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Sample records for microscopy lithography surface

  1. High resolution imaging and lithography using interference of light and surface plasmon waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yang-Hyo

    2007-01-01

    The resolution of optical imaging and lithography is limited by the wave nature of light. Studies have been undertaken to overcome the diffraction limit for imaging and lithography. In our lab, the standing wave surface ...

  2. Multilayer resist methods for nanoimprint lithography on nonflat surfaces Xiaoyun Sun, Lei Zhuang,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 98 10106-3 I. INTRODUCTION Nanoimprint lithography NIL , a new approach of modifying the resist's chemical properties with radiation as in conventional lithography.1 NIL has issue for NIL to become a major li- thography tool is to imprint on nonflat surfaces. This article

  3. Development of a microfluidic device for patterning multiple species by scanning probe lithography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivas Cardona, Juan Alberto

    2009-06-02

    Scanning Probe Lithography (SPL) is a versatile nanofabrication platform that leverages microfluidic “ink” delivery systems with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) for generating surface-patterned chemical functionality on ...

  4. Comparison of infrared frequency selective surfaces fabricated by direct-write electron-beam and bilayer nanoimprint lithographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krchnavek, Robert R.

    Comparison of infrared frequency selective surfaces fabricated by direct-write electron-beam-dipole resonant filters by direct-write electron-beam and nanoimprint lithographies. Such structures have been-write electron electron- beam lithography DEBL . Since DEBL is based on expo- sure of the resist point by point

  5. Application of Surface Spectroscopies and Microscopies to Elucidate Sorption Mechanisms on Oxide Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    -resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and surface probing microscopy (SPM) were used to discern

  6. Maskless lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  7. Maskless lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stulen, R.H.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides. 12 figs.

  8. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorén, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  9. Chains of quantum dot molecules grown on Si surface pre-patterned by ion-assisted nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smagina, Zh. V.; Stepina, N. P., E-mail: stepina@isp.nsc.ru; Zinovyev, V. A.; Kuchinskaya, P. A. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrenteva 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novikov, P. L.; Dvurechenskii, A. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrenteva 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova, 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-13

    An original approach based on the combination of nanoimprint lithography and ion irradiation through mask has been developed for fabrication of large-area periodical pattern on Si(100). Using the selective etching of regions amorphized by ion irradiation ordered structures with grooves and ridges were obtained. The shape and depth of the relief were governed by ion energy and by the number of etching stages as well. Laterally ordered chains of Ge quantum dots were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy of Ge on the pre-patterned Si substrates. For small amount of Ge deposited chains contain separate quantum dot molecules. The increase of deposition amount leads to overlapping of quantum dot molecules with formation of dense homogeneous chains of quantum dots. It was shown that the residual irradiation-induced bulk defects underneath the grooves suppress nucleation of Ge islands at the bottom of grooves. On pre-patterned substrates with whole defect regions, etched quantum dots grow at the bottom of grooves. The observed location of Ge quantum dots is interpreted in terms of local strain-mediated surface chemical potential which controls the sites of islands nucleation. The local chemical potential is affected by additional strain formed by the residual defects. It was shown by molecular dynamics calculations that these defects form the compressive strain at the bottom of grooves.

  10. VUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, Edward V. (Livermore, CA); Oster, Yale (Danville, CA); Mundinger, David C. (Stockton, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  11. VUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  12. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  13. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  14. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of surface electronic structure in GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of surface electronic structure in GaN grown by hydride vapor Engineering and Program in Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla microscopy is used to image surface potential variations in GaN 0001 grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

  15. Contact thermal lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

  16. Automation of soft lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation is a final documentation of the project whose goal is demonstrating manufacturability of soft lithography. Specifically, our target is creating micron scale patterns of resists on a 3 square inch, relatively ...

  17. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  18. Leakage radiation microscopy of surface plasmons launched by a nanodiamond-based tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollet, O; Drezet, A; Huant, S; 10.1016/j.diamond.2011.05.012

    2011-01-01

    Leakage-radiation microscopy of a thin gold film demonstrates the ability of an ensemble of fluorescent diamond nanoparticles attached onto the apex of an optical tip to serve as an efficient near-field surface-plasmon polariton launcher. The implementation of the nanodiamond-based tip in a near-field scanning optical microscope will allow for an accurate control on the launching position, thereby opening the way to scanning plasmonics.

  19. Investigations into Protein-Surface Interactions via Atomic Force Microscopy and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settle, Jenifer Kaye

    2012-08-31

    performed via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to investigate the dynamics of this adsorption process on gold, and an amine-, carboxyl-, methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated SAM films. Chapter 4 provides background and investigation into F1-Adenosine triphosphate...

  20. Electron Beam Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    Electron Beam Lithography Marco Salerno #12;Outline · general lithographic concepts · EBL www.cnf.cornell.edu/SPIEBook/SPIE1.HTM #12;Typical Electron Beam Column Zeiss GeminiTM column Types of Electron Beam Columns · no e- cross over no Boersch-effect (additional energy spread) · beam booster

  1. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopf, Juliane [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY OF THE CLEAVED Rb1/3WO3 (0001) SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY OF THE CLEAVED Rb1/3WO3 (0001) SURFACE of cleaved (0001) surfaces of the hexagonal tungsten bronze, Rbl/ 3WO3 , show two distinct contrast patterns bronze (HTB), Rbl/ 3WO3 [5]. The structure of this compound, originally determined by Magndli [6

  3. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore »environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  4. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Rama K. Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  5. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M., E-mail: roverney@u.washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1750 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  6. Normal-Incidence Photoemission Electron Microscopy (NI-PEEM) for Imaging Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschlimann, Martin

    Philip Kahl & Simone Wall & Christian Witt & Christian Schneider & Daniela Bayer & Alexander Fischer-incidence photoemission microscopy P. Kahl :S. Wall :C. Witt :M. Horn-von Hoegen : F.

  7. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Gregory F. (Oakland, CA); Talin, Albert A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  8. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. ...

  9. Low-cost interference lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Corey P.

    The authors report demonstration of a low-cost ( ? 1000 USD) interference lithography system based on a Lloyd’s mirror interferometer that is capable of ? 300?nm pitch patterning. The components include only a 405?nm GaN ...

  10. Tailoring Nanostructures Using Copolymer Nanoimprint Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal Thebault; Stefan Niedermayer; Stefan Landis; Nicolas Chaix; Patrick Guenoun; Jean Daillant; Xingkun Man; David Andelman; Henri Orland

    2012-07-12

    Finding affordable ways of generating high-density ordered nanostructures that can be transferred to a substrate is a major challenge for industrial applications like memories or optical devices with high resolution features. In this work, we report on a novel technique to direct self-assembled structures of block copolymers by NanoImprint Lithography. Surface energy of a reusable mold and nanorheology are used to organize the copolymers in defect-free structures over tens of micrometers in size. Versatile and controlled in-plane orientations of about 25 nm half-period lamellar nanostructures are achieved and, in particular, include applications to circular tracks of magnetic reading heads.

  11. Tailoring Nanostructures Using Copolymer Nanoimprint Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thebault, Pascal; Landis, Stefan; Chaix, Nicolas; Guenoun, Patrick; Daillant, Jean; Man, Xingkun; Andelman, David; Orland, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Finding affordable ways of generating high-density ordered nanostructures that can be transferred to a substrate is a major challenge for industrial applications like memories or optical devices with high resolution features. In this work, we report on a novel technique to direct self-assembled structures of block copolymers by NanoImprint Lithography. Surface energy of a reusable mold and nanorheology are used to organize the copolymers in defect-free structures over tens of micrometers in size. Versatile and controlled in-plane orientations of about 25 nm half-period lamellar nanostructures are achieved and, in particular, include applications to circular tracks of magnetic reading heads.

  12. Ultrathin fluorinated diamondlike carbon coating for nanoimprint lithography imprinters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krchnavek, Robert R.

    Ultrathin fluorinated diamondlike carbon coating for nanoimprint lithography imprinters Ryan W-DLC is used as a NIL imprinter coating to provide this durable antiwear, antistick layer. Previous works10,11 have shown that DLC is a durable coating with a low surface energy 40 mJ/m2 . The fluorinated self

  13. Phase states of water near the surface of a polymer membrane. Phase microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N. F., E-mail: nbunkin@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorelik, V. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Kozlov, V. A., E-mail: v.kozlov@hotmail.com; Shkirin, A. V., E-mail: avshkirin@mephi.ru; Suyazov, N. V., E-mail: nvs@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Phase microscopy is used to show that the refractive index in the near-surface layer of water at the surface of a polymer Nafion membrane increases by a factor of 1.1 as compared to bulk water. Moreover, this layer exhibits birefringence. Experiments on UV irradiation of dry (anhydrous) and water-soaked Nafion are performed in grazing-incidence geometry to study their stimulated luminescence spectra. These spectra are found to be identical in both cases. For dry Nafion, luminescence can only be excited if probing radiation illuminates the polymer surface. The luminescence of water-soaked Nafion can also be excited if the distance between the optical axis and the surface is several hundred micrometers.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  15. Development of an immersion maskless lithography system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, David, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    As lithography quickly approaches its limits with current technologies, a host of new ideas is being proposed in hopes of pushing lithography to new levels of performance. The work presented in this thesis explores the use ...

  16. Fluorescence Microscopy Evidence for Quasi-Permanent Attachment of Antifreeze Proteins to Ice Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Fluorescence Microscopy Evidence for Quasi-Permanent Attachment of Antifreeze Proteins to Ice ABSTRACT Many organisms are protected from freezing by the presence of extracellular antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice, modify its morphology, and prevent its further growth. These proteins have

  17. Scanning probe microscopy imaging before and after atomic layer oxide deposition on a compound semiconductor surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Scanning probe microscopy imaging before and after atomic layer oxide deposition on a compound fabricated using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the Al2O3 gate oxide level (Fig 2) suggesting that an ordered monolayer layer might be a requirement for unpinning

  18. Review: Recent Advances and Current Challenges in Scanning Probe Microscopy of Biomolecular Surfaces and Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    States ABSTRACT: The introduction of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques revolutionized the field on biological systems with some success, the biophysical sciences remain on the cusp of a breakthrough with SPM, and complex with the experimental requirements of SPM techniques. However, there are a growing number

  19. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Markle, David A. (Saratoga, CA)

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  20. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  1. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    propargylglycine unnatural functional groups 20 Å apart and an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold-terminated surfaces in which a structured -helical peptide is chemically bonded to an alkanethiol self-assembledMolecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling

  2. Pattern transfer of electron beam modified self-assembled monolayers for high-resolution lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Pattern transfer of electron beam modified self-assembled monolayers for high-resolution electron beam lithography. Focused electron beams from 1 to 50 keV and scanning tunneling microscopy at 10 of electron beam damage on the monolayers and the subsequent etching reactions has been explored through x

  3. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15

    -specific protein-protein interactions between surface immobilized cadherin fragments demonstrate the potential utility of this experimental system and these methods. Additionally, quantum dot-modified colloids were synthesized and evanescent wave...

  4. Membrane projection lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  5. Modeling atomic force microscopy at LiNbO3 surfaces from first-principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    on different atomic tip models interacting with x-cut and z-cut LiNbO3 surfaces are calculated within density 30 years AFM has become a major tool for imaging and manipulating matter at the atomic scale [5]. Due of the converse piezoelectric effect to excite deformations of the sample with a metal-coated tip under alternat

  6. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  7. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  8. Scattering with angular limitation projection electron beam lithography for suboptical lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    Scattering with angular limitation projection electron beam lithography for suboptical lithography era early in the next century. The scattering with angular limitation projection electron-beam lithography SCALPEL approach combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam

  9. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror...

  10. Photo-lithography of xanthate precursor poly(p-phenylenevinylene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Photo-lithography of xanthate precursor poly(p-phenylenevinylene) polymers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photo-lithography of xanthate precursor...

  11. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  12. Fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon by direct six-beam laser interference lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jia; Zhang, Ziang; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin Wang, Dapeng

    2014-05-28

    This paper presents a new method for the generation of cross-scale laser interference patterns and the fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon. In the method, moth-eye structures were produced on a surface of silicon wafer using direct six-beam laser interference lithography to improve the antireflection performance of the material surface. The periodic dot arrays of the moth-eye structures were formed due to the ablation of the irradiance distribution of interference patterns on the wafer surface. The shape, size, and distribution of the moth-eye structures can be adjusted by controlling the wavelength, incidence angles, and exposure doses in a direct six-beam laser interference lithography setup. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that direct six-beam laser interference lithography can provide a way to fabricate cross-scale moth-eye structures for antireflection applications.

  13. Detailed scanning probe microscopy tip models determined from simultaneous atom-resolved AFM and STM studies of the TiO2(110) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnle, Angelika

    scattering theory, we demonstrate how the state of the scanning probe microscopy SPM tip in the experiments may be determined. The analysis of a large number of experimental SPM images recorded with different-AFM and the tunneling current It images on TiO2 110 surface. The exact state of the SPM tip must, therefore

  14. Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

    2003-11-21

    Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

  15. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E. (Livermore, CA); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  16. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E. (727 Clara St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Kubiak, G. D. (475 Maple St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  17. Diffractive optics for maskless lithography and imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Rajesh, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor industry has primarily been driven by the capability of lithography to pattern smaller and smaller features. However due to increasing mask costs and complexity, and increasing tool costs, the state-of-the-art ...

  18. Nanometer-scale investigations by atomic force microscopy into the effect of different treatments on the surface structure of hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durkan, C.; Wang, N.

    2014-09-15

    left behind by commercial products. Methods Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and related techniques. Results It can be directly seen that washing hair using commercial hair-care products removes deposits that naturally form on the shaft, revealing... . The factors determining which products a given consumer purchases include the brand, the cost, the scent and the perceived benefit. Hair shafts have traditionally been studied using scanning or transmission electron microscopy (SEM or TEM) 2...

  19. Microchannel molding: A soft lithography-inspired approach to micrometer-scale patterning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Microchannel molding: A soft lithography-inspired approach to micrometer-scale patterning large amounts of shrinkage during drying, topographical distortions develop. In place of patterning the elastomeric mold, the network of capillary channels was patterned directly into the substrate surface

  20. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require applications such as surface plasmonics[1] , data storage[2] , optoelectronic devices[3] , and nanoA novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures Wei Wu

  1. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA); Shafer, David (Fairfield, CT); McGuire, James (Pasadena, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  2. A direct-write thick-film lithography process for multi-parameter control of tooling in continuous roll-to-roll microcontact printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nietner, Larissa F

    2014-01-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) microcontact printing ([mu]CP) aims to transform micron-precision soft lithography in a continuous, large-scale, high-throughput process for large-area surface patterning, flexible electronics and ...

  3. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  4. Scanning-helium-ion-beam lithography with hydrogen silsesquioxane resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    A scanning-helium-ion-beam microscope is now commercially available. This microscope can be used to perform lithography similar to, but of potentially higher resolution than, scanning electron-beam lithography. This article ...

  5. Sub-10-nm lithography with light-ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) is the workhorse of nanoscale lithography in part because of the high brightness of the Schottky source of electrons, but also benefiting from decades of incremental innovation and ...

  6. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  7. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore »the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  8. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  9. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  10. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy study of InP,,001... surface reconstructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    -source, cracked phosphorus, valved effusion cell. Five InP 001 reconstructions are observed with RHEED until the entire device structure is formed. Naturally, surface structure plays an important roleAs there are three dominant techniques for preparing the InP surface: sputter-and-anneal, growth of InP using gas

  11. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  12. A new technique for imaging Mineralized Fibrils on Bovine Trabecular Bone Fracture Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    A new technique for imaging Mineralized Fibrils on Bovine Trabecular Bone Fracture Surfaces coated with extrafibrillar mineral particles. The mineral particles are distinctly different in different collagen fibrils. If the observed particles can be verified to be native extrafibrillar mineral, this could

  13. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Surface Simulation of Zinc-Blende GaN(001) Intrinsic 4 Reconstruction: Linear Gallium Tetramers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reconstruction: Linear Gallium Tetramers? Hamad A. AL-Brithen, Rong Yang, Muhammad B. Haider, Costel Constantin and occupied states, in agreement with surface simulations based on the 4 1 linear tetramer model the existence of linear Ga tetramers. DOI: PACS numbers: 68.35.Bs, 68.37.Ef, 73.20.At Based on both fundamental

  14. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x?2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x?2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings.more »The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  15. Laser direct write system for fabricating seamless roll-to-roll lithography tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrzelka, Joseph E.

    Implementations of roll to roll contact lithography require new approaches towards manufacturing tooling, including stamps for roll to roll nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and soft lithography. Suitable roll based tools must ...

  16. Multilevel interference lithography--fabricating sub-wavelength periodic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Hao, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Periodic nanostructures have many exciting applications, including high-energy spectroscopy, patterned magnetic media, photonic crystals, and templates for self-assembly. Interference lithography (IL) is an attractive ...

  17. Scanning tuneeling microscopy studies of fivefold surfaces of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals and of thin silver films on those surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Baris

    2008-12-01

    The present work in this dissertation mainly focuses on the clean fivefold surfaces of i-Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals as well as the nucleation and growth of Ag films on these surfaces. In addition, Ag film growth on NiAl(110) has been explored in the frame of this dissertation. First, we have investigated the equilibration of a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal at 900-915 K and 925-950 K, using Omicron variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Annealing at low temperatures resulted in many voids on some terraces while the others were almost void-free. After annealing at 925-950K, void-rich terraces became much rarer. Our STM images suggest that through growth and coalescence of the voids, a different termination becomes exposed on host terraces. All of these observations in our study indicate that even after the quasicrystalline terrace-step structure appears, it evolves with time and temperature. More specifically, based on the STM observations, we conclude that during the annealing a wide range of energetically similar layers nucleate as surface terminations, however, with increasing temperature (and time) this distribution gets narrower via elimination of the metastable void-rich terraces. Next, we have examined the bulk structural models of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal in terms of the densities, compositions and interplanar spacings for the fivefold planes that might represent physical surface terminations. In our analyses, we mainly have focused on four deterministic models which have no partial or mixed occupancy but we have made some comparisons with an undeterministic model. We have compared the models with each other and also with the available experimental data including STM, LEED-IV, XPD and LEIS. In all deterministic models, there are two different families of layers (a pair of planes), and the nondeterministic model contains similar group of planes. These two families differ in terms of the chemical decoration of their top planes. Hence, we name them as Pd+(with Pd) and Pd-(without Pd). Based on their planer structure and the step height, it can be said that these two families can be viable surface terminations. However, besides the Pd content, these two sets differ in terms of relative densities of their top planes as well as the gap separating the layer from the nearest atomic plane. The experimental data and other arguments lead to the conclusion that the Pd- family is favored over the Pd+. This has an important implication on the interpretation of local motifs seen in the high resolution STM images. In other words, the dark stars are not formed by cut-Bergmans rather they are formed by cut-Mackays.

