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1

A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Microscopic Double-Slit A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Wednesday, 29 February 2012 00:00 Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in establishing the validity of wave-particle duality, a puzzling concept that has ultimately become central to the interpretation of complementarity in quantum mechnanics. In a new twist on this classic experiment, the double slit (with light waves) has been replaced by a diatomic molecule (with electron waves). At ALS Beamline 10.0.1, researchers have shown that diatomic molecules can serve as two-center emitters of electron waves and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in precise measurements of vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra.

2

A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in establishing the validity of wave-particle duality, a puzzling concept that has ultimately become central to the interpretation of complementarity in quantum mechnanics. In a new twist on this classic experiment, the double slit (with light waves) has been replaced by a diatomic molecule (with electron waves). At ALS Beamline 10.0.1, researchers have shown that diatomic molecules can serve as two-center emitters of electron waves and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in precise measurements of vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra.

3

A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment Print Two centuries ago, Thomas Young performed the classic demonstration of the wave nature of light. He placed a screen with two tiny slits in front of a single light source, effectively converting it into a two-centered source. On a second screen far away, he saw a pattern of light and dark diffraction fringes, a well-known hallmark of wave interference. Along with later studies using particles instead of light, the experiment played a crucial role in establishing the validity of wave-particle duality, a puzzling concept that has ultimately become central to the interpretation of complementarity in quantum mechnanics. In a new twist on this classic experiment, the double slit (with light waves) has been replaced by a diatomic molecule (with electron waves). At ALS Beamline 10.0.1, researchers have shown that diatomic molecules can serve as two-center emitters of electron waves and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in precise measurements of vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra.

4

Ion and electron beam nanofabrication of the which-way double-slit experiment in a transmission electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have realized a which-way experiment closely resembling the original Feynman's proposal exploiting focused ion beam milling to prepare two nanoslits and electron beam induced deposition to grow, selectively over one of them, electron transparent layers of low atomic number amorphous material to realize a which-way detector for high energy electrons. By carrying out the experiment in an electron microscope equipped with an energy filter, we show that the inelastic scattering of electron transmitted through amorphous layers of different thicknesses provides the control of the dissipative interaction process responsible for the localization phenomena which cancels out the interference effects.

Frabboni, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, via G. Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Gazzadi, Gian Carlo [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, via G. Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pozzi, Giulio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

Time-resolved double-slit experiment with entangled photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. While the direct event-by-event buildup of this interference pattern has been observed for massive particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules, it has not yet been measured for massless particles like photons. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications.

Piotr Kolenderski; Carmelo Scarcella; Kelsey D. Johnsen; Deny R. Hamel; Catherine Holloway; Lynden K. Shalm; Simone Tisa; Alberto Tosi; Kevin J. Resch; Thomas Jennewein

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print For the first time, an international research team carried out a double-slit experiment in H2, the...

7

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print Wednesday, 27 February 2008 00:00 For the first time, an international research team carried out a double-slit experiment in H2, the smallest and simplest molecule. Thomas Young's original experiment in 1803 passed light through two slits cut in a solid thin plate. In the groundbreaking experiment performed at ALS Beamlines 4.0 and 11.0.1, the researchers used electrons instead of light and the nuclei of the hydrogen molecule as the slits. The experiment revealed that only one "observing" electron suffices to induce the emergence of classical properties such as loss of coherence. Double photoionization of H2. Left: Circularly polarized light comes from the top. All angular distributions are in the plane perpendicular to the photon propagation vector: Φe-mol is the angle of the fast electron's trajectory to the molecular axis; Φe-e is the angle between both electron trajectories. Center: Photoionization by circularly polarized light launches a coherent spherical photoelectron wave at each nucleus of the molecule; the light propagates into the plane. Right: Measured electron angular distribution Φe-mol of the faster electron (E1) from double photoionization of H2 by circularly polarized light. The orientation of the molecule is horizontal. Light propagates into the plane of the figure, the molecule is fixed ±10° within the plane shown, Eϒ = 240 eV, and the energy of the slow electron E2 = 0 to 5 eV, resulting in E1 = 185 to 190 eV.

