National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for microscopy lithography surface

  1. "A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors ..--.. Manfred Bitter, Kenneth Hill, Philip Efthimion. This invention is a new x-ray scheme for stigmatic...

  2. Objective for EUV microscopy, EUV lithography, and x-ray imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth W.; Efthimion, Philip

    2016-05-03

    Disclosed is an imaging apparatus for EUV spectroscopy, EUV microscopy, EUV lithography, and x-ray imaging. This new imaging apparatus could, in particular, make significant contributions to EUV lithography at wavelengths in the range from 10 to 15 nm, which is presently being developed for the manufacturing of the next-generation integrated circuits. The disclosure provides a novel adjustable imaging apparatus that allows for the production of stigmatic images in x-ray imaging, EUV imaging, and EUVL. The imaging apparatus of the present invention incorporates additional properties compared to previously described objectives. The use of a pair of spherical reflectors containing a concave and convex arrangement has been applied to a EUV imaging system to allow for the image and optics to all be placed on the same side of a vacuum chamber. Additionally, the two spherical reflector segments previously described have been replaced by two full spheres or, more precisely, two spherical annuli, so that the total photon throughput is largely increased. Finally, the range of permissible Bragg angles and possible magnifications of the objective has been largely increased.

  3. Maskless Lithography and in situ Visualization of Conductivity of Graphene using Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iberi, Vighter O.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Zhang, X. -G.; Matola, Brad R.; Linn, Allison R.; Joy, David Charles; Adam Justin Rondinone

    2015-07-07

    The remarkable mechanical and electronic properties of graphene make it an ideal candidate for next generation nanoelectronics. With the recent development of commercial-level single-crystal graphene layers, the potential for manufacturing household graphene-based devices has improved, but significant challenges still remain with regards to patterning the graphene into devices. In the case of graphene supported on a substrate, traditional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography (EBL) are often used in fabricating graphene nanoribbons but the multi-step processes they require can result in contamination of the graphene with resists and solvents. In this letter, we report the utility of scanning helium ion lithography for fabricating functional graphene nanoconductors that are supported directly on a silicon dioxide layer, and we measure the minimum feature size achievable due to limitations imposed by thermal fluctuations and ion scattering during the milling process. Further we demonstrate that ion beams, due to their positive charging nature, may be used to observe and test the conductivity of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices in situ.

  4. Maskless Lithography and in situ Visualization of Conductivity of Graphene using Helium Ion Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iberi, Vighter O.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Zhang, X. -G.; Matola, Brad R.; Linn, Allison R.; Joy, David Charles; Adam Justin Rondinone

    2015-07-07

    The remarkable mechanical and electronic properties of graphene make it an ideal candidate for next generation nanoelectronics. With the recent development of commercial-level single-crystal graphene layers, the potential for manufacturing household graphene-based devices has improved, but significant challenges still remain with regards to patterning the graphene into devices. In the case of graphene supported on a substrate, traditional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography (EBL) are often used in fabricating graphene nanoribbons but the multi-step processes they require can result in contamination of the graphene with resists and solvents. In this letter, we report the utility of scanning helium ionmore » lithography for fabricating functional graphene nanoconductors that are supported directly on a silicon dioxide layer, and we measure the minimum feature size achievable due to limitations imposed by thermal fluctuations and ion scattering during the milling process. Further we demonstrate that ion beams, due to their positive charging nature, may be used to observe and test the conductivity of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices in situ.« less

  5. Maskless lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  6. Maskless lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stulen, R.H.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides. 12 figs.

  7. Localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy for ultrathin transparent specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Feifei; Lu, Dylan; Aguinaldo, Ryan; Ma, Yicong; Sinha, Sunil K.; Liu, Zhaowei

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a high contrast imaging technique, termed localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy, by combining localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and dark-field microscopy technique. Due to the sensitive response of LSPR to the refractive index of the surrounding media, this technique is capable of converting a small refractive index difference to a change in scattering intensity, resulting in a high-contrast, diffraction limited image of a thin unstained specimen with small, gradual refractive-index variation.

  8. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  9. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorn, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Ingans, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  10. VUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  11. VUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  12. Method for maskless lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  13. Advances in Lithography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advances in Lithography Advances in Lithography Print Tuesday, 16 December 2014 11:40 Work featured on Applied Optics cover from ALS Beamline 11.3.2. Field-dependent wavefront aberration distribution of an extreme ultraviolet single-lens zone-plate microscope, recovered by the gradient descent algorithm customized for partially coherent imaging and targeted for fast and accurate retrieval. For information, see Yamazoe et al., pp. B34-B43, part of the Applied Optics-JOSA A cohosted feature,

  14. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  15. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  16. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  17. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  18. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  19. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  20. Imaging of the surface resistance of an SRF cavity by low-temperature laser scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ciovati, S.M. Anlage, A.V. Gurevich

    2013-06-01

    Temperature mapping of the outer surface of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity is a technique that is often used to identify lossy areas on the cavity surface. In this contribution, we present 2-D images of the superconducting state surface resistance R{sub s} of the inner surface of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity obtained by low-temperature laser scanning microscopy. This technique, which is applied for the first time to study lossy regions in an operating SRF cavity, allows identifying 'hotspots' with about one order of magnitude better spatial resolution ( ~2 mm) than by thermometry. The R{sub s}-resolution is of the order of 1 {micro}{Ohm} at 3.3 GHz. Surface resistance maps with different laser power and optical images of the cavity surface are discussed in this contribution. It is also shown that the thermal gradient on the niobium surface created by the laser beam can move some of the hotspots, which are identified as locations of trapped bundle of fluxoids. The prospects for this microscope to identify defects that limit the performance of SRF cavities will also be discussed.

  1. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  2. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  3. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  4. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  5. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Rama K. Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  7. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Markle, David A. (Saratoga, CA)

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  8. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  9. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  10. Decal transfer lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Childs, William R.; Motala, Michael J.; Lee, Keon Jae

    2010-02-16

    A method of making a microstructure includes selectively activating a portion of a surface of a silicon-containing elastomer, contacting the activated portion with a substance, and bonding the activated portion and the substance, such that the activated portion of the surface and the substance in contact with the activated portion are irreversibly attached. The selective activation may be accomplished by positioning a mask on the surface of the silicon-containing elastomer, and irradiating the exposed portion with UV radiation.

  11. Membrane projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  12. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  15. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using

  16. Interferometric Lithography Patterned Pyrolytic Carbon. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interferometric Lithography Patterned Pyrolytic Carbon. Abstract not provided. Authors: Burckel, David Bruce ; Polsky, Ronen ; Washburn, Cody M. ; Wheeler, David Roger ; ...

  17. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  18. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E. (727 Clara St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Kubiak, G. D. (475 Maple St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  19. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  20. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  1. Fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon by direct six-beam laser interference lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jia; Zhang, Ziang; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin Wang, Dapeng

    2014-05-28

    This paper presents a new method for the generation of cross-scale laser interference patterns and the fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon. In the method, moth-eye structures were produced on a surface of silicon wafer using direct six-beam laser interference lithography to improve the antireflection performance of the material surface. The periodic dot arrays of the moth-eye structures were formed due to the ablation of the irradiance distribution of interference patterns on the wafer surface. The shape, size, and distribution of the moth-eye structures can be adjusted by controlling the wavelength, incidence angles, and exposure doses in a direct six-beam laser interference lithography setup. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that direct six-beam laser interference lithography can provide a way to fabricate cross-scale moth-eye structures for antireflection applications.

  2. Micropatterning of metal substrate by adhesive force lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Soon-min; Park, Jeong-yong; Lee, Hong H.

    2005-03-28

    We introduce adhesive force lithography (AFL), a detachment-based method for patterning metal surface. In this method, all the polymer layer except for the desired pattern gets lifted up from the metal surface. The craze microstructure unique to thin polymer films on the order of 10{sup 2} nm is utilized for this AFL along with a difference in adhesive force at two interfaces. Poly(urethaneacrylate) mold, which has a high enough work of adhesion with polymer, makes AFL effective. This technique is purely additive, fast ({approx}10 s contact time), and applicable to large area patterning (10 cmx10 cm)

  3. Self-cleaning optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-12-16

    A multilayer reflective optic or mirror for lithographic applications, and particularly extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, having a surface or "capping" layer which in combination with incident radiation and gaseous molecular species such as O.sub.2, H.sub.2, H.sub.2 O provides for continuous cleaning of carbon deposits from the optic surface. The metal capping layer is required to be oxidation resistant and capable of transmitting at least 90% of incident EUV radiation. Materials for the capping layer include Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au and combinations thereof.

  4. Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Taylor, John S.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2003-11-21

    Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

  5. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blemishes. In lithography, the complex process used to create computer chips, a six-inch glass plate called a mask carries one layer of a circuit pattern-the image of which is...

  6. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  7. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  8. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  9. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  10. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  11. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper

  12. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  13. Holographic illuminator for synchrotron-based projection lithography systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-08-09

    The effective coherence of a synchrotron beam line can be tailored to projection lithography requirements by employing a moving holographic diffuser and a stationary low-cost spherical mirror. The invention is particularly suited for use in an illuminator device for an optical image processing system requiring partially coherent illumination. The illuminator includes: (1) a synchrotron source of coherent or partially coherent radiation which has an intrinsic coherence that is higher than the desired coherence, (2) a holographic diffuser having a surface that receives incident radiation from said source, (3) means for translating the surface of the holographic diffuser in two dimensions along a plane that is parallel to the surface of the holographic diffuser wherein the rate of the motion is fast relative to integration time of said image processing system; and (4) a condenser optic that re-images the surface of the holographic diffuser to the entrance plane of said image processing system.

  14. SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS FOR MASKLESS LITHOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Joy, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Clonts, Lloyd G

    2004-01-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting problems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-off switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devices are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  15. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Talin, Albert Alec; Losey, Matthew W.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  16. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  17. Sequential Infiltration Synthesis for Enhancing Advanced Lithography |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Lithography Technology available for licensing: The invention is a plasma etch resist material modified by an inorganic protective component via sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) and methods of preparing the modified resist material. The SIS process forms the protective component within the bulk resist material through a plurality of alternating exposures to gas phase precursors which infiltrate the resist material. Benefits: The plasma etch resist

  18. Nanoimprint-lithography Patterned Epitaxial Fe Nanowire Arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    epitaxial Fe nanowire arrays on MgO(001) substrates by nanoimprint lithography with a direct metallization of epitaxial materials through a metallic mask, which avoided the...

  19. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  20. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  1. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  2. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  3. Efficient Coupling and Transport of a Surface Plasmon at 780 nm in a Gold Nanostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-28

    We studied plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We designed an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  4. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, A. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com

    2014-05-14

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10{sup −2} millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale.

  5. Compact multi-bounce projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2002-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four optical elements providing five reflective surfaces for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical surfaces are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The second and fourth reflective surfaces are part of the same optical element. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width, which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion.

  6. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  7. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings.more » The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  8. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archanjo, Braulio S.; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Gustavo Canado, Luiz; Winston, Donald; Miao, Feng; Alberto Achete, Carlos; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel defect lines of ?1??m length and ?5?nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20?nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ? 2 smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  9. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E. (Alameda County, CA); Kubiak, G. D. (Alameda County, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  10. Properites of ultrathin films appropriate for optics capping layers in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Edwards, N V; Madey, T E

    2007-06-25

    The contamination of optical surfaces by irradiation shortens optics lifetime and is one of the main concerns for optics used in conjunction with intense light sources, such as high power lasers, 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron sources or plasma sources used in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tools. This paper focuses on properties and surface chemistry of different materials, which as thin layers, could be used as capping layers to protect and extend EUVL optics lifetime. The most promising candidates include single element materials such as ruthenium and rhodium, and oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  11. Cavity-enhanced single photon emission from site-controlled In(Ga)As quantum dots fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommila, J.; Hakkarainen, T. V.; Schramm, A. Guina, M.; Belykh, V. V.; Sibeldin, N. N.; Heinonen, E.

    2014-05-26

    We report on the emission dynamics of single In(Ga)As quantum dots formed in etched GaAs pits and integrated into micropillar cavities. The site-controlled quantum dots were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on nanoimprint lithography patterned GaAs(001) surfaces. Triggered single photon emission confirmed by photon autocorrelation measurements is demonstrated. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments clearly show an effect of the cavity on the spontaneous emission rate of the quantum dot.

  12. Microphotonic parabolic light directors fabricated by two-photon lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Jackson H; Spinelli, P.; Kosten, Emily D; Parsons, J.; Van Lare, C; Van de Groep, J; Garcia de Abajo, J.; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A.

    2011-01-01

    We have fabricated microphotonic parabolic light directors using two-photon lithography, thin-film processing, and aperture formation by focused ion beam lithography. Optical transmission measurements through upright parabolic directors 22 ?m high and 10 ?m in diameter exhibit strong beam directivity with a beam divergence of 5.6, in reasonable agreement with ray-tracing and full-field electromagnetic simulations. The results indicate the suitability of microphotonic parabolic light directors for producing collimated beams for applications in advanced solar cell and light-emitting diode designs.

  13. Electron Microscopy Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Electron Microscopy Center Web Site has moved This page has moved to http:www.anl.govcnmgroupelectron-microscopy-cente...

  14. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  15. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  16. Ultratech Develops an Improved Lithography Tool for LED Wafer Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ultratech modified an existing lithography tool used for semiconductor manufacturing to better meet the cost and performance targets of the high-brightness LED manufacturing industry. The goal was to make the equipment compatible with the wide range of substrate diameters and thicknesses prevalent in the industry while reducing the capital cost and the overall cost of ownership (COO).

  17. Condenser for extreme-UV lithography with discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system, for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography, employs quasi grazing-incidence collector mirrors that are coated with a suitable reflective metal such as ruthenium to collect radiation from a discharge source to minimize the effect of contaminant accumulation on the collecting mirrors.

  18. Composite patterning devices for soft lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne

    2007-03-27

    The present invention provides methods, devices and device components for fabricating patterns on substrate surfaces, particularly patterns comprising structures having microsized and/or nanosized features of selected lengths in one, two or three dimensions. The present invention provides composite patterning devices comprising a plurality of polymer layers each having selected mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus and flexural rigidity, selected physical dimensions, such as thickness, surface area and relief pattern dimensions, and selected thermal properties, such as coefficients of thermal expansion, to provide high resolution patterning on a variety of substrate surfaces and surface morphologies.