  18. Compact multi-bounce projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four optical elements providing five reflective surfaces for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical surfaces are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The second and fourth reflective surfaces are part of the same optical element. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width, which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion.

  19. Interference Assisted Lithography for Patterning of 1D Gridded Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    , USA 78750 3 University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA 92093 4 Tela Innovations, Inc Assisted Lithography (IAL) as a promising and cost-effective solution for extending lithography. IAL for pattern splitting, as well as to address concerns of significantly increased patterning cost. Nano

  20. Multidimensional Simulation and Optimization of Hybrid Laser and Discharge Plasma Devices for EUV Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    advantages and disadvantages. In order to meet the requirements of the Intel Lithography Roadmap goals

  1. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archanjo, Braulio S.; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Winston, Donald; Miao, Feng; Alberto Achete, Carlos; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel “defect” lines of ?1??m length and ?5?nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20?nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ? 2× smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  2. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, T. E. (Alameda County, CA); Kubiak, G. D. (Alameda County, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  3. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  4. Metrology for electron-beam lithography and resist contrast at the sub-10 nm scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huigao

    Exploring the resolution limit of electron-beam lithography is of great interest both scientifically and technologically. However, when electron-beam lithography approaches its resolution limit, imaging and metrology of ...

  5. Design and prototype : a manufacturing system for the soft lithography technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Arthur Y. (Arthur Yao)

    2006-01-01

    Ever since 1998 when the term "soft lithography" was first created, soft lithography techniques have drawn close attention of the academia and the industry. Micro contact printing is by far the most widely used soft ...

  6. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dominguez@ttu.edu; Peralta, Luis Grave de [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Bernussi, Ayrton A. [Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  7. Geometry of nanopore devices fabricated by electron beam lithography: Simulations and experimental comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Geometry of nanopore devices fabricated by electron beam lithography: Simulations and experimental 2013 Keywords: Nanopore Simulation Electron beam lithography Penelope Nanotechnology Monte Carlo a b be fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) with high density (on the order of 10 devices per cm2

  8. Lithography and Design in Partnership: A New Roadmap Andrew B. Kahng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    Lithography and Design in Partnership: A New Roadmap Andrew B. Kahng UCSD Departments of CSE roadmap' between lithography and design from several perspectives. First, we examine cultural gaps and other intrinsic barriers to a shared roadmap. Second, we discuss how lithography technol- ogy can change

  9. Microphotonic parabolic light directors fabricated by two-photon lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Jackson H; Spinelli, P.; Kosten, Emily D; Parsons, J.; Van Lare, C; Van de Groep, J; Garcia de Abajo, J.; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A.

    2011-01-01

    We have fabricated microphotonic parabolic light directors using two-photon lithography, thin-film processing, and aperture formation by focused ion beam lithography. Optical transmission measurements through upright parabolic directors 22 ?m high and 10 ?m in diameter exhibit strong beam directivity with a beam divergence of 5.6°, in reasonable agreement with ray-tracing and full-field electromagnetic simulations. The results indicate the suitability of microphotonic parabolic light directors for producing collimated beams for applications in advanced solar cell and light-emitting diode designs.

  10. Exploring the nature of surface barriers on MOF Zn(tbip) by applying IR microscopy in high temporal and spatial resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    ,8­10], surface permeabilities are by far more complicated to be assessed. This complication is related by deviations from the ideal crystal structure which are more likely to occur close to the surface than in the crystal bulk phase. They may give rise to pore narrowing or to total pore blocking at the surface and

  11. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  12. "A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-52542 120 Federal Columbia River..--..

  13. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  14. Ultratech Develops an Improved Lithography Tool for LED Wafer Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ultratech modified an existing lithography tool used for semiconductor manufacturing to better meet the cost and performance targets of the high-brightness LED manufacturing industry. The goal was to make the equipment compatible with the wide range of substrate diameters and thicknesses prevalent in the industry while reducing the capital cost and the overall cost of ownership (COO).

  15. Digital microfluidics using soft lithography{ John Paul Urbanski,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarasinghe, Saman

    Digital microfluidics using soft lithography{ John Paul Urbanski,a William Thies,b Christopher published as an Advance Article on the web 29th November 2005 DOI: 10.1039/b510127a Although microfluidic software to drive the pumps, valves, and electrodes used to manipulate fluids in microfluidic devices

  16. Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

    2001-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  17. Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

    2002-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  18. Functional photoacoustic microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hao

    2009-06-02

    This dissertation focuses on laser-based noninvasive photoacoustic microscopy of subsurface structures in vivo. Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality that combines the high-resolution advantage of ultrasonic imaging in deep tissue...

  19. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  20. Nodal photolithography : lithography via far-field optical nodes in the resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, I investigate one approach - stimulated emission depletion - to surmounting the diffraction limitation of optical lithography. This approach uses farfield optical nodes to orchestrate reversible, saturable ...

  1. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  2. Design of superconducting transmission line integrated surface-electrode ion-traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, David Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated superconducting surface electrode ion traps with integrated microwave coplanar waveguides using direct-write optical lithography and a niobium on sapphire process. We then tested these traps in a closed cycle ...

  3. Plastic masters--rigid templates for soft lithography Salil P. Desai,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    Plastic masters--rigid templates for soft lithography Salil P. Desai,a Dennis M. Freemanab and Joel plastic master molds for soft lithography directly from (poly)dimethysiloxane devices. Plastics masters without the need for cleanroom facilities. We have successfully demonstrated the use of plastics

  4. A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b, , Zhen He c microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) platform built by soft-lithography tech- niques. The MFC design includes a unique sub-5 lL polydimethylsiloxane soft chamber featuring carbon cloth electrodes and microfluidic

  5. An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm Kenneth lithography design rules. The proposed microscope features an array of user-selectable Fresnel zoneplate-EUV, Fresnel zoneplate microscope, the AIT has been in the vanguard of high-resolution EUV mask imaging

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  8. Quantum lithography with classical light: Generation of arbitrary patterns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qingqing; Hemmer, Philip R.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-01-01

    stream_source_info PhysRevA.75.065803.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 16287 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name PhysRevA.75.065803.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Quantum... alternative meth- ods based on classical fields ?9?11?. In Ref. ?12?, a novel approach was proposed to implement quantum lithography using the classical light. This is accom- plished by correlating wave vector and frequency in a narrow band multiphoton...

  9. Super-resolution deep imaging with hollow Bessel beam STED microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wentao; Dong, Dashan; Yang, Xusan; Xiao, Yunfeng; Gong, Qihuang; Xi, Peng; Shi, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy has become a powerful imaging and localized excitation method beating the diffraction barrier for improved lateral spatial resolution in cellular imaging, lithography, etc. Due to specimen-induced aberrations and scattering distortion, it has been a great challenge for STED to maintain consistent lateral resolution deeply inside the specimens. Here we report on a deep imaging STED microscopy by using Gaussian beam for excitation and hollow Bessel beam for depletion (GB-STED). The proposed scheme shows the improved imaging depth up to ~155{\\mu}m in solid agarose sample, ~115{\\mu}m in PDMS and ~100{\\mu}m in phantom of gray matter in brain tissue with consistent super resolution, while the standard STED microscopy shown a significantly reduced lateral resolution at the same imaging depth. The results indicate the excellent imaging penetration capability of GB-STED, making it a promising tool for deep 3D imaging optical nanoscopy and laser fabrication.

  10. Computational microscopy for sample analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikoma, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Computational microscopy is an emerging technology which extends the capabilities of optical microscopy with the help of computation. One of the notable example is super resolution fluorescence microscopy which achieves ...

  11. Development of ion sources for ion projection lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.

    1996-05-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of generating ion beams with low axial energy spread as required by the Ion Projection Lithography (IPL). Longitudinal ion energy spread has been studied in two different types of plasma discharge: the filament discharge ion source characterized by its low axial energy spread, and the RF-driven ion source characterized by its long source lifetime. For He{sup +} ions, longitudinal ion energy spreads of 1-2 eV were measured for a filament discharge multicusp ion source which is within the IPL device requirements. Ion beams with larger axial energy spread were observed in the RF-driven source. A double-chamber ion source has been designed which combines the advantages of low axial energy spread of the filament discharge ion source with the long lifetime of the RF-driven source. The energy spread of the double chamber source is lower than that of the RF-driven source.

  12. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  13. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  14. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Simon J. (Pleasanton, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A critical illumination condenser system, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 .mu.m source and requires a magnification of 26.times.. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth.

  15. The development of a prototype Zone-Plate-Array Lithography (ZPAL) system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Amil Ashok, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    The research presented in this paper aims to build a Zone-Plate-Array Lithography (ZPAL) prototype tool that will demonstrate the high-resolution, parallel patterning capabilities of the architecture. The experiment will ...

  16. Modeling the point-spread function in helium-ion lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    We present here a hybrid approach to modeling helium-ion lithography that combines the power and ease-of-use of the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) software with the results of recent work simulating secondary ...

  17. Resolution Limits of Electron-Beam Lithography toward the Atomic Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lihua

    We investigated electron-beam lithography with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. We achieved 2 nm isolated feature size and 5 nm half-pitch in hydrogen silsesquioxane resist. We also analyzed ...

  18. Development of a simple, compact, low-cost interference lithography system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korre, Hasan

    Interference lithography (IL) has proven itself to be an enabling technology for nanofabrication. Within IL, issues of spatial phase distortion, fringe stability, and substrate development have been explored and addressed. ...

  19. Limiting factors in sub-10 nm scanning-electron-beam lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    Achieving the highest possible resolution using scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) has become an increasingly urgent problem in recent years, as advances in various nanotechnology applications [ F. S. Bates and G. ...

  20. Understanding of hydrogen silsesquioxane electron resist for sub-5-nm-half-pitch lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    The authors, demonstrated that 4.5-nm-half-pitch structures could be achieved using electron-beam lithography, followed by salty development. They also hypothesized a development mechanism for hydrogen silsesquioxane, ...

  1. Large area high density quantized magnetic disks fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for fabricating large area quantized magnetic disks QMDs using nanoimprint lithography NIL , electroplating or a via array. The other is that for high resolution an antireflection coating ARC layer is needed, which

  2. Contact region fidelity, sensitivity, and control in roll-based soft lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrzelka, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Soft lithography is a printing process that uses small features on an elastomeric stamp to transfer micron and sub-micron patterns to a substrate. Translating this lab scale process to a roll-based manufacturing platform ...

  3. Nanometer-precision electron-beam lithography with applications in integrated optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Jeffrey Todd, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron-beam lithography (SEBL) provides sub-10-nm resolution and arbitrary-pattern generation; however, SEBL's pattern-placement accuracy remains inadequate for future integrated-circuits and integrated-optical ...

  4. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  5. M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueck, Steven R.J. (Albuquerque, NM); Chen, Xiaolan (Albuquerque, NM); Zaidi, Saleem (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Daniel J. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1998-06-02

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

  6. Droplet Impingement Cooling Experiments on Nano-structured Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yen-Po

    2011-10-21

    design of surface structure used in Sriraman and Banerjee's study [15] was adopted and fabricated using step and flash imprinting lithography (S- FIL) followed by several steps of thin film heater deposition. The purpose of this work is to obtain thin... Step and Flash Imprinting Lithography (S-FIL) is a nano fabrication technique developed by C.G. Willson and S. V. Sreenivasan's research group [16, 17] at the University of Texas at Austin. S-FIL defines and reproduces surface features based on a...

  7. Self-Cleaning Synthetic Adhesive Surfaces Mimicking Tokay Geckos.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Burckel, David Bruce; Fan, Hongyou; Houston, Jack E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Johnson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    A gecko's extraordinary ability to suspend itself from walls and ceilings of varied surface roughness has interested humans for hundreds of years. Many theories and possible explanations describing this phenomenon have been proposed including sticky secretions, microsuckers, and electrostatic forces; however, today it is widely accepted that van der Waals forces play the most important role in this type of dry adhesion. Inarguably, the vital feature that allows a gecko's suspension is the presence of billions 3 of tiny hairs on the pad of its foot called spatula. These features are small enough to reach within van der Waals distances of any surface (spatula radius ~100 nm); thus, the combined effect of billions of van der Waals interactions is more than sufficient to hold a gecko's weight to surfaces such as smooth ceilings or wet glass. Two lithographic approaches were used to make hierarchal structures with dimensions similar to the gecko foot dimensions noted above. One approach combined photo-lithography with soft lithography (micro-molding). In this fabrication scheme the fiber feature size, defined by the alumina micromold was 0.2 um in diameter and 60 um in height. The second approach followed more conventional photolithography-based patterning. Patterned features with dimensions ~0.3 mm in diameter by 0.5 mm tall were produced. We used interfacial force microscopy employing a parabolic diamond tip with a diameter of 200 nm to measure the surface adhesion of these structures. The measured adhesive forces ranged from 0.3 uN - 0.6 uN, yielding an average bonding stress between 50 N/cm2 to 100 N/cm2. By comparison the reported literature value for the average stress of a Tokay gecko foot is 10 N/cm2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Sandia National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research & Development program (LDRD). All coating processes were conducted in the cleanroom facility located at the University of New Mexico's Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM). SEM images were performed at UNM's Center for Micro-Engineering on equipment funded by a NSF New Mexico EPSCoR grant. 4

  8. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Simon J (Pleasonton, CA); Jeong, Hwan J (Los Altos, CA); Shafer, David R (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  9. Fundamentals of embossing nanoimprint lithography in polymer substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; King, William P.

    2011-02-01

    The convergence of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and biomedical industries is creating a need for innovation and discovery around materials, particularly in miniaturized systems that use polymers as the primary substrate. Polymers are ubiquitous in the microelectronics industry and are used as sensing materials, lithography tools, replication molds, microfluidics, nanofluidics, and biomedical devices. This diverse set of operational requirements dictates that the materials employed must possess different properties in order to reduce the cost of production, decrease the scale of devices to the appropriate degree, and generate engineered devices with new functional properties at cost-competitive levels of production. Nanoscale control of polymer deformation at a massive scale would enable breakthroughs in all of the aforementioned applications, but is currently beyond the current capabilities of mass manufacturing. This project was focused on developing a fundamental understanding of how polymers behave under different loads and environments at the nanoscale in terms of performance and fidelity in order to fill the most critical gaps in our current knowledgebase on this topic.

  10. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  11. Lithography with MeV Energy Ions for Biomedical Applications: Accelerator Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Whitlow, H. J.; Nakagawa, S. T.; Yoshida, E.

    2009-03-10

    MeV ion beam lithographies are very powerful techniques for 3D direct writing in positive or negative photoresist materials. Nanometer-scale rough structures, or clear areas with straight vertical sidewalls as thin as a few 10's of nm in a resist of a few nm to 100 {mu}m thickness can be made. These capabilities are particularly useful for lithography in cellular- and sub-cellular level biomedical research and technology applications. It can be used for tailor making special structures such as optical waveguides, biosensors, DNA sorters, spotting plates, systems for DNA, protein and cell separation, special cell-growth substrates and microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Furthermore MeV ion beam lithography can be used for rapid prototyping, and also making master stamps and moulds for mass production by hot embossing and nanoimprint lithography. The accelerator requirements for three different high energy ion beam lithography techniques are overviewed. We consider the special requirements placed on the accelerator and how this is achieved for a commercial proton beam writing tool.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy study of atomic and electronic structures of In2O on InAs and In0.53Ga0.47As,,001...-,,42... surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy study of atomic and electronic structures of In2O on In trap density.4 On an atomic level, electronic defects result from strong perturbations to the electronic structure of the oxide/ semiconductor interface forming interface trap states. These perturbations

  13. An optical parametric oscillator as a high-flux source of two-mode light for quantum lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    An optical parametric oscillator as a high-flux source of two-mode light for quantum lithography of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About of Physics An optical parametric oscillator as a high-flux source of two-mode light for quantum lithography

  14. Using neutral metastable argon atoms and contamination lithography to form nanostructures in silicon, silicon dioxide, and gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thywissen, Joseph

    Using neutral metastable argon atoms and contamination lithography to form nanostructures vapors present as dilute contaminants in the vacuum chamber, were used to create 80-nm features in Si, Si with similar contaminants present in a vacuum system to produce 8-nm features.1­3 This type of lithography

  15. Received 1 May 2013 | Accepted 26 Jul 2013 | Published 3 Sep 2013 Atomic layer lithography of wafer-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    and high throughput. Here we introduce a new patterning technology based on atomic layer deposition lithography, combines atomic layer deposition (ALD) with `plug-and-peel' metal patterning using adhesive tapeARTICLE Received 1 May 2013 | Accepted 26 Jul 2013 | Published 3 Sep 2013 Atomic layer lithography

  16. 2496 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 16, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2004 Soft Lithography Replica Molding of Critically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Molding of Critically Coupled Polymer Microring Resonators Joyce K. S. Poon, Student Member, IEEE, Yanyi lithography replica molding to fabricate unclad polystyrene (PS) and clad SU-8 microring resonator filters of the microring resonator filters show the practicality of soft-lithography replica molding for the fabrication

  17. Soft X-ray Lithography Beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klysubun, P.; Chomnawang, N.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2007-01-19

    Construction of a soft x-ray lithography beamline utilizing synchrotron radiation generated by one of the bending magnets at the Siam Photon Laboratory is finished and the beamline is currently in a commissioning period. The beamline was modified from the existing monitoring beamline and is intended for soft x-ray lithographic processing and radiation biological research. The lithography exposure station with a compact one-dimensional scanning mechanism was constructed and assembled in-house. The front-end of the beamline has been modified to allow larger exposure area. The exposure station for studying radiation effects on biological samples will be set up in tandem with the lithography station, with a Mylar window for isolation. Several improvements to both the beamline and the exposure stations, such as improved scanning speed and the ability to adjust the exposure spectrum by means of low-Z filters, are planned and will be implemented in the near future.