8

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print For the first time, an international research team carried out a double-slit experiment in H2, the smallest and simplest molecule. Thomas Young's original experiment in 1803 passed light through two slits cut in a solid thin plate. In the groundbreaking experiment performed at ALS Beamlines 4.0 and 11.0.1, the researchers used electrons instead of light and the nuclei of the hydrogen molecule as the slits. The experiment revealed that only one "observing" electron suffices to induce the emergence of classical properties such as loss of coherence. Double photoionization of H2. Left: Circularly polarized light comes from the top. All angular distributions are in the plane perpendicular to the photon propagation vector: Φe-mol is the angle of the fast electron's trajectory to the molecular axis; Φe-e is the angle between both electron trajectories. Center: Photoionization by circularly polarized light launches a coherent spherical photoelectron wave at each nucleus of the molecule; the light propagates into the plane. Right: Measured electron angular distribution Φe-mol of the faster electron (E1) from double photoionization of H2 by circularly polarized light. The orientation of the molecule is horizontal. Light propagates into the plane of the figure, the molecule is fixed ±10° within the plane shown, Eϒ = 240 eV, and the energy of the slow electron E2 = 0 to 5 eV, resulting in E1 = 185 to 190 eV.

9

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print For the first time, an international research team carried out a double-slit experiment in H2, the smallest and simplest molecule. Thomas Young's original experiment in 1803 passed light through two slits cut in a solid thin plate. In the groundbreaking experiment performed at ALS Beamlines 4.0 and 11.0.1, the researchers used electrons instead of light and the nuclei of the hydrogen molecule as the slits. The experiment revealed that only one "observing" electron suffices to induce the emergence of classical properties such as loss of coherence. Double photoionization of H2. Left: Circularly polarized light comes from the top. All angular distributions are in the plane perpendicular to the photon propagation vector: Φe-mol is the angle of the fast electron's trajectory to the molecular axis; Φe-e is the angle between both electron trajectories. Center: Photoionization by circularly polarized light launches a coherent spherical photoelectron wave at each nucleus of the molecule; the light propagates into the plane. Right: Measured electron angular distribution Φe-mol of the faster electron (E1) from double photoionization of H2 by circularly polarized light. The orientation of the molecule is horizontal. Light propagates into the plane of the figure, the molecule is fixed ±10° within the plane shown, Eϒ = 240 eV, and the energy of the slow electron E2 = 0 to 5 eV, resulting in E1 = 185 to 190 eV.

10

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Print For the first time, an international research team carried out a double-slit experiment in H2, the smallest and simplest molecule. Thomas Young's original experiment in 1803 passed light through two slits cut in a solid thin plate. In the groundbreaking experiment performed at ALS Beamlines 4.0 and 11.0.1, the researchers used electrons instead of light and the nuclei of the hydrogen molecule as the slits. The experiment revealed that only one "observing" electron suffices to induce the emergence of classical properties such as loss of coherence. Double photoionization of H2. Left: Circularly polarized light comes from the top. All angular distributions are in the plane perpendicular to the photon propagation vector: Φe-mol is the angle of the fast electron's trajectory to the molecular axis; Φe-e is the angle between both electron trajectories. Center: Photoionization by circularly polarized light launches a coherent spherical photoelectron wave at each nucleus of the molecule; the light propagates into the plane. Right: Measured electron angular distribution Φe-mol of the faster electron (E1) from double photoionization of H2 by circularly polarized light. The orientation of the molecule is horizontal. Light propagates into the plane of the figure, the molecule is fixed ±10° within the plane shown, Eϒ = 240 eV, and the energy of the slow electron E2 = 0 to 5 eV, resulting in E1 = 185 to 190 eV.