  19. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  20. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  1. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  2. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  3. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  4. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  5. Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  6. Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  7. Resolution Limits of Electron-beam Lithography Pushed Towards the Atomic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Resolution Limits of Electron-beam Lithography Pushed Towards the Atomic Scale 10.22.2013

  8. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  9. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  10. Imaging the surface morphology, chemistry and conductivity of LiNi 1/3 Fe 1/3 Mn 4/3 O 4 crystalline facets using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Cutler, Jeffrey; Hu, Enyuan; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2016-07-26

    We have employed scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) using the X-ray fluorescence mode in order to elucidate the chemical structures at Ni, Fe, Mn and O sites from the (111) and (100) facets of micron-sized LiNi1/3Fe1/3Mn4/3O4 energy material particles. Furthermore, STXM imaging using electron yield mode has mapped out the surface conductivity of the crystalline particles. Our study presents a novel approach that visualizes local element segregation, chemistry and conductivity variation among different crystal facets, which will assist further tailoring of the morphology and surface structure of this high voltage spinel lithium ion battery cathode material.

  11. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  12. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Probe Microscopy Photo of NREL researcher using scanning probe microscope. Capability of use with ultra-high vacuum makes NREL Scanning Probe Microscopy particularly valuable for certain applications. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) provides surface images at up to atomic scale and other valuable high-resolution data. SPM encompasses a group of techniques that use very sharp tips that scan extremely closely (several nm) to or in contact with the material being analyzed. The interaction

  13. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  14. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings. The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.

  15. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  16. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Simon J.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1998-01-01

    A critical illumination condenser system, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 .mu.m source and requires a magnification of 26.times.. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth.

  17. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  18. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  19. Development of ion sources for ion projection lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.

    1996-05-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of generating ion beams with low axial energy spread as required by the Ion Projection Lithography (IPL). Longitudinal ion energy spread has been studied in two different types of plasma discharge: the filament discharge ion source characterized by its low axial energy spread, and the RF-driven ion source characterized by its long source lifetime. For He{sup +} ions, longitudinal ion energy spreads of 1-2 eV were measured for a filament discharge multicusp ion source which is within the IPL device requirements. Ion beams with larger axial energy spread were observed in the RF-driven source. A double-chamber ion source has been designed which combines the advantages of low axial energy spread of the filament discharge ion source with the long lifetime of the RF-driven source. The energy spread of the double chamber source is lower than that of the RF-driven source.

  20. Experimental demonstration of line-width modulation in plasmonic lithography using a solid immersion lens-based active nano-gap control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won-Sup; Kim, Taeseob; Choi, Guk-Jong; Lim, Geon; Joe, Hang-Eun; Gang, Myeong-Gu; Min, Byung-Kwon; Park, No-Cheol; Moon, Hyungbae; Kim, Do-Hyung; Park, Young-Pil

    2015-02-02

    Plasmonic lithography has been used in nanofabrication because of its utility beyond the diffraction limit. The resolution of plasmonic lithography depends on the nano-gap between the nanoaperture and the photoresist surface—changing the gap distance can modulate the line-width of the pattern. In this letter, we demonstrate solid-immersion lens based active non-contact plasmonic lithography, applying a range of gap conditions to modulate the line-width of the pattern. Using a solid-immersion lens-based near-field control system, the nano-gap between the exit surface of the nanoaperture and the media can be actively modulated and maintained to within a few nanometers. The line-widths of the recorded patterns using 15- and 5-nm gaps were 47 and 19.5 nm, respectively, which matched closely the calculated full-width at half-maximum. From these results, we conclude that changing the nano-gap within a solid-immersion lens-based plasmonic head results in varying line-width patterns.

  1. M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueck, Steven R.J.; Chen, Xiaolan; Zaidi, Saleem; Devine, Daniel J.

    1998-06-02

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

  2. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  3. Fundamentals of embossing nanoimprint lithography in polymer substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; King, William P.

    2011-02-01

    The convergence of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and biomedical industries is creating a need for innovation and discovery around materials, particularly in miniaturized systems that use polymers as the primary substrate. Polymers are ubiquitous in the microelectronics industry and are used as sensing materials, lithography tools, replication molds, microfluidics, nanofluidics, and biomedical devices. This diverse set of operational requirements dictates that the materials employed must possess different properties in order to reduce the cost of production, decrease the scale of devices to the appropriate degree, and generate engineered devices with new functional properties at cost-competitive levels of production. Nanoscale control of polymer deformation at a massive scale would enable breakthroughs in all of the aforementioned applications, but is currently beyond the current capabilities of mass manufacturing. This project was focused on developing a fundamental understanding of how polymers behave under different loads and environments at the nanoscale in terms of performance and fidelity in order to fill the most critical gaps in our current knowledgebase on this topic.

  4. Lithography with MeV Energy Ions for Biomedical Applications: Accelerator Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Whitlow, H. J.; Nakagawa, S. T.; Yoshida, E.

    2009-03-10

    MeV ion beam lithographies are very powerful techniques for 3D direct writing in positive or negative photoresist materials. Nanometer-scale rough structures, or clear areas with straight vertical sidewalls as thin as a few 10's of nm in a resist of a few nm to 100 {mu}m thickness can be made. These capabilities are particularly useful for lithography in cellular- and sub-cellular level biomedical research and technology applications. It can be used for tailor making special structures such as optical waveguides, biosensors, DNA sorters, spotting plates, systems for DNA, protein and cell separation, special cell-growth substrates and microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Furthermore MeV ion beam lithography can be used for rapid prototyping, and also making master stamps and moulds for mass production by hot embossing and nanoimprint lithography. The accelerator requirements for three different high energy ion beam lithography techniques are overviewed. We consider the special requirements placed on the accelerator and how this is achieved for a commercial proton beam writing tool.

  5. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  6. Soft X-ray Lithography Beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klysubun, P.; Chomnawang, N.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2007-01-19

    Construction of a soft x-ray lithography beamline utilizing synchrotron radiation generated by one of the bending magnets at the Siam Photon Laboratory is finished and the beamline is currently in a commissioning period. The beamline was modified from the existing monitoring beamline and is intended for soft x-ray lithographic processing and radiation biological research. The lithography exposure station with a compact one-dimensional scanning mechanism was constructed and assembled in-house. The front-end of the beamline has been modified to allow larger exposure area. The exposure station for studying radiation effects on biological samples will be set up in tandem with the lithography station, with a Mylar window for isolation. Several improvements to both the beamline and the exposure stations, such as improved scanning speed and the ability to adjust the exposure spectrum by means of low-Z filters, are planned and will be implemented in the near future.

  7. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  8. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Atomic Force Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Force Microscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) operates in several modes. In contact mode, a tip that is attached to a cantilever is scanned over the sample surface, while the force between tip and sample is measured. While the tip is scanned laterally, the force is kept constant by moving the cantilever/tip assembly up and down, so that the deflection of the cantilever is kept constant. The vertical movement of the cantilever/tip assembly is recorded and used to generate an image of the

  9. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  10. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2003-04-15

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  11. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  12. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

    2003-04-08

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  13. Lithography-free large-area metamaterials for stable thermophotovoltaic energy conversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coppens, Zachary J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2016-02-08

    A large-area metamaterial thermal emitter is fabricated using facile, lithography-free techniques. The device is composed of conductive oxides, refractory ceramics, and noble metals and shows stable, selective emission after exposure to 1173 K for 22 h in oxidizing and inert atmospheres. Lastly, the results indicate that the metamaterial can be used to achieve high-performance thermophotovoltaic devices for applications such as portable power generation.

  14. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aseyev, S A; Mironov, B N; Minogin, V G; Cherkun, Aleksandr P; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} was focused to a 40-{mu}m-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and {approx}2-{mu}m spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  16. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  17. The Future of Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Haimei Zheng discusses the future of electron microscopy and her breakthrough research into examining liquids using an electron microscope.

  18. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  19. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  20. Low thermal distortion Extreme-UV lithography reticle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  1. Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Seo, Hyungtak; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-04-10

    The authors report the chemical influence of cleaning of the Ru capping layer on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector surface. The cleaning of EUV reflector to remove the contamination particles has two requirements: to prevent corrosion and etching of the reflector surface and to maintain the reflectivity functionality of the reflector after the corrosive cleaning processes. Two main approaches for EUV reflector cleaning, wet chemical treatments [sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM), ozonated water, and ozonated hydrogen peroxide] and dry cleaning (oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment), were tested. The changes in surface morphology and roughness were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the surface etching and change of oxidation states were probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Significant surface oxidation of the Ru capping layer was observed after oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment, while the oxidation is unnoticeable after SPM treatment. Based on these surface studies, the authors found that SPM treatment exhibits the minimal corrosive interactions with Ru capping layer. They address the molecular mechanism of corrosive gas and liquid-phase chemical interaction with the surface of Ru capping layer on the EUV reflector.

  2. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  3. Multilayer mirror with enhanced spectral selectivity for the next generation extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedev, V. V. Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Novikova, N. N.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.; MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede ; Yakunin, A. M.

    2013-11-25

    We have demonstrated a hybrid extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer mirror for 6.x nm radiation that provides selective suppression for infrared (IR) radiation. The mirror consists of an IR-transparent LaN∕B multilayer stack which is used as EUV-reflective coating and antireflective (AR) coating to suppress IR. The AR coating can be optimized to suppress CO{sub 2} laser radiation at the wavelength of 10.6 μm, which is of interest for application in next-generation EUV lithography systems.

  4. Diffraction spectral filter for use in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser system for generating a beam of radiation includes a source of radiation light that generates a continuous spectrum of radiation light; a condenser comprising one or more first optical elements for collecting radiation from the source of radiation light and for generating a beam of radiation; and a diffractive spectral filter for separating first radiation light having a particular wavelength from the continuous spectrum of radiation light. Cooling devices can be employed to remove heat generated. The condenser system can be used with a ringfield camera in projection lithography.

  5. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  6. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Nanofactory Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Stage * Measures force interactions on samples with higher sensitivity than the NanoIndentation stage * Load range between 10 - 2,000 nN * ...

  7. Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo, E-mail: tbwei@semi.ac.cn; Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin [Semiconductor Lighting Technology Research and Development Center, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-07-07

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6 through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350?mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

  8. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures. A lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2015-12-10

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic, developer for exposed PMMA. We also have found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data shows that there both tightly bonded –OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded –OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded –OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA. The impact of the understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  9. Soft holographic interference lithography microlens for enhanced organic light emitting diode light extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Joong-Mok; Gan, Zhengqing; Leung, Wai Y.; Liu, Rui; Ye, Zhuo; Constant, Kristen; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-06-06

    Very uniform 2 {micro}m-pitch square microlens arrays ({micro}LAs), embossed on the blank glass side of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated 1.1 mm-thick glass, are used to enhance light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by {approx}100%, significantly higher than enhancements reported previously. The array design and size relative to the OLED pixel size appear to be responsible for this enhancement. The arrays are fabricated by very economical soft lithography imprinting of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold (itself obtained from a Ni master stamp that is generated from holographic interference lithography of a photoresist) on a UV-curable polyurethane drop placed on the glass. Green and blue OLEDs are then fabricated on the ITO to complete the device. When the {mu}LA is {approx}15 x 15 mm{sup 2}, i.e., much larger than the {approx}3 x 3 mm{sup 2} OLED pixel, the electroluminescence (EL) in the forward direction is enhanced by {approx}100%. Similarly, a 19 x 25 mm{sup 2} {mu}LA enhances the EL extracted from a 3 x 3 array of 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} OLED pixels by 96%. Simulations that include the effects of absorption in the organic and ITO layers are in accordance with the experimental results and indicate that a thinner 0.7 mm thick glass would yield a {approx}140% enhancement.

  10. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  11. Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Title: Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Authors: Novak, Michael A. ...

  12. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories ...

  13. Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device - progress report 6152014. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflected beam illumination microscopy ...

  14. Achieving clean epitaxial graphene surfaces suitable for device applications by improved lithographic process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, A., E-mail: anath@gmu.edu; Rao, M. V. [George Mason University, 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Koehler, A. D.; Jernigan, G. G.; Wheeler, V. D.; Hite, J. K.; Hernndez, S. C.; Robinson, Z. R.; Myers-Ward, R. L.; Eddy, C. R.; Gaskill, D. K. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Garces, N. Y. [Sotera Defense Solutions, 2200 Defense Hwy. Suite 405, Crofton, Maryland 21114 (United States)

    2014-06-02

    It is well-known that the performance of graphene electronic devices is often limited by extrinsic scattering related to resist residue from transfer, lithography, and other processes. Here, we report a polymer-assisted fabrication procedure that produces a clean graphene surface following device fabrication by a standard lithography process. The effectiveness of this improved lithography process is demonstrated by examining the temperature dependence of epitaxial graphene-metal contact resistance using the transfer length method for Ti/Au (10?nm/50?nm) metallization. The Landauer-Buttiker model was used to explain carrier transport at the graphene-metal interface as a function of temperature. At room temperature, a contact resistance of 140 ?-?m was obtained after a thermal anneal at 523?K for 2?hr under vacuum, which is comparable to state-of-the-art values.

  15. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  16. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  17. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with highermore » lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.« less

  18. Study of nano imprinting using soft lithography on Krafty glue and PVDF polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, M. S. Ravi, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu; Gangineni, Ramesh Babu, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Puducherry - 605014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The present work reveals soft lithography strategy based on self assembly and replica molding for carrying out micro and nanofabrication. It provides a convenient, effective and very low cost method for the formation and manufacturing of micro and nano structures. Al-layer of compact disc (sony CD-R) used as a stamp with patterned relief structures to generate patterns and structures with pattern size of 100nm height, 1.7 ?m wide. In literature, PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) solution is widely used to get negative copy of the Al-layer. In this work, we have used inexpensive white glue (Polyvinylacetate + water), 15gm (?5) and PVDF (Polyvinylidene difluoride) spin coated films and successfully transferred the nano patterns of Al layer on to white glue and PVDF films.

