to affect the Pt particle size and density. Lower-temperature MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorption yielded smaller particles due to reduced thermal decomposition. A 300 C air treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to PtO. In subsequent ALD cycles, the MeCpPtMe{sub 3} reduces the PtO to metallic Pt in the ratio of one precursor molecule per PtO. A 200 C H{sub 2} treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to the formation of 1-2 nm, metallic Pt nanoparticles. During subsequent ALD cycles, MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorbs on the support, which, upon reduction, yields additional Pt nanoparticles with a minimal increase in size of the previously formed nanoparticles. The catalysts produced by ALD had identical water-gas shift reaction rates and reaction kinetics to those of Pt catalysts prepared by standard solution methods. ALD synthesis of catalytic nanoparticles is an attractive method for preparing novel model and practical catalysts.

  16. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  17. Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

  18. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  19. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  20. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, W. S., E-mail: liuweicheng@zju.edu.cn; Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, J. [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Luo, J. K. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  1. Electron microscopy and microanalysis Two transmission electron microscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution (laser scatter- ing) q Powder surface area by gas adsorption (BET) Commercially Available of a failed austenitic stainless steel tube. The failure type is identified as a fatigue failure, due

  2. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Centre for Sustainable Energy, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  3. Initial stages of the autocatalytic oxidation of the InAs(0 0 1)-(4 2)/c(8 2) surface by molecular oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    by molecular oxygen Jonathon B. Clemens a , Sarah R. Bishop a , Darby L. Feldwinn a,1 , Ravi Droopad b,2 simulations Scanning tunneling microscopy Chemisorption Oxidation Indium arsenide Oxygen Semi conducting) surface by molecular oxygen (O2) were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density

  4. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Progress report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, D.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary focus of this research is to address those issues which are keys to understanding the relationship between surface properties and catalytic activity/selectivity. These issues also impact the understanding of the origins of the enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), ultraviolet and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy (STM and AFM). This research program builds upon previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well, the authors are exploiting recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. Specifically, the program is proceeding toward three goals: (1) the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; (2) the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and (3) the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  5. Photoionization microscopy in terms of local frame transformation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giannakeas; F. Robicheaux; Chris H. Greene

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon ionization of an alkali-metal atom in the presence of a uniform electric field is investigated using a standardized form of local frame transformation and generalized quantum defect theory. The relevant long-range quantum defect parameters in the combined Coulombic plus Stark potential is calculated with eigenchannel R-matrix theory applied in the downstream parabolic coordinate $\\eta$. The present formulation permits us to express the corresponding microscopy observables in terms of the local frame transformation, and it gives a critical test of the accuracy of the Harmin-Fano theory permitting a scholastic investigation of the claims presented in Zhao {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012)].

  6. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

  7. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmen, Tim [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G [ORNL] [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kubel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany; Slusallek, Phillip [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; De Jonge, Niels [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  8. Handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiraki, Atsushi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by adopting an in-line type hologram, a webcam, a high power RGB light emitting diode (LED), and a pinhole. It cost less than 20,000 yen (approximately 250 US dollars at 80 yen/dollar), and was approximately 120 mm x 80 mm x 55 mm in size. In addition, by adjusting the recording-distance of a hologram, the lateral resolution power at the most suitable distance was 17.5 um. Furthermore, this DHM was developed for use in open source libraries, and is therefore low-cost and can be easily developed by anyone. In this research, it is the feature to cut down cost and size and to improve the lateral resolution power further rather than existing reports. This DHM will be a useful application in fieldwork, education, and so forth.

  9. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H; Downing, K; Huang, X; Kirz, J; Marchesini, S; Nelson, J; Shapiro, D; Steinbrener, J; Stewart, A; Jacobsen, C

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  10. Two-Color Ultrafast Photoexcited Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camillone, N.; Dolocan, A.; Acharya, D.P.; Zahl, P.; Sutter, P.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on two-color two-photon photoexcitation of a metal surface driven by ultrafast laser pulses and detected with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a proximate anode. Results are presented for two cases: (i) where the tip is retracted from the surface far enough to prohibit tunneling, and (ii) where the tip is within tunneling range of the surface. A delay-modulation technique is implemented to isolate the two-color photoemission from concurrent one-color two-photon photoemission and provide subpicosecond time-resolved detection. When applied with the tip in tunneling range, this approach effectively isolates the two-photon photoexcited current signal from the conventional tunneling current and enables subpicosecond time-resolved detection of the photoexcited surface electrons. The advantage of the two-color approach is highlighted by comparison with the one-color case where optical interference causes thermal modulation of the STM tip length, resulting in tunneling current modulations that are orders of magnitude larger than the current due to photoexcitation of surface electrons. By completely eliminating this interference, and thereby avoiding thermal modulation of the STM tip length, the two-color approach represents an important step toward the ultimate goal of simultaneous subnanometer and subpicosecond measurements of surface electron dynamics by ultrafast-laser-excited STM.