11

A matterless double slit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double-slits provide incoming photons with a choice. Those that survive the passage have chosen from two possible paths which interfere to distribute them in a wave-like manner. Such wave-particle duality continues to be challenged and investigated in a broad range of disciplines with electrons, neutrons, helium atoms, C60 fullerenes, Bose-Einstein condensates and biological molecules. All variants have hitherto involved material constituents. We present a matterless double-slit scenario in which photons generated from virtual electron-positron pair annihilation in head-on collisions of a probe laser field with two ultra-intense laser beams form a double-slit interference pattern. Such electromagnetic fields are predicted to induce material-like behaviour in the vacuum, supporting elastic scattering between photons. Our double-slit scenario presents on the one hand a realisable method to observe photon-photon scattering, and demonstrates on the other, the possibility of both controlling light with light and non-locally investigating features of the quantum vacuum's structure.

B. King; A. Di Piazza; C. H. Keitel

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Optical double-slit particle measuring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for in situ measurement of particle size is described. The size information is obtained by scanning an image of the particle across a double-slit mask and observing the transmitted light. This method is useful when the particle size of primary interest is 3..mu..m and larger. The technique is well suited to applications in which the particles are non-spherical and have unknown refractive index. It is particularly well suited to high temperature environments in which the particle incandescence provides the light source.

Tichenor, D.A.; Wang, J.C.F.; Hencken, K.R.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Double-slit vacuum polarisation effects in ultra-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of the strong laser-driven vacuum on a propagating electromagnetic probe wave has been studied in detail. We investigate two scenarios comprising a focused probe laser beam passing through a region of vacuum polarised by an ultra-intense laser field. By splitting this strong field into two, separated, monochromatic Gaussian pulses counter-propagating in a plane perpendicular to the probe field axis, we demonstrate a leading order light-by-light diffraction effect that generates an interference pattern reminiscent of the classic double-slit experiment. We calculate the total number of probe photons diffracted as well as the number diffracted into regions where the vacuum polarisation signal is higher than the probe background. In addition, we calculate the induced ellipticity and polarisation rotation in the probe beam and show how, in the realistic situation in which the centres of the two strong fields are not exactly aligned, certain ranges of beam separation and observation distance may actually lead to an increase over the idealised case of a single strong laser beam.

B. King; A. Di Piazza; C. H. Keitel

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Level densities of nickel isotopes: microscopic theory versus experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a spin-projection method to calculate microscopically the level densities of a family of nickel isotopes $^{59-64}$Ni using the shell model Monte Carlo approach in the complete $pfg_{9/2}$ shell. Accurate ground-state energies of the odd-mass nickel isotopes, required for the determination of excitation energies, are determined using the Green's function method recently introduced to circumvent the odd particle-number sign problem. Our results are in excellent agreement with recent measurements based on proton evaporation spectra and with level counting data at low excitation energies. We also compare our results with neutron resonance data, assuming equilibration of parity and a spin-cutoff model for the spin distribution at the neutron binding energy, and find good agreement with the exception of $^{63}$Ni.

M. Bonett-Matiz; Abhishek Mukherjee; Y. Alhassid

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Scientists combine X-rays and microscopes for precise experiments | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This insulator-coated "smart tip" for synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy confines the signal detection to a tiny region of a sample. The nanofabricated tips have been developed by an Argonne team led by Argonne nanoscientist Volker Rose to improve the sensitivity of the SXSTM technique. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. This insulator-coated "smart tip" for synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy confines the signal detection to a tiny region of a sample. The nanofabricated tips have been developed by an Argonne team led by Argonne nanoscientist Volker Rose to improve the sensitivity of the SXSTM technique. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. This insulator-coated "smart tip" for synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy confines the signal detection to a tiny region of a sample. The nanofabricated tips have been developed by an Argonne team led by Argonne nanoscientist Volker Rose to improve the sensitivity of the SXSTM technique. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Scientists combine X-rays and microscopes for precise experiments

16

Big microscope  

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microscope Name: stacy Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What type of Microscope has the highest magnification? Replies: What type of...