  19. Repair of localized defects in multilayer-coated reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2004-11-23

    A method is provided for repairing defects in a multilayer coating layered onto a reticle blank used in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system. Using high lateral spatial resolution, energy is deposited in the multilayer coating in the vicinity of the defect. This can be accomplished using a focused electron beam, focused ion beam or a focused electromagnetic radiation. The absorbed energy will cause a structural modification of the film, producing a localized change in the film thickness. The change in film thickness can be controlled with sub-nanometer accuracy by adjusting the energy dose. The lateral spatial resolution of the thickness modification is controlled by the localization of the energy deposition. The film thickness is adjusted locally to correct the perturbation of the reflected field. For example, when the structural modification is a localized film contraction, the repair of a defect consists of flattening a mound or spreading out the sides of a depression.

  20. Window-assisted nanosphere lithography for vacuum micro-nano-electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Nannan; Pang, Shucai; Yan, Fei; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Xiang, Wei; Zhang, De; Zeng, Baoqing

    2015-04-15

    Development of vacuum micro-nano-electronics is quite important for combining the advantages of vacuum tubes and solid-state devices but limited by the prevailing fabricating techniques which are expensive, time consuming and low-throughput. In this work, window-assisted nanosphere lithography (NSL) technique was proposed and enabled the low-cost and high-efficiency fabrication of nanostructures for vacuum micro-nano-electronic devices, thus allowing potential applications in many areas. As a demonstration, we fabricated high-density field emitter arrays which can be used as cold cathodes in vacuum micro-nano-electronic devices by using the window-assisted NSL technique. The details of the fabricating process have been investigated. This work provided a new and feasible idea for fabricating nanostructure arrays for vacuum micro-nano-electronic devices, which would spawn the development of vacuum micro-nano-electronics.

  1. Method for the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by deep X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2005-04-05

    A method for the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by deep X-ray lithography (DXRL) comprises a masking process that uses a patterned mask with inclined mask holes and off-normal exposures with a DXRL beam aligned with the inclined mask holes. Microstructural features that are oriented in different directions can be obtained by using multiple off-normal exposures through additional mask holes having different orientations. Various methods can be used to block the non-aligned mask holes from the beam when using multiple exposures. A method for fabricating a precision 3D X-ray mask comprises forming an intermediate mask and a master mask on a common support membrane.

  2. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  3. SURFACE COATING EFFECTS ON THE ASSEMBLY OF GOLD NANOSPHERES ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SILICA; SUBSTRATES; MICROSPHERES; ORGANIC POLYMERS Nanoscale; assembly; tip; nanoparticles; microscopy; total internal reflection; dimer; tribological; shear; surface ...

  4. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Analytical Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Microscopy Analytical microscopy uses various high-resolution techniques to obtain information about materials on the atomic scale. It is one of the most powerful tools available for understanding a material's basic structure, chemistry, and morphology. We use two complementary types of analytical microscopy - electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy - together with a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools to capture data about photovoltaic (PV) materials

  5. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  6. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Whealton, John H.; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  7. Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mingolo, N. Martnez, O. E.

    2014-01-15

    A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

  8. Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesse, Stephen; Morozovska, A. N.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Eliseev, E. A.; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; Tebano, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

  9. A simplified method for generating periodic nanostructures by interference lithography without the use of an anti-reflection coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapon, Omree; Muallem, Merav; Palatnik, Alex; Aviv, Hagit; Tischler, Yaakov R.

    2015-11-16

    Interference lithography has proven to be a useful technique for generating periodic sub-diffraction limited nanostructures. Interference lithography can be implemented by exposing a photoresist polymer to laser light using a two-beam arrangement or more simply a one beam configuration based on a Lloyd's Mirror Interferometer. For typical photoresist layers, an anti-reflection coating must be deposited on the substrate to prevent adverse reflections from cancelling the holographic pattern of the interfering beams. For silicon substrates, such coatings are typically multilayered and complex in composition. By thinning the photoresist layer to a thickness well below the quarter wavelength of the exposing beam, we demonstrate that interference gratings can be generated without an anti-reflection coating on the substrate. We used ammonium dichromate doped polyvinyl alcohol as the positive photoresist because it provides excellent pinhole free layers down to thicknesses of 40 nm, and can be cross-linked by a low-cost single mode 457 nm laser, and can be etched in water. Gratings with a period of 320 nm and depth of 4 nm were realized, as well as a variety of morphologies depending on the photoresist thickness. This simplified interference lithography technique promises to be useful for generating periodic nanostructures with high fidelity and minimal substrate treatments.

  10. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  11. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  12. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  13. Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to Study ... Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Materials Research Society ...

  14. Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wolff, C. H.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2008-02-15

    Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

  15. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.

  16. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  17. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separatemore » the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.« less

  18. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-03-13

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer ismore » severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.« less

  19. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  20. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  1. A Molecular- and Nano-Electronics Test (MONET) platform fabricated using extreme ultraviolet lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Cardinale, Gregory F.; Hunter, Luke L.; Talin, Albert Alec

    2003-12-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of an electrode array test structure, designed for electrical probing of molecules and nanocrystals. We use Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) to define the electrical test platform features. As fabricated, the platform includes nominal electrode gaps of 0 nm, 40 nm, 60 nm, and 80 nm. Additional variation in electrode gap is achieved by controlling the exposure conditions, such as dose and focus. To enable EUVL based nanofabrication, we develop a novel bi-level photoresist process. The bi-level photoresist consists of a combination of a commercially available polydimethylglutarimide (PMGI) bottom layer and an experimental EUVL photoresist top (imaging) layer. We measure the sensitivity of PMGI to EUV exposure dose as a function of photoresist pre-bake temperature, and using this data, optimize a metal lift-off process. Reliable fabrication of 700 Angstrom thick Au structures with sub-1000 Angstrom critical dimensions is achieved, even without the use of a Au adhesion layer, such as Ti. Several test platforms are used to characterize electrical properties of organic molecules deposited as self assembled monolayers.

  2. Electrostrictive and electrostatic responses in contact mode voltage modulated Scanning Probe Microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Ievlev, Anton; Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical response of solids underpins image formation mechanism of several scanning probe microscopy techniques including the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). While the theory of linear piezoelectric and ionic responses are well developed, the contributions of quadratic effects including electrostriction and capacitive tip-surface forces to measured signal remain poorly understood. Here we analyze the electrostrictive and capacitive contributions to the PFM and ESM signals and discuss the implications of the dielectric tip-surface gap on these interactions.

  3. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  4. Band Excitation Method Applicable to Scanning Probe Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and piezoresponse force microscopy. It is relevant to all SPM manufacturers and can yield data about a sample's electrical, ...

  5. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy...

  6. Electron Microscopy Center | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Electron Microscopy Center The Electron Microscopy Center Group (EMC) develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials challenges. EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, experimental technique and instrumentation development, and operation of unique and state-of-the-art instrumentation. The goals of EMC materials research are closely aligned with those of our user community.

  7. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Researcher using field-emission scanning electron microscope. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) JEOL 6320F. This FE-SEM equipped with a cold field-emission source and in-lens detectors is designed for ultra-high resolution at low accelerating voltage. Compositional mapping by energy-dispersive microscopy and Electron Backscattered Diffraction are available. In basic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a beam of highly energetic (0.1-50 keV) electrons is

  8. Microscopy (XSD-MIC) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microdiffraction, fluorescence tomography, coherent diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM) This website is intended to provide useful...

  9. Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: A Window into Electromechanical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Behavior at the Nanoscale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: A Window into Electromechanical Behavior at the Nanoscale Authors: Bonnell, ...

  10. X-Ray Microscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy X-Ray Microscopy This group exploits the unique capabilities of hard X-ray microscopy to visualize and understand the structure and behavior of hybrid, energy-related, and tailored nanomaterials The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe, located at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and operated by our group and APS, is the only dedicated X-ray microscopy beamline within the portfolios of the nation's Nanoscale Science Research Centers. Our scientific program seeks to understand

  11. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-06-23

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  12. Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a microfluidics device - progress report 6152014. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device - ...

  13. Scientific Achievement Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method was developed to determine thickness and wrinkles in electron beam sensitive 2-dimensional (2D) MFI nanosheets....

  14. Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: SC USDOE - Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC); Electrochemical Strain Microscopy ...

  15. Radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy of condensed media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyamshev, L.M.; Chelnokov, B.I.

    1984-07-01

    Possibilities are discussed for the application of scanning radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy, using different types of radiation, for microstructure analysis. (AIP)

  16. Amplified spontaneous emission in active channel waveguides produced by electron-beam lithography in LiF crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montereali, R. M.; Piccinini, M.; Burattini, E.

    2001-06-25

    In this letter we report the observation of amplified spontaneous emission of the red light from LiF:F{sub 2} centers in active channel waveguides realized by electron-beam lithography in lithium fluoride crystals. Low pumping power densities have been used in quasi-continuous-wave regime at room temperature; the appreciable values of the gain coefficients, 4.67 cm{minus}1 with an exciting power density of 0.31 W/cm2 at 458 nm, make this material a good candidate for the realization of active integrated optical devices. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  18. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides.

  19. Demonstration of electronic pattern switching and 10x pattern demagnification in a maskless micro-ion beam reduction lithography system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, V.V.; Akker, B.; Leung, K.N.; Noh, I.; Scott, K.L.; Wilde, S.

    2002-05-31

    A proof-of-principle ion projection lithography (IPL) system called Maskless Micro-ion beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL) has been developed and tested at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for future integrated circuits (ICs) manufacturing and thin film media patterning [1]. This MMRL system is aimed at completely eliminating the first stage of the conventional IPL system [2] that contains the complicated beam optics design in front of the stencil mask and the mask itself. It consists of a multicusp RF plasma generator, a multi-beamlet pattern generator, and an all-electrostatic ion optical column. Results from ion beam exposures on PMMA and Shipley UVII-HS resists using 75 keV H+ are presented in this paper. Proof-of-principle electronic pattern switching together with 10x reduction ion optics (using a pattern generator made of nine 50-{micro}m switchable apertures) has been performed and is reported in this paper. In addition, the fabrication of a micro-fabricated pattern generator [3] on an SOI membrane is also presented.

  20. Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bauer, Ernst [Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

    2010-01-08

    The short penetration and escape depth of electrons with energies below 1 keV make them ideally suited for the study of surfaces and ultrathin films. The combination of the low energy electrons and the high lateral resolution of a microscope produces a powerful method for the characterization of nanostructures on bulk samples, in particular if the microscope is equipped with an imaging energy filter and connected to a synchrotron radiation source. Comprehensive characterization by imaging, diffraction, and spectroscope of the structural, chemical, and magnetic properties is then possible. The Talk will describe the various imaging techniques in using reflected and emitted electrons in low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), with an emphasis on magnetic materials with spin-polarized LEEM and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism PEEM. The talk with end with an outlook on future possibilities.

  1. Tuning the interaction between propagating and localized surface plasmons for surface enhanced Raman scattering in water for biomedical and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shioi, Masahiko; Jans, Hilde; Lodewijks, Kristof; Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet; Kawamura, Tatsuro

    2014-06-16

    With a view to biomedical and environmental applications, we investigate the plasmonic properties of a rectangular gold nanodisk array in water to boost surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effects. To control the resonance wavelengths of the surface plasmon polariton and the localized surface plasmon, their dependence on the array period and diameter in water is studied in detail using a finite difference time domain method. A good agreement is obtained between calculated resonant wavelengths and those of gold nanodisk arrays fabricated using electron beam lithography. For the optimized structure, a SERS enhancement factor of 7.8 × 10{sup 7} is achieved in water experimentally.

  2. New Microscopy Patent Awarded | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Microscopy Patent Awarded Congratulations to former Ames Laboratory staff Ning Fang and Wei Sun for being awarded a new patent, "Auto-calibrated scanning-angle prism-type total...

  3. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-02-15

    We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. Furthermore, the ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems.

  4. Defect reduction in epitaxial GaSb grown on nanopatterned GaAs substrates using full wafer block copolymer lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Smita; Liu, C.-C.; Nealey, P. F.; Kuech, T. F.; Kuan, T. S.; Babcock, S. E.; Park, J. H.; Mawst, L. J.

    2009-08-10

    Defect reduction in the large lattice mismatched system of GaSb on GaAs, {approx}7%, was accomplished using full wafer block copolymer (BCP) lithography. A self-assembled BCP mask layer was used to generate a hexagonal pattern of {approx}20 nm holes on {approx}40 nm centers in a 20 nm SiO{sub 2} layer. GaSb growth initially takes place selectively within these holes leading to a dense array of small, strain-relaxed epitaxial GaSb islands. The GaSb grown on the patterned SiO{sub 2} layer exhibits a reduction in the x-ray linewidth attributed to a decrease in the threading dislocation density when compared to blanket pseudomorphic film growth.

  5. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy and Raman microscopy * Transmission electron microscopy and tomography * Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy * Atomic force microscopy. ...

  6. Surface-Plasmon Enhanced Transparent Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly III, T. H.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Tenent, R. C.; Morfa, A. J.; Rowlen, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Random silver nanohole films were created through colloidal lithography techniques and metal vapor deposition. The transparent electrodes were characterized by uv-visible spectroscopy and incorporated into an organic solar cell. The test cells were evaluated for solar power-conversion efficiency and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency spectra displayed evidence that a nanohole film with 92 nm diameter holes induces surface-plasmon-enhanced photoconversion. The nanohole silver films demonstrate a promising route to removing the indium tin oxide transparent electrode that is ubiquitous in organic optoelectronics.

  7. Ultrahigh density ferroelectric storage and lithography by high order ferroic switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shin, Junsoo; Gruverman, Alexei L.; Karapetian, Edgar; Kachanov, Mark

    2007-11-06

    A method for switching the direction of polarization in a relatively small domain in a thin-film ferroelectric material whose direction of polarization is oriented normal to the surface of the material involves a step of moving an electrically-chargeable tip into contact with the surface of the ferroelectric material so that the direction of polarization in a region adjacent the tip becomes oriented in a preselected direction relative to the surface of the ferroelectric material. The tip is then pressed against the surface of the ferroelectric material so that the direction of polarization of the ferroelectric material within the area of the ferroelectric material in contact with the tip is reversed under the combined effect of the compressive influence of the tip and electric bias.

  8. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and ... Title: Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and ...

  9. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, ...

  10. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle ...

  11. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Investigations ...

  12. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-situ ...

  13. High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-FieldCathodolumine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-Field Cathodoluminescence of Quantum Dots. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy ...

  14. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jungjohann, Katherine ...

  15. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pm029allard2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst...

  16. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is ... removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. ...

  17. Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in Hexagonal Boron Nitride Title: Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in Hexagonal Boron Nitride ...