  11. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical origins of this phenomenon is therefore needed for designing cathode materials with optimal surface chemistry. We quantitatively assessed the elastic and electrostatic interactions of the dopant with the surrounding lattice as the key driving forces for segregation on model perovskite compounds, LnMnO3 (host cation Ln=La, Sm). Our approach combines surface chemical analysis with X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy on model dense thin films, and computational analysis with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and analytical models. Elastic energy differences were systematically induced in the system by varying the radius of the selected dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba) with respect to the host cations (La, Sm) while retaining the same charge state. Electrostatic energy differences were introduced by varying the distribution of charged oxygen and cation vacancies in our models. Varying the oxygen chemical potential in our experiments induced changes in both the elastic energy and electrostatic interactions. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that the mechanism of dopant segregation on perovskite oxides includes both the elastic and electrostatic energy contributions. A smaller size mismatch between the host and dopant cations and a chemically expanded lattice were found to reduce the segregation level of the dopant and to enable more stable cathode surfaces. Ca-doped LaMnO3 was found to have the most stable surface composition with the least cation segregation among the compositions surveyed. The diffusion kinetics of the larger dopants, Ba and Sr, was found to be slower, and can kinetically trap the segregation at reduced temperatures despite the larger elastic energy driving force. Lastly, scanning probe image-contrast showed that the surface chemical heterogeneities made of dopant oxides upon segregation were electronically insulating. The consistency between the results obtained from experiments, DFT calculations and analytical theory in this work provides a predictive capability to tailor the cathode surface compositions for high-performance SO

  12. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  13. ITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    , Acknowledgment Surface waves are phenomena that are characterised by the dynamic interplay between linear.3 Linear Dispersive wave model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Wave groupsITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves Brenny van Groesen, Applied Analysis & Mathematical

  14. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  15. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F., E-mail: roger.loring@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  16. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

  18. Comparison of Graphene Formation on C-face and Si-face SiC {0001} Surfaces Luxmi, N. Srivastava, Guowei He, and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Comparison of Graphene Formation on C-face and Si-face SiC {0001} Surfaces Luxmi, N. Srivastava of graphene formed on the ( 1000 ) surface (the C-face) and the (0001) surface (the Si-face) of Si) and low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The graphene forms due to preferential sublimation of Si from

  19. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Manaka, Sachie [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Nakane, Daisuke [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption spectroscopic microscopy Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    version of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The tunable infrared radiation... the l 3.5 mm, CH vibrational stretch mode absorption band. ... Source:...

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of whiskers and hillocks formed on Al films deposited onto a glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saka, H.; Fujino, S.; Kuroda, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Tsujimoto, K.; Tsuji, S. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Shimotsuruma, Yamato, Kanagawa 242 (Japan); Takatsuji, H. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Ichimiyake, Yasu-gun, Shiga 520-23 (Japan)

    1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Whiskers and hillocks formed on an Al film deposited onto a glass substrate have been observed by means of a variety of transmission electron microscopy technique.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical electron microscopy Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Rutgers Research Showcase Summary: Electron Microscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy X-Ray Diffraction Facility (XRD) Micro-Analytical... for...

  3. Thermal calibration of photodiode sensitivity for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attard, Phil; Pettersson, Torbjoern; Rutland, Mark W. [School of Chemistry F11, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia (Australia); Department of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden and Institute for Surface Chemistry, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodiode sensitivity in the atomic force microscope is calibrated by relating the voltage noise to the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever angle. The method accounts for the ratio of the thermal fluctuations measured in the fundamental vibration mode to the total, and also for the tilt and extended tip of the cantilever. The method is noncontact and is suitable for soft or deformable surfaces where the constant compliance method cannot be used. For hard surfaces, the method can also be used to calibrate the cantilever spring constant.

  4. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  5. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal & Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Satish, C

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  6. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taoufyq, A. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Département d‘Études des Réacteurs, Laboratoire Dosimétrie Capteurs Instrumentation, CEA Cadarache (France); Société CESIGMA—Signals and Systems, 1576 Chemin de La Planquette, F 83 130 LA GARDE (France); Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Patout, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The bismuth tungstate Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2{sub 1} non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 °C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 °C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: • Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. • The phase transition at 660 °C is evidenced from electrical modification.