  18. Reinventing Pocket Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, T; Lee, W M

    2015-01-01

    The key to the success of pocket microscopes stems from the convenience for anyone to magnify the fine details (tens of micrometres) of any object on-thespot. The capability with a portable microscope lets us surpass our limited vision and is commonly used in many areas of science, industry, education. The growth of imaging and computing power in smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscope. In this article, we briefly describe the history of pocket microscopy and elucidate how mobile technologies are set to become the next platform for pocket microscopes

  19. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  20. Nanofabrication of Optical Elements for SXR and EUV Applications: Ion Beam Lithography as a New Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenz, J. [Institute for X-Optics, RheinAhrCampus Remagen, University of Applied Sciences Koblenz, Suedallee 2, 53424 Remagen (Germany); Research Group Electron Microscopy and Analytics, caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Krupp, N.; Irsen, S. [Research Group Electron Microscopy and Analytics, caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Wilhein, T. [Institute for X-Optics, RheinAhrCampus Remagen, University of Applied Sciences Koblenz, Suedallee 2, 53424 Remagen (Germany)

    2011-09-09

    Diffractive optical elements are important components for applications in soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation. At present, the standard fabrication method for such optics is based on electron beam lithography followed by nanostructuring. This requires a series of complex processes including exposure, reactive ion-etching, and electro-plating. We report on experiments showing the single-step fabrication of such elements using ion beam lithography. Both transmission and reflection gratings were fabricated and successfully implemented as spectrometers at laboratory soft x-ray sources. Additionally, first steps toward zone plate fabrication are described.

  1. Critical dimension and pattern size enhancement using pre-strained lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jian-Wei [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsin Chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chung-Yuan [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsin Chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lo, Cheng-Yao, E-mail: chengyao@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsin Chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsin Chu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-13

    This paper proposes a non-wavelength-shortening-related critical dimension and pattern size reduction solution for the integrated circuit industry that entails generating strain on the substrate prior to lithography. Pattern size reduction of up to 49% was achieved regardless of shape, location, and size on the xy plane, and complete theoretical calculations and process steps are described in this paper. This technique can be applied to enhance pattern resolution by employing materials and process parameters already in use and, thus, to enhance the capability of outdated lithography facilities, enabling them to particularly support the manufacturing of flexible electronic devices with polymer substrates.

  2. Sub-5 keV electron-beam lithography in hydrogen silsesquioxane resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfrinato, Vitor R.

    We fabricated 9–30 nm half-pitch nested Ls and 13–15 nm half-pitch dot arrays, using 2 keV electron-beam lithography with hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) as the resist. All structures with 15 nm half-pitch and above were ...

  3. Energy flow in light-coupling masks for lensless optical lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Energy flow in light-coupling masks for lensless optical lithography Olivier J. F. Martin@zurich.ibm.com Abstract: We illustrate the propagation of light in a new type of coupling mask for lensless optical. Biebuck, B. Michel, O.J.F. Martin and N.B. Piller, "Light-coupling masks: an alternative, lensless

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 3 Nanopatterning With Interferometric Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 3 Nanopatterning the potential of compact EUV lasers in nanotechnology applications. Index Terms--Nanotechnology, photolithography, X-ray lasers, X-ray lithography. THE increasing activity in nanotechnology and nanoscience fuels

  5. INTEGRATED SIMULATION OF DISCHARGE AND LASER PRODUCED PLASMAS IN EUV LITHOGRAPHY DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    of the plasma energy that includes thermal energy of electron and ionization energy; ie - ion component to support the throughput requirements of High-Volume Manufacturing lithography exposure tools. One method not only of power sources but also plasma irradiation parameters, plasma energy deposition, target material

  6. Low-voltage spatial-phase-locked scanning-electron-beam lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheong, Lin Lee

    2010-01-01

    Spatial-phase-locked electron-beam lithography (SPLEBL) is a method that tracks and corrects the position of an electron-beam in real-time by using a reference grid placed above the electron-beam resist. In this thesis, ...

  7. Silicon nanopillar anodes for lithium-ion batteries using nanoimprint lithography with flexible molds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Craig B.

    ) The lithium ion battery, a preferred energy storage technology, is limited by its volumetric and gravimetric. INTRODUCTION The lithium ion battery has become the energy storage me- dium of choice for almost allSilicon nanopillar anodes for lithium-ion batteries using nanoimprint lithography with flexible

  8. Optimization Criteria for SRAM Design -Lithography Contribution Daniel C. Cole,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Dan C.

    Optimization Criteria for SRAM Design - Lithography Contribution Daniel C. Cole,b Orest Bula, to predict and "optimize" the printed shapes through all critical levels in a dense SRAM design. Our key emphasis here is on "optimization criteria," namely, having achieved good predictability for printability

  9. Heidelberg DWL66 Direct Write Lithography System Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, UC Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Heidelberg DWL66 Direct Write Lithography System Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, UC Berkeley Standard Operating Procedure Prepared By: Frankie Myers (fbm@berkeley.edu) Updated: July 30, 2010, Peter Ledochowitz) may use this machine. Qualification must include one supervised run. SAFETY WARNING

  10. Sub-10 nm imprint lithography and applications Stephen Y. Chou,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    imprint. Moreover, imprint lithography was used to fabricate the silicon quantum dot, wire, and ring to the ultrasmall force in tapping mode, both the nano-CD and the scanning probe will not show noticeable wear after-cost nanopatterning technology, particularly a nanolithography which allows complete free- dom in designing the size

  11. Flexible CO2 laser system for fundamental research related to an extreme ultraviolet lithography source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Flexible CO2 laser system for fundamental research related to an extreme ultraviolet lithography 2009; published online 10 December 2009 A CO2 laser system with flexible parameters was developed 1010 W/cm2 . Utilizing this CO2 MOPA laser system, high conversion efficiency from laser to in-band 2

  12. Room-temperature Si single-electron memory fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Haixiong Ge, Christopher Keimel, and Stephen Y. Chou NanoStructure Laboratory, Department of Electrical using nanoimprint lithography NIL . The devices consist of a narrow channel metal­ oxide­semiconductor field-effect transistor and a sub-10-nm storage dot, which is located between the channel and the gate

  13. Self-Aligned Colloidal Lithography for Controllable and Tuneable Plasmonic Nanogaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Tao; Herrmann, Lars O.; de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-12-15

    the Au NPs. Hence the Au NPs remain isolated from the Au fi lm and produce nanogaps in-between. The surface roughness of Au fi lms was char- acterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM, Figure S1a). The height profi le (Figure S1b) shows a very small... NPs and Au fi lm can be discerned using SEM (Figure 1 e-g) although it is diffi cult to clearly visualize the shape of the entire gap in such semi-embedded nanostructures. The thickness of the Au fi lms can be adjusted in order to tune the size...

  14. Design and analysis of a scanning beam interference lithography system for patterning gratings with nanometer-level distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konkola, Paul Thomas, 1973-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and analysis of a system for patterning large-area gratings with nanometer level phase distortions. The novel patterning method, termed scanning beam interference lithography (SBIL), uses ...

  15. Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly(methyl methacrylate) as a negative resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    Developing high-resolution resists and processes for electron-beam lithography is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen ...

  16. Graphene Edge Lithography Guibai Xie, Zhiwen Shi, Rong Yang, Donghua Liu, Wei Yang, Meng Cheng, Duoming Wang, Dongxia Shi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guangyu

    Graphene Edge Lithography Guibai Xie, Zhiwen Shi, Rong Yang, Donghua Liu, Wei Yang, Meng Cheng: Fabrication of graphene nanostructures is of importance for both investigating their intrinsic physical approach for graphene nanostructures. Compared with conventional lithographic fabrication techniques

  17. Scanning probe lithography of self-assembled monolayers Guohua Yang, Nabil A. Amro, Gang-yu Liu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Gang-yu

    fabrication strategies. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques, such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM

  18. Integration of a 2D Periodic Nanopattern Into Thin Film Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Nanoimprint Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, Islam; Deckers, Jan; Depauw, Valérie; Tous, Loic; Van Gestel, Dries; Guindi, Rafik; Gordon, Ivan; Daif, Ounsi El

    2015-01-01

    The integration of two-dimensional (2D) periodic nanopattern defined by nanoimprint lithography and dry etching into aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) based polycrystalline silicon (Poly-Si) thin film solar cells is investigated experimentally. Compared to the unpatterned cell an increase of 6% in the light absorption has been achieved thanks to the nanopattern which, in turn, increased the short circuit current from 20.6 mA/cm2 to 23.8 mA/cm2. The efficiency, on the other hand, has limitedly increased from 6.4% to 6.7%. We show using the transfer length method (TLM) that the surface topography modification caused by the nanopattern has increased the sheet resistance of the antireflection coating (ARC) layer as well as the contact resistance between the ARC layer and the emitter front contacts. This, in turn, resulted in increased series resistance of the nanopatterned cell which has translated into a decreased fill factor, explaining the limited increase in efficiency.

  19. Nanofabrication of super-high-aspect-ratio structures in hydrogen silsesquioxane from direct-write e-beam lithography and hot development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocola, L. E.; Tirumala, V. R.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; NIST

    2008-11-01

    Super-high-aspect-ratio structures (>10) in hydrogen silsesquioxane resist using direct write electron beam lithography at 100 kV and hot development and rinse are reported. Posts of 100 nm in width and 1.2 {micro}m tall have been successfully fabricated without the need of supercritical drying. Hot rinse solution with isopropyl alcohol has been used to reduce surface tension effects during drying. Dose absorption effects have been observed and modeled using known Monte Carlo models. These results indicate that for e-beam exposures of thick negative resists (>1 {micro}m), the bottom of the structures will have less cross-link density and therefore will be less stiff than the top. These results will have impact in the design of high-aspect-ratio structures that can be used in microelectromechanical system devices and high-aspect-ratio Fresnel zone plates.

  20. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  1. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  2. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  3. Nanoscale GaAs metalsemiconductormetal photodetectors fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­V) characteristics of the contacts are very sensi- tive to the surface states and defects. In this letter, we report mold with interdigited fin- gers was first created on a silicon substrate. Next, a layer of polymethylmethancrylate PMMA was spun on a semi- insulating SI GaAs substrate. Before imprinting, both the mold

  4. Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal Materials - Slide - Cover Slip - Paraffin Wax Candle - Pasteur Pipette (suggested size 5 3/4 inch) - Matches Preparation of the Slide - You may want to protect the work surface from melted wax. We use a sheet of aluminum foil taped

  5. Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low- Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM range of surface analytical techniques at low temperature ­ enables ultra-violet/X-ray photoelectron

  6. Transient photoinduced diffractive solid immersion lens for infrared microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    plate structure on the surfaces of semiconductor wafers with high indices of refraction. Lenses properties were determined. We demonstrate that transient SILs can have lifetimes longer than 50 ps microscopy. A solid immersion lens SIL focuses radiation within a material of a high re- fractive index

  7. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  8. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  9. Low thermal distortion Extreme-UV lithography reticle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on Engineered Nano-Finned Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongjoo

    2014-08-10

    and Flash Imprint Lithography ......................................................... 45 2.3.5. Pattern Transfer ......................................................................................... 47 2.3.6. Silica and Nickel Nanofin, TFT... .................................................................................. 188 8.1. Experimental Results...................................................................................... 188 8.1.1. Nickel Flat Surface ................................................................................. 188 8.1.2. Nickel...

  11. Achieving clean epitaxial graphene surfaces suitable for device applications by improved lithographic process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, A., E-mail: anath@gmu.edu; Rao, M. V. [George Mason University, 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Koehler, A. D.; Jernigan, G. G.; Wheeler, V. D.; Hite, J. K.; Hernández, S. C.; Robinson, Z. R.; Myers-Ward, R. L.; Eddy, C. R.; Gaskill, D. K. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Garces, N. Y. [Sotera Defense Solutions, 2200 Defense Hwy. Suite 405, Crofton, Maryland 21114 (United States)

    2014-06-02

    It is well-known that the performance of graphene electronic devices is often limited by extrinsic scattering related to resist residue from transfer, lithography, and other processes. Here, we report a polymer-assisted fabrication procedure that produces a clean graphene surface following device fabrication by a standard lithography process. The effectiveness of this improved lithography process is demonstrated by examining the temperature dependence of epitaxial graphene-metal contact resistance using the transfer length method for Ti/Au (10?nm/50?nm) metallization. The Landauer-Buttiker model was used to explain carrier transport at the graphene-metal interface as a function of temperature. At room temperature, a contact resistance of 140 ?-?m was obtained after a thermal anneal at 523?K for 2?hr under vacuum, which is comparable to state-of-the-art values.

  12. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore »to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  13. Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo, E-mail: tbwei@semi.ac.cn; Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin [Semiconductor Lighting Technology Research and Development Center, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-07-07

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6° through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350?mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

  14. LASER CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE STUDY OF DENTAL MORPHOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jernvall, Jukka

    LASER CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE STUDY OF DENTAL MORPHOLOGY be transferred to geographic information systems (GIS) as well as interpreted by surface rendering computer parameters using geographic information systems (GIS). We then present a laser confocal microscopy technique

  15. Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesse, Stephen; Morozovska, A. N.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Eliseev, E. A.; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; Tebano, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

  16. Optimization of THz Microscopy Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niessen, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    THz near field microscopy opens a new frontier in material science. High spatial resolution requires the detection crystal to have uniform and reproducible response. We present the THz near field spatial and temporal response of ZnTe and GaP and examine possible properties that give rise to the ZnTe degraded signal.

  17. Holographic microscopy of holographically trapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    . Padgett, "Permanent 3D microstructures in a polymeric host created using holographic optical tweezers," J to organize microscopic materials into three-dimensional structures. In a complementary manner, holographicHolographic microscopy of holographically trapped three-dimensional structures Sang-Hyuk Lee

  18. Ice-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene This article has been downloaded from IOPscience-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene Jules A Gardener1 and J A Golovchenko1,2 1 Department of Physics demonstrate that a low energy focused electron beam can locally pattern graphene coated with a thin ice layer

  19. Fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled-plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the ZnO/GaN heterojunction light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shr-Jia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Kao, Jiann-Shiun; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng [Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 300 Taiwan (China); Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    This article reports fabrication of n-ZnO photonic crystal/p-GaN light emitting diode (LED) by nanosphere lithography to further booster the light efficiency. In this article, the fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals is carried out by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gas gives high etching rate of n-ZnO film, which yields a better surface morphology and results less plasma-induced damages of the n-ZnO film. Optimal ZnO lattice parameters of 200 nm and air fill factor from 0.35 to 0.65 were obtained from fitting the spectrum of n-ZnO/p-GaN LED using a MATLAB code. In this article, we will show our recent result that a ZnO photonic crystal cylinder has been fabricated using polystyrene nanosphere mask with lattice parameter of 200 nm and radius of hole around 70 nm. Surface morphology of ZnO photonic crystal was examined by scanning electron microscope.

  20. Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mingolo, N. Martínez, O. E.

    2014-01-15

    A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

  1. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  2. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  3. Scanning standing-wave illumination microscopy : a path to nanometer resolution in X-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Stanley Seokjong, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    X-ray microscopy can potentially combine the advantages of light microscopy with resolution approaching that of electron microscopy. In theory, x-ray microscopes can image unsectioned hydrated cells with nanometer resolution. ...

  4. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  5. Surface Localization Determinants of Borrelia burgdorferi Lipoproteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumru, Ozan

    2011-02-25

    these virulence factors reach the spirochetal surface. We observed in previous studies that monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fused to specifically mutated outer surface protein A (OspA) lipopeptides could be detected by epifluorescence microscopy...

  6. Electrostrictive and electrostatic responses in contact mode voltage modulated Scanning Probe Microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Ievlev, Anton; Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical response of solids underpins image formation mechanism of several scanning probe microscopy techniques including the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). While the theory of linear piezoelectric and ionic responses are well developed, the contributions of quadratic effects including electrostriction and capacitive tip-surface forces to measured signal remain poorly understood. Here we analyze the electrostrictive and capacitive contributions to the PFM and ESM signals and discuss the implications of the dielectric tip-surface gap on these interactions.

  7. Soft holographic interference lithography microlens for enhanced organic light emitting diode light extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Joong-Mok; Gan, Zhengqing; Leung, Wai Y.; Liu, Rui; Ye, Zhuo; Constant, Kristen; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-06-06

    Very uniform 2 {micro}m-pitch square microlens arrays ({micro}LAs), embossed on the blank glass side of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated 1.1 mm-thick glass, are used to enhance light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by {approx}100%, significantly higher than enhancements reported previously. The array design and size relative to the OLED pixel size appear to be responsible for this enhancement. The arrays are fabricated by very economical soft lithography imprinting of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold (itself obtained from a Ni master stamp that is generated from holographic interference lithography of a photoresist) on a UV-curable polyurethane drop placed on the glass. Green and blue OLEDs are then fabricated on the ITO to complete the device. When the {mu}LA is {approx}15 x 15 mm{sup 2}, i.e., much larger than the {approx}3 x 3 mm{sup 2} OLED pixel, the electroluminescence (EL) in the forward direction is enhanced by {approx}100%. Similarly, a 19 x 25 mm{sup 2} {mu}LA enhances the EL extracted from a 3 x 3 array of 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} OLED pixels by 96%. Simulations that include the effects of absorption in the organic and ITO layers are in accordance with the experimental results and indicate that a thinner 0.7 mm thick glass would yield a {approx}140% enhancement.

  8. 3D microfabrication of single-wall carbon nanotube/polymer composites by two-photon polymerization lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    3D microfabrication of single-wall carbon nanotube/polymer composites by two-photon polymerization online 16 March 2013 A B S T R A C T We present a method to develop single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer-photon polymerization lithography, allows one to fabricate three-dimensional SWCNT/polymer composites with a minimum

  9. Polymer sphere lithography for solid oxide fuel cells: a route to functional, well-defined electrode structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymer sphere lithography for solid oxide fuel cells: a route to functional, well. Introduction Dramatic breakthroughs in the materials, particularly electrode materials, for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been reported in recent years.1­3 Fundamental understanding of the electro- catalytic

  10. Feature filling modeling for step and flash imprint lithography Siddharth Chauhan, Frank Palmieri, Roger T. Bonnecaze,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 10.1116/1.3147212 I. INTRODUCTION Step and flash imprint lithography SFIL is a low pres- sure molding technology of integrated circuits ICs , including high throughput and low defects, necessitate nearly perfect defect-free imprinting in SFIL. Complete filling of features during the imprint step is imperative

  11. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  12. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  13. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  14. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Hercules, CA)

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  15. Surface Preparation in Ultra High Vacuum for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Surface Preparation in Ultra High Vacuum for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Department of Physics University of New Hampshire, Durham NH 03824 Ultra High Vacuum environments bring about removing the sample from the vacuum environment. New sets of tools must be developed that are usable within of the tunneling current the feedback electronic keeps the distance between tip and sample constant. Piezo electric

  16. Method for the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by deep X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2005-04-05

    A method for the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures by deep X-ray lithography (DXRL) comprises a masking process that uses a patterned mask with inclined mask holes and off-normal exposures with a DXRL beam aligned with the inclined mask holes. Microstructural features that are oriented in different directions can be obtained by using multiple off-normal exposures through additional mask holes having different orientations. Various methods can be used to block the non-aligned mask holes from the beam when using multiple exposures. A method for fabricating a precision 3D X-ray mask comprises forming an intermediate mask and a master mask on a common support membrane.