  18. Orientation imaging microscopy of polycrystalline sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staiger, M.P.; Kolbeinsson, I.; Newman, J.; Woodfield, T.; Sato, T.

    2010-04-15

    A novel preparation technique is described that makes possible grain size analysis of polycrystalline NaCl using orientation imaging microscopy via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The preparation methodology is specifically developed to overcome difficulties in preparing microporous NaCl for microscopy. The grain size and crystallographic texture of polycrystalline NaCl samples, prepared via solution pressure and sintered in the range of 650-780 deg. C, were able to be measured successfully with EBSD. The limitations of the preparation technique for EBSD analysis of NaCl are also discussed.

  19. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  20. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  1. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  2. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  3. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  4. Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

    2014-09-02

    An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

  5. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  6. Impact of polymer film thickness and cavity size on polymer flow during embossing : towards process design rules for nanoimprint lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; King, William P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Rowland, Harry D.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents continuum simulations of polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The simulations capture the underlying physics of polymer flow from the nanometer to millimeter length scale and examine geometry and thermophysical process quantities affecting cavity filling. Variations in embossing tool geometry and polymer film thickness during viscous flow distinguish different flow driving mechanisms. Three parameters can predict polymer deformation mode: cavity width to polymer thickness ratio, polymer supply ratio, and Capillary number. The ratio of cavity width to initial polymer film thickness determines vertically or laterally dominant deformation. The ratio of indenter width to residual film thickness measures polymer supply beneath the indenter which determines Stokes or squeeze flow. The local geometry ratios can predict a fill time based on laminar flow between plates, Stokes flow, or squeeze flow. Characteristic NIL capillary number based on geometry-dependent fill time distinguishes between capillary or viscous driven flows. The three parameters predict filling modes observed in published studies of NIL deformation over nanometer to millimeter length scales. The work seeks to establish process design rules for NIL and to provide tools for the rational design of NIL master templates, resist polymers, and process parameters.

  7. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  8. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  9. Electron microscopy of Mg/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst morphology for deep desulfurization of diesel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yee Cia; Kait, Chong Fai Fatimah, Hayyiratul Wilfred, Cecilia

    2015-07-22

    A series of Mg/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were prepared and characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The average particle sizes of the photocatalysts were ranging from 25.7 to 35.8 nm. Incorporation of Mg on TiO{sub 2} did not lead to any surface lattice distortion to TiO{sub 2}. HRTEM data indicated the presence of MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2} mixture at low Mg loading while at higher Mg loading, the presence of lamellar Mg-oxyhydroxide intermediates and Mg(OH){sub 2}.

  10. Multifrequency imaging in the intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy: beyond phase imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Senli; Santiago, Solares D; Mochalin, Vadym; Neitzel, Ioannis; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Force-based scanning probe microscopies have emerged as a mainstay for probing structural and mechanical properties of materials on the nanometer and molecular scales. Despite tremendous progress achieved to date, the cantilever dynamics in single frequency scanning probe microscopies (SPM) is undefined due to having only two output variables. Here we demonstrate on diamond nanoparticles with different functionalization layers that the use of broad band detection by multiple frequency SPM allows complete information on tip-surface interactions in intermittent contact SPM to be acquired. The obtained data allows sub-3nm resolution even in ambient environment. By tuning the strength of tip-surface interaction, the information on surface state can be obtained.

  11. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  12. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  13. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Spence, Paul A.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  14. Electron Microscopy Center Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Capabilities ACAT: Argonne Chromatic Aberration-corrected TEM This FEI Titan 80-300 ST has a CEOS Cc/Cs corrector on the imaging side of the column to correct both spherical and chromatic aberrations. The Cc/Cs corrector also provides greatly-improved resolution and signal for energy filtered imaging and EELS. FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM This premier analytical transmission electron microscope (AEM) has specialized accessories including an energy-dispersive x-ray

  15. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  16. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  17. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

  18. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with...

  19. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  20. Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy of Si and Ge nanowires (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CATALYSTS; DIFFUSION LENGTH; MICROSCOPY; PHOTOCURRENTS; ...

  1. Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, Chad

    2012-10-26

    The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

  2. Surface-structure sensitivity of CeO2 nanocrystals in photocatalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heterogeneous (photo)catalysis. In this study, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), the atomic surface structures of well-defined...

  3. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, N. L.

    2005-04-15

    This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break

  5. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  6. Note: Fabrication and characterization of molybdenum tips for scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrozzo, P.; Tumino, F.; Facibeni, A.; Passoni, M.; Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method for the preparation of bulk molybdenum tips for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy and we assess their potential in performing high resolution imaging and local spectroscopy by measurements on different single crystal surfaces in UHV, namely, Au(111), Si(111)-7 × 7, and titanium oxide 2D ordered nanostructures supported on Au(111). The fabrication method is versatile and can be extended to other metals, e.g., cobalt.

  7. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called non-blinking quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  8. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 {mu}m, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu K{alpha}. At higher energies such as Ag K{alpha}, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection.

  9. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Xiong, Gang; Droubay, Timothy C.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2007-04-15

    Thermally-induced martensitic phase transformations in polycrystalline CuZnAl and thin-film NiTiCu shape memory alloys were probed using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy shows a reversible change in the apparent work function during transformation, presumably due to the contrasting surface electronic structures of the martensite and austenite phases. In situ PEEM images provide information on the spatial distribution of these phases and the evolution of the surface microstructure during transformation. PEEM offers considerable potential for improving our understanding of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys in real time.

  10. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650?nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500?nA/W and 11 10{sup ?6} for 445?nm illumination.

  11. Electron Microscopy > Analytical Resources > Research > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell Analytical Resources In This Section Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectroscopy (DEMS) Electron Microscopy X-Ray Diffraction Electron Microscopy Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope Facility Electron microscopy provides atomic-resolution images of the structure, composition and bonding of our fuel cells and their components. Three-dimensional images of catalyst particles and their support materials are constructed using electron tomography - a similar

  12. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics.

  13. Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy What is STED? Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy is a super resolution microscopy tool that captures super resolution images on a nanometer scale. A donut-shaped red light switches off surrounding molecules, allowing only those in the center to fluoresce. At the nanoscale, light microscopes cannot tell features apart. Because light moves as waves and the particles of light are so close together, the lens used cannot focus all of the

  14. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  15. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of MaterialNanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    be used for quantitative imaging of nanoscale material features - including features that may be buried so as to be inaccessible to conventional lightwave or electron microscopies. ...

  16. Ultrasonic-Based Mode-Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Only ultrasonic-based atomic force microscopy in the industry Sufficiently flexible for compatibility with spectroscopic approaches such as Raman spectroscopy Easily adaptable to ...

  17. A Sealed Liquid Cell for In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Sealed Liquid Cell for In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Controlled Electrochemical Processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Sealed Liquid Cell for In ...

  18. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (PAGES). ...

  19. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable ...

  20. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Prev Next Title: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence ...

  1. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print ... are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly ...

  2. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Citation Details In-Document Search ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  3. Half-harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy with transfer function...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using linear and half-harmonic BE enables quantitative correction of the cantilever transfer function. Half-harmonic band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (HBE KPFM) thus ...

  4. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES ...

  5. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Grapes, Michael D. Department of...

  6. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Title: In situ...

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prev Next Title: X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Authors: Turner, Joshua J. ; Huang, Xiaojing ; Krupin, Oleg ; Seu, Keoki A. ; Parks, Daniel ; Kevan,...

  8. Decoupling indirect topographic cross-talk in band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazet, Lucie; Jesse, Stephen; Niu, Gang; Schroeder, Thomas; Schamm-Chardon, Sylvie; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Yang, Sang Mo; Okatan, M. Baris

    2016-06-20

    Here, all scanning probe microscopies are subjected to topographic cross-talk, meaning the topography-related contrast in functional images. Here, we investigate the signatures of indirect topographic cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging and spectroscopy and its decoupling using band excitation (BE) method in ferroelectric BaTiO3 deposited on the Si substrates with free standing nanopillars of diameter 50 nm. Comparison between the single-frequency PFM and BE-PFM results shows that the measured signal can be significantly distorted by topography-induced shifts in the contact resonance frequency and cantilever transfer function. However, with proper correction, such shifts do not affect PFM imaging and hysteresismore » loop measurements. This suggests the necessity of an advanced approach, such as BE-PFM, for detection of intrinsic sample piezoresponse on the topographically non-uniform surfaces.« less

  9. Characterization of LiMn2O4 cathodes by electrochemical strain microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Luchkin, S. Yu.; Turygin, A. P.; Shur, V. Ya.; Kalinin, S. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) is a scanning probe microscopy(SPM) method in which the local electrodiffusion is probed via application of AC voltage to the SPM tip and registration of resulting electrochemical strain. In this study, we implemented ESM to measure local strain in bulk LiMn2O4 cathodes of a commercial Li-battery in different states of charge to investigate distribution of Li-ion mobility and concentration. Ramped AC ESM imaging and voltage spectroscopy were used to find the most reliable regime of measurements allowing separating and diminishing different contributions to ESM. This is not a trivial task due to complex geometry of themore » sample and various obstacles resulting in less predictable contributions of different origins into ESM response: electrostatic tip–surface interactions, charge injection, electrostriction, and flexoelectricity. Finally, understanding and control of these contributions is an important step towards quantitative interpretation of ESM data.« less

  10. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  11. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doyle, Barney L.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Weller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  12. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  13. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  14. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-27

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  16. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

  17. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Work performed on ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys....

  19. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with...

  20. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in ...

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing ...

  2. THz near-field microscopy of graphene structures. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: THz near-field microscopy of graphene structures. Abstract not provided. Authors: Pan, Wei ; Brener, Igal ; Mitrofanov, O ; Thompson, R ; Yu, W ; berger, c ; de heer, w.a. ; ...

  3. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  4. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  5. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  6. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  7. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es095_unocic_2011_o.pdf (1.17 MB) More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes

  8. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons

  9. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy lm034_rohatgi_2011_o.pdf (1.05 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Nanostructured Materials by Machining 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials Department of Energy

    pm029_allard_2011_p.pdf (2.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst

  10. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  11. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  12. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  13. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and

  14. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the

  15. Nanofabrication of sharp diamond tips by e-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Zeng, H.; Carlisle, J. A.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

    2009-12-07

    Ultrasharp diamond tips make excellent atomic force microscopy probes, field emitters, and abrasive articles due to diamond's outstanding physical properties, i.e., hardness, low friction coefficient, low work function, and toughness. Sharp diamond tips are currently fabricated as individual tips or arrays by three principal methods: (1) focused ion beam milling and gluing onto a cantilever of individual diamond tips, (2) coating silicon tips with diamond films, or (3) molding diamond into grooves etched in a sacrificial substrate, bonding the sacrificial substrate to another substrate or electrodepositing of a handling chip, followed by dissolution of the sacrificial substrate. The first method is tedious and serial in nature but does produce very sharp tips, the second method results in tips whose radius is limited by the thickness of the diamond coating, while the third method involves a costly bonding and release process and difficulties in thoroughly filling the high aspect ratio apex of molding grooves with diamond at the nanoscale. To overcome the difficulties with these existing methods, this article reports on the feasibility of the fabrication of sharp diamond tips by direct etching of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{reg_sign}) as a starting and structural material. The UNCD is reactive ion etched using a cap-precursor-mask scheme. An optimized etching recipe demonstrates the formation of ultrasharp diamond tips ({approx} 10 nm tip radius) with etch rates of 650 nm/min.

  16. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D.; Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing ?s time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few ?m{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the particular

  17. MATERIALS, FABRICATION, AND MANUFACTURING OF MICRO/NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR PHASE-CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M; Gerasopoulos, K; Maroo, SC; Hart, AJ

    2014-07-23

    This article describes the most prominent materials, fabrication methods, and manufacturing schemes for micro- and nanostructured surfaces that can be employed to enhance phase-change heat transfer phenomena. The numerous processes include traditional microfabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, lithography, and etching, as well as template-assisted and template-free nanofabrication techniques. The creation of complex, hierarchical, and heterogeneous surface structures using advanced techniques is also reviewed. Additionally, research needs in the field and future directions necessary to translate these approaches from the laboratory to high-performance applications are identified. Particular focus is placed on the extension of these techniques to the design of micro/nanostructures for increased performance, manufacturability, and reliability. The current research needs and goals are detailed, and potential pathways forward are suggested.

  18. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Ryan C. Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-14

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  19. Cross-sectional electrostatic force microscopy of thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballif, C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-01-15

    In a recent work, we showed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful technique to image cross sections of polycrystalline thin films. In this work, we apply a modification of AFM, namely, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), to investigate the electronic properties of cleaved II--VI and multijunction thin-film solar cells. We cleave the devices in such a way that they are still working with their nominal photovoltaic efficiencies and can be polarized for the measurements. This allows us to differentiate between surface effects (work function and surface band bending) and bulk device properties. In the case of polycrystalline CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass solar cells, we find a drop of the EFM signal in the area of the CdTe/CdS interface ({+-}50 nm). This drop varies in amplitude and sign according to the applied external bias and is compatible with an n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunction model, thereby invalidating the possibility of a deeply buried n-p CdTe homojunction. In the case of a triple-junction GaInP/GaAs/Ge device, we observe a variation of the EFM signal linked to both the material work-function differences and to the voltage bias applied to the cell. We attempt a qualitative explanation of the results and discuss the implications and difficulties of the EFM technique for the study of such thin-film devices.

  20. Sub-5 nm Domains in Ordered Poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) Block Polymers for Lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennemur, Justin; Yao, Li; Bates, Frank Stephen; Hillmyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A series of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly- (methyl methacrylate) (PCHE PMMA) diblock copolymers with varying molar mass (4.9 kg/mol Mn 30.6 kg/mol) and narrow molar mass distribution were synthesized through a combination of anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) techniques. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of -(hydroxy)polystyrene (PS-OH) yielded -(hydroxy)poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHEOH) with little loss of hydroxyl functionality. PCHE-OH was reacted with -bromoisobutyryl bromide (BiBB) to produce an ATRP macroinitiator used for the polymerization of methyl methacrylate. PCHE PMMA is a glassy, thermally stable material with a large effective segment segment interaction parameter, eff = (144.4 6.2)/T (0.162 0.013), determined by meanfield analysis of order-to-disorder transition temperatures (TODT) measured by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Ordered lamellar domain pitches (9 D 33 nm) were identified by small-angle X-ray scattering from neat BCPs containing 43 52 vol % PCHE ( f PCHE). Atomic force microscopy was used to show 7.5 nm lamellar features (D = 14.8 nm) which are some of the smallest observed to date. The lowest molar mass sample (Mn = 4.9 kg/mol, f PCHE = 0.46) is characterized by TODT = 173 3 C and sub-5 nm nanodomains, which together with the sacrificial properties of PMMA and the high overall thermal stability place this material at the forefront of high- systems for advanced nanopatterning applications.