  7. surface science | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface science surface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Nonlinear Photoemission Electron Micrographs of Plasmonic Nanoholes in Gold Thin Films. Abstract:...

  8. Surface tension and contact with soft elastic solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Callen Hyland; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

    2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson-Kendall-Robert (JKR) theory is the basis of modern contact mechanics. It describes how two deformable objects adhere together, driven by adhesion energy and opposed by elasticity. However, it does not include solid surface tension, which also opposes adhesion by acting to flatten the surface of soft solids. We tested JKR theory to see if solid surface tension affects indentation behaviour. Using confocal microscopy, we characterised the indentation of glass particles into soft, silicone substrates. While JKR theory held for particles larger than a critical, elastocapillary lengthscale, it failed for smaller particles. Instead, adhesion of small particles mimicked the adsorption of particles at a fluid interface, with a size-independent contact angle between the undeformed surface and the particle given by a generalised version of Young's law. A simple theory quantitatively captures this behaviour, and explains how solid surface tension dominates elasticity for small-scale indentation of soft materials.

  9. Predicting the stability of surface phases of molybdenum selenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roma, Guido [Institut für Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, D-55128, Mainz (Germany); CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, F-91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ghorbani, Elaheh [Institut für Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, D-55128, Mainz (Germany); IBM Mainz (Germany); Mirhosseini, Hossein; Kühne, Thomas D. [Institut für Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, D-55128, Mainz (Germany); Kiss, Janos; Felser, Claudia [Institut für Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, D-55128, Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The selenization of molybdenum might become an important step in the production of nanostructures based on the layered compound MoSe{sub 2}. It is already technologically relevant for the production of thin film chalcopyrite solar cells. However, the control of the process is still very poor, due to the lack of basic knowledge of the surface thermodynamics of the system. Here, we present a theoretical study on the stability of surface adlayers of Se on the Mo(110) surface, predicting surface patterns and their stability range in terms of temperature and selenium partial pressure. Our results, based on density functional theory, show that the attainable Se coverages range from 1/4 to 3/4 of a monolayer for systems in equilibrium with a gas formed of Se molecules. We provide simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images to help the experimental characterization of adsorbed surface patterns.

  10. Corrosion protection of ENIG surface finishing using electrochemical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, Q.V.; Nam, N.D.; Choi, D.H.; Lee, J.B.; Lee, C.Y. [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kar, A. [National Metallurgical Laboratory (CSIR), Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory (CSIR), Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Kim, J.G. [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, S.B., E-mail: sbjung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of thin film coating were carried out on copper for electronic materials by the electroless plating method at a pH range from 3 to 9. The coating performance was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization testing in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. In addition, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction were also used to analyze the coating surfaces. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings was improved using the electroless nickel plating solution of pH 5. The electroless nickel/immersion gold on the copper substrate exhibited high protective efficiency, charge transfer resistance and very low porosity, indicating an increase in corrosion resistance. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the surface uniformity and the formation of the crystalline-refined NiP {l_brace}1 2 2{r_brace} phase at pH 5.

  11. Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques) to examine the molecular-level details of heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. Among them range of surface analytical techniques at low temperature ­ enables ultra-violet/X-ray photoelectron electron diffraction (LEED). In situ sample preparation ­ offers heating up to 1500 K, cooling down to 50 K

  12. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  13. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spemann, D., E-mail: spemann@uni-leipzig.de; Esquinazi, P., E-mail: esquin@physik.uni-leipzig.de; Setzer, A.; Böhlmann, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  14. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Corradini; Kumar Sridharan

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  15. Surface texture and specific adsorption sites of sol-gel synthesized anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaki, Mohamed I., E-mail: mizaki@link.net [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia, 61519 (Egypt); Mekhemer, Gamal A.H.; Fouad, Nasr E. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia, 61519 (Egypt)] [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia, 61519 (Egypt); Jagadale, Tushar C. [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India)] [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Ogale, Satishchandra B., E-mail: sb.ogale@ncl.res.in [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface properties of sol-gel synthesized anatase titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are probed by sorptiometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results reveal strong correlations of the surface area, porosity, pyridine adsorption capacity and strength, and catalytic methylbutynol decomposition activity.