  17. Progress in the fabrication of high aspect ratio zone plates by soft x-ray lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divan, R.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N. A.; Lai, B.; Assoufid, L.; Leondard, Q.; Cerrina, F.

    2002-08-13

    Soft x-ray lithography technology has been applied to fabrication of phase shifting Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP's) for hard x-rays. Effects of the exposure conditions, developing system, and electroplating process parameters on line width and aspect ratio have been analyzed. The process has been optimized and an aspect ratio of 11 has been achieved for 110 nm outermost zone width. SEM and AFM have been used for preliminary metrology of the FZPs. The FZP optical performance was characterized at 8 keV photon energy at the 2-ID-D beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. Focusing efficiencies of 23% for FZPs apertures to 100 microns and 18% for 150-micron-diameter apertures have been obtained. The parameters of the fabricated FZP are in good agreement with the predicted values.

  18. Study of nano imprinting using soft lithography on Krafty glue and PVDF polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, M. S. Ravi, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu; Gangineni, Ramesh Babu, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Puducherry - 605014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The present work reveals soft lithography strategy based on self assembly and replica molding for carrying out micro and nanofabrication. It provides a convenient, effective and very low cost method for the formation and manufacturing of micro and nano structures. Al-layer of compact disc (sony CD-R) used as a stamp with patterned relief structures to generate patterns and structures with pattern size of 100nm height, 1.7 ?m wide. In literature, PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) solution is widely used to get negative copy of the Al-layer. In this work, we have used inexpensive white glue (Polyvinylacetate + water), 15gm (?5) and PVDF (Polyvinylidene difluoride) spin coated films and successfully transferred the nano patterns of Al layer on to white glue and PVDF films.

  19. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, John C. (Clinton, TN); Wilgen, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  20. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization...

  1. Communications Near-Field Fluorescence Microscopy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ** By Grace M. Credo and Steven K. Buratto* We use near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe. Buratto, G. M. Credo Department of Chemistry U

  2. Radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy of condensed media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyamshev, L.M.; Chelnokov, B.I.

    1984-07-01

    Possibilities are discussed for the application of scanning radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy, using different types of radiation, for microstructure analysis. (AIP)

  3. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-06-23

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  4. Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to Study Reversible Lithiation of Silicon Nanowires. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining...

  5. ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    images of the nucleation and growth of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. ORNL electron microscopy captured the first real-time nanoscale...

  6. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High...

  7. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2011-01-01

    which we can obtain their distance and location information. This procedure also works for atomic separation above one wavelength and therefore provides a seamless microscopy....

  8. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  9. Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bauer, Ernst [Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

    2010-01-08

    The short penetration and escape depth of electrons with energies below 1 keV make them ideally suited for the study of surfaces and ultrathin films. The combination of the low energy electrons and the high lateral resolution of a microscope produces a powerful method for the characterization of nanostructures on bulk samples, in particular if the microscope is equipped with an imaging energy filter and connected to a synchrotron radiation source. Comprehensive characterization by imaging, diffraction, and spectroscope of the structural, chemical, and magnetic properties is then possible. The Talk will describe the various imaging techniques in using reflected and emitted electrons in low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), with an emphasis on magnetic materials with spin-polarized LEEM and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism PEEM. The talk with end with an outlook on future possibilities.

  10. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  11. Nonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    /20/2010 Published on Web: 11/16/2010 FIGURE 1. Illustration of the nonlinear dark-field imaging method. Two incidentNonlinear Dark-Field Microscopy Hayk Harutyunyan, Stefano Palomba, Jan Renger, Romain Quidant Dark-field microscopy is a background-free imaging method that provides high sensitivity and a large

  12. An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Enachescu, M. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab); Stach, Eric A. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab); Alsem, Daan Hein (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab); Ritchie, Robert O. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)

    2005-02-01

    Wear is a critical factor in determining the durability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). While the reliability of polysilicon MEMS has received extensive attention, the mechanisms responsible for this failure mode at the microscale have yet to be conclusively determined. We have used on-chip polycrystalline silicon side-wall friction MEMS specimens to study active mechanisms during sliding wear in ambient air. Worn parts were examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while local temperature changes were monitored using advanced infrared microscopy. Observations show that small amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) are removed by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm) and are oxidized during this process. Agglomeration of such debris particles into larger clusters also occurs. Some of these debris particles/clusters create plowing tracks on the beam surface. A nano-crystalline surface layer ({approx}20-200 nm), with higher oxygen content, forms during wear at and below regions of the worn surface; its formation is likely aided by high local stresses. No evidence of dislocation plasticity or of extreme local temperature increases was found, ruling out the possibility of high temperature-assisted wear mechanisms.

  13. Tuning the interaction between propagating and localized surface plasmons for surface enhanced Raman scattering in water for biomedical and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shioi, Masahiko; Jans, Hilde; Lodewijks, Kristof; Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet; Kawamura, Tatsuro

    2014-06-16

    With a view to biomedical and environmental applications, we investigate the plasmonic properties of a rectangular gold nanodisk array in water to boost surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effects. To control the resonance wavelengths of the surface plasmon polariton and the localized surface plasmon, their dependence on the array period and diameter in water is studied in detail using a finite difference time domain method. A good agreement is obtained between calculated resonant wavelengths and those of gold nanodisk arrays fabricated using electron beam lithography. For the optimized structure, a SERS enhancement factor of 7.8?×?10{sup 7} is achieved in water experimentally.

  14. Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasarao, Mohan

    Photon tunnelling microscopy of polyethylene single crystals Mohan Srinivasarao* and Richard S:photon tunnellingmicroscopy;single crystals; polyethylene) INTRODUCTION The study of morphology of polymers is an area

  15. Data visualization of biological microscopy image analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scelfo, Tony (Tony W.)

    2006-01-01

    The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) provides biologists with a framework to store, analyze and manipulate large sets of image data. Current microscopes are capable of generating large numbers of images and when coupled ...

  16. Chapter One Microscopy of Soft Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    . Shaving cream is a common example. · Sand, composed of large solid particles in vacuum, air, or a liquid of these soft systems are often com- patible with conventional video microscopy. For example, consider food

  17. Controlled nanostructure fabrication using atomic force microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapcharoenkun, Chaweewan

    2013-06-29

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) nanolithography has been found to be a powerful and low-cost approach for sub-100 nm patterning. In this thesis, the possibility of using a state-of-the-art SPM system to controllably ...

  18. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  19. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Catalyst...

  20. ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers used atomic force microscopy to draw nanoscale patterns in a...

  1. Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

    2014-09-02

    An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

  2. Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique Steffi Krause a technique, scanning photo-induced impedance micro- scopy (SPIM), suitable for the imaging of the complex Photoelectrochemistry has been used widely to study photo-thermally induced current changes at metal surfaces

  3. Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale Structural Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale, such as radially or azimuthally polarized doughnut beams, are combined with topography studies of pentacene thin in the mirror focus and kept within a nanometer distance from the surface to probe the topography using shear

  4. Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry Via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipson, Albert L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Ginder, Ryan S. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-12-15

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy imaging of battery electrodes, using the geometry shown in the figure, is a tool for in situ nanoscale mapping of surface topography and local ion current. Images of silicon and tin electrodes show that the combination of topography and ion current provides insight into the local electrochemical phenomena that govern the operation of lithium ion batteries.

  5. Nonlinear Chemical Imaging Microscopy: Near-Field Third Harmonic Generation Imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    radiation in human red blood cells. We show that resonantly enhanced THG is a chemically specific bulk probeNonlinear Chemical Imaging Microscopy: Near-Field Third Harmonic Generation Imaging of Human Red experiments do not produce contrast that is truly surface specific. There is much current interest in the use

  6. Potential contributions of noncontact atomic force microscopy for the future Casimir force measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Kim; U. D. Schwarz

    2010-10-18

    Surface electric noise, i.e., the non-uniform distribution of charges and potentials on a surface, poses a great experimental challenge in modern precision force measurements. Such a challenge is encountered in a number of different experimental circumstances. The scientists employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) have long focused their efforts to understand the surface-related noise issues via variants of AFM techniques, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy or electric force microscopy. Recently, the physicists investigating quantum vacuum fluctuation phenomena between two closely-spaced objects have also begun to collect experimental evidence indicating a presence of surface effects neglected in their previous analyses. It now appears that the two seemingly disparate science communities are encountering effects rooted in the same surface phenomena. In this report, we suggest specific experimental tasks to be performed in the near future that are crucial not only for fostering needed collaborations between the two communities, but also for providing valuable data on the surface effects in order to draw the most realistic conclusion about the actual contribution of the Casimir force (or van der Waals force) between a pair of real materials.

  7. Spatially resolved low-frequency noise measured by atomic force microscopy Lynda Cockins, Yoichi Miyahara,* and Peter Grutter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    about the location of each trap even if a single trap is involved. Scanning tunneling microscopy has to traps located near noninsulating surfaces because a tunneling current of at least several picoamperes with surface InAs quantum dots and a buried two-dimensional electron gas. The observed noise exhibits

  8. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for the Maskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-01-01

    ion is 10.0 eV. Assuming the surface charging generates aneV 84 mrad Switching pad and connection wire: 0 volt Insulator 1.0 volt surface chargingeV in this region. Consequently, ion trajectories are very sensitive to the surface charging

  9. Demonstration of electronic pattern switching and 10x pattern demagnification in a maskless micro-ion beam reduction lithography system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, V.V.; Akker, B.; Leung, K.N.; Noh, I.; Scott, K.L.; Wilde, S.

    2002-05-31

    A proof-of-principle ion projection lithography (IPL) system called Maskless Micro-ion beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL) has been developed and tested at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for future integrated circuits (ICs) manufacturing and thin film media patterning [1]. This MMRL system is aimed at completely eliminating the first stage of the conventional IPL system [2] that contains the complicated beam optics design in front of the stencil mask and the mask itself. It consists of a multicusp RF plasma generator, a multi-beamlet pattern generator, and an all-electrostatic ion optical column. Results from ion beam exposures on PMMA and Shipley UVII-HS resists using 75 keV H+ are presented in this paper. Proof-of-principle electronic pattern switching together with 10x reduction ion optics (using a pattern generator made of nine 50-{micro}m switchable apertures) has been performed and is reported in this paper. In addition, the fabrication of a micro-fabricated pattern generator [3] on an SOI membrane is also presented.

  10. Physics PhD scholarship available in one the worlds top 10 cities Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies of rare earth nitrides and related materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    studies of rare earth nitrides and related materials This is an opportunity to explore how new rare earth nitride materials can be made and how they can be probed using scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy is a powerful tool to obtain both atomic resolution imaging of the surface of materials

  11. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  12. E. Dan Dahlberg Magnetic Microscopy Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    Coating Nanotube Bundle #12;Conventional EBD Topography Magnetism MFM Tip MFM Tip 1 µm Nickel Particles Beam Deposition (Spike) tips - Carbon Nanotube AFM/MFM tips High Resolution Magnetic Force Microscopy #12;Gonzo 500 nm #12;Carbon Nanotube MFM Uncoated Coated After Crash 300nm 6.7 µm 200 nm Multilayer

  13. Four-wave mixing microscopy of nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Four-wave mixing microscopy of nanostructures Yong Wang, Chia-Yu Lin, Alexei Nikolaenko, Varun July 14, 2010; accepted July 27, 2010; published September 10, 2010 (Doc. ID 128079) The basics of four-wave. Four-Wave Mixing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2

  14. Femtosecond Optical Spectroscopy and Scanning Probe Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    microscopy (FOS-SPM), is capable of spatial localization of optically induced phenomenon at intdaces. Spatially localized, time resolved spectroscopicmeasurements are achieved via couplingof the metal SPM tip to an optical field at the interhqe.[2,3] FOS-SPM has been shown to be capable of identqing and differentating

  15. Applied Surface Science 302 (2014) 231235 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    of processing techniques such as stamping, stereo lithography, two-photon poly- merization, electrospinning

  16. Sub-50 nm scratch-proof DLC molds for reversal nanoimprint lithography L. Tao, C. T. Nelson, K. Trivedi, S. Ramachandran, M. Goeckner, L. Overzet, and Walter Hua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    Sub-50 nm scratch-proof DLC molds for reversal nanoimprint lithography L. Tao, C. T. Nelson, K of the industry is related to the mold life time that significantly affects cost of ownership and manufacturing reproducibility. Nowadays, most often used Si or glass molds that are very expensive can be damaged after certain

  17. Surface-structure sensitivity of CeO2 nanocrystals in photocatalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heterogeneous (photo)catalysis. In this study, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), the atomic surface structures of well-defined...

  18. Surface Preparation of Gallium Nitride for Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Oxide /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Amanda J.

    2014-01-01

    Nitride for Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Oxide AForce Microscopy Atomic Layer Deposition Capacitance-VoltageSurfaces for Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Oxide” x

  19. Multifrequency imaging in the intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy: beyond phase imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Senli; Santiago, Solares D; Mochalin, Vadym; Neitzel, Ioannis; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Force-based scanning probe microscopies have emerged as a mainstay for probing structural and mechanical properties of materials on the nanometer and molecular scales. Despite tremendous progress achieved to date, the cantilever dynamics in single frequency scanning probe microscopies (SPM) is undefined due to having only two output variables. Here we demonstrate on diamond nanoparticles with different functionalization layers that the use of broad band detection by multiple frequency SPM allows complete information on tip-surface interactions in intermittent contact SPM to be acquired. The obtained data allows sub-3nm resolution even in ambient environment. By tuning the strength of tip-surface interaction, the information on surface state can be obtained.

  20. Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, Chad

    2012-10-26

    The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

  1. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  2. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  3. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  4. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Baldwin, Charles; Cheng, Guangfeng; Flood, Roger; Jordan, Kevin; Kneisel, Peter; Morrone, Michael; Nemes, George; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  5. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  6. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore »this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  7. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian B. Burgess; Joanna Aizenberg; Marko Loncar

    2012-11-29

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  8. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Ian B; Loncar, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  9. New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology** By Zhong Lin Wang* 1. Electron Microscopy and Nanotechnology Nanotechnology, as an international initiative for science manufacturing are the foundation of nanotechnology. Tracking the historical background of why nanotechnology

  10. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    es095unocic2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage...

  11. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    es095unocic2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage...

  12. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with...

  13. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  14. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  15. Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smid, Michiel

    Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters Quantifizieren von microscopy, the topography of brittle fracture surfaces and wire- eroded surfaces was quantified. The global-related parameters in topographies, which uses methods of computational geometry. The software was tested using

  16. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  17. New Microscopy Patent Awarded | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications64 2.251 2.211 2.196 2.172companies atNew Microscopy

  18. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to find the 3D orientation of stationary metallic anisotropic nanoparticles utilizing only long-axis SPR enhancement. The polarization direction of the illuminating light was rotated causing the relative intensity of p-polarized and s-polarized light within the evanescent field to change. The interaction of the evanescent field with the particles is dependent on the orientation of the particle producing an intensity curve. This curve and the in-plane angle can be compared with simulations to accurately determine the 3D orientation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is another non-invasive far-field technique based upon interferometry that does not rely on staining or other contrast enhancing techniques. In addition, high numerical aperture condensers and objectives can be used to give a very narrow depth of field allowing for the optical tomography of samples, which makes it an ideal candidate to study biological systems. DIC microscopy has also proven itself in determining the orientation of gold nanorods in both engineered environments and within cells. Many types of nanoparticles and nanostructures have been synthesized using lithographic techniques on silicon wafer substrates. Traditionally, reflective mode DIC microscopes have been developed and applied to the topographical study of reflective substrates and the imaging of chips on silicon wafers. Herein, a laser-illuminated reflected-mode DIC was developed for studying nanoparticles on reflective surfaces.

  19. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell (218 Eastridge Dr., San Ramon, CA 94583-4905); Shafer, David (50 Drake La., Fairfield, CT 06430-2925)

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  20. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell (315 Eastridge Dr., San Ramon, CA 94583-4905)

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  1. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell (218 Eastridge Dr., San Ramon, CA 84583-4905)

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  2. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell (218 Eastridge Dr., San Ramon, CA 94583-4905); Shafer, David R. (56 Drake La., Fairfield, CT 06430-2925)

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  3. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  4. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  5. Molecular-Scale Soft Imprint Lithography for Alignment Layers in Liquid Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    , Beckman Institute, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, UniVersity of Illinois at UrbanasChampaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 Received March 8, 2007; Revised Manuscript Received April 19, 2007 ABSTRACT We involve the formation of surface relief structures that could serve as engineered sites for molecular

  6. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the recalcitrant nature of biomass feedstocks and the performance of techniques to deconstruct biomass NREL of biomass feedstocks. BSCL imaging capabilities include: · Confocal microscopy and Raman microscopy

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  8. Near-eld microscopy of collapsed LangmuirBlodgett lms Steven R. Cordero, Kenneth D. Weston, Steven K. Buratto*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-®eld microscopy of collapsed Langmuir±Blodgett ®lms Steven R. Cordero, Kenneth D. Weston-to-one correlation between ¯uorescence contrast and ®lm topography. In particular, ®lms of the phospholipid DPPC in supported ®lms of 100% DiIC12 deposited at high surface pressure. In these ®lms, spatially

  9. Spark-Gap Atomic Emission Microscopy P. G. Van Patten, J. D. Noll, and M. L. Myrick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Spark-Gap Atomic Emission Microscopy P. G. Van Patten, J. D. Noll, and M. L. Myrick* Department been developed. The technique is based on spark atomic emission spectroscopy and provides information the sample and cause emission. Spectra from a polished copper electrode surface are presented and discussed

  10. Shape reconstruction and height fluctuations of red blood cells using defocusing microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siman, L; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the bright-field defocusing microscopy (DM) technique is presented. DM is able to obtain quantitative information of each plane/surface of pure phase objects, as live unlabeled cells, and its application to red blood cells (RBCs) is demonstrated. Based on contrast, simple methods to obtain thickness profile and three dimensional (3D) total reconstruction of RBCs are proposed and the actual height profiles of upper and lower surface-membranes (lipid bilayer$/$cytoskeleton) of discocyte and stomatocyte red cells are presented as examples. In addition, using the mean square contrast fluctuation and modeling the RBC membranes fluctuations spectra as dependent of a bending modulus $(\\kappa_c)$, a surface tension $(\\sigma)$ and a confining potential $(\\gamma)$ term, slowly varying quantities along the cell radius, a genetic algorithm (GA) is used and the radial height fluctuations of each surface-membrane are accessed, separately. The radial behaviors of $\\kappa_c$, $\\sigma$ and $\\gamma$ are also obta...