  1. Spectroscopic infrared near-field microscopy and x-ray reflectivity studies of order and clustering in lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Generosi, J.; Margaritondo, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Tolk, N. H.; Piston, D. W.; Castellano, A. Congiu; Cricenti, A.

    2006-12-04

    Lipid membranes were studied by infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy at several wavelengths and by x-ray reflectivity. Together with the x-ray data, the optical images indicate the formation of locally ordered multiple bilayers, and the topographical micrographs reveal the presence of islands at the surface, both critically important features for biotechnology and medical applications such as biosensors and gene therapy.

  2. Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    microscopy for 3D materials characterization. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D materials characterization. ...

  3. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  4. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2010-05-01

    GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

  5. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, Kwang T.; Eom, Daejin; Chan, Siu-Wai; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2012-10-23

    The reduced surface of a natural Hematite single crystal a-Fe2O3(0001) sample has multiple surface domains with di!erent terminations, Fe2O3(0001), FeO(111), and Fe3O4(111). The adsorption of water on this surface was investigated via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and first-principle theoretical simulations. Water species are observed only on the Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface at temperatures up to 235 K. Between 235 and 245 K we observed a change in the surface species from intact water molecules and hydroxyl groups bound to the surface to only hydroxyl groups atop the surface terminating FeIII cations. This indicates a low energy barrier for water dissociation on the surface of Fe3O4 that is supported by our theoretical computations. Our first principles simulations con"rm the identity of the surface species proposed from the STM images, finding that the most stable state of a water molecule is the dissociated one (OH + H), with OH atop surface terminating FeIII sites and H atop under-coordinated oxygen sites. Attempts to simulate reaction of the surface OH with coadsorbed CO fail because the only binding sites for CO are the surface FeIII atoms, which are blocked by the much more strongly bound OH. In order to promote this reaction we simulated a surface decorated with gold atoms. The Au adatoms are found to cap the under-coordinated oxygen sites and dosed CO is found to bind to the Au adatom. This newly created binding site for CO not only allows for coexistence of CO and OH on the surface of Fe3O4 but also provides colocation between the two species. These two factors are likely promoters of catalytic activity on Au/Fe3O4(111) surfaces.

  6. Photothermal single particle microscopy using a single laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selmke, Markus; Heber, André; Braun, Marco; Cichos, Frank

    2014-07-07

    We introduce a single-laser-beam photothermal microscopy scheme for the detection of single absorbing nano-objects. Here, a modulated incident laser beam with a constant intensity offset serves as pump and probe beam at the same time. Using the out-of-phase scattering response of the retarded thermorefractive wave field, the method provides a selective contrast for absorbers over a possible background of scatterers. The use of a single wavelength and a single beam, considerably simplifies the setup and integration of photothermal detection in existing microscopy schemes.

  7. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  8. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes

  9. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  10. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grnewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  11. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed in situ via transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Sullivan, John P.; Harris, Charles Thomas

    2015-03-18

    Electrodeposited metallic lithium is an ideal negative battery electrode, but nonuniform microstructure evolution during cycling leads to degradation and safety issues. A better understanding of the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. Here we use a custom microfabricated, sealed liquid cell for in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image the first few cycles of lithium electrodeposition/dissolution in liquid aprotic electrolyte at submicron resolution. Cycling at current densities from 1 to 25 mA/cm2 leads to variations in grain structure, with higher current densities giving a more needle-like, higher surface area deposit. The effectmore » of the electron beam was explored, and it was found that, even with minimal beam exposure, beam-induced surface film formation could alter the Li microstructure. The electrochemical dissolution was seen to initiate from isolated points on grains rather than uniformly across the Li surface, due to the stabilizing solid electrolyte interphase surface film. As a result, we discuss the implications for operando STEM liquid-cell imaging and Li-battery applications.« less

  12. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  13. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-02-18

    This article describes how the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  14. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  15. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  16. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  17. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; et al

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  18. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  19. Scanning Probe Microscopy with Spectroscopic Molecular Recognition - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Scanning Probe Microscopy with Spectroscopic Molecular Recognition Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers developed an innovative imaging method that possesses the imaging capability of scanning near-field ultrasound holography and the chemical specificity of reverse photoacoustic spectroscopy. This imaging method can achieve chemical differentiation with nanometer resolution. DescriptionAtomic force

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  3. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  4. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  5. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  6. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  7. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  8. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  9. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  10. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  11. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  12. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  13. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature andmore » does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  14. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  15. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.

    2006-02-27

    Photoemission electron microscopy, in conjunction with photoemission spectroscopy, reflectivity, and surface roughness measurements, is used to study the thermally-induced martensitic transformation in a CuZnAI shape memory alloy. Real-time phase transformation is observed as a nearly instantaneous change of photoelectron intensity, accompanied by microstructural deformation and displacement due to the shape memory effect. The difference in the photoelectron intensity before and after the phase transformation is attributed to the concomitant change of work function as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoemission electron microscopy is shown to be a valuable new technique facilitating the study of phase transformations in shape memory alloys, and provides real-time information on microstructural changes and phase-dependent electronic properties.

  16. Imaging space charge regions in Sm-doped ceria using electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu; Adler, Stuart B.

    2014-11-17

    Nanocrystalline ceria exhibits a total conductivity several orders of magnitude higher than microcrystalline ceria in air at high temperature. The most widely accepted theory for this enhancement (based on fitting of conductivity data to various transport and kinetic models) is that relatively immobile positively charged defects and/or impurities accumulate at the grain boundary core, leading to a counterbalancing increase in the number of mobile electrons (small polarons) within a diffuse space charge region adjacent to each grain boundary. In an effort to validate this model, we have applied electrochemical strain microscopy to image the location and relative population of mobile electrons near grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sm-doped ceria in air at 20200?C. Our results show the first direct (spatially resolved) evidence that such a diffuse space charge region does exist in ceria, and is localized to both grain boundaries and the gas-exposed surface.

  17. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-? oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tselev, Alexander Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208

    2013-12-09

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100?nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  18. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable successseveral features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  19. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-10-30

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  20. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore » new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  1. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designing new nanostructured materials is discussed.

  2. Ultrafast Imaging of Surface Plasmons Propagating on a Gold Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Hu, Dehong; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-05-13

    We record time-resolved nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (tr-PEEM) images of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from a lithographically patterned rectangular trench on a flat gold surface. Our tr-PEEM scheme involves a pair of identical, spatially separated, and interferometrically-locked femtosecond laser pulses. Power dependent PEEM images provide experimental evidence for a sequential coherent nonlinear photoemission process, in which one laser source creates a PSP polarization state through a linear interaction, and the second subsequently probes the prepared state via two photon photoemission. The recorded time-resolved movies of a PSP allow us to directly measure various properties of the surface-bound wave packet, including its carrier wavelength (785 nm) and group velocity (0.95c). In addition, tr-PEEM in concert with finite-difference time domain simulations together allow us to set a lower limit of 75 μm for the decay length of the PSP on a 100 nm thick gold film.

  3. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  4. Si(hhm) surfaces: Templates for developing nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozhko, S. I. Ionov, A. M.; Chaika, A. N.

    2015-06-15

    The fabrication of ordered low-dimensional structures on clean and metal-atom-decorated stepped Si(557) and Si(556) surfaces is discussed. The formation conditions and atomic structure of regular step systems on clean Si(557) 7 × 7 and Si(556) 7 × 7 surfaces are studied. The atomic structure of stepped Si(hhm), Ag/Si(557), and Gd/Si(557) surfaces is studied using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The possibility of fabricating 1D and 2D structures of gadolinium and silver atoms on the Si(557) surface is demonstrated.

  5. Surface charge compensation for a highly charged Ion emissionmicroscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.W.; Hamza, A.V.; Newman, M.W.; Holder, J.P.; Schneider, D.H.G.; Schenkel, T.

    2003-04-01

    A surface charge compensation electron flood gun has been added to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) highly charged ion (HCI) emission microscope. HCI surface interaction results in a significant charge residue being left on the surface of insulators and semiconductors. This residual charge causes undesirable aberrations in the microscope images and a reduction of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass resolution when studying the surfaces of insulators and semiconductors. The benefits and problems associated with HCI microscopy and recent results of the electron flood gun enhanced HCI microscope are discussed.

  6. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  7. X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Surface and Interface Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Carlos Gutierrez Carlos Gutierrez Manager Resources Department Folder 01114 Sharepoint Visit Our Labs Grest Group Nanorheology Research (514 KB PDF) Interfacial Force Microscopy Group (701 KB PDF)

  9. Magnetic imaging with full-field soft X-ray microscopies (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray microscopies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic imaging with full-field soft X-ray microscopies You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  10. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 ...

  11. Electrophilic surface sites as precondition for the chemisorption of pyrrole on GaAs(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruhn, Thomas; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Vogt, Patrick

    2015-03-14

    We report how the presence of electrophilic surface sites influences the adsorption mechanism of pyrrole on GaAs(001) surfaces. For this purpose, we have investigated the adsorption behavior of pyrrole on different GaAs(001) reconstructions with different stoichiometries and thus different surface chemistries. The interfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and by reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy in a spectral range between 1.5 and 5 eV. On the As-rich c(4 × 4) reconstruction that exhibits only nucleophilic surface sites, pyrrole was found to physisorb on the surface without any significant modification of the structural and electronic properties of the surface. On the Ga-rich GaAs(001)-(4 × 2)/(6 × 6) reconstructions which exhibit nucleophilic as well as electrophilic surface sites, pyrrole was found to form stable covalent bonds mainly to the electrophilic (charge deficient) Ga atoms of the surface. These results clearly demonstrate that the existence of electrophilic surface sites is a crucial precondition for the chemisorption of pyrrole on GaAs(001) surfaces.

  12. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  13. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  14. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  15. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  16. Extreme-UV lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Replogle, William C.; Sweatt, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A photolithography system that employs a condenser that includes a series of aspheric mirrors on one side of a small, incoherent source of radiation producing a series of beams is provided. Each aspheric mirror images the quasi point source into a curved line segment. A relatively small arc of the ring image is needed by the camera; all of the beams are so manipulated that they all fall onto this same arc needed by the camera. Also, all of the beams are aimed through the camera's virtual entrance pupil. The condenser includes a correcting mirror for reshaping a beam segment which improves the overall system efficiency. The condenser efficiently fills the larger radius ringfield created by today's advanced camera designs. The system further includes (i) means for adjusting the intensity profile at the camera's entrance pupil or (ii) means for partially shielding the illumination imaging onto the mask or wafer. The adjusting means can, for example, change at least one of: (i) partial coherence of the photolithography system, (ii) mask image illumination uniformity on the wafer or (iii) centroid position of the illumination flux in the entrance pupil. A particularly preferred adjusting means includes at least one vignetting mask that covers at least a portion of the at least two substantially equal radial segments of the parent aspheric mirror.

  17. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  18. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  19. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  20. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  1. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  2. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  3. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  4. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  5. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  6. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  7. NMR microscopy of heavy metal absorption in calcium alginate beads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nestle, N.; Kimmich, R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, heavy metal uptake by biopolymer gels, such as Cal-Alginate or chitosan, has been studied by various methods. This is of interest because such materials might be an alternative to synthetical ion-exchange resins in the treatment of industrial waste waters. Most of the work done in this field consisted of studies of equilibrium absorption of different heavy metal ions with dependence on various experimental parameters. In some publications, the kinetics of absorption were studied, too. However, no experiments on the spatial distribution of heavy metals during the absorption process are known to us. Using Cu as an example, it is demonstrated in this article that NMR microscopy is an appropriate tool for such studies. By the method presented here, it is possible to monitor the spatial distribution of heavy metal ions with a time resolution of about 5 min and a spatial resolution of 100 {mu}m or even better. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  9. Self-consistent modeling of electrochemical strain microscopy of solid electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tselev, Alexander; Morozovska, Anna N.; Udod, Alexei; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-10

    Electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) employs a strong electromechanical coupling in solid ionic conductors to map ionic transport and electrochemical processes with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. To elucidate the mechanisms of the ESM image formation, we performed self-consistent numerical modeling of the electromechanical response in solid electrolytes under the probe tip in a linear, small-signal regime using the Boltzmann–Planck–Nernst–Einstein theory and Vegard's law while taking account of the electromigration and diffusion. We identified the characteristic time scales involved in the formation of the ESM response and found that the dynamics of the charge carriers in the tip-electrolyte system with blocking interfaces canmore » be described as charging of the diffuse layer at the tip-electrolyte interface through the tip contact spreading resistance. At the high frequencies used in the detection regime, the distribution of the charge carriers under the tip is governed by evanescent concentration waves generated at the tip-electrolyte interface. The ion drift length in the electric field produced by the tip determines the ESM response at high frequencies, which follows a 1/f asymptotic law. The electronic conductivity, as well as the electron transport through the electrode-electrolyte interface, do not have a significant effect on the ESM signal in the detection regime. The results indicate, however, that for typical solid electrolytes at room temperature, the ESM response originates at and contains information about the very surface layer of a sample, and the properties of the one-unit-cell-thick surface layer may significantly contribute to the ESM response, implying a high surface sensitivity and a high lateral resolution of the technique. On the other hand, it follows that a rigorous analysis of the ESM signals requires techniques that account for the discrete nature of a solid.« less

  10. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the

  11. Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, J.