  16. AFM/LFM surface studies of a ternary polymer blend cast on substrates covered by a self-assembled monolayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbigniew, Postawa

    AFM/LFM surface studies of a ternary polymer blend cast on substrates covered by a self force microscopy; Friction; Self-assembly; Surface thermodynamics (including phase transitions); Growth are of utmost current interest. In many practical appli- cations films of incompatible mixtures are pre- pared

  17. Characterization of an Irradiated RERTR-7 Fuel Plate Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Gan; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. D. Miller; A. B. Robinson; P. Medvedev

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize an irradiated fuel plate with Al-2Si matrix from the RERTR-7 experiment that was irradiated under moderate reactor conditions. The results of this work showed the presence of a bubble superlattice within the U-7Mo grains that accommodated fission gases (e.g., Xe). The presence of this structure helps the U-7Mo exhibit a stable swelling behaviour during irradiation. Furthermore, TEM analysis showed that the Si-rich interaction layers that develop around the fuel particles at the U-7Mo/matrix interface during fuel plate fabrication and irradiation become amorphous during irradiation, and in regions of the interaction layer that have relatively high Si concentrations the fission gas bubbles remain small and contained within the layer but in areas with lower Si concentrations the bubbles grow in size. An important question that remains to be answered about the irradiation behaviour of U-Mo dispersion fuels, is how do more aggressive irradiation conditions affect the behaviour of fission gases within the U-7Mo fuel particles and in the amorphous interaction layers on the microstructural scale that can be characterized using TEM? This paper discusses the results of TEM analysis that was performed on a sample taken from an irradiated RERTR-7 fuel plate with Al-2Si matrix. This plate was exposed to more aggressive irradiation conditions than was the sample taken from the RERTR-6 plate. The microstructural features present within the U-7Mo and the amorphous interaction layers will be discussed. The results of this analysis will be compared to what was observed in the earlier RERTR-6 fuel plate characterization.

  18. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  19. Unified Surface Analysis Manual Weather Prediction Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -bone in stage IV. The stages in the respective cyclone evolutions are separated by approximately 6­ 24 h's) National Weather Service (NWS) were generally based on the Norwegian Cyclone Model (Bjerknes 1919) over below shows a typical evolution according to both models of cyclone development. Conceptual models

  20. Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the system will include an intense He lamp for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), an argon ion gun for sputter depth profiling, and a C60 ion gun for high-resolution...

  1. Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the‹ See allElectrochemicalElectron

  2. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Surface Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearch Staff Materials and Chemical Science

  3. Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    based systems can be used as electrolytes to develop solid oxide fuel cells for clean energy production and to prevent air... Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide...

  4. Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the effect of surface preparation on the radiation buildup of steam generator materials of construction was conducted. The tests consisted of exposing treated manway seal plates to primary reactor coolant during the second through the fifth fuel cycle of the Chinon B1 pressurized water reactor. The pretreatments included: mechanical polishing, electropolishing (either on the as received surface or on a surface which had been previously mechanically polished), and passivation via the RCT (laboratory) process or the Framatome (in situ) process. Radioactivity buildup was determined at the end of each fuel cycle. A selected number of the seal plates were removed from the steam generators after each exposure cycle for destructive examinations. The electropolished surfaces exhibited a significantly lower radioactive buildup rate; an average factor of five less buildup compared to an as-received surface. Passivation of the electropolished surface, especially via the RCT process, reduced the buildup rate still further by a factor of two over the electropolished-only surface. Examination of the surfaces by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, etc., after exposure indicated no detrimental effects on the surface characteristics attributable to the surface treatments. A program has now been instituted to electropolish the steam generator channel heads of all new reactors in France, as well as the steam generators intended for replacement in existing plants. 1 ref., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE-EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis Science #12;ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis) ______________________________ ______________________________ Ergun Akleman Valerie Taylor (Member) (Head of Department) December 2003 Major Subject: Computer Science

  6. High spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a total optical power proportional to its absolute temperature to the fourth power. An object that hasHigh spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a) S. A. Thorne, M. G increasing lens technique to subsurface thermal emission microscopy of Si integrated circuits. We achieve

  7. Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Yining-downregulated alfalfa lines were imaged using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The 1,600-cm-1 (CARS) . Lignin-downregulated alfalfa Introduction Lignocellulosic biomass is under consideration

  8. Technical note: Characterizing individual milk fat globules with holographic video microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Technical note: Characterizing individual milk fat globules with holographic video microscopy Fook representation of holographic video microscopy. The sample scatters light from a collimated laser beam. Both to a video camera, which records their interference as a hologram. A typical example of one fat droplet

  9. Size effects in bimetallic nickelgold nanowires: Insight from atomic force microscopy nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansoz, Frederic

    Size effects in bimetallic nickel­gold nanowires: Insight from atomic force microscopy the local plastic behavior and hardness properties of electrodeposited bimetallic Ni­Au NWs ranging from 60 rights reserved. Keywords: Atomic force microscopy (AFM); Nanowire; Nickel; Gold; Nanoindentation 1