  11. Cell shape identification using digital holographic microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakrisson, Johan; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    We present a cost-effective, simple and fast digital holographic microscopy method based upon Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation for identification of the geometrical shape of a cell. The method was tested using synthetic hologram images generated by ray-tracing software and from experimental images of semi-transparent spherical beads and living red blood cells. Our results show that by only using the real part of the back-reconstructed amplitude the proposed method can provide information of the geometrical shape of the object and at the same time accurately determine the axial position of the object under study. The proposed method can be used in flow chamber assays for pathophysiological studies where fast morphological changes of cells are studied in high numbers and at different heights.

  12. Impact of polymer film thickness and cavity size on polymer flow during embossing : towards process design rules for nanoimprint lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; King, William P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Rowland, Harry D.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents continuum simulations of polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The simulations capture the underlying physics of polymer flow from the nanometer to millimeter length scale and examine geometry and thermophysical process quantities affecting cavity filling. Variations in embossing tool geometry and polymer film thickness during viscous flow distinguish different flow driving mechanisms. Three parameters can predict polymer deformation mode: cavity width to polymer thickness ratio, polymer supply ratio, and Capillary number. The ratio of cavity width to initial polymer film thickness determines vertically or laterally dominant deformation. The ratio of indenter width to residual film thickness measures polymer supply beneath the indenter which determines Stokes or squeeze flow. The local geometry ratios can predict a fill time based on laminar flow between plates, Stokes flow, or squeeze flow. Characteristic NIL capillary number based on geometry-dependent fill time distinguishes between capillary or viscous driven flows. The three parameters predict filling modes observed in published studies of NIL deformation over nanometer to millimeter length scales. The work seeks to establish process design rules for NIL and to provide tools for the rational design of NIL master templates, resist polymers, and process parameters.

  13. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  14. Distance dependence of the phase signal in eddy current microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roll, Tino; Fischer, Ulrich; Schleberger, Marika

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy using a magnetic tip is a promising tool for investigating conductivity on the nano-scale. By the oscillating magnetic tip eddy currents are induced in the conducting parts of the sample which can be detected in the phase signal of the cantilever. However, the origin of the phase signal is still controversial because theoretical calculations using a monopole appoximation for taking the electromagnetic forces acting on the tip into account yield an effect which is too small by more than two orders of magnitude. In order to determine the origin of the signal we used especially prepared gold nano patterns embedded in a non-conducting polycarbonate matrix and measured the distance dependence of the phase signal. Our data clearly shows that the interacting forces are long ranged and therefore, are likely due to the electromagnetic interaction between the magnetic tip and the conducting parts of the surface. Due to the long range character of the interaction a change in conductivity of $\\Del...

  15. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in...

  16. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Grapes, Michael D. Department of...

  17. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Title: In situ...

  18. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is also greater flexibility in choice of standards and ZAF correction schemes. Digital Mapping and Imaging. Automated Stage capable of 1 micron steps. Geller Microscopy Wavelength...

  19. Surface nanobubbles: Seeing is believing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Seddon, James R T; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef; Riegler, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The existence of surface nanobubbles has been previously suggested using various experimental techniques, including attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflectometry, and x-ray reflectivity, but all of these techniques provide a sole number to quantify the existence of gas over (usually) hundreds of square microns. Thus `nanobubbles' are indistinguishable from a `uniform gassy layer' between surface and liquid. Atomic force microscopy, on the other hand, does show the existence of surface nanobubbles, but the highly intrusive nature of the technique means that a uniform gassy layer could break down into nanobubbles \\textit{due to} the motion of the microscope's probe. Here we demonstrate \\textit{optical} visualisation of surface nanobubbles, thus validating their individual existence non-intrusively.

  20. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650?nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500?nA/W and 11 × 10{sup ?6} for 445?nm illumination.

  1. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca; Vitorino, Miguel V; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which expla...

  2. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  3. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-27

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  4. Special Topics PHY 894 (#07177) Room: Clip 132A Surfaces and Surface Analytical Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microscopy and Spectroscopy, Theory, Techniques, and Applications, 2nd edition, Wiley-Vch. 9. T. Sakurai, Y theory to get the physical basis of the technique and will discuss applications to current research. The methods are fundamental for condensed matter and nanoscience, particularly at surfaces in vacuum. We

  5. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  6. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  7. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 97 North Eagleville Road, Unit 3136, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3136 (United States); Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing ?s time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few ?m{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the particular benefit of UFM and related methods for nanoscale mapping of stiff materials.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  9. Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

  10. Imaging chromophores with undetectable fluorescence by stimulated emission microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    LETTERS Imaging chromophores with undetectable fluorescence by stimulated emission microscopy Wei, that is, spontaneous emission, is generally more sensitive than absorption measurement, and is widely used undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by theirfastnon-radiative decay3

  11. Classifying and Segmenting Microscopy Images Using Convolutional Multiple Instance Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren Z. Kraus; Lei Jimmy Ba; Brendan Frey

    2015-11-17

    Convolutional neural networks (CNN) have achieved state of the art performance on both classification and segmentation tasks. Applying CNNs to microscopy images is challenging due to the lack of datasets labeled at the single cell level. We extend the application of CNNs to microscopy image classification and segmentation using multiple instance learning (MIL). We present the adaptive Noisy-AND MIL pooling function, a new MIL operator that is robust to outliers. Combining CNNs with MIL enables training CNNs using full resolution microscopy images with global labels. We base our approach on the similarity between the aggregation function used in MIL and pooling layers used in CNNs. We show that training MIL CNNs end-to-end outperforms several previous methods on both mammalian and yeast microscopy images without requiring any segmentation steps.

  12. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around ...

  13. Spectroscopic infrared near-field microscopy and x-ray reflectivity studies of order and clustering in lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Generosi, J.; Margaritondo, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Tolk, N. H.; Piston, D. W.; Castellano, A. Congiu; Cricenti, A.

    2006-12-04

    Lipid membranes were studied by infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy at several wavelengths and by x-ray reflectivity. Together with the x-ray data, the optical images indicate the formation of locally ordered multiple bilayers, and the topographical micrographs reveal the presence of islands at the surface, both critically important features for biotechnology and medical applications such as biosensors and gene therapy.

  14. Combined confocal Raman and quantitative phase microscopy system for biomedical diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jeon Woong

    We have developed a novel multimodal microscopy system that incorporates confocal Raman, confocal reflectance, and quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) into a single imaging entity. Confocal Raman microscopy provides detailed ...

  15. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLOTM oxide layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLOTM oxide layers Benoit de, and archived before and after the transition, are characterized using transmission electron microscopy improvement. Results obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples archived just before

  16. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

  17. Cross-sectional electrostatic force microscopy of thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballif, C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-01-15

    In a recent work, we showed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful technique to image cross sections of polycrystalline thin films. In this work, we apply a modification of AFM, namely, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), to investigate the electronic properties of cleaved II--VI and multijunction thin-film solar cells. We cleave the devices in such a way that they are still working with their nominal photovoltaic efficiencies and can be polarized for the measurements. This allows us to differentiate between surface effects (work function and surface band bending) and bulk device properties. In the case of polycrystalline CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass solar cells, we find a drop of the EFM signal in the area of the CdTe/CdS interface ({+-}50 nm). This drop varies in amplitude and sign according to the applied external bias and is compatible with an n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunction model, thereby invalidating the possibility of a deeply buried n-p CdTe homojunction. In the case of a triple-junction GaInP/GaAs/Ge device, we observe a variation of the EFM signal linked to both the material work-function differences and to the voltage bias applied to the cell. We attempt a qualitative explanation of the results and discuss the implications and difficulties of the EFM technique for the study of such thin-film devices.

  18. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  19. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, Kwang T.; Eom, Daejin; Chan, Siu-Wai; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2012-10-23

    The reduced surface of a natural Hematite single crystal a-Fe2O3(0001) sample has multiple surface domains with di!erent terminations, Fe2O3(0001), FeO(111), and Fe3O4(111). The adsorption of water on this surface was investigated via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and first-principle theoretical simulations. Water species are observed only on the Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface at temperatures up to 235 K. Between 235 and 245 K we observed a change in the surface species from intact water molecules and hydroxyl groups bound to the surface to only hydroxyl groups atop the surface terminating FeIII cations. This indicates a low energy barrier for water dissociation on the surface of Fe3O4 that is supported by our theoretical computations. Our first principles simulations con"rm the identity of the surface species proposed from the STM images, finding that the most stable state of a water molecule is the dissociated one (OH + H), with OH atop surface terminating FeIII sites and H atop under-coordinated oxygen sites. Attempts to simulate reaction of the surface OH with coadsorbed CO fail because the only binding sites for CO are the surface FeIII atoms, which are blocked by the much more strongly bound OH. In order to promote this reaction we simulated a surface decorated with gold atoms. The Au adatoms are found to cap the under-coordinated oxygen sites and dosed CO is found to bind to the Au adatom. This newly created binding site for CO not only allows for coexistence of CO and OH on the surface of Fe3O4 but also provides colocation between the two species. These two factors are likely promoters of catalytic activity on Au/Fe3O4(111) surfaces.

  20. Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsen, Osman Oguz

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

  1. Comparison of the Electrical Properties and Chemical Stability of Crystalline Silicon(111) Surfaces Alkylated Using Grignard Reagents or Olefins with Lewis Acid Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    of electrically active trap sites.1 These surfaces are of great importance because as electronic devices surface bonds using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques28 or the transition metal

  2. Determination and Characterization of Ice Propagation Mechanisms on Surfaces Undergoing Dropwise Condensation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Jeffrey B.

    2011-08-08

    The mechanisms responsible for ice propagation on surfaces undergoing dropwise condensation have been determined and characterized. Based on experimental data acquired non-invasively with high speed quantitative microscopy, ...

  3. Confocal microscopy studies of colloidal assembly on microfabricated physically templated surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sumit

    2005-02-17

    deposition, and glass micro machining. Various stages of the process were optimized while selecting reactive ion etch (RIE) and nickel etch mask with a suitable etch recipe for microfabrication of patterns on thin multi-component glass coverslips. Pattern...

  4. Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauboeuf, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

  5. On the use of peak-force tapping atomic force microscopy for quantification of the local elastic modulus in hardened cement paste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trtik, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.trtik@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Josef [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Volz, Udo [Bruker Nano GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    A surface of epoxy-impregnated hardened cement paste was investigated using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging mode that allows for the quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus. The analyzed surface was previously prepared using focussed ion beam milling. The same surface was also characterized by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate the capability of this quantitative nanomechanical mapping to provide information on the local distribution of the elastic modulus (from about 1 to about 100 GPa) with a spatial resolution in the range of decananometers, that corresponds to that of low-keV back-scattered electron imaging. Despite some surface roughness which affects the measured nanomechanical properties it is shown that topography, adhesion and Young's modulus can be clearly distinguished. The quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus is able to discriminate between phases in the cement paste microstructure that cannot be distinguished from the corresponding back-scattered electron images.

  6. MATERIALS, FABRICATION, AND MANUFACTURING OF MICRO/NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR PHASE-CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M; Gerasopoulos, K; Maroo, SC; Hart, AJ

    2014-07-23

    This article describes the most prominent materials, fabrication methods, and manufacturing schemes for micro- and nanostructured surfaces that can be employed to enhance phase-change heat transfer phenomena. The numerous processes include traditional microfabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, lithography, and etching, as well as template-assisted and template-free nanofabrication techniques. The creation of complex, hierarchical, and heterogeneous surface structures using advanced techniques is also reviewed. Additionally, research needs in the field and future directions necessary to translate these approaches from the laboratory to high-performance applications are identified. Particular focus is placed on the extension of these techniques to the design of micro/nanostructures for increased performance, manufacturability, and reliability. The current research needs and goals are detailed, and potential pathways forward are suggested.

  7. Lithography Trouble-Shooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    , or alternative coating techniques such as spray coating, roller coating, or dip coating are possible work, roller coating, or dip coating are reasonable alternatives for spin coating. Please contact us and Comet-Like Structures After Spin Coating? Possible reasons and work- arounds are listed in the section

  8. Advances in Lithography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp &AdvancedAdvancedExamples

  9. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil We

  10. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  11. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2010-05-01

    GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

  12. On Surface Approximation using Developable Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. Keywords: computer aided design, computer aided manufacturing, surface ap- proximation, reverse engineering, surface of revolution, developable surface, shipbuilding. 2 #12

  13. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benzerara, K; Tyliszczak, T

    2007-01-01

    Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

  14. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    polymer photoresists by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology

  15. Detection of Percolating Paths in PMMA/CB Segregated Network Composites Using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ou, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gupta, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Parker, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario [Georgia Institute of Technology; Seal, Katyayani [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Composite specimens possessing polyhedral segregated network microstructures require a very small amount of nanosize filler, <1 vol %, to reach percolation because percolation occurs by accumulation of the fillers along the edges of the deformed polymer matrix particles. In this paper, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) were used to confirm the location of the nanosize fillers and the corresponding percolating paths in polymethyl methacrylate/carbon black composites. The EFM and C-AFM images revealed that the polyhedral polymer particles were coated with filler, primarily on the edges as predicted by the geometric models provided.

  16. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-10-30

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  17. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1 , T. Ndukum3 , K. C. Schwab3 measurementsinmesoscopicelectronicsandmechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection tech- niques, and the radio

  18. Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Michael A. Novak,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Ag or TiO2 nanocrystals.21,22 Although this approach is high throughput, the deposited materialVisualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Michael A. Novak, Sumedh Surwade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a silicon wafer using a conventional optical microscope. We show

  19. Contact stiffness of layered materials for ultrasonic atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contact stiffness of layered materials for ultrasonic atomic force microscopy G. G. Yaralioglu,a) F the contact stiffness between a layered material and an ultrasonic atomic force microscope UAFM tip of the method for modeling defects and power loss due to radiation in layered materials. © 2000 American

  20. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  1. POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    1 POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH1 , V. SEMET1 and N. GARCIA2 1 exploited in a compact low-energy electron microscope: the Fresnel Projection Microscope. Images size of the sources. The result is a high-resolution, low-energy electron microscope, the "Fresnel

  2. Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy Gary, Israel 4 rosen@ee.bgu.ac.il *gbrooker@jhu.edu Abstract: Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH. Rosen and G. Brooker, "Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography," Opt. Lett. 32(8), 912­914 (2007

  3. An investigation of receiver probe development for magnetic resonance microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Jeffrey Scott

    1995-01-01

    . The objective of the research presented in this thesis is to extend the analysis and design of conventional RF coil systems to that for MR microscopy. Specifically, distinctions in terms of signal and noise are made between conventional RF coils and coils...

  4. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore »surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  5. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  6. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  7. Imaging space charge regions in Sm-doped ceria using electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu; Adler, Stuart B.

    2014-11-17

    Nanocrystalline ceria exhibits a total conductivity several orders of magnitude higher than microcrystalline ceria in air at high temperature. The most widely accepted theory for this enhancement (based on fitting of conductivity data to various transport and kinetic models) is that relatively immobile positively charged defects and/or impurities accumulate at the grain boundary core, leading to a counterbalancing increase in the number of mobile electrons (small polarons) within a diffuse space charge region adjacent to each grain boundary. In an effort to validate this model, we have applied electrochemical strain microscopy to image the location and relative population of mobile electrons near grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sm-doped ceria in air at 20–200?°C. Our results show the first direct (spatially resolved) evidence that such a diffuse space charge region does exist in ceria, and is localized to both grain boundaries and the gas-exposed surface.

  8. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-? oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tselev, Alexander Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208

    2013-12-09

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100?nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  9. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore »new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  10. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  11. Surface Science 429 (1999) L509L514 www.elsevier.nl/locate/susc Surface Science Letters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    1999-01-01

    of the Si(111)- 3� 3-Ag surface are studied by first-principles calculations based on the density functional. Keywords: Density functional calculations; Metal­semiconductor interfaces; Scanning tunneling microscopy]. Based upon calculations based on the density functional theory their X-ray diffraction ( XRD) data

  12. Nanofabrication of sharp diamond tips by e-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Zeng, H.; Carlisle, J. A.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

    2009-12-07

    Ultrasharp diamond tips make excellent atomic force microscopy probes, field emitters, and abrasive articles due to diamond's outstanding physical properties, i.e., hardness, low friction coefficient, low work function, and toughness. Sharp diamond tips are currently fabricated as individual tips or arrays by three principal methods: (1) focused ion beam milling and gluing onto a cantilever of individual diamond tips, (2) coating silicon tips with diamond films, or (3) molding diamond into grooves etched in a sacrificial substrate, bonding the sacrificial substrate to another substrate or electrodepositing of a handling chip, followed by dissolution of the sacrificial substrate. The first method is tedious and serial in nature but does produce very sharp tips, the second method results in tips whose radius is limited by the thickness of the diamond coating, while the third method involves a costly bonding and release process and difficulties in thoroughly filling the high aspect ratio apex of molding grooves with diamond at the nanoscale. To overcome the difficulties with these existing methods, this article reports on the feasibility of the fabrication of sharp diamond tips by direct etching of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{reg_sign}) as a starting and structural material. The UNCD is reactive ion etched using a cap-precursor-mask scheme. An optimized etching recipe demonstrates the formation of ultrasharp diamond tips ({approx} 10 nm tip radius) with etch rates of 650 nm/min.