    2007-11-15

    Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

  12. Active phase distribution changes within a catalyst particle during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis as revealed by multi-scale microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cats, K. H.; Andrews, J. C.; Stephan, O.; March, K.; Karunakaran, C.; Meirer, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction is one of the most promising processes to convert alternative energy sources, such as natural gas, coal or biomass, into liquid fuels and other high-value products. Despite its commercial implementation, we still lack fundamental insights into the various deactivation processes taking place during FTS. In this work, a combination of three methods for studying single catalyst particles at different length scales has been developed and applied to study the deactivation of Co/TiO2 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. By combining transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electronmore » energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) we visualized changes in the structure, aggregate size and distribution of supported Co nanoparticles that occur during FTS. At the microscale, Co nanoparticle aggregates are transported over several μm leading to a more homogeneous Co distribution, while at the nanoscale Co forms a thin layer of ~1-2 nm around the TiO2 support. The formation of the Co layer is the opposite case to the “classical” strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in which TiO2 surrounds the Co, and is possibly related to the surface oxidation of Co metal nanoparticles in combination with coke formation. In other words, the observed migration and formation of a thin CoOx layer are similar to a previously discussed reaction-induced spreading of metal oxides across a TiO2 surface.« less

  13. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Quan; Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei; Yang, Qizhi

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  14. Charge transfer of single laser crystallized intrinsic and phosphorus-doped Si-nanocrystals visualized by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jie; Xu, Jun Lu, Peng; Shan, Dan; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji

    2014-10-07

    Isolated intrinsic and phosphorus doped (P-doped) Si-nanocrystals (Si-NCs) on n- and p-Si substrates are fabricated by excimer laser crystallization techniques. The formation of Si-NCs is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive AFM measurements. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is then carried out to visualize the trapped charges in a single Si-NC dot which derives from the charge transfer between Si-NCs and Si substrates due to their different Fermi levels. The laser crystallized P-doped Si-NCs have a similar Fermi level around the mid-gap to the intrinsic counterparts, which might be caused by the inactivated impurity atoms or the surface states-related Fermi level pinning. A clear rise of the Fermi level in P-doped Si-NCs is observed after a short time thermal annealing treatment, indicating the activation of dopants in Si-NCs. Moreover, the surface charge quantity can be estimated using a simple parallel plate capacitor model for a quantitative understanding of the KPFM results at the nanoscale.

  15. Ferroelectric Switching by the Grounded Scanning Probe Microscopy Tip

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    The process of polarization reversal by the tip of scanning probe microscope was intensively studied for last two decades. Number of the abnormal switching phenomena was reported by the scientific groups worldwide. In particularly it was experimentally and theoretically shown that slow dynamics of the surface screening controls kinetics of the ferroelectric switching, backswitching and relaxation and presence of the charges carriers on the sample surface and in the sample bulk significantly change polarization reversal dynamics. Here we experimentally demonstrated practical possibility of the history dependent polarization reversal by the grounded SPM tip. This phenomenon was attributed to induction ofmore » the slowly dissipating charges into the surface of the grounded tip that enables polarization reversal under the action of the produced electric field. Analytical and numerical electrostatic calculations allow additional insight into nontrivial abnormal switching phenomena reported earlier.« less

  16. Ferroelectric Switching by the Grounded Scanning Probe Microscopy Tip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    The process of polarization reversal by the tip of scanning probe microscope was intensively studied for last two decades. Number of the abnormal switching phenomena was reported by the scientific groups worldwide. In particularly it was experimentally and theoretically shown that slow dynamics of the surface screening controls kinetics of the ferroelectric switching, backswitching and relaxation and presence of the charges carriers on the sample surface and in the sample bulk significantly change polarization reversal dynamics. Here we experimentally demonstrated practical possibility of the history dependent polarization reversal by the grounded SPM tip. This phenomenon was attributed to induction of the slowly dissipating charges into the surface of the grounded tip that enables polarization reversal under the action of the produced electric field. Analytical and numerical electrostatic calculations allow additional insight into nontrivial abnormal switching phenomena reported earlier.

  17. Sweet Surface Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sweet Surface Area Sweet Surface Area Create a delicious root beer float and learn sophisticated science concepts at the same time. Sweet Surface Area Science is all around us, so ...

  18. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  19. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  20. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes as a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  1. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  2. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  3. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes asmore » a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.« less

  4. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  5. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  6. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  7. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  8. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, W. S. Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H.; Zhang, J.; Luo, J. K.; Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB

    2014-02-15

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  9. Analytical Microscopy. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Measurements and Charactization (Fact Sheet).

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAJOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Special Features Lateral Resolution Typical Applications Analytical Technique System FEI F20 (UT) Phillips CM30 Transmission electron microscopy Structural and compositional analysis and lattice imaging 0.23 nm High-resolution, EDS Field-emission scanning transmission electron microscopy Structural, electronic, and compositional analysis; elemental mapping; lattice imaging 0.19 nm for HRTEM; 0.14 nm for Z-contrast STEM High-resolution,

  10. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  11. Elucidation of Perovskite Film Micro-Orientations Using Two-Photon Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Brianna R; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Yingzhong; Doughty, Benjamin L; Calhoun, Tessa R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of efficient hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite photovoltaic materials has caused the rapid development of a variety of preparation and processing techniques designed to maximize their performance. As processing methods continue to emerge, it is important to understand how the optical properties of these materials are affected on a microscopic scale. Here polarization resolved two-photon total internal reflectance microscopy (TIRFM) was used to probe changes in transition dipole moment orientation as a function of thermal annealing time in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on glass. These results show that as thermal annealing time is increased the distribution of transition moments pointing out-of-plane decreases in favor of forming areas with increased in-plane orientations. It was also shown through the axial sensitivity of TIRFM that the surface topography is manifested in the signal intensity and can be used to survey aspects of morphology in coincidence with the optical properties of these films.

  12. Elucidation of perovskite film micro-orientations using two-photon total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Watson, Brianna R.; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Doughty, Benjamin L.; Calhoun, Tessa R.

    2015-07-29

    The emergence of efficient hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite photovoltaic materials has caused the rapid development of a variety of preparation and processing techniques designed to maximize their performance. As processing methods continue to emerge, it is important to understand how the optical properties of these materials are affected on a microscopic scale. Here polarization resolved two-photon total internal reflectance microscopy (TIRFM) was used to probe changes in transition dipole moment orientation as a function of thermal annealing time in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on glass. These results show that as thermal annealing time is increased themore » distribution of transition moments pointing out-of-plane decreases in favor of forming areas with increased in-plane orientations. As a result, it was also shown through the axial sensitivity of TIRFM that the surface topography is manifested in the signal intensity and can be used to survey aspects of morphology in coincidence with the optical properties of these films.« less

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evaluation of MHD channel electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martello, D.V.; Baltrus, J.P.; Diehl, J.R.; Makovsky, L.E.

    1994-12-31

    Anode elements from the coal-fired Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana have been selected for study of the effects of localized phase morphology and chemistry on anode degradation. The platinum/tungsten/copper anode elements from the 1A{sub 4} channel were examined with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy following testing in the MHD channel, and the results compared to those for unexposed anodes. Evidence suggests that the surface of the tungsten anode is chemically attacked by a potassium-rich slag to form a fine-grained crystalline reaction product layer that is covered by a fused, glassy slag during channel operation. Examination of a mechanically separated, partially delaminated platinum cap and polished cross-sections of anode segments showed evidence of chemical attack along the braze used to join the two caps. Interface porosity may provide a path for slag penetration and diffusion of corrosive gases and liquids during channel operation, leading to delamination. The microstructure of the brazed joint cross-sections were similar, independent of exposure severity in the MHD channel. The primary mechanism of tungsten degradation appears to be grain exfoliation due to severe grain boundary attack.

  14. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4 ° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides andmore » the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.« less

  15. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Elucidation of perovskite film micro-orientations using two-photon total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Brianna R.; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Doughty, Benjamin L.; Calhoun, Tessa R.

    2015-07-29

    The emergence of efficient hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite photovoltaic materials has caused the rapid development of a variety of preparation and processing techniques designed to maximize their performance. As processing methods continue to emerge, it is important to understand how the optical properties of these materials are affected on a microscopic scale. Here polarization resolved two-photon total internal reflectance microscopy (TIRFM) was used to probe changes in transition dipole moment orientation as a function of thermal annealing time in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on glass. These results show that as thermal annealing time is increased the distribution of transition moments pointing out-of-plane decreases in favor of forming areas with increased in-plane orientations. As a result, it was also shown through the axial sensitivity of TIRFM that the surface topography is manifested in the signal intensity and can be used to survey aspects of morphology in coincidence with the optical properties of these films.

  17. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed in situ via transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Sullivan, John P.; Harris, Charles Thomas

    2015-03-18

    Electrodeposited metallic lithium is an ideal negative battery electrode, but nonuniform microstructure evolution during cycling leads to degradation and safety issues. A better understanding of the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. Here we use a custom microfabricated, sealed liquid cell for in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image the first few cycles of lithium electrodeposition/dissolution in liquid aprotic electrolyte at submicron resolution. Cycling at current densities from 1 to 25 mA/cm2 leads to variations in grain structure, with higher current densities giving a more needle-like, higher surface area deposit. The effect of the electron beam was explored, and it was found that, even with minimal beam exposure, beam-induced surface film formation could alter the Li microstructure. The electrochemical dissolution was seen to initiate from isolated points on grains rather than uniformly across the Li surface, due to the stabilizing solid electrolyte interphase surface film. As a result, we discuss the implications for operando STEM liquid-cell imaging and Li-battery applications.

  18. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  19. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin ...

  20. 3?m aperture probes for near-field terahertz transmission microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3?m aperture probes for near-field terahertz transmission microscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 3?m aperture probes for near-field terahertz transmission ...

  1. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the ... PROPERTIES; MAGNETISM; MICROSCOPY; OPTICS; SENSORS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPIN; TIME ...

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of whiskers and hillocks formed on Al films deposited onto a glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saka, H.; Fujino, S.; Kuroda, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Tsujimoto, K.; Tsuji, S. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Shimotsuruma, Yamato, Kanagawa 242 (Japan); Takatsuji, H. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Ichimiyake, Yasu-gun, Shiga 520-23 (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    Whiskers and hillocks formed on an Al film deposited onto a glass substrate have been observed by means of a variety of transmission electron microscopy technique.

  3. Characterization of a Hybrid Optical Microscopy/Laser Ablation Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization System for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-22

    Herein, a commercial optical microscope, laser microdissection instrument was coupled with an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer via a low profile liquid vortex capture probe to yield a hybrid optical microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system. The instrument has bright-field and fluorescence microscopy capabilities in addition to a highly focused UV laser beam that is utilized for laser ablation of samples. With this system, material laser ablated from a sample using the microscope was caught by a liquid vortex capture probe and transported in solution for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Both lane scanning and spot sampling mass spectral imaging modes weremore » used. The smallest area the system was able to ablate was ~0.544 μm × ~0.544 μm, achieved by oversampling of the smallest laser ablation spot size that could be obtained (~1.9 μm). With use of a model photoresist surface, known features as small as ~1.5 μm were resolved. The capabilities of the system with real world samples were demonstrated first with a blended polymer thin film containing poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(N-vinylcarbazole). Using spot sampling imaging, sub-micrometer sized features (0.62, 0.86, and 0.98 μm) visible by optical microscopy were clearly distinguished in the mass spectral images. A second real world example showed the imaging of trace amounts of cocaine in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Lastly, with use of a lane scanning mode with ~6 μm × ~6 μm data pixels, features in the tissue as small as 15 μm in size could be distinguished in both the mass spectral and optical images.« less

  4. Ion-assisted physical vapor deposition for enhanced film properties on nonflat surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alami, J.; Persson, P.O.A.; Music, D.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Bohlmark, J.; Helmersson, U.

    2005-03-01

    We have synthesized Ta thin films on Si substrates placed along a wall of a 2-cm-deep and 1-cm-wide trench, using both a mostly neutral Ta flux by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and a mostly ionized Ta flux by high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS). Structure of the grown films was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The Ta thin film grown by HPPMS has a smooth surface and a dense crystalline structure with grains oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface, whereas the film grown by dcMS exhibits a rough surface, pores between the grains, and an inclined columnar structure. The improved homogeneity achieved by HPPMS is a direct consequence of the high ion fraction of sputtered species.

  5. Surface determination through atomically resolved secondary-electron imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciston, J.; Brown, H. G.; D’Alfonso, A. J.; Koirala, P.; Ophus, C.; Lin, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Inada, H.; Zhu, Y.; Allen, L. J.; et al

    2015-06-17

    We report that unique determination of the atomic structure of technologically relevant surfaces is often limited by both a need for homogeneous crystals and ambiguity of registration between the surface and bulk. Atomically resolved secondary-electron imaging is extremely sensitive to this registration and is compatible with faceted nanomaterials, but has not been previously utilized for surface structure determination. Here we show a detailed experimental atomic-resolution secondary-electron microscopy analysis of the c(6 x 2) reconstruction on strontium titanate (001) coupled with careful simulation of secondary-electron images, density functional theory calculations and surface monolayer-sensitive aberration-corrected plan-view high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Our workmore » reveals several unexpected findings, including an amended registry of the surface on the bulk and strontium atoms with unusual seven-fold coordination within a typically high surface coverage of square pyramidal TiO5 units. Lastly, dielectric screening is found to play a critical role in attenuating secondary-electron generation processes from valence orbitals.« less

  6. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  7. A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF PRESOLAR HIBONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-04-01

    We report isotopic and microstructural data on five presolar hibonite grains (KH1, KH2, KH6, KH15, and KH21) identified in an acid residue of the Krymka LL3.1 ordinary chondrite. Isotopic measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) verified a presolar circumstellar origin for the grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the crystal structure and chemistry of the grains was enabled by in situ sectioning and lift-out with a focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). Comparisons of isotopic compositions with models indicate that four of the five grains formed in low-mass stars that evolved through the red giant/asymptotic giant branches (RGBs/AGBs), whereas one grain formed in the ejecta of a Type II supernova. Selected-area electron-diffraction patterns show that all grains are single crystals of hibonite. Some grains contain minor structural perturbations (stacking faults) and small spreads in orientation that can be attributed to a combination of growth defects and mechanical processing by grain-grain collisions. The similar structure of the supernova grain to those from RGB/AGB stars indicates a similarity in the formation conditions. Radiation damage (e.g., point defects), if present, occurs below our detection limit. Of the five grains we studied, only one has the pure hibonite composition of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}. All others contain minor amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, and Fe. The microstructural data are generally consistent with theoretical predictions, which constrain the circumstellar condensation temperature to a range of 1480-1743 K, assuming a corresponding total gas pressure between 1 x 10{sup -6} and 1 x 10{sup -3} atm. The TEM data were also used to develop a calibration for SIMS determination of Ti contents in oxide grains. Grains with extreme {sup 18}O depletions, indicating deep mixing has occurred in their parent AGB stars, are slightly Ti enriched compared with grains from stars without deep mixing, most

  8. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  9. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of carbon deposited on the NiO/MgO solid solution catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y.H.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1999-05-15

    The carbon deposition due to the CH{sub 4} decomposition at 790 C over NiO/MgO catalysts was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. While no deposits could be detected over the catalysts with a NiO content smaller than 9.1 wt%, they were detected over the catalysts with NiO contents of 23 and 50 wt%. The carbon deposits are composed of platelets located at distances of about 0.34 nm, corresponding to the graphitic carbon. Various structures of the deposited carbon were observed: (a) carbon consisting of platelets parallel to the surface of the particle, which covers a catalyst particle, (b) nanotubes composed of platelets parallel to their axis, and (c) carbon vortexes consisting of platelets parallel to their axis.