  10. Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene-based devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene; accepted 24 July 2007; published online 15 August 2007 Raman microscopy of graphene was carried out over-band frequencies extracted from Raman spectra of the single-layer graphene are - 1.6±0.2 10-2 cm-1 /K and - 3

  11. Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology Ji 11747-3157 USA ABSTRACT Laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with fast., 1990). Duncan et al. constructed the first CARS microscope by use of two dye laser beams

  12. SUBMOLECULAR IMAGING OF EPITAXIALLY CRYSTALLIZED HELICAL POLYOLEFINS BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    Digital Instruments, Inc., Santa Barbara, Cal. USA. Images were taken with an A­type scan head (max. scan microscopy EM and electron diffraction ED. AFM pictures with high resolution could be obtained when using polypropylene has been determined by electron microscopy EM and electron diffraction ED: chain conformation

  13. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL] [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL] [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

  14. Micro- and nanodomain imaging in uniaxial ferroelectrics: Joint application of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Zelenovskiy, P. S. [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the most effective methods of the domain visualization in model uniaxial ferroelectrics of lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) family, and relaxor strontium-barium niobate (SBN) have been reviewed in this paper. We have demonstrated the synergetic effect of joint usage of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopies which provide extracting of the unique information about formation of the micro- and nanodomain structures. The methods have been applied for investigation of various types of domain structures with increasing complexity: (1) periodical domain structure in LN and LT, (2) nanodomain structures in LN, LT, and SBN, (3) nanodomain structures in LN with modified surface layer, (4) dendrite domain structure in LN. The self-assembled appearance of quasi-regular nanodomain structures in highly non-equilibrium switching conditions has been considered.

  15. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Corbin1 , Niklas Dellby1 , Matthew F. Murfitt1 , Christopher S. Own1 , Zoltan S. Szilagyi1 , Mark P

  16. Submitted to Microscopy and Analysis (March 2000) On the measurement by EDX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by electrodeposition is analysed, where 2hCu denotes the thickness of the copper layer and hNi that of each Nickel

  17. Submitted to Microscopy and Analysis (March 2000) On the measurement by EDX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a Ni/Cu/Ni layered material of overall thickness 2(hCu+hNi) 100µm obtained by electrodeposition is analysed, where 2hCu denotes the thickness of the copper layer and hNi that of each Nickel layer

  18. Computational image analysis of subcellular dynamics in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Austin V., 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of image segmentation and motion tracking algorithms was adapted for analyzing time-lapse data of cells with fluorescently labeled protein. Performance metrics were devised and algorithm parameters were matched to ...

  19. Atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy analysis of palladium and silver nanophase materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattler, Klaus

    . INTRODUCTION Nanophase materials consolidated from atom clusters produced by the gas condensation method be made by gas condensation, not only at the labo- ratory scale but also in commercial production and properties of nano- phase materials assembled by consolidating gas-condensed atom clusters in vacuum have

  20. NANOMETER-SCALE INVESTIGATIONS BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY INTO THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TREATMENTS ON THE SURFACE STRUCTURE OF HAIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durkan, C.; Wang, N.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    number rms r oughn ess (n m) 0   10   20   30   40   50   1   6   11   16   Shampoos C O Before washing FIGURE 11 ...

  1. Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

  2. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon L Dettmer; Ulrich F Keyser; Stefano Pagliara

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g. electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  3. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  4. Multifocal Multiphoton Laser-Scanning Structured Illumination Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUN 2

  5. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy for Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/Surface Reactions andOctober 5,

  6. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Transport Measurements by Scanning Probe Microscopy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/Surface Reactions andOctober 5,October

  7. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos, Sandia National

  8. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos, Sandia

  9. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos, SandiaXL30

  10. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos, SandiaXL30Strata

  11. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos,

  12. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos,840 EPMA with

  13. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos,840 EPMA withCM30

  14. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplantsLosAlamos,840 EPMA withCM30XL30