17

microscopes_2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 . His work was a giant 6 6 6 6 6 for science. Today, microscopes are much stronger. An electron microscope can make tiny organisms look 200,000 times 7 7 7 7 7 size. A few...

18

Electron microscopic evaluation and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment: A preliminary Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Post-irradiation examination of coated particle fuel from the AGR-1 experiment is in progress at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this presentation a brief summary of results from characterization of microstructures in the coating layers of selected irradiated fuel particles with burnup of 11.3% and 19.3% FIMA will be given. The main objective of the characterization were to study irradiation effects, fuel kernel porosity, layer debonding, layer degradation or corrosion, fission-product precipitation, grain sizes, and transport of fission products from the kernels across the TRISO layers. Characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy were used. A new approach to microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates is also briefly demonstrated. The characterization emphasized fission-product precipitates in the SiC-IPyC interface, SiC layer and the fuel-buffer interlayer, and provided significant new insights into mechanisms of fission-product transport. Although Pd-rich precipitates were identified at the SiC-IPyC interlayer, no significant SiC-layer thinning was observed for the particles investigated. Characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentration Ag in precipitates with significantly higher concentrations of contain Pd and U. Different approaches to resolving this problem are discussed. Possible microstructural differences between particles with high and low releases of Ag particles are also briefly discussed, and an initial hypothesis is provided to explain fission-product precipitate compositions and locations. No SiC phase transformations or debonding of the SiC-IPyC interlayer as a result of irradiation were observed. Lessons learned from the post-irradiation examination are described and future actions are recommended.

I J van Rooyen; D E Janney; B D Miller; J L Riesterer; P A Demkowicz

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ALSNews Vol. 328  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALSNews Vol. 328 Print ALSNews Vol. 328 Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment In a new twist on Young's classic double-slit experiment, researchers have shown that the double slits can be replaced by electron-emitting diatomic molecules and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in measurements of the vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra. Read more... Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved The signal recognition particle (SRP) delivers proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Researchers learned more about this essential and evolutionarily conserved process, called co-translational protein targeting, via the crystal structure of the complexed SRP molecule. Read more...

20

ALSNews Vol. 328  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Print 8 Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment In a new twist on Young's classic double-slit experiment, researchers have shown that the double slits can be replaced by electron-emitting diatomic molecules and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in measurements of the vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra. Read more... Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved The signal recognition particle (SRP) delivers proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Researchers learned more about this essential and evolutionarily conserved process, called co-translational protein targeting, via the crystal structure of the complexed SRP molecule. Read more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ALSNews Vol. 328  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Print 8 Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment In a new twist on Young's classic double-slit experiment, researchers have shown that the double slits can be replaced by electron-emitting diatomic molecules and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in measurements of the vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra. Read more... Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved The signal recognition particle (SRP) delivers proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Researchers learned more about this essential and evolutionarily conserved process, called co-translational protein targeting, via the crystal structure of the complexed SRP molecule. Read more...

22

ALSNews Vol. 328  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALSNews Vol. 328 Print ALSNews Vol. 328 Print A Microscopic Double-Slit Experiment In a new twist on Young's classic double-slit experiment, researchers have shown that the double slits can be replaced by electron-emitting diatomic molecules and that traces of electron-wave interference can be directly observed in measurements of the vibrationally resolved photoionization spectra. Read more... Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved The signal recognition particle (SRP) delivers proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Researchers learned more about this essential and evolutionarily conserved process, called co-translational protein targeting, via the crystal structure of the complexed SRP molecule. Read more...