  13. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  14. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; et al

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore »microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  15. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. A discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  16. Ion Beam Analysis Of Silicon-Based Surfaces And Correlation With Surface Energy Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing Qian; Herbots, N.; Hart, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Wilkens, B. J.; Sell, D. A.; Culbertson, R. J.; Whaley, S. D. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Sell, Clive H.; Kwong, Henry Mark Jr. [Associated Retina Consultants, 7600 N 15th Street, Suite 155, Phoenix, AZ 85020 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified by contact angle measurement and surface free energy to explain hydrophobic or hydrophilic behavior of silicone, silicates, and silicon surfaces. Surface defects such as dangling bonds, surface free energy including Lewis acid-base and Lifshitz-van der Waals components are discussed. Water nucleation and condensation is further explained by surface topography. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) provides statistical analysis of the topography of these Si-based surfaces. The correlation of the above two characteristics describes the behavior of water condensation at Si-based surfaces. Surface root mean square roughness increasing from several A ring to several nm is found to provide nucleation sites that expedite water condensation visibly for silica and silicone. Hydrophilic surfaces have a condensation pattern that forms puddles of water while hydrophobic surfaces form water beads. Polymer adsorption on these surfaces alters the water affinity as well as the surface topography, and therefore controls condensation on Si-based surfaces including silicone intraocular lens (IOL). The polymer film is characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in conjunction with 4.265 MeV {sup 12}C({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 12}C, 3.045 MeV {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O nuclear resonance scattering (NRS), and 2.8 MeV elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen for high resolution composition and areal density measurements. The areal density of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film ranges from 10{sup 18} atom/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} atom/cm{sup 2} gives the silica or silicone surface a roughness of several A ring and a wavelength of 0.16{+-}0.02 {mu}m, and prevents fogging by forming a complete wetting layer during water condensation.

  17. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  18. Measurement of the Penetration Depth and Coherence Length of MgB2 in All Directions Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, J. C.; Yazdi, S.; Kasama, T.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.

    2015-02-05

    Kongens Lyngby, Denmark 3Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093, Zurich, Switzerland 4Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, EPFL, 1015-Lausanne, Switzerland (Dated: January 15, 2015) We demonstrate that images of flux... that it was electron-transparent using a 30 kV Ga ion beam. Finally, the specimen surfaces were polished by a low-energy (2kV) Ga ion beam to minimise the damage layer caused by FIB milling. Electron microscopy was undertaken at DTU using an FEI Titan 80-300ST...

  19. Failure Surface Analysis of Polyimide/Titanium Notched Coating Adhesion Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIUNTA,RACHEL K.; KANDER,RONALD G.

    2000-12-18

    Adhesively bonded joints of LaRC{trademark} PETI-5, a phenylethynyl-terminated polyimide, with chromic acid anodized titanium were fabricated and debonded interfacially. The adhesive-substrate failure surfaces were investigated using several surface analysis techniques. From Auger spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies, polymer appears to be penetrating the pores of the anodized substrate to a depth of approximately 100 nm. From x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data, the polymer penetrating the pores appears to be in electrical contact with the titanium substrate, leading to differential charging. These analyses confirm that the polymer is becoming mechanically interlocked within the substrate surface.

  20. Surface Science 415 (1998) 2936 Structural studies of sulfur-passivated GaAs (100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    1998-01-01

    . Keywords: Atomic force microscopy; Gallium arsenide; Low-energy electron diffraction; Roughness; SulfurSurface Science 415 (1998) 29­36 Structural studies of sulfur-passivated GaAs (100) surfaces Abstract We present the results of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED

  1. Sub-5 nm Domains in Ordered Poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) Block Polymers for Lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennemur, Justin; Yao, Li; Bates, Frank Stephen; Hillmyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A series of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly- (methyl methacrylate) (PCHE PMMA) diblock copolymers with varying molar mass (4.9 kg/mol Mn 30.6 kg/mol) and narrow molar mass distribution were synthesized through a combination of anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) techniques. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of -(hydroxy)polystyrene (PS-OH) yielded -(hydroxy)poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHEOH) with little loss of hydroxyl functionality. PCHE-OH was reacted with -bromoisobutyryl bromide (BiBB) to produce an ATRP macroinitiator used for the polymerization of methyl methacrylate. PCHE PMMA is a glassy, thermally stable material with a large effective segment segment interaction parameter, eff = (144.4 6.2)/T (0.162 0.013), determined by meanfield analysis of order-to-disorder transition temperatures (TODT) measured by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Ordered lamellar domain pitches (9 D 33 nm) were identified by small-angle X-ray scattering from neat BCPs containing 43 52 vol % PCHE ( f PCHE). Atomic force microscopy was used to show 7.5 nm lamellar features (D = 14.8 nm) which are some of the smallest observed to date. The lowest molar mass sample (Mn = 4.9 kg/mol, f PCHE = 0.46) is characterized by TODT = 173 3 C and sub-5 nm nanodomains, which together with the sacrificial properties of PMMA and the high overall thermal stability place this material at the forefront of high- systems for advanced nanopatterning applications.

  2. High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Heejin

    2014-01-01

    Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

  3. Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, James G.

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

  4. Electrostatic Force Microscopy Characterization of Trioctylphosphine Oxide Self-assembled Monolayers on Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    orientation of SAMs. The invention of the scanning probe microscope (SPM)12,13 has provided scientists resolution by SPM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM),16 a variant of atomic force microscopy (AFM),13 can

  5. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D?=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s?¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy examination of oxide layers formed on Zr alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Transmission electron microscopy examination of oxide layers formed on Zr alloys Aylin Yilmazbayhan, United States Received 14 July 2005; accepted 31 October 2005 Abstract A transmission electron microscopy. In this work, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the morphology

  7. Atomic force microscopy of nickel dot arrays with tuning fork and nanotube probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekhar, Venkat

    Atomic force microscopy of nickel dot arrays with tuning fork and nanotube probe S. Rozhok,a) S microscopy are combined with the unique properties of carbon nanotubes to improve the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy AFM images of nickel dot arrays. These arrays have high relief features

  8. Nuclear emission microscopies B.L. Doyle a,*, D.S. Walsh a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear emission microscopies B.L. Doyle a,*, D.S. Walsh a , S.N. Renfrow a,b , G. Vizkelethy a,1 Abstract Alternatives to traditional nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) emerged two years ago with the invention of ion electron emission microscopy (IEEM). With nuclear emission microscopy (NEM) the ion beam

  9. Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate Ethan Schonbrun,* Winnie N. Ye demonstrate a form of scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate and a low-NA relay. In this scheme, parallel scanning microscopy using a Fresnel zone-plate array would require only a single spatial

  10. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  11. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  12. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore »to those of other techniques available.« less

  13. Video Microscopy of Colloidal Suspensions and Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Habdas; Eric R. Weeks

    2002-04-23

    Colloidal suspensions are simple model systems for the study of phase transitions. Video microscopy is capable of directly imaging the structure and dynamics of colloidal suspensions in different phases. Recent results related to crystallization, glasses, and 2D systems complement and extend previous theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, new techniques allow the details of interactions between individual colloidal particles to be carefully measured. Understanding these details will be crucial for designing novel colloidal phases and new materials, and for manipulating colloidal suspensions for industrial uses.

  14. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-TimeRecord-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy

  15. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-TimeRecord-Setting Microscopy Illuminates

  16. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford Site WideRecord-Setting Microscopy

  17. Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, J.

    2007-11-15

    Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

  18. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, W. S. Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H.; Zhang, J.; Luo, J. K.; Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB

    2014-02-15

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  19. Three-Dimensional Quantification of Cellular Traction Forces and Mechanosensing of Thin Substrata by Fourier Traction Force Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan C del Alamo; Ruedi Meili; Begoña Alvarez-Gonzalez; Baldomero Alonso-Latorre; Effie Bastounis; Richard Firtel; Juan C Lasheras

    2013-06-18

    We introduce a novel three-dimensional (3D) traction force microscopy (TFM) method motivated by the recent discovery that cells adhering on plane surfaces exert both in-plane and out-of-plane traction stresses. We measure the 3D deformation of the substratum on a thin layer near its surface, and input this information into an exact analytical solution of the elastic equilibrium equation. These operations are performed in the Fourier domain with high computational efficiency, allowing to obtain the 3D traction stresses from raw microscopy images virtually in real time. We also characterize the error of previous two-dimensional (2D) TFM methods that neglect the out-of-plane component of the traction stresses. This analysis reveals that, under certain combinations of experimental parameters (\\ie cell size, substratums' thickness and Poisson's ratio), the accuracy of 2D TFM methods is minimally affected by neglecting the out-of-plane component of the traction stresses. Finally, we consider the cell's mechanosensing of substratum thickness by 3D traction stresses, finding that, when cells adhere on thin substrata, their out-of-plane traction stresses can reach four times deeper into the substratum than their in-plane traction stresses. It is also found that the substratum stiffness sensed by applying out-of-plane traction stresses may be up to 10 times larger than the stiffness sensed by applying in-plane traction stresses.

  20. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  1. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  2. Generation and Application of Bessel Beams in Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Grillo; Jérémie Harris; Gian Carlo Gazzadi; Roberto Balboni; Erfan Mafakheri; Mark R. Dennis; Stefano Frabboni; Robert W. Boyd; Ebrahim Karimi

    2015-05-28

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electro-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with efficiencies reaching $37 \\pm 3\\%$. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. Finally, we discuss a specific potential application of electron Bessel beams in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  4. Open-core screw dislocations in GaN epilayers observed by scanning force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    -resolution transmission electron microscopy W. Qian, G. S. Rohrer, and M. Skowronski Department of Materials Science. K. Gaskill Laboratory for Advanced Material Synthesis, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC of organometallic vapor phase epitaxy grown -GaN films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

  5. Ion-assisted physical vapor deposition for enhanced film properties on nonflat surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alami, J.; Persson, P.O.A.; Music, D.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Bohlmark, J.; Helmersson, U.

    2005-03-01

    We have synthesized Ta thin films on Si substrates placed along a wall of a 2-cm-deep and 1-cm-wide trench, using both a mostly neutral Ta flux by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and a mostly ionized Ta flux by high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS). Structure of the grown films was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The Ta thin film grown by HPPMS has a smooth surface and a dense crystalline structure with grains oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface, whereas the film grown by dcMS exhibits a rough surface, pores between the grains, and an inclined columnar structure. The improved homogeneity achieved by HPPMS is a direct consequence of the high ion fraction of sputtered species.

  6. Comparison of Graphene Formation on C-face and Si-face SiC {0001} Surfaces Luxmi, N. Srivastava, Guowei He, and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Comparison of Graphene Formation on C-face and Si-face SiC {0001} Surfaces Luxmi, N. Srivastava of graphene formed on the ( 1000 ) surface (the C-face) and the (0001) surface (the Si-face) of Si) and low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The graphene forms due to preferential sublimation of Si from

  7. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  8. Photoionization microscopy in terms of local frame transformation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giannakeas; F. Robicheaux; Chris H. Greene

    2014-10-27

    Two-photon ionization of an alkali-metal atom in the presence of a uniform electric field is investigated using a standardized form of local frame transformation and generalized quantum defect theory. The relevant long-range quantum defect parameters in the combined Coulombic plus Stark potential is calculated with eigenchannel R-matrix theory applied in the downstream parabolic coordinate $\\eta$. The present formulation permits us to express the corresponding microscopy observables in terms of the local frame transformation, and it gives a critical test of the accuracy of the Harmin-Fano theory permitting a scholastic investigation of the claims presented in Zhao {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012)].

  9. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  10. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore »using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  11. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  12. Handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiraki, Atsushi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study developed handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by adopting an in-line type hologram, a webcam, a high power RGB light emitting diode (LED), and a pinhole. It cost less than 20,000 yen (approximately 250 US dollars at 80 yen/dollar), and was approximately 120 mm x 80 mm x 55 mm in size. In addition, by adjusting the recording-distance of a hologram, the lateral resolution power at the most suitable distance was 17.5 um. Furthermore, this DHM was developed for use in open source libraries, and is therefore low-cost and can be easily developed by anyone. In this research, it is the feature to cut down cost and size and to improve the lateral resolution power further rather than existing reports. This DHM will be a useful application in fieldwork, education, and so forth.

  13. Bacterial Immobilization for Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, David P [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    AFM is a high-resolution (nm scale) imaging tool that mechanically probes a surface. It has the ability to image cells and biomolecules, in a liquid environment, without the need to chemically treat the sample. In order to accomplish this goal, the sample must sufficiently adhere to the mounting surface to prevent removal by forces exerted by the scanning AFM cantilever tip. In many instances, successful imaging depends on immobilization of the sample to the mounting surface. Optimally, immobilization should be minimally invasive to the sample such that metabolic processes and functional attributes are not compromised. By coating freshly cleaved mica surfaces with porcine (pig) gelatin, negatively charged bacteria can be immobilized on the surface and imaged in liquid by AFM. Immobilization of bacterial cells on gelatin-coated mica is most likely due to electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged bacteria and the positively charged gelatin. Several factors can interfere with bacterial immobilization, including chemical constituents of the liquid in which the bacteria are suspended, the incubation time of the bacteria on the gelatin coated mica, surface characteristics of the bacterial strain and the medium in which the bacteria are imaged. Overall, the use of gelatin-coated mica is found to be generally applicable for imaging microbial cells.

  14. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  15. Polarization controlled deep sub-wavelength periodic features written by femtosecond laser on nanodiamond thin film surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Kuntumalla, Mohan; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.; Rajamudili, Kuladeep; Rao Desai, Narayana

    2014-04-21

    Deep sub-wavelength (?/??=??0.22) periodic features are induced uniformly on a nanodiamond (ND) thin film surface using femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation (pulse duration?=??110 fs and central wavelength of ?800?nm). The topography of the surface features is controlled by the laser polarization. Orientation of features is perpendicular to laser polarization. Periodicity (spatial periodicity of?surface features is less than the laser wavelength. This work gives an experimental proof of polarization controlled surface plasmon-fs laser coupling mechanism prompting the interaction between fs laser and solid matter (here ND thin film) which in turn is resulting in the periodic surface features. Scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with micro Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy are carried out to extract surface morphology and phase information of the laser irradiated regions. This work demonstrates an easy and efficient surface fabrication technique.

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 115422 (2013) Charge compensation by long-period reconstruction in strongly polar lithium niobate surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnle, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    force microscopy and first-principles calculations. It is found that the surface reconstructs, wavelength filters, second- harmonic generators, and nonvolatile memories.1 While these applications exploit, the strong electric fields and charges at the surfaces of ferroelectric materials have recently attracted

  17. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  18. Elucidation of Perovskite Film Micro-Orientations Using Two-Photon Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Brianna R; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Yingzhong; Doughty, Benjamin L; Calhoun, Tessa R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of efficient hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite photovoltaic materials has caused the rapid development of a variety of preparation and processing techniques designed to maximize their performance. As processing methods continue to emerge, it is important to understand how the optical properties of these materials are affected on a microscopic scale. Here polarization resolved two-photon total internal reflectance microscopy (TIRFM) was used to probe changes in transition dipole moment orientation as a function of thermal annealing time in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on glass. These results show that as thermal annealing time is increased the distribution of transition moments pointing out-of-plane decreases in favor of forming areas with increased in-plane orientations. It was also shown through the axial sensitivity of TIRFM that the surface topography is manifested in the signal intensity and can be used to survey aspects of morphology in coincidence with the optical properties of these films.

  19. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4 ° and a coiling period of 3.3?nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal ?-stacking between DNA nucleotides andmore »the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality. « less

  1. Morphological properties of pillared layered materials investigated by electron microscopy technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navas de Mascianglioli, Margarit

    1993-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate morphological features of a diverse range of pillared layered materials. Pillared layered zirconium phosphates, zirconium polyimine phosphonates and anion exchanger ...

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of whiskers and hillocks formed on Al films deposited onto a glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saka, H.; Fujino, S.; Kuroda, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Tsujimoto, K.; Tsuji, S. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Shimotsuruma, Yamato, Kanagawa 242 (Japan); Takatsuji, H. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Ichimiyake, Yasu-gun, Shiga 520-23 (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    Whiskers and hillocks formed on an Al film deposited onto a glass substrate have been observed by means of a variety of transmission electron microscopy technique.

  3. Ferroelectric Switching by the Grounded Scanning Probe Microscopy Tip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    The process of polarization reversal by the tip of scanning probe microscope was intensively studied for last two decades. Number of the abnormal switching phenomena was reported by the scientific groups worldwide. In particularly it was experimentally and theoretically shown that slow dynamics of the surface screening controls kinetics of the ferroelectric switching, backswitching and relaxation and presence of the charges carriers on the sample surface and in the sample bulk significantly change polarization reversal dynamics. Here we experimentally demonstrated practical possibility of the history dependent polarization reversal by the grounded SPM tip. This phenomenon was attributed to induction of the slowly dissipating charges into the surface of the grounded tip that enables polarization reversal under the action of the produced electric field. Analytical and numerical electrostatic calculations allow additional insight into nontrivial abnormal switching phenomena reported earlier.

  4. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  5. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  6. Differential Dynamic Microscopy to characterize Brownian motion and bacteria motility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Germain; Mathieu Leocmach; Thomas Gibaud

    2015-11-03

    We have developed a lab work module where we teach undergraduate students how to quantify the dynamics of a suspension of microscopic particles, measuring and analyzing the motion of those particles at the individual level or as a group. Differential Dynamic Microscopy (DDM) is a relatively recent technique that precisely does that and constitutes an alternative method to more classical techniques such as dynamics light scattering (DLS) or video particle tracking (VPT). DDM consists in imaging a particle dispersion with a standard light microscope and a camera. The image analysis requires the students to code and relies on digital Fourier transform to obtain the intermediate scattering function, an autocorrelation function that characterizes the dynamics of the dispersion. We first illustrate DDM on the textbook case of colloids where we measure the diffusion coefficient. Then we show that DDM is a pertinent tool to characterize biologic systems such as motile bacteria i.e.bacteria that can self propel, where we not only determine the diffusion coefficient but also the velocity and the fraction of motile bacteria. Finally, so that our paper can be used as a tutorial to the DDM technique, we have joined to this article movies of the colloidal and bacterial suspensions and the DDM algorithm in both Matlab and Python to analyze the movies.