  15. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

  16. Femtosecond time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy for spatiotemporal imaging of photogenerated carrier dynamics in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukumoto, Keiki, E-mail: fukumoto.k.ab@m.titech.ac.jp; Yamada, Yuki; Matsuki, Takashi; Koshihara, Shin-ya [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-CREST, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Onda, Ken [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-PRESTO, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Sei-ichi [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed an instrument for time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM) utilizing femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to visualize the dynamics of photogenerated electrons in semiconductors on ultrasmall and ultrafast scales. The spatial distribution of the excited electrons and their relaxation and/or recombination processes were imaged by the proposed TR-PEEM method with a spatial resolution about 100 nm and an ultrafast temporal resolution defined by the cross-correlation of the fs laser pulses (240 fs). A direct observation of the dynamical behavior of electrons on higher resistivity samples, such as semiconductors, by TR-PEEM has still been facing difficulties because of space and/or sample charging effects originating from the high photon flux of the ultrashort pulsed laser utilized for the photoemission process. Here, a regenerative amplified fs laser with a widely tunable repetition rate has been utilized, and with careful optimization of laser parameters, such as fluence and repetition rate, and consideration for carrier lifetimes, the electron dynamics in semiconductors were visualized. For demonstrating our newly developed TR-PEEM method, the photogenerated carrier lifetimes around a nanoscale defect on a GaAs surface were observed. The obtained lifetimes were on a sub-picosecond time scale, which is much shorter than the lifetimes of carriers observed in the non-defective surrounding regions. Our findings are consistent with the fact that structural defects induce mid-gap states in the forbidden band, and that the electrons captured in these states promptly relax into the ground state.

  17. Terahertz imaging of sub-wavelength particles with Zenneck surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro-Cía, M., E-mail: m.navarro@imperial.ac.uk [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Centre for Plasmonics and Metamaterials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Terahertz Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Natrella, M.; Graham, C.; Renaud, C. C.; Seeds, A. J.; Mitrofanov, O., E-mail: o.mitrofanov@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Dominec, F.; Kužel, P., E-mail: kuzelp@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Delagnes, J. C.; Mounaix, P., E-mail: p.mounaix@loma.u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Bordeaux 1 University, CNRS UMR 4798, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of sub-wavelength-size dielectric particles on Zenneck surface waves on planar metallic antennas is investigated at terahertz (THz) frequencies with THz near-field probe microscopy. Perturbations of the surface waves show the particle presence, despite its sub-wavelength size. The experimental configuration, which utilizes excitation of surface waves at metallic edges, is suitable for THz imaging of dielectric sub-wavelength size objects. As a proof of concept, the effects of a small strontium titanate rectangular particle and a titanium dioxide sphere on the surface field of a bow-tie antenna are experimentally detected and verified using full-wave simulations.

  18. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ?50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  19. Fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on aluminum alloy substrates by RF-sputtered polytetrafluoroethylene coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Hai Feng, E-mail: wy3121685@163.com; Zhou, Zhi Ping [Department of Microelectronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China)] [Department of Microelectronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a method of fabricating super-hydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy substrate. The etching of aluminum surfaces has been performed using Beck's dislocation etchant for different time to create micrometer-sized irregular steps. An optimised etching time of 50 s is found to be essential before polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, to obtain a highest water contact angle of 165±2° with a lowest contact angle hysteresis as low as 5±2°. The presence of patterned microstructure as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the low surface energy ultrathin RF-sputtered PTFE films renders the aluminum alloy surfaces highly super-hydrophobic.

  20. surface chemistry | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface chemistry surface chemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study....

  1. Two-dimensional Vortex Behavior in Highly Underdoped YBa2Cu3O6 x Observed by Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guikema, J.W.

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report scanning Hall probe microscopy of highly underdoped superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} with T{sub c} ranging from 5 to 15 K which showed distinct flux bundles with less than one superconducting flux quantum ({Iota}{sub 0}) through the sample surface. The sub-{Iota}{sub 0} features occurred more frequently for lower T{sub c}, were more mobile than conventional vortices, and occurred more readily when the sample was cooled with an in-plane field component. We show that these features are consistent with kinked stacks of pancake vortices.

  2. Two-dimensional Vortex Behavior in Highly Underdoped YBa_2Cu_3O_{6+x} Observed byScanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guikema, J.W.; Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Bonn, D.A.; Liang, Ruixing; Hardy, W.N.; /British Columbia U.; Moler, K.A.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report scanning Hall probe microscopy of highly underdoped superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+z} with T{sub c} ranging from 5 to 15 K which showed distinct flux bundles with less than one superconducting flux quantum ({Phi}{sub 0}) through the sample surface. The sub-{Phi}{sub 0} features occurred more frequently for lower T{sub c}, were more mobile than conventional vortices, and occurred more readily when the sample was cooled with an in-plane field component. We show that these features are consistent with kinked stacks of pancake vortices.