  10. Micro- and nanodomain imaging in uniaxial ferroelectrics: Joint application of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya. Zelenovskiy, P. S.

    2014-08-14

    The application of the most effective methods of the domain visualization in model uniaxial ferroelectrics of lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) family, and relaxor strontium-barium niobate (SBN) have been reviewed in this paper. We have demonstrated the synergetic effect of joint usage of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopies which provide extracting of the unique information about formation of the micro- and nanodomain structures. The methods have been applied for investigation of various types of domain structures with increasing complexity: (1) periodical domain structure in LN and LT, (2) nanodomain structures in LN, LT, and SBN, (3) nanodomain structures in LN with modified surface layer, (4) dendrite domain structure in LN. The self-assembled appearance of quasi-regular nanodomain structures in highly non-equilibrium switching conditions has been considered.

  11. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skapin, A. Sever Ropret, P. Bukovec, P.

    2007-11-15

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods.

  12. ARM - Measurement - Surface condition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    condition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface condition State of the surface, including vegetation, land use, surface type, roughness, and such; often provided in model output. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list

  13. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  14. Surface texture and specific adsorption sites of sol-gel synthesized anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaki, Mohamed I.; Mekhemer, Gamal A.H.; Fouad, Nasr E.; Jagadale, Tushar C.; Ogale, Satishchandra B.

    2010-10-15

    The surface properties of sol-gel synthesized anatase titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are probed by sorptiometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results reveal strong correlations of the surface area, porosity, pyridine adsorption capacity and strength, and catalytic methylbutynol decomposition activity.

  15. Experimental Observation of Quantum Oscillation of Surface Chemical Reactivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, X.; Jiang, P.; Qi, Y.; Jia, J.; Yang, Y.; Duan, W.; Li, W. X.; Bao, X.; Zhang, S. B.

    2007-05-29

    Here we present direct observation of a quantum reactivity with respect to the amounts of O2 adsorbed and the rates of surface oxidation as a function of film thickness on ultrathin (2-6 nm) Pb mesas by scanning tunneling microscopy. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements on the electronic structures reveal a quantum oscillation that originates from quantum well states of the mesas, as a generalization of the Fabry-P{acute e}rot modes of confined electron waves. We expect the quantum reactivity to be a general phenomenon for most ultrathin metal films with broad implications, such as nanostructure tuning of surface reactivities and rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  16. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  17. Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy in a cryogen free dilution refrigerator at 15 mK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haan, A. M. J. den Wijts, G. H. C. J.; Galli, F.; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Usenko, O.; Baarle, G. J. C. van; Zalm, D. J. van der

    2014-03-15

    Pulse tube refrigerators are becoming more common, because they are cost efficient and demand less handling than conventional (wet) refrigerators. However, a downside of a pulse tube system is the vibration level at the cold-head, which is in most designs several micrometers. We implemented vibration isolation techniques which significantly reduced vibration levels at the experiment. These optimizations were necessary for the vibration sensitive magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments at milli-kelvin temperatures for which the cryostat is intended. With these modifications we show atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy on graphite. This is promising for scanning probe microscopy applications at very low temperatures.

  18. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  19. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  20. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  1. Palladium diffusion into bulk copper via the (100) surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussmann, Ezra; Pohl, Karsten; Sun, Jiebing; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we measure the diffusion of Pd into bulk Cu at the Cu(100) surface. Interdiffusion is tracked by measuring the dissolution of the Cu(100)-c(2 x 2)-Pd surface alloy during annealing (T > 240 C). The activation barrier for Pd diffusion from the surface alloy into the bulk is determined to be (1.8 {+-} 0.6) eV. During annealing, we observe the growth of a new layer of Cu near step edges. Under this new Cu layer, dilute Pd remaining near the surface develops a layered structure similar to the Cu{sub 3}Pd L 1{sub 2} bulk alloy phase.

  2. Real time imaging of live cell ATP leaking or release events by chemiluminescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yun

    2008-12-18

    The purpose of this research was to expand the chemiluminescence microscopy applications in live bacterial/mammalian cell imaging and to improve the detection sensitivity for ATP leaking or release events. We first demonstrated that chemiluminescence (CL) imaging can be used to interrogate single bacterial cells. While using a luminometer allows detecting ATP from cell lysate extracted from at least 10 bacterial cells, all previous cell CL detection never reached this sensitivity of single bacteria level. We approached this goal with a different strategy from before: instead of breaking bacterial cell membrane and trying to capture the transiently diluted ATP with the firefly luciferase CL assay, we introduced the firefly luciferase enzyme into bacteria using the modern genetic techniques and placed the CL reaction substrate D-luciferin outside the cells. By damaging the cell membrane with various antibacterial drugs including antibiotics such as Penicillins and bacteriophages, the D-luciferin molecules diffused inside the cell and initiated the reaction that produces CL light. As firefly luciferases are large protein molecules which are retained within the cells before the total rupture and intracellular ATP concentration is high at the millmolar level, the CL reaction of firefly luciferase, ATP and D-luciferin can be kept for a relatively long time within the cells acting as a reaction container to generate enough photons for detection by the extremely sensitive intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. The result was inspiring as various single bacterium lysis and leakage events were monitored with 10-s temporal resolution movies. We also found a new way of enhancing diffusion D-luciferin into cells by dehydrating the bacteria. Then we started with this novel single bacterial CL imaging technique, and applied it for quantifying gene expression levels from individual bacterial cells. Previous published result in single cell gene expression quantification

  3. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2012-03-06

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  4. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  5. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion batteries with Al ...

  6. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in all-solid-state Li-ion batteries ...

  7. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  8. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  9. THz near-field microscopy of graphene nano-ribbon arrays. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: THz near-field microscopy of graphene nano-ribbon arrays. Authors: Pan, Wei ; Brener, Igal ; Mitrofanov, O. ; Thompson, R ; Yu, W. ; berger, c ; de heer, w.a. ; Jiang, Z. ...

  10. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  11. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  12. Appendix PORSURF: Porosity Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PORSURF-2014 Porosity Surface United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix PORSURF-2014 Table of Contents PORSURF-1.0 Introduction PORSURF-2.0 Creep Closure Method PORSURF-3.0 Conceptual Model for Porosity Surface PORSURF-4.0 SANTOS Numerical Analyses PORSURF-5.0 Implementation of Porosity Surface in BRAGFLO PORSURF-6.0 Dynamic Closure of the North End and Hallways PORSURF-7.0

  13. ARM - Measurement - Surface albedo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface albedo The fraction of incoming solar radiation at a surface (i.e. land, cloud top) that is effectively reflected by that surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of

  14. The cell surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axel, R.; Goodman, C.; Hynes, R.; Stillman, B.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of made at the LVII Cold Springs Symposium on Quantitative Biology, entitled The Cell Surface.

  15. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  16. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Wednesday, 28 October 2015 00:00 Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and

  17. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-07-09

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal.

  18. Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using

  19. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  20. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M.; Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J.; Salmon, W. C.; Sheu, S. S.

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15?nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  2. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Microscopy and ... SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; MICROANALYSIS; MICROSCOPY; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS

  3. Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu; Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst; Wegmann, Urs; Maier, Urs; Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel

    2012-06-15

    State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

  4. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  5. Fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on aluminum alloy substrates by RF-sputtered polytetrafluoroethylene coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Hai Feng Zhou, Zhi Ping

    2014-03-15

    In this work, we present a method of fabricating super-hydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy substrate. The etching of aluminum surfaces has been performed using Beck's dislocation etchant for different time to create micrometer-sized irregular steps. An optimised etching time of 50 s is found to be essential before polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, to obtain a highest water contact angle of 1652 with a lowest contact angle hysteresis as low as 52. The presence of patterned microstructure as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) together with the low surface energy ultrathin RF-sputtered PTFE films renders the aluminum alloy surfaces highly super-hydrophobic.

  6. Surface control of epitaxial manganite films via oxygen pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Qiao, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Meyer, Tricia L.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Biegalski, Michael D.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei

    2015-03-11

    The trend to reduce device dimensions demands increasing attention to atomic-scale details of structure of thin films as well as to pathways to control it. We found that this is of special importance in the systems with multiple competing interactions. We have used in situ scanning tunneling microscopy to image surfaces of La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The atomically resolved imaging was combined with in situ angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We find a strong effect of the background oxygen pressure during deposition on structural and chemical features of the film surface. Deposition at 50 mTorr of O2 leads to mixed-terminated film surfaces, with B-site (MnO2) termination being structurally imperfect at the atomic scale. Moreover, a relatively small reduction of the oxygen pressure to 20 mTorr results in a dramatic change of the surface structure leading to a nearly perfectly ordered B-site terminated surface with only a small fraction of A-site (La,Ca)O termination. This is accompanied, however, by surface roughening at a mesoscopic length scale. The results suggest that oxygen has a strong link to the adatom mobility during growth. The effect of the oxygen pressure on dopant surface segregation is also pronounced: Ca surface segregation is decreased with oxygen pressure reduction.

  7. Surface control of epitaxial manganite films via oxygen pressure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Qiao, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Meyer, Tricia L.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Biegalski, Michael D.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei

    2015-03-11

    The trend to reduce device dimensions demands increasing attention to atomic-scale details of structure of thin films as well as to pathways to control it. We found that this is of special importance in the systems with multiple competing interactions. We have used in situ scanning tunneling microscopy to image surfaces of La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The atomically resolved imaging was combined with in situ angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We find a strong effect of the background oxygen pressure during deposition on structural and chemical features of the film surface. Deposition at 50 mTorr of O2 leadsmore » to mixed-terminated film surfaces, with B-site (MnO2) termination being structurally imperfect at the atomic scale. Moreover, a relatively small reduction of the oxygen pressure to 20 mTorr results in a dramatic change of the surface structure leading to a nearly perfectly ordered B-site terminated surface with only a small fraction of A-site (La,Ca)O termination. This is accompanied, however, by surface roughening at a mesoscopic length scale. The results suggest that oxygen has a strong link to the adatom mobility during growth. The effect of the oxygen pressure on dopant surface segregation is also pronounced: Ca surface segregation is decreased with oxygen pressure reduction.« less

  8. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  9. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  10. Nonfunctionalized Polydimethyl Siloxane Superhydrophobic Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surfaces Based on Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonfunctionalized Polydimethyl Siloxane Superhydrophobic Surfaces Based ...

  11. Rapid prototyping of microchannels with surface patterns for fabrication of polymer fibers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goodrich, Payton J.; Sharifi, Farrokh; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-08-14

    Microfluidic technology has provided innovative solutions to numerous problems, but the cost of designing and fabricating microfluidic channels is impeding its expansion. In this study, Shrinky-Dink thermoplastic sheets are used to create multilayered complex templates for microfluidic channels. We also used inkjet and laserjet printers to raise a predetermined microchannel geometry by depositing several layers of ink for each feature consecutively. We achieved feature heights over 100 μm, which were measured and compared with surface profilometry. Templates closest to the target geometry were then used to create microfluidic devices from soft-lithography with the molds as a template. These microfluidic devicesmore » were, futhermore used to fabricate polymer microfibers using the microfluidic focusing approach to demonstrate the potential that this process has for microfluidic applications. Finally, an economic analysis was conducted to compare the price of common microfluidic template manufacturing methods. We showed that multilayer microchannels can be created significantly quicker and cheaper than current methods for design prototyping and point-of-care applications in the biomedical area.« less

  12. Rapid prototyping of microchannels with surface patterns for fabrication of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, Payton J.; Sharifi, Farrokh; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-08-14

    Microfluidic technology has provided innovative solutions to numerous problems, but the cost of designing and fabricating microfluidic channels is impeding its expansion. In this study, Shrinky-Dink thermoplastic sheets are used to create multilayered complex templates for microfluidic channels. We also used inkjet and laserjet printers to raise a predetermined microchannel geometry by depositing several layers of ink for each feature consecutively. We achieved feature heights over 100 μm, which were measured and compared with surface profilometry. Templates closest to the target geometry were then used to create microfluidic devices from soft-lithography with the molds as a template. These microfluidic devices were, futhermore used to fabricate polymer microfibers using the microfluidic focusing approach to demonstrate the potential that this process has for microfluidic applications. Finally, an economic analysis was conducted to compare the price of common microfluidic template manufacturing methods. We showed that multilayer microchannels can be created significantly quicker and cheaper than current methods for design prototyping and point-of-care applications in the biomedical area.

  13. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  14. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  15. Cross-Sectional Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Effects of Etching and Back-Contact Processes; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C.-S.; Gessert, T. A.; Duda, A. M.; Young, M.; Metzger, W. K.; Li, X.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the etching processes using bromine and nitric-phosphoric acid solutions, as well as of Cu, in the bulk electrical conductivity of CdTe/CdS solar cells using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Although the etching process can create a conductive layer on the surface of the CdTe, the layer is very shallow. In contrast, the addition of a thin layer of Cu to the surface creates a conductive layer inside the CdTe that is not uniform in depth, is concentrated at grains boundaries, and may short circuit the device if the CdTe is too thin. The etching process facilitates the Cu diffusion and results in thicker conductive layers. The existence of this inhomogeneous conductive layer directly affects the current transport and is probably the reason for needing thick CdTe in these devices.