  7. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  8. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  9. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruther, Rose E [ORNL; Callender, Andrew F. [Tennessee Technological University; Zhou, Hui [ORNL; Martha, Surendra [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes as a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  10. Micro- and nanodomain imaging in uniaxial ferroelectrics: Joint application of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Zelenovskiy, P. S. [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-14

    The application of the most effective methods of the domain visualization in model uniaxial ferroelectrics of lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) family, and relaxor strontium-barium niobate (SBN) have been reviewed in this paper. We have demonstrated the synergetic effect of joint usage of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopies which provide extracting of the unique information about formation of the micro- and nanodomain structures. The methods have been applied for investigation of various types of domain structures with increasing complexity: (1) periodical domain structure in LN and LT, (2) nanodomain structures in LN, LT, and SBN, (3) nanodomain structures in LN with modified surface layer, (4) dendrite domain structure in LN. The self-assembled appearance of quasi-regular nanodomain structures in highly non-equilibrium switching conditions has been considered.

  11. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skapin, A. Sever Ropret, P. Bukovec, P.

    2007-11-15

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods.

  12. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of carbon deposited on the NiO/MgO solid solution catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y.H.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1999-05-15

    The carbon deposition due to the CH{sub 4} decomposition at 790 C over NiO/MgO catalysts was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. While no deposits could be detected over the catalysts with a NiO content smaller than 9.1 wt%, they were detected over the catalysts with NiO contents of 23 and 50 wt%. The carbon deposits are composed of platelets located at distances of about 0.34 nm, corresponding to the graphitic carbon. Various structures of the deposited carbon were observed: (a) carbon consisting of platelets parallel to the surface of the particle, which covers a catalyst particle, (b) nanotubes composed of platelets parallel to their axis, and (c) carbon vortexes consisting of platelets parallel to their axis.

  13. A Hybrid Analog/Digital Phase-Locked Loop for Frequency Mode Non-contact Scanning Probe Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has developed into a powerful technique to image many different properties of samples. The conventional method involves monitoring the amplitude, phase or frequency of a cantilever oscillating at or near its resonant frequency as it is scanned across the surface of a sample. For high Q factor cantilevers, monitoring the resonant frequency is the preferred method in order to obtain reasonable scan times. This can be done by using a phase-locked-loop (PLL). PLLs can be obtained as commercial integrated circuits, but these do not have the frequency resolution required for SPM. To increase the resolution, all-digital PLLs requiring sophisticated digital signal processors or field programmable gate arrays have also been implemented. We describe here a hybrid analog/digital PLL where most of the components are implemented using discrete analog integrated circuits, but the frequency resolution is provided by a direct digital synthesis chip controlled by a simple PIC microc...

  14. Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology Ji 11747-3157 USA ABSTRACT Laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with fast., 1990). Duncan et al. constructed the first CARS microscope by use of two dye laser beams

  15. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism. Optical probes for live cell

  16. Spark-gap atomic emission microscopy. II. Improvements in resolution P. G. Van Patten,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Spark-gap atomic emission microscopy. II. Improvements in resolution P. G. Van Patten,a) J. D. Noll which enhance performance in spark-gap atomic emission microscopy SGAEM experiments. SGAEM is a recent as small as 5 V, and intense atomic emission has been observed in such sparks. Small 1 nF , high

  17. Static Stern-Gerlach effect in magnetic force microscopy G. P. Berman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammel, P. Chris

    Static Stern-Gerlach effect in magnetic force microscopy G. P. Berman,1 G. D. Doolen,1 P. C. Hammel February 2002 We examine static single-spin measurements using magnetic-force microscopy methods. We show, 07.79.Pk I. INTRODUCTION The Stern-Gerlach SG effect, one of the cornerstones of a quantum mechanics

  18. Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene-based devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene; accepted 24 July 2007; published online 15 August 2007 Raman microscopy of graphene was carried out over-band frequencies extracted from Raman spectra of the single-layer graphene are - 1.6±0.2 10-2 cm-1 /K and - 3

  19. Deposition and atomic force microscopy of individual phthalocyanine polymers between nanofabricated electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    Deposition and atomic force microscopy of individual phthalocyanine polymers between nanofabricated of cellulose using the Langmuir­Blodgett deposition technique. Atomic force microscopy was used to study- layer of an insulating molecule.6 We show that this method leads to a controlled deposition and strong

  20. Palladium diffusion into bulk copper via the (100) surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussmann, Ezra; Pohl, Karsten; Sun, Jiebing; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we measure the diffusion of Pd into bulk Cu at the Cu(100) surface. Interdiffusion is tracked by measuring the dissolution of the Cu(100)-c(2 x 2)-Pd surface alloy during annealing (T > 240 C). The activation barrier for Pd diffusion from the surface alloy into the bulk is determined to be (1.8 {+-} 0.6) eV. During annealing, we observe the growth of a new layer of Cu near step edges. Under this new Cu layer, dilute Pd remaining near the surface develops a layered structure similar to the Cu{sub 3}Pd L 1{sub 2} bulk alloy phase.

  1. The study of organic crystals by atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Ernest Ho Hin

    2014-07-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.16 2-D and 3-D height images of a chocolate sample obtained at various storage times. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.17 AFM images of the {110} face of paracetamol crystals. . . . . . 26 2.18 AFM images of glycine crystals... BFDH growth morphology of ASA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.4 AFM 3-D images of ASA (001) surface under dissolution. . . . . 42 3.5 AFM Deflection images of ASA (100) face etched by water, ace- tone, and ethyl...

  2. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  3. Terahertz imaging of sub-wavelength particles with Zenneck surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro-Cía, M., E-mail: m.navarro@imperial.ac.uk [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Centre for Plasmonics and Metamaterials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Terahertz Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Natrella, M.; Graham, C.; Renaud, C. C.; Seeds, A. J.; Mitrofanov, O., E-mail: o.mitrofanov@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Dominec, F.; Kužel, P., E-mail: kuzelp@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Delagnes, J. C.; Mounaix, P., E-mail: p.mounaix@loma.u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Bordeaux 1 University, CNRS UMR 4798, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France)

    2013-11-25

    Impact of sub-wavelength-size dielectric particles on Zenneck surface waves on planar metallic antennas is investigated at terahertz (THz) frequencies with THz near-field probe microscopy. Perturbations of the surface waves show the particle presence, despite its sub-wavelength size. The experimental configuration, which utilizes excitation of surface waves at metallic edges, is suitable for THz imaging of dielectric sub-wavelength size objects. As a proof of concept, the effects of a small strontium titanate rectangular particle and a titanium dioxide sphere on the surface field of a bow-tie antenna are experimentally detected and verified using full-wave simulations.

  4. Molecular Dynamics of Surface-Moving Thermally Driven Alexei V. Akimov,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the qualitative features of the thermally activated migration of the nanocars: the primary pivoting motion observed migration of nanocars over gold crystals as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Coarse and sometimes bearing a loading bay. Their thermally initiated migration on the surface of gold crystals

  5. Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment N. Srivastavaa , Guowei-face, graphene, interface structure, low energy electron microscopy, disilane Abstract. The formation of epitaxial graphene on SiC( 1000 ) in a disilane environment is studied. The higher graphitization

  6. Surface Tension of Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayar, Kishor Govind

    New measurements and a reference correlation for the surface tension of seawater at atmospheric pressure are presented in this paper. Surface tension of seawater was measured across a salinity range of 20 ? S ? 131 g/kg ...

  7. Extreme-UV lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A photolithography system that employs a condenser that includes a series of aspheric mirrors on one side of a small, incoherent source of radiation producing a series of beams is provided. Each aspheric mirror images the quasi point source into a curved line segment. A relatively small arc of the ring image is needed by the camera; all of the beams are so manipulated that they all fall onto this same arc needed by the camera. Also, all of the beams are aimed through the camera's virtual entrance pupil. The condenser includes a correcting mirror for reshaping a beam segment which improves the overall system efficiency. The condenser efficiently fills the larger radius ringfield created by today's advanced camera designs. The system further includes (i) means for adjusting the intensity profile at the camera's entrance pupil or (ii) means for partially shielding the illumination imaging onto the mask or wafer. The adjusting means can, for example, change at least one of: (i) partial coherence of the photolithography system, (ii) mask image illumination uniformity on the wafer or (iii) centroid position of the illumination flux in the entrance pupil. A particularly preferred adjusting means includes at least one vignetting mask that covers at least a portion of the at least two substantially equal radial segments of the parent aspheric mirror.

  8. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro & Friedrich W. Hehl Outline Linear media Linear media-you. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces: geometrical optics in dispersionless linear (meta)materials and vacuum, 19­23 November 2012 Email: favaro@thp.uni-koeln.de #12;Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro

  9. Structure of native oligomeric Sprouty2 by electron microscopy and its property of electroconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Feng-Jung [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Kuan-Wei; Lai, Chun-Chieh [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Sue-Ping [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Hsiao-Hsuian [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Shu-Ping [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Bang-Hung [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Ling-Mei [Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liou, Gunn-Guang, E-mail: bogun@nhri.org.tw [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •Spry2 self-assembles into distinct oligomeric forms. •Self-interaction of Spry2 is detected with a high kinetic affinity in vitro. •The 3D structure of oligomeric Spry2 likes as a donut shape with two lip-cover parts. •Spry2 contains silicon and iron. •Spry2 has a potential to serve as a biological material conductor. -- Abstract: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate many cellular processes, and Sprouty2 (Spry2) is known as an important regulator of RTK signaling pathways. Therefore, it is worth investigating the properties of Spry2 in more detail. In this study, we found that Spry2 is able to self-assemble into oligomers with a high-affinity KD value of approximately 16 nM, as determined through BIAcore surface plasmon resonance analysis. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of Spry2 was resolved using an electron microscopy (EM) single-particle reconstruction approach, which revealed that Spry2 is donut-shaped with two lip-cover domains. Furthermore, the method of energy dispersive spectrum obtained through EM was analyzed to determine the elements carried by Spry2, and the results demonstrated that Spry2 is a silicon- and iron-containing protein. The silicon may contribute to the electroconductivity of Spry2, and this property exhibits a concentration-dependent feature. This study provides the first report of a silicon- and iron-containing protein, and its 3D structure may allow us (1) to study the potential mechanism through the signal transduction is controlled by switching the electronic transfer on or off and (2) to develop a new type of conductor or even semiconductor using biological or half-biological hybrid materials in the future.

  10. A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF PRESOLAR HIBONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-04-01

    We report isotopic and microstructural data on five presolar hibonite grains (KH1, KH2, KH6, KH15, and KH21) identified in an acid residue of the Krymka LL3.1 ordinary chondrite. Isotopic measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) verified a presolar circumstellar origin for the grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the crystal structure and chemistry of the grains was enabled by in situ sectioning and lift-out with a focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). Comparisons of isotopic compositions with models indicate that four of the five grains formed in low-mass stars that evolved through the red giant/asymptotic giant branches (RGBs/AGBs), whereas one grain formed in the ejecta of a Type II supernova. Selected-area electron-diffraction patterns show that all grains are single crystals of hibonite. Some grains contain minor structural perturbations (stacking faults) and small spreads in orientation that can be attributed to a combination of growth defects and mechanical processing by grain-grain collisions. The similar structure of the supernova grain to those from RGB/AGB stars indicates a similarity in the formation conditions. Radiation damage (e.g., point defects), if present, occurs below our detection limit. Of the five grains we studied, only one has the pure hibonite composition of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}. All others contain minor amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, and Fe. The microstructural data are generally consistent with theoretical predictions, which constrain the circumstellar condensation temperature to a range of 1480-1743 K, assuming a corresponding total gas pressure between 1 x 10{sup -6} and 1 x 10{sup -3} atm. The TEM data were also used to develop a calibration for SIMS determination of Ti contents in oxide grains. Grains with extreme {sup 18}O depletions, indicating deep mixing has occurred in their parent AGB stars, are slightly Ti enriched compared with grains from stars without deep mixing, most likely reflecting differences in grain condensation conditions.

  11. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  12. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  13. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  14. Simultaneous forward and epi-CARS microscopy with a single detector by time-correlated single photon counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy," Proc Natl Acadenables separation of CARS microscopy data from multiphoton-overlap of the F and E-CARS signals. Due to traveling an

  15. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  16. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  17. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  18. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  19. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, andmore »scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.« less

  20. Morphology of the surface of technically pure titanium VT1-0 after electroexplosive carbonization with a weighed zirconium oxide powder sample and electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sosnin, Kirill V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Titanium is carbonized by the electroexplosive method. Formation of a surface alloyed layer and a coating on the treated surface is established by the methods of transmission electron microscopy. The morphology and elemental composition of the alloyed layer are analyzed. A dependence of the structure of the modified layer subjected to electron gun treatment on the absorbed power density is revealed.

  1. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  2. Development of high-speed two-photon microscopy for biological and medical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ki Hean

    2005-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) is one of the most powerful microscopic technologies for in-vivo 3D tissue imaging up to a few hundred micrometers. It has been finding important applications in neuronal imaging, tumor physiology ...

  3. MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO FOR AUTOMATED TRACKING OF GENEALOGY IN MICROSCOPY VIDEOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO FOR AUTOMATED TRACKING OF GENEALOGY IN MICROSCOPY VIDEOS KATHLEEN CHAMPION of the nuclei in the images and their genealogies. Evan Tice '09 has already developed some code that aims

  4. CellVisualizer : exploring hierarchical, multi-dimensional data with applications to high-throughput microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, InHan

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a system for visualizing hierarchical, multi-dimensional, memory-intensive datasets. Specifically, we designed an interactive system to visualize data collected by high-throughput microscopy and ...

  5. Development of the Ultrashort Pulse Nonlinear Optical Microscopy Spectral Imaging System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Anthony Chien-der

    2012-10-19

    by broadband sub-10-fs pulses. This dissertation will discuss the development of two spectral imaging systems using the principles of nonlinear optical microscopy for pixel-by-pixel spectral segmentation of multiple fluorescent spectra. The first spectral...

  6. Experimenting Liver Fibrosis Diagnostic by Two Photon Excitation Microscopy and Bag-of-Features Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanciu, Stefan G.

    The accurate staging of liver fibrosis is of paramount importance to determine the state of disease progression, therapy responses, and to optimize disease treatment strategies. Non-linear optical microscopy techniques ...

  7. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore »freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  8. Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor-based adaptive optics system for microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Peter T. C.

    The imaging depth of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy is partly limited by the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in biological specimens. This inhomogeneity results in a distortion of the wavefront of the ...

  9. Hybrid near-field scanning optical microscopy tips for live cell measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapkiai, Luka K.; Moore-Nichols, David; Carnell, Jonathan; Krogmeier, Jeffrey R.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2004-03-08

    atomic force microscopy cantilever. Imaging of fluorescent latex spheres suspended in an acetate matrix demonstrates the subdiffraction limited fluorescence and topography capabilities of the tips. The reduced spring constant of the hybrid tip is also...

  10. Topography and refractometry of nanostructures using spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillette, Martha U.

    Topography and refractometry of nanostructures using spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM topography at a single atomic layer in graphene. Further, using a decoupling procedure that we developed high- throughput topography and refractometry of man-made and biological nanostructures. Quantitative

  11. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ...

  12. Reconstruction of 3D Neuronal Structures from Densely Packed Electron Microscopy Data Stacks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Huei-Fang

    2012-10-19

    The goal of fully decoding how the brain works requires a detailed wiring diagram of the brain network that reveals the complete connectivity matrix. Recent advances in high-throughput 3D electron microscopy (EM) image ...

  13. High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

  14. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in all-solid-state Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ...

  15. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

  16. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-03-06

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  17. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  18. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and theoretical studies of 1-halohexane monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    . In accordance with the higher degree of disorder observed in scanning tunneling microscopy images of 1 of the interactions governing 2D self-organization. Simple functionalized hydrocarbon molecules are known to form self

  19. Exciton diffusion in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes studied by transient absorption microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Wang, Rui; Lohrman, Jessica; Ren, Shenqiang; Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-09

    Spatiotemporal dynamics of excitons in isolated semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied using transient absorption microscopy. Differential reflection and transmission of an 810-nm probe pulse after excitation by a 750-nm pump...

  20. Thermal and Optical Characterization of Photonic Integrated Circuits by Thermoreflectance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgings, Janice A.

    We report high resolution, non-invasive, thermal and optical characterization of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and SOA-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) using thermoreflectance microscopy. Chip-scale ...

  1. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  2. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  3. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Peter; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01

    A number of questions in systems biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organism. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microscopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important par...

  4. Behaviour of nanocolloidal particles on mica: investigations using atomic force microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Richard John

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate systematically the behaviour of both electrostatically stabilised silica and sterically stabilised polystyrene (PS) colloidal systems on freshly cleaved ...

  5. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy:excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Braggmirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through

  6. Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Euiheon

    2007-01-01

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

  7. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-07-09

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal.

  8. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  9. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  10. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  11. Noncommutative Riemann Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Arnlind; Martin Bordemann; Laurent Hofer; Jens Hoppe; Hidehiko Shimada

    2007-11-16

    We introduce C-Algebras of compact Riemann surfaces $\\Sigma$ as non-commutative analogues of the Poisson algebra of smooth functions on $\\Sigma$. Representations of these algebras give rise to sequences of matrix-algebras for which matrix-commutators converge to Poisson-brackets as $N\\to\\infty$. For a particular class of surfaces, nicely interpolating between spheres and tori, we completely characterize (even for the intermediate singular surface) all finite dimensional representations of the corresponding C-algebras.

  12. Cross-Sectional Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Effects of Etching and Back-Contact Processes; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C.-S.; Gessert, T. A.; Duda, A. M.; Young, M.; Metzger, W. K.; Li, X.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the etching processes using bromine and nitric-phosphoric acid solutions, as well as of Cu, in the bulk electrical conductivity of CdTe/CdS solar cells using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Although the etching process can create a conductive layer on the surface of the CdTe, the layer is very shallow. In contrast, the addition of a thin layer of Cu to the surface creates a conductive layer inside the CdTe that is not uniform in depth, is concentrated at grains boundaries, and may short circuit the device if the CdTe is too thin. The etching process facilitates the Cu diffusion and results in thicker conductive layers. The existence of this inhomogeneous conductive layer directly affects the current transport and is probably the reason for needing thick CdTe in these devices.