  3. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  4. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  5. In Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nanosecond irradiation coupled with extinction measurement Total deposited fluence Fig. 2 Optical microscopyIn Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser Irradiation of Silver Ion Exchanged Silicate Glass Olivier Véron & Jean-Philippe Blondeau

  6. Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment N. Srivastavaa , Guowei-face, graphene, interface structure, low energy electron microscopy, disilane Abstract. The formation of epitaxial graphene on SiC( 1000 ) in a disilane environment is studied. The higher graphitization

  7. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  8. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  9. Alpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -differential-interference-contrast microscopy; Scanning force microscopy; Natural radiation damage 1. Introduction Alpha-recoil tracks (ARTsAlpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force

  10. SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

  11. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; Parten, Randy J [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Geer, Tom [ORNL

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  12. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  13. Scanning photovoltage microscopy of potential modulations in carbon Marcus Freitag,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Scanning photovoltage microscopy of potential modulations in carbon nanotubes Marcus Freitag generated photovoltage in carbon nanotubes to image potential modulations produced by defects are consistent with trapped electrons near the tube. An offset photovoltage is generated when the laser populates

  14. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Peter; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of questions in systems biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organism. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microscopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important par...

  15. Industrial Affiliates Day 2006, April 21, 2006 ULTRAFAST NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    of studies, including photochemical reactions, molecular dynamics, micropharmacology and optical memory. History of Two-Photon Molecular Excitation 1905 First Conception: A. Einstein: Creation and Conversion for data storage. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, multiphoton excitation (MPE) provides 3D

  16. Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Euiheon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

  17. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

  18. Improving the delivery and efficacy of molecular medicine via extracellular matrix modulation : insights from intravital microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Trevor David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extracellular matrix of tumors is a major barrier to the delivery of molecular medicine. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching combined with intravital microscopy to quantitate the transport properties of ...

  19. Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue engineering: A polylactide model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue engineering: A polylactide model K. J. L seeding; magnetic resonance mi- croscopy; polylactide; tissue engineering INTRODUCTION Absorbable polymers Engineering Research Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 2 Department of Radiology

  20. Thermal and Optical Characterization of Photonic Integrated Circuits by Thermoreflectance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgings, Janice A.

    We report high resolution, non-invasive, thermal and optical characterization of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and SOA-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) using thermoreflectance microscopy. Chip-scale ...

  1. Demonstration of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy / Spectroscopy on the Au/Si (001) system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drummond, Mary Alyssa

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy; hence, the analytical capabilities of BEEM are on a manometer scale. To use BEEM, low-noise Au/Si (001) Schottky diodes have been fabricated. The diodes were macroscopically tested for their electrical properties using conventional current...

  2. Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms for Early Detection of Oral Epithelial Cancer Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joohyung

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the clinical potential of the endogenous multispectral Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was investigated to objectively detect oral cancer. To this end, in vivo FLIM imaging was performed on a hamster cheek pouch model...

  3. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  4. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  5. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  6. Design and implementation of a fiber optic doppler optical coherence microscopy system for cochlear imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Logan P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the design and implementation of a fiber optic Doppler optical coherence microscopy (FO-DOCM) system for cochlear imaging applications is presented. The use of a fiber optic design significantly reduces ...

  7. Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor-based adaptive optics system for microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Peter T. C.

    The imaging depth of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy is partly limited by the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in biological specimens. This inhomogeneity results in a distortion of the wavefront of the ...

  8. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, J.; Huang, X.; Steinbrener, J.; Shapiro, D.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Neiman, A. M.; Turner, J. J.; Jacobsen, C.

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolu- tion limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11–13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of mole- cular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lec- tin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  9. GR via Characteristic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonetta Frittelli; Carlos Kozameh; Ted Newman

    1995-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We reformulate the Einstein equations as equations for families of surfaces on a four-manifold. These surfaces eventually become characteristic surfaces for an Einstein metric (with or without sources). In particular they are formulated in terms of two functions on R4xS2, i.e. the sphere bundle over space-time, - one of the functions playing the role of a conformal factor for a family of associated conformal metrics, the other function describing an S2's worth of surfaces at each space-time point. It is from these families of surfaces themselves that the conformal metric - conformal to an Einstein metric - is constructed; the conformal factor turns them into Einstein metrics. The surfaces are null surfaces with respect to this metric.