23

Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities > Transmission Electron Facilities > Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes FACILITIES Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes The research activities of the Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Section are supported by complete metallography/sample preparation rooms equipped with several optical and electron microscopes: a Transmission Electron Microscope and two Scanning Electron Microscopes. Bookmark and Share Transmission electron microscope (TEM) Detail of JEOL 100CXII TEM Figure 1: Detail of JEOL 100CXII TEM. Click on image to view larger image.

24

Reading Comprehension - Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopes Microscopes It happened over 300 years _________ since ago before after in Holland. Anton van Leeuwenhoek (AN-tun van LAY-vun-hook) had a new microscope that he had _________ made lost previewed delivered . One day he _________ fell broke looked went through it at a drop of lake water. What he saw surprised him. The water was alive with what Leeuwenhoek called "wee beasties." The microscope made tiny organisms look 200 times _________ farther smaller darker larger than life size. Leeuwenhoek was one of the first scientists to see living things that were that _________ life small darker larger . His work was a giant _________ turtle gorilla step tower for science. Today, microscopes are much stronger. An electron microscope can make tiny organisms look 200,000 times _________ small over under life size. A few

25

On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Thermodynamic and Microscopic Reversibility Abstract. Theof the University of California. On Thermodynamic andMicroscopic Reversibility Thermodynamic reversibility The

Crooks, Gavin E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Recurrence Tracking Microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to probe nanostructures on a surface we present a microscope based on the quantum recurrence phenomena. A cloud of atoms bounces off an atomic mirror connected to a cantilever and exhibits quantum recurrences. The times at which the recurrences occur depend on the initial height of the bouncing atoms above the atomic mirror, and vary following the structures on the surface under investigation. The microscope has inherent advantages over existing techniques of scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. Presently available experimental technology makes it possible to develop the device in the laboratory.

Farhan Saif

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Microscopes - Teacher Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards of Learning Download this Activity Background: With the invention of the microscope, scientist could see things they never could before. They discovered that we were...

28

Towards a Neutron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Towards a Neutron Microscope. Summary: ... The novel lens is a Wolter Optic similar in design to the telescope of the CHANDRA x-ray observatory. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microscopic Properties of Horizons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that all horizons of spacetime, no matter whether they are black hole, Rindler or de Sitter horizons, have certain microscopic properties in common. We propose that these propertues may be used as the starting points, or postulates, of a microscopic theory of gravity.

Jarmo Makela

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments, an American-European team, led by researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, first developed and then applied coherent x-ray speckle metrology to microscopic magnetic domains in a series of thin multilayer perpendicular magnetic materials of varying disorder. Their results, at odds with all previous theories, have set a new reference point for future theories.

31

Microscope collision protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments, an American-European team, led by researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, first developed and then applied coherent x-ray speckle metrology to microscopic magnetic domains in a series of thin multilayer perpendicular magnetic materials of varying disorder. Their results, at odds with all previous theories, have set a new reference point for future theories.

34

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print Disorder-Induced Microscopic Magnetic Memory Print The magnetic-recording industry deliberately introduces carefully controlled disorder into its materials to obtain the desired magnetic properties. But as the density of magnetic disks climbs, the size of the magnetic domains responsible for storage must decrease, posing new challenges. Beautiful theories based on random microscopic disorder have been developed over the past ten years. To directly compare these theories with precise experiments, an American-European team, led by researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, first developed and then applied coherent x-ray speckle metrology to microscopic magnetic domains in a series of thin multilayer perpendicular magnetic materials of varying disorder. Their results, at odds with all previous theories, have set a new reference point for future theories.

35

ALSNews Vol. 284  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Register Now for the 2008 Beam Instrumentation Workshop Operations...

36

Soft x-ray laser microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

Suckewer, P.I.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ion photon emission microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Scanning Confocal Electron Microscope (SCEM)  

Transmission/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope. The SCEM enables imaging of sub-surface structures of thick, optically opaque materials, ...