  13. An in-vivo study of electrical charge distribution on the bacterial cell wall by Atomic Force Microscopy in vibrating force mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Marliere; Samia Dhahri

    2015-04-13

    We report an in-vivo electromechanical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of charge distribution on the cell wall of Gram plus Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria, naturally adherent to a glass substrate, in physiological conditions. The method presented in this paper relies on a detailed study of AFM approach-retract curves giving the variation of the interaction force versus distance between tip and sample. In addition to classical height and mechanical (as stiffness) data, mapping of local electrical properties, as bacterial surface charge, was proved to be feasible at a spatial resolution better than few tens of nanometers. This innovative method relies on the measurement of the cantilever's surface stress through its deflection far from (higher than 10nm) the repulsive contact zone. The variations of surface stress come from modification of electrical surface charge of the cantilever (as in classical electrocapillary measurements) likely stemming from its charging during contact of both tip and sample electrical double layers. This method offers an important improvement in local electrical and electrochemical measurements at the solid-liquid interface particularly in high-molarity electrolytes when compared to technics focused on the direct use of electrostatic force. It thus opens a new way to directly investigate in-situ biological electrical surface processes involved in numerous practical and fundamental problems as bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cell, etc.

  14. Self-assembled nanoparticle surface patterning for improved digital image correlation in a scanning electron microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Samantha

    of these techniques are expensive, require a cleanroom, or can only produce the pattern over small areas of the test, it is an inexpensive and fast patterning technique that does not require cleanroom access or specialized lithography

  15. Near ultraviolet-wavelength photonic-crystal biosensor with enhanced surface-to-bulk sensitivity ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Brian

    in a Si/SiO2/poly methyl- methacrylate substrate by electron-beam lithography and etched into the discovery,1 environmental detection, medical diagnostics, and life science research.2 Traditional labeled

  16. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?°C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  17. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Carpick, R. W.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.

    2007-12-15

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2{+-}2 vs 826{+-}186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2{+-}0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals' interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a direct link between the surface chemistry and nanoscale friction. The proposed mechanism, supported by the detailed surface spectroscopic analysis, is the elimination of reactive (e.g., C*-), polar (e.g., C=O), and {pi}-bonded (C=C) surface groups, which are replaced by fully saturated, hydrogen-terminated surface bonds to produce an inert surface that interacts minimally with the contacting counterface.

  18. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2007-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2 {+-} 2 vs 826 {+-} 186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2 {+-} 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a direct link between the surface chemistry and nanoscale friction. The proposed mechanism, supported by the detailed surface spectroscopic analysis, is the elimination of reactive (e.g., C*-), polar (e.g., C-O), and {pi}-bonded (C-C) surface groups, which are replaced by fully saturated, hydrogen-terminated surface bonds to produce an inert surface that interacts minimally with the contacting counterface.

  19. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santala, Teuvo J. (Attleboro, MA)

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  20. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  1. Digital processing of SEM images for the assessment of evaluation indexes of cleaning interventions on Pentelic marble surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moropoulou, A. Delegou, E.T.; Vlahakis, V.; Karaviti, E.

    2007-11-15

    In this work, digital processing of scanning-electron-microscopy images utilized to assess cleaning interventions applied on the Pentelic marble surfaces of the National Archaeological Museum and National Library in Athens, Greece. Beside mineralogical and chemical characterization that took place by scanning-electron-microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, the image-analysis program EDGE was applied for estimating three evaluation indexes of the marble micro-structure. The EDGE program was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the evaluation of cleaning interventions applied on Philadelphia City Hall. This computer program analyzes scanning-electron-microscopy images of stone specimens cut in cross-section for measuring the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces, the stone near-surface fracture density, the shape factor (a surface roughness factor) and the friability index which represents the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical stability of the stone surface. The results indicated that the evaluation of the marble surface micro-structure before and after cleaning is achieved by the suggested indexes, while the performance of cleaning interventions on the marble surfaces can be assessed.

  2. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISO/TC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Chemical Analysis- Characterization of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2012-09-01

    ISO Technical Report (TR) 14187 provides an introduction to (and examples of) the information that can be obtained about nanostructured materials using surface-analysis tools. In addition, both general issues and challenges associated with characterising nanostructured materials and the specific opportunities and challenges associated with individual analytical methods are identified. As the size of objects or components of materials approaches a few nanometres, the distinctions among 'bulk', 'surface' and 'particle' analysis blur. This Technical Report focuses on issues specifically relevant to surface chemical analysis of nanostructured materials. The report considers a variety of analysis methods but focuses on techniques that are in the domain of ISO/TC 201 including Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning probe microscopy. Measurements of nanoparticle surface properties such as surface potential that are often made in a solution are not discussed.

  3. Characterization of multilayer nitride coatings by electron microscopy and modulus mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemmasani, Sai Pramod [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Rajulapati, Koteswararao V. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Ramakrishna, M.; Valleti, Krishna [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Gundakaram, Ravi C., E-mail: ravi.gundakaram@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Joshi, Shrikant V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India)

    2013-07-15

    This paper discusses multi-scale characterization of physical vapour deposited multilayer nitride coatings using a combination of electron microscopy and modulus mapping. Multilayer coatings with a triple layer structure based on TiAlN and nanocomposite nitrides with a nano-multilayered architecture were deposited by Cathodic arc deposition and detailed microstructural studies were carried out employing Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Electron Backscattered Diffraction, Focused Ion Beam and Cross sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy in order to identify the different phases and to study microstructural features of the various layers formed as a result of the deposition process. Modulus mapping was also performed to study the effect of varying composition on the moduli of the nano-multilayers within the triple layer coating by using a Scanning Probe Microscopy based technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on modulus mapping of cathodic arc deposited nitride multilayer coatings. This work demonstrates the application of Scanning Probe Microscopy based modulus mapping and electron microscopy for the study of coating properties and their relation to composition and microstructure. - Highlights: • Microstructure of a triple layer nitride coating studied at multiple length scales. • Phases identified by EDS, EBSD and SAED (TEM). • Nanolayered, nanocomposite structure of the coating studied using FIB and TEM. • Modulus mapping identified moduli variation even in a nani-multilayer architecture.

  4. Rapid prototyping of microchannels with surface patterns for fabrication of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, Payton J.; Sharifi, Farrokh; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-08-14

    Microfluidic technology has provided innovative solutions to numerous problems, but the cost of designing and fabricating microfluidic channels is impeding its expansion. In this study, Shrinky-Dink thermoplastic sheets are used to create multilayered complex templates for microfluidic channels. We also used inkjet and laserjet printers to raise a predetermined microchannel geometry by depositing several layers of ink for each feature consecutively. We achieved feature heights over 100 ?m, which were measured and compared with surface profilometry. Templates closest to the target geometry were then used to create microfluidic devices from soft-lithography with the molds as a template. These microfluidic devices were, futhermore used to fabricate polymer microfibers using the microfluidic focusing approach to demonstrate the potential that this process has for microfluidic applications. Finally, an economic analysis was conducted to compare the price of common microfluidic template manufacturing methods. We showed that multilayer microchannels can be created significantly quicker and cheaper than current methods for design prototyping and point-of-care applications in the biomedical area.

  5. Rapid prototyping of microchannels with surface patterns for fabrication of polymer fibers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goodrich, Payton J.; Sharifi, Farrokh; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-08-14

    Microfluidic technology has provided innovative solutions to numerous problems, but the cost of designing and fabricating microfluidic channels is impeding its expansion. In this study, Shrinky-Dink thermoplastic sheets are used to create multilayered complex templates for microfluidic channels. We also used inkjet and laserjet printers to raise a predetermined microchannel geometry by depositing several layers of ink for each feature consecutively. We achieved feature heights over 100 ?m, which were measured and compared with surface profilometry. Templates closest to the target geometry were then used to create microfluidic devices from soft-lithography with the molds as a template. These microfluidic devicesmore »were, futhermore used to fabricate polymer microfibers using the microfluidic focusing approach to demonstrate the potential that this process has for microfluidic applications. Finally, an economic analysis was conducted to compare the price of common microfluidic template manufacturing methods. We showed that multilayer microchannels can be created significantly quicker and cheaper than current methods for design prototyping and point-of-care applications in the biomedical area.« less

  6. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.more »For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.« less

  7. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  8. 1732 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 24, No. 23 / December 1, 1999 Deconvolution of local surface response from topography in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from topography in nanometer profilometry with a dual-scan method Chao-Wei Tsai, Chau-Hwang Lee of topography and elasticity profiles. Similarly, in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the magnitude a simple yet accurate method for the deconvolution of topography from lo- cal surface responses. We

  9. InGaAs surface preparation for atomic layer deposition by hydrogen cleaning and improvement with high temperature anneal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    InGaAs surface preparation for atomic layer deposition by hydrogen cleaning and improvement channel III-V MOS devices can be fabricated with atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-K gate-first proc atomic scale imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, a combination of atomic hydrogen

  10. Enhanced surface hydrophobicity by coupling of surface polarity and topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhanced surface hydrophobicity by coupling of surface polarity and topography Nicolas organization and contact angle. We show that when the topography and polarity of the surface act in concert- ciated that the topography of a surface is important in deter- mining the degree of surface

  11. Direct Probing of Charge Injection and Polarization-Controlled Ionic Mobility on Ferroelectric LiNbO3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Dr. Anton; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Shur, V.Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Mapping surface potential with time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) in LiNbO3 periodically-poled single crystal revealed activation of the surface ionic subsystem. Electric fields higher than certain threshold value but lower than the switching field induce injection of charge from the biased electrode, formation of an active region in its vicinity and uneven distribution of screening charge on the opposite ferroelectric domains. Tr-KPFM technique allows investigating these phenomena in details.

  12. The application of Graphene as a sample support in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantelic, R S; Kaiser, U; Stahlberg, H

    2012-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has witnessed rampant development and surging point resolution over the past few years. The improved imaging performance of modern electron microscopes shifts the bottleneck for image contrast and resolution to sample preparation. Hence, it is increasingly being realized that the full potential of electron microscopy will only be realized with the optimization of current sample preparation techniques. Perhaps the most recognized issues are background signal and noise contributed by sample supports, sample charging and instability. Graphene provides supports of single atom thickness, extreme physical stability, periodic structure, and ballistic electrical conductivity. As an increasing number of applications adapting graphene to their benefit emerge, we discuss the unique capabilities afforded by the use of graphene as a sample support for electron microscopy.

  13. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Karapetian, Edgar [ORNL; Mirman, B [Suffolk University, Boston; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine

    2007-01-01

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  14. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  15. Entropy and surfaceness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casper, James Kyle

    1997-01-01

    The layer of the Earth's atmosphere which contains clouds and weather systems is a thin thermoregulatory surface. It maintains an exact energy budget between the Earth and the Sun. Recent work in theoretical physics is ...

  16. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  17. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  18. Structured surfaces for hemocompatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrauth, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    The rise of micro- and nano-technologies has brought to light intriguing examples of scale-driven performance in a diverse array of fields. The quest to create highly hydrophobic surfaces is one such field. The application ...

  19. A surface ionization source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  20. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uçar, A.; Çopuro?lu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Ar?kan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (?0.5°) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45° before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100° were obtained.

  1. Multifunctional thin film surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  2. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  3. Hyperspectral Microscopy of Explosives Particles Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-12-26

    Using infrared hyperspectral imaging, we demonstrate microscopy of small particles of the explosives compounds RDX, tetryl, and PETN with near diffraction-limited performance. The custom microscope apparatus includes an external cavity quantum cascade laser illuminator scanned over its tuning range of 9.13-10.53 µm in four seconds, coupled with a microbolometer focal plane array to record infrared transmission images. We use the hyperspectral microscopy technique to study the infrared absorption spectra of individual explosives particles, and demonstrate sub-nanogram detection limits.

  4. Axial range of conjugate adaptive optics in two-photon microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Hari P; Mertz, Jerome; Bifano, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an adaptive optics technique for two-photon microscopy in which the deformable mirror used for aberration compensation is positioned in a plane conjugate to the plane of the aberration. We demonstrate in a proof-of-principle experiment that this technique yields a large field of view advantage in comparison to standard pupil-conjugate adaptive optics. Further, we show that the extended field of view in conjugate AO is maintained over a relatively large axial translation of the deformable mirror with respect to the conjugate plane. We conclude with a discussion of limitations and prospects for the conjugate AO technique in two-photon biological microscopy.

  5. Imaging individual lanthanum atoms in zeolite Y by scanning transmission electron microscopy: evidence of lanthanum pair sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Pinghong; Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Debefve, Louise M.; Browning, Nigel D.; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-09-01

    Images of La-exchanged NaY zeolite obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that about 80% of the La cations were present as site-isolated species, with the remainder in pair sites. The distance between La cations in the pair sites ranged from 1.44 to 3.84 Å, consistent with the presence of pairs of cations tilted at various angles with respect to the support surface. The actual distance between La cations in the pair sites is inferred to be approximately 3.84 Å, which is shorter than the distance between the nearest Al sites in the zeolite (4.31 Å). The results therefore suggest the presence of dimeric structures of La cations bridged with OH groups, and the presence of such species has been inferred previously on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (W. Grünert, U. Sauerlandt, R. Schlögl, H.G. Karge, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 1413).

  6. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.; Brookhaven National Lab.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, butmore »exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions« less

  7. Growth of nanocrystalline MoO{sub 3} on Au(111) studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Schalek, Richard; Friend, Cynthia M. [Department of Chemistry, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Center for Imaging and Mesoscale Structures, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Center for Imaging and Mesoscale Structures, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2004-12-15

    The growth of nanocrystalline MoO{sub 3} islands on Au(111) using physical vapor deposition of Mo has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The growth conditions affect the shape and distribution of the MoO{sub 3} nanostructures, providing a means of preparing materials with different percentages of edge sites that may have different chemical and physical properties than atoms in the interior of the nanostructures. MoO{sub 3} islands were prepared by physical vapor deposition of Mo and subsequent oxidation by NO{sub 2} exposure at temperatures between 450 K and 600 K. They exhibit a crystalline structure with a c(4x2) periodicity relative to unreconstructed Au(111). While the atomic-scale structure is identical to that of MoO{sub 3} islands prepared by chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate that the distribution of MoO{sub 3} islands on the Au(111) surface reflects the distribution of Mo clusters prior to oxidation although the growth of MoO{sub 3} involves long-range mass transport via volatile MoO{sub 3} precursor species. The island morphology is kinetically controlled at 450 K, whereas an equilibrium shape is approached at higher preparation temperatures or after prolonged annealing at the elevated temperature. Mo deposition at or above 525 K leads to the formation of a Mo-Au surface alloy as indicated by the observation of embedded MoO{sub 3} islands after oxidation by NO{sub 2}. Au vacancy islands, formed when Mo and Au dealloy to produce vacancies, are observed for these growth conditions.

  8. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jing [Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); White, Michael G. [Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Yan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zahl, Percy [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stacchiola, Dario J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, but exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions

  9. Time-gated single photon counting enables separation of CARS microscopy data from multiphoton-excited tissue autofluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ly, Sonny; McNerney, Gregory; Chan, James; Fore, Samantha; Huser, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation andanti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging," Opt. Lett. 31,and separated from the CARS signal by employing time-gating

  10. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  11. Reducing the In2O3(111) Surface Results in Ordered Indium Adatoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Margareta; Seiler, Steffen; Meyer, Bernd; Boatner, Lynn A; Schmid, M.; Diebold, U.

    2014-01-01

    The In2O3(111) surface can be transformed from an oxidized bulk termination to one that is covered by single In adatoms. As each adatom sits at one specific site within the surface unit cell they form a well-ordered (1 1) superstructure. Annealing at 500 C in O2 or in ultrahigh vacuum results in a fully reversible conversion between these two surface terminations; this transformation and intermediate stages were followed with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Formation of this novel surface structure under reducing conditions is corroborated by Density Functional Theory (DFT). The reduced adatom-covered and the oxidized In2O3(111) surfaces are expected to exhibit different chemical and electronic properties, which can easily be exploited by the facile and reversible switching between the two terminations.

  12. Experimental evidence of slippage breakdown for a superhydrophobic surface in a microfluidic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guido Bolognesi; Cecile Cottin-Bizonne; Christophe Pirat

    2014-06-12

    A full characterization of the water flow past a silicon superhydrophobic surface with longitudinal micro-grooves enclosed in a microfluidic device is presented. Fluorescence microscopy images of the flow seeded with fluorescent passive tracers were digitally processed to measure both the velocity field and the position and shape of the liquid-air interfaces at the superhydrophobic surface. The simultaneous access to the meniscus and velocity profiles allows us to put under a strict test the no-shear boundary condition at the liquid-air interface. Surprisingly, our measurements show that air pockets in the surface cavities can sustain non-zero interfacial shear stresses, thereby hampering the friction reduction capabilities of the surface. The effects of the meniscus position and shape as well as of the liquid-air interfacial friction on the surface performances are separately assessed and quantified.

  13. Experimental evidence of slippage breakdown for a superhydrophobic surface in a microfluidic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolognesi, Guido; Pirat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    A full characterization of the water flow past a silicon superhydrophobic surface with longitudinal micro-grooves enclosed in a microfluidic device is presented. Fluorescence microscopy images of the flow seeded with fluorescent passive tracers were digitally processed to measure both the velocity field and the position and shape of the liquid-air interfaces at the superhydrophobic surface. The simultaneous access to the meniscus and velocity profiles allows us to put under a strict test the no-shear boundary condition at the liquid-air interface. Surprisingly, our measurements show that air pockets in the surface cavities can sustain non-zero interfacial shear stresses, thereby hampering the friction reduction capabilities of the surface. The effects of the meniscus position and shape as well as of the liquid-air interfacial friction on the surface performances are separately assessed and quantified.

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  16. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

  17. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  18. Reaction of Si(111) Surface with Saturated Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suryana, Risa; Nakahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Yahachi; Ichimiya, Ayahiko

    2011-12-10

    Reaction of Si(111) surface with saturated hydrocarbon such as methane (CH{sub 4}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) was carried out in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). After carbonization, structures formed on the surface were observed by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Structures transition formed on the surface were 7x7, {delta}-7x7, 1x1, and SiC structures. In the case of CH{sub 4}, the Si surfaces were carbonized at 800 deg. C for 120 min (7.2x10{sup 4} L) with a W-filament of 2800 deg. C, and SiC layers were obtained. In the case of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, the mixture of 7x7 and SiC structure was observed. Decomposition of hydrocarbon was characterized in quadrupole mass spectroscopy (QMS) measurements. An atomic force microscopy (AFM) image of the mixture of 7x7 and SiC shows a wandering shape. Whereas, the SiC layer shows a regular step. This result seems to be related to the different in the amount of CH{sub 3} molecules on the surface.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    cladding include austenitic stainless steels, solid solution and precipitation-hardened alloys, ferritic­martensitic is on the ferritic­martensitic 9Cr ODS steel, which was originally developed by JAEA for use in sodium-cooled fastTransmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water A

  20. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X