  10. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  11. Colour centres and nanostructures on the surface of laser crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulagin, N A [Firma SIFA Ukraine - Germany Joint Venture, ul. Shekspira 6-48, 61045 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of structural and radiationinduced colour centres in the bulk and ordered nanostructures on the surface of doped laser crystals: sapphire, yttrium aluminium garnet and strontium titanate. The influence of thermal annealing, ionising radiation and plasma exposure on the spectroscopic properties of high-purity materials and crystals containing Ti, V and Cr impurities is examined. Colour centres resulting from changes in the electronic state of impurities and plasma-induced surface modification of the crystals are studied by optical, EPR and X-ray spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. X-ray line valence shift measurements are used to assess changes in the electronic state of some impurity and host ions in the bulk and on the surface of oxide crystals. Conditions are examined for the formation of one- and two-level arrays of ordered crystallites 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -7} m in size on the surface of crystals doped with irongroup and lanthanoid ions. The spectroscopic properties of the crystals are analysed using ab initio self-consistent field calculations for Me{sup n+} : [O{sup 2-}]{sub k} clusters. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Development of the Ultrashort Pulse Nonlinear Optical Microscopy Spectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Anthony Chien-der

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF THE ULTRASHORT PULSE NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM A Dissertation by ANTHONY CHIEN-DER LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Anthony Chien-der Lee DEVELOPMENT OF THE ULTRASHORT PULSE NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM A Dissertation by ANTHONY CHIEN-DER LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  13. Investigations of laser-induced damages in fused silica optics using x-ray laser interferometric microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margarone, D.; Rus, B.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Homer, P.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M. [Department of X-ray Lasers/PALS Centre, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Lagron, J. C.; Ros, D. [LIXAM, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Danson, C.; Hawkes, S. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel x-ray laser (XRL) application, aimed at understanding the microscopic effects involved in formation of laser-induced damage in optical materials exposed to high-power sub-ns laser pulses, is presented. Standard fused silica substrates with permanent damage threshold below 20 J/cm{sup 2}, when irradiated by 438 nm laser pulses, were probed in situ by a neonlike zinc XRL at 21.2 nm. The probing beamline employed a double Lloyd's mirror x-ray interferometer, used in conjunction with an imaging mirror to achieve magnification of {approx}8. In conjunction with an array of in situ optical diagnostics, the main question addressed is whether the damage on the rear surface of the beamsplitter is transient or permanent. The second issue, examined by both the x-ray interferometric microscopy and the optical diagnostics, is whether a local rear-surface modification is associated with nonlinear effects such as self-focusing or filamentation of the damaging laser beam in the bulk.

  14. Bouncing or sticky droplets: impalement transitions on superhydrophobic micropatterned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Bartolo; Farid Bouamrirene; Emilie Verneuil; Axel Buguin; Pascal Silberzan; Sebastien Moulinet

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    When a liquid drops impinges a hydrophobic rough surface it can either bounce off the surface (fakir droplets) or be impaled and strongly stuck on it (Wenzel droplets). The analysis of drop impact and quasi static ''loading'' experiments on model microfabricated surfaces allows to clearly identify the forces hindering the impalement transitions. A simple semi-quantitative model is proposed to account for the observed relation between the surface topography and the robustness of fakir non-wetting states. Motivated by potential applications in microfluidics and in the fabrication of self cleaning surfaces, we finally propose some guidelines to design robust superhydrophobic surfaces.

  15. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  16. Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Lin, Y. H. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

  17. Hydrogen Dissociation on Pd4S Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.B.; Alfonso, D.R.; Howard, B.H.; O'Brien, C.P.; Morreale, B.D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure of Pd-based hydrogen purification membranes to H,S. a common contaminant in coal gasification streams, can cause membrane performance to deteriorate, either by deactivating surface sites required for dissociative H, adsorption or by forming a low-permeability sulfide scale. In this work. the composition, structure, and catalytic activity of Pd4S, a surface scale commonly observed in Pd-membrane separation of hydrogen from sulfur-containing gas streams, were examined using a combination of experimental characterization and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A Pd,S sample was prepared by exposing a 100 f1m Pd foil to H2S at 908 K. Both X-ray photoemission depth profiling and low energy ion scattering spectroscopic (LEISS) analysis reveal slight sulfur-enrichment of the top surface of the sample. This view is consistent with the predictions of DFT atomistic thermodynamic calculations. which identified S-terminated Pd,S surfaces as energetically favored over corresponding Pd-terminated surfaces. Activation barriers for H2 dissociation on the Pd,S surfaces were calculated. Although barriers are higher than on Pd(lll). transition state theory analysis identified reaction pathways on the S-terminated surfaces for which hydrogen dissociation rates are high enough to sustain the separation process at conditions relevant to gasification applications.

  18. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  19. Surface-micromachined microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Montague, Stephen (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Redmond, WA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Krygowski, Thomas W. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Nichols, Christopher A. (Hauppauge, NY); Jakubczak, II, Jerome F. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  20. EMSL - surface chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface-chemistry en FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...