39

Aberration Corrected Analytical Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), where ... the beam electrons as they ... filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

Young, I.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, Ian T. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transmission electron microscope CCD camera  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

Downing, Kenneth H. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ScanningTransmission Electron Microscopes Nion UltraSTEM 60-100 dedicated aberration-corrected STEM for low- to mid-voltage operation and Enfina EELS Contact: Juan-Carlos Idrobo,...

44

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

45

On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility  

SciTech Connect

The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

Crooks, Gavin E.

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

Olson, D.M.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reading Comprehension - Dissecting and Compound Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light

48

Microscope and method of use  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

Bongianni, Wayne L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The History of the Microscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Microscope the Microscope Nature Bulletin No. 506 November 9, 1957 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE HISTORY OF THE MICROSCOPE During that historic period known as the Renaissance, after the "dark" Middle Ages, there occurred the inventions of printing, gunpowder and the mariner's compass, followed by the discovery of America. Equally remarkable was the invention of the microscope: an instrument that enables the human eye, by means of a lens or combinations of lenses, to observe enlarged images of tiny objects. It made visible the fascinating details of worlds within worlds. Long before, in the hazy unrecorded past, someone picked up a piece of transparent crystal thicker in the middle than at the edges, looked through it, and discovered that it made things look larger. Someone also found that such a crystal would focus the sun's rays and set fire to a piece of parchment or cloth. Magnifiers and "burning glasses" are mentioned in the writings of Seneca and Pliny the Elder, Roman philosophers during the first century A. D., but apparently they were not used much until the invention of spectacles, toward the end of the 13th century. They were named lenses because they are shaped like the seeds of a lentil.

50

Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

Suckewer, P.I.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Overview of Electron Microscope Interference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power frequency magnetic fields can interfere with proper operation of electronic imaging systems. Electron microscopes are susceptible to deflection of their electron beam by an external magnetic field. This unwanted deflection can cause blurring of the image. MRI equipment is susceptible to induced voltage in the sensing coil caused by changing magnetic fields. In either case the result is degradation of the image. Magnetic field strengths that impact the images are on the same order of magnitude as th...

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Solid-state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, I.T.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

Davis, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Available Technologies: Transmission Electron Microscope Phase ...  

Robert Glaeser and Jian Jin have developed an apparatus that can be integrated into transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to enable high contrast imaging of weak ...

56

NIST's New Scanning Probe Microscope is Supercool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The microscope is mounted on a 6-ton granite table (4), also supported by pneumatic isolators. The cryostat (5) is mounted ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope Technology available for licensing: Steradian X-ray detection system increases the detection capability of SEMs during...

58

NIST Physicists 'Entangle' Microscopic Drum's Beat with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... entangled a microscopic mechanical drum with electrical signals ... Entanglement has technological uses. ... cooled" the drum to a very low energy level ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Scanning x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning x-ray microscope is described including: an x-ray source capable of emitting a beam of x-rays; a collimator positioned to receive the beam of x-rays and to collimate this beam, a focusing cone means to focus the beam of x-rays, directed by the collimator, onto a focal plane, a specimen mount for supporting a specimen in the focal plane to receive the focused beam of x-rays, and x-ray beam scanning means to relatively move the specimen and the focusing cone means and collimator to scan the focused x-ray beam across the specimen. A detector is disposed adjacent the specimen to detect flourescent photons emitted by the specimen upon exposure to the focused beam of x-rays to provide an electrical output representative of this detection. Means are included for displaying and/or recording the information provided by the output from the detector, as are means for providing information to the recording and/or display means representative of the scan rate and position of the focused x-ray beam relative to the specimen whereby the recording and/or display means can correlate the information received to record and/or display quantitive and distributive information as to the quantity and distribution of elements detected in the specimen. Preferably there is provided an x-ray beam modulation means upstream, relative to the direction of emission of the xray beam, of the focusing cone means.

Wang, C.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

60

Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1-50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

Rau, E. I. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Orlikovskiy, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical Technological Institute (Russian Federation); Ivanova, E