  16. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  17. Multifunctional thin film surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  18. Handsfree Surface Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-01

    The HANDSFREE SURFACE ANALYSIS software code enables unattended analysis of surfaces by desorption electrospray (DESI) and liquid-junction surface sampling probe (SSP) mass spectrometry. The software allows automated lane scanning, imaging (e.g. lane rastering), spot and array sampling, and array scanning methods by controlling the movement of the sample attached to a computer-controlled stage. The software is able to collect, visualize and analyze mass spectrometry data real-time for surface analysis purposes by interacting with mass spectrometrymore » instrumentation software. The software also enables data post processing for imaging and other analytical purposes. The software also contains image analysis approaches to control the sampling capillary-to-surface distance when used with DESI, and for automated formation and real-time reoptimization of the sampling probe-to-surface liquid microjunction when used with SSP. Control of these distances is essential to automated, hands-free operation of a DESI or SSP mass spectrometry system.« less

  19. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Carpick, R. W.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.

    2007-12-15

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2{+-}2 vs 826{+-}186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2{+-}0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals' interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a

  20. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2007-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2 {+-} 2 vs 826 {+-} 186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2 {+-} 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well

  1. Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific applications also stand to benefit greatly, such as electron-beam lithography, electron microscopy, and next-generation free-electron lasers. Diamondoids are molecular ...

  2. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in diverse research areas such as cell biology, lithography, infrared microscopy, radiology, and x-ray tomography. Time-Resolved These techniques exploit the pulsed nature of...

  3. Hyperspectral Microscopy of Explosives Particles Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-12-26

    Using infrared hyperspectral imaging, we demonstrate microscopy of small particles of the explosives compounds RDX, tetryl, and PETN with near diffraction-limited performance. The custom microscope apparatus includes an external cavity quantum cascade laser illuminator scanned over its tuning range of 9.13-10.53 m in four seconds, coupled with a microbolometer focal plane array to record infrared transmission images. We use the hyperspectral microscopy technique to study the infrared absorption spectra of individual explosives particles, and demonstrate sub-nanogram detection limits.

  4. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  5. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their

  6. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benzerara, K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Brown, G.E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-03

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were combined to characterize various samples of geomicrobiological interest down to the nanometer scale. An approach based on energy-filtered imaging was used to examine microbe-mineral interactions and the resulting biominerals, as well as biosignatures in simplified laboratory samples. This approach was then applied to natural samples, including natural biofilms entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates and bioweathered silicates and facilitated location of bacterial cells and provided unique insights about their biogeochemical interactions with minerals at the 30-40 nm scale.

  7. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  8. Morphology of the surface of technically pure titanium VT1-0 after electroexplosive carbonization with a weighed zirconium oxide powder sample and electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sosnin, Kirill V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Titanium is carbonized by the electroexplosive method. Formation of a surface alloyed layer and a coating on the treated surface is established by the methods of transmission electron microscopy. The morphology and elemental composition of the alloyed layer are analyzed. A dependence of the structure of the modified layer subjected to electron gun treatment on the absorbed power density is revealed.

  9. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences. For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.

  10. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.more » For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.« less

  11. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.moreFor ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.less

  12. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  13. Dual surface interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardue, Robert M.; Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarter-wave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  14. Dual surface interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  15. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  16. Surface controlled blade stabilizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, Larry R.

    1983-01-01

    Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

  17. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  18. Contribution to crystallographic slip assessment by means of topographic measurements achieved with atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahloun, C.; Badji, R.; Bacroix, B.; Bouabdallah, M.

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively characterize the plastic glide occurring during tensile deformation of a duplex 2205 stainless steel sample. We demonstrate that an appropriate treatment of the topographic image issued from AFM measurements allows precise and quantitative information about the characteristics of plastic deformation and especially the amount of crystallographic slip.

  19. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  20. Imaging individual lanthanum atoms in zeolite Y by scanning transmission electron microscopy: evidence of lanthanum pair sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Pinghong; Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Debefve, Louise M.; Browning, Nigel D.; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-09-01

    Images of La-exchanged NaY zeolite obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that about 80% of the La cations were present as site-isolated species, with the remainder in pair sites. The distance between La cations in the pair sites ranged from 1.44 to 3.84 Å, consistent with the presence of pairs of cations tilted at various angles with respect to the support surface. The actual distance between La cations in the pair sites is inferred to be approximately 3.84 Å, which is shorter than the distance between the nearest Al sites in the zeolite (4.31 Å). The results therefore suggest the presence of dimeric structures of La cations bridged with OH groups, and the presence of such species has been inferred previously on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (W. Grünert, U. Sauerlandt, R. Schlögl, H.G. Karge, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 1413).

  1. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISO/TC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Chemical Analysis- Characterization of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2012-09-01

    ISO Technical Report (TR) 14187 provides an introduction to (and examples of) the information that can be obtained about nanostructured materials using surface-analysis tools. In addition, both general issues and challenges associated with characterising nanostructured materials and the specific opportunities and challenges associated with individual analytical methods are identified. As the size of objects or components of materials approaches a few nanometres, the distinctions among 'bulk', 'surface' and 'particle' analysis blur. This Technical Report focuses on issues specifically relevant to surface chemical analysis of nanostructured materials. The report considers a variety of analysis methods but focuses on techniques that are in the domain of ISO/TC 201 including Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning probe microscopy. Measurements of nanoparticle surface properties such as surface potential that are often made in a solution are not discussed.

  2. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, but exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions

  3. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, butmore » exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions« less

  4. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  5. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated aging of roofing surfaces Hugo Destaillats, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National ... H. Laboratory method mimicking natural soiling and weathering of outdoor surfaces. Ser. ...

  6. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childs, E.L.

    1984-01-23

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

  7. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childs, Everett L.

    1984-11-06

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

  8. Digital processing of SEM images for the assessment of evaluation indexes of cleaning interventions on Pentelic marble surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moropoulou, A. Delegou, E.T.; Vlahakis, V.; Karaviti, E.

    2007-11-15

    In this work, digital processing of scanning-electron-microscopy images utilized to assess cleaning interventions applied on the Pentelic marble surfaces of the National Archaeological Museum and National Library in Athens, Greece. Beside mineralogical and chemical characterization that took place by scanning-electron-microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, the image-analysis program EDGE was applied for estimating three evaluation indexes of the marble micro-structure. The EDGE program was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the evaluation of cleaning interventions applied on Philadelphia City Hall. This computer program analyzes scanning-electron-microscopy images of stone specimens cut in cross-section for measuring the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces, the stone near-surface fracture density, the shape factor (a surface roughness factor) and the friability index which represents the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical stability of the stone surface. The results indicated that the evaluation of the marble surface micro-structure before and after cleaning is achieved by the suggested indexes, while the performance of cleaning interventions on the marble surfaces can be assessed.

  9. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uar, A.; opuro?lu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Ar?kan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (?0.5) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45 before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100 were obtained.

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  12. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  13. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright; Karen E.; Cooper, David C.; Peterman, Dean R.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Tripp, Julia L.; Hull, Laurence C.

    2011-03-29

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  14. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  15. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  16. Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Gas Cluster Ion Beam Prepared GaSb Substrates: Towards Improved Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnaswami, Kannan; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Dauplaise, Helen; Allen, Lisa; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Bliss, David; Goodhue, William

    2008-04-01

    A key problem in producing mid-infrared optoelectronic and low-power electronic devices in the GaSb material system is the lack of substrates with appropriate surfaces for epitaxial growth. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaSb results in surface damage accompanied by tenacious oxides that do not easily desorb. To overcome this, we have developed a process using gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) to remove surface damage and produce engineered surface oxides. In this paper, we present surface modification results on GaSb substrates using O2-, CF4/O2-, and HBr-GCIB processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of GCIB produced surface layers showed the presence of mixed Ga- and Sb-oxides, with mostly Ga-oxides at the interface, desorbing at temperatures ranging 530°C to 560°C. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaSb/AlGaSb layers showed that GCIB surfaces yielded smooth defect free substrate to epi transitions as compared to CMP surfaces. Furthermore, HBr-GCIB surfaces exhibited neither dislocation layers nor discernable interfaces, indicating complete oxide desorbtion prior to epigrowth on a clean single crystal template. Atomic force microscopy of GCIB epilayers exhibited smooth surfaces with characteristic step-terrace formations comprising monatomic steps and wide terraces. The HBr-GCIB process can be easily adapted to a large scale manufacturing process for epi-ready GaSb.

  17. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  18. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  19. Direct Probing of Charge Injection and Polarization-Controlled Ionic Mobility on Ferroelectric LiNbO3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Dr. Anton; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Shur, V.Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Mapping surface potential with time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) in LiNbO3 periodically-poled single crystal revealed activation of the surface ionic subsystem. Electric fields higher than certain threshold value but lower than the switching field induce injection of charge from the biased electrode, formation of an active region in its vicinity and uneven distribution of screening charge on the opposite ferroelectric domains. Tr-KPFM technique allows investigating these phenomena in details.

  20. The role of surface passivation in controlling Ge nanowire faceting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Kodambaka, S.; Zakharov, D. N.; Ross, F. M.; Stach, E. A.

    2015-11-05

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of nanowire morphologies indicate that during Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth, Ge facets can rapidly form along the nanowire sidewalls when the source gas (here, digermane) flux is decreased or the temperature is increased. This sidewall faceting is accompanied by continuous catalyst loss as Au diffuses from the droplet to the wire surface. We suggest that high digermane flux and low temperatures promote effective surface passivation of Ge nanowires with H or other digermane fragments inhibiting diffusion and attachment of Au and Ge on the sidewalls. Furthermore, these results illustrate the essential roles of the precursor gas and substrate temperature in maintaining nanowire sidewall passivation, necessary to ensure the growth of straight, untapered, <111>-oriented nanowires.

  1. The role of surface passivation in controlling Ge nanowire faceting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Kodambaka, S.; Zakharov, D. N.; Ross, F. M.; Stach, E. A.

    2015-11-05

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of nanowire morphologies indicate that during Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth, Ge facets can rapidly form along the nanowire sidewalls when the source gas (here, digermane) flux is decreased or the temperature is increased. This sidewall faceting is accompanied by continuous catalyst loss as Au diffuses from the droplet to the wire surface. We suggest that high digermane flux and low temperatures promote effective surface passivation of Ge nanowires with H or other digermane fragments inhibiting diffusion and attachment of Au and Ge on the sidewalls. Furthermore, these results illustrate the essential roles of themore » precursor gas and substrate temperature in maintaining nanowire sidewall passivation, necessary to ensure the growth of straight, untapered, <111>-oriented nanowires.« less

  2. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  3. Reaction of Si(111) Surface with Saturated Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suryana, Risa; Nakahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Yahachi; Ichimiya, Ayahiko

    2011-12-10

    Reaction of Si(111) surface with saturated hydrocarbon such as methane (CH{sub 4}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) was carried out in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). After carbonization, structures formed on the surface were observed by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Structures transition formed on the surface were 7x7, {delta}-7x7, 1x1, and SiC structures. In the case of CH{sub 4}, the Si surfaces were carbonized at 800 deg. C for 120 min (7.2x10{sup 4} L) with a W-filament of 2800 deg. C, and SiC layers were obtained. In the case of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, the mixture of 7x7 and SiC structure was observed. Decomposition of hydrocarbon was characterized in quadrupole mass spectroscopy (QMS) measurements. An atomic force microscopy (AFM) image of the mixture of 7x7 and SiC shows a wandering shape. Whereas, the SiC layer shows a regular step. This result seems to be related to the different in the amount of CH{sub 3} molecules on the surface.

  4. Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jun; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miguel; Xiao, Xudong

    1999-01-01

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

  5. Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

    1999-03-09

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

  6. Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

    1998-04-28

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

  7. Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jun; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miguel; Xiao, Xudong

    1998-01-01

    The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

  8. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and processes in liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Tselev, Alexander; Ievlev, Anton V.

    2016-02-11

    Here, noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid–solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imagingmore » with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging.« less

  9. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  10. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-15

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the “forest of peaks” frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  11. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  12. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2013-12-15

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging.

  13. Microscopy imaging system and method employing stimulated raman spectroscopy as a contrast mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2011-09-27

    A microscopy imaging system includes a first light source for providing a first train of pulses at a first center optical frequency .omega..sub.1, a second light source for providing a second train of pulses at a second center optical frequency .omega..sub.2, a modulator system, an optical detector, and a processor. The modulator system is for modulating a beam property of the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency f of at least 100 kHz. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of the first train of pulses from the common focal volume by blocking the second train of pulses being modulated. The processor is for detecting, a modulation at the modulation frequency f, of the integrated intensity of the optical frequency components of the first train of pulses to provide a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  14. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  15. Investigating the mesostructure of ordered porous silica nanocomposites by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullita, S.; Casula, M. F.; Piludu, M.; Falqui, A.; Carta, D.; Corrias, A.

    2014-10-21

    Nanocomposites made out of FeCo alloy nanocrystals supported onto pre-formed mesoporous ordered silica which features a cubic arrangement of pores (SBA-16) were investigated. Information on the effect of the nanocrystals on the mesostructure (i.e. pore arrangement symmetry, pore size, and shape) were deduced by a multitechnique approach including N2 physisorption, low angle X-ray diffraction, and Transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques are required, however, to gain direct evidence on key compositional and textural features of the nanocomposites. In particular, electron tomography and microtomy techniques make clear that the FeCo nanocrystals are located within the pores of the SBA-16 silica, and that the ordered mesostructure of the nanocomposite is retained throughout the observed specimen.

  16. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C. -C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T. O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; et al

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore » computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  17. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celano, Umberto E-mail: u.celano@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo

    2015-06-07

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10?nm{sup 2}) of the physical contact (?100?nm{sup 2}) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10?nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  18. Graphene-based textured surface by pulsed laser deposition as a robust platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tite, T.; Donnet, C.; Loir, A.-S.; Reynaud, S.; Michalon, J.-Y.; Vocanson, F.; Garrelie, F.

    2014-01-27

    We have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrate based on gold nanoparticles-decorated few-layer (fl) graphene grown by pulsed laser deposition. Diamond-Like Carbon film has been converted to fl-graphene after thermal annealing at low temperature. The formation of fl-graphene was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and surface morphology was highlighted by scanning electron microscopy. We found that textured fl-graphene film with nanoscale roughness was highly beneficial for SERS detection. Rhodamine 6G and p-aminothiophenol proposed as test molecules were detected with high sensitivity. The detection at low concentration of deltamethrin, an active molecule of a commercial pesticide was further demonstrated.

  19. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical

  20. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George T., III; Livescu, Veronica; Cerreta, Ellen K

    2010-03-18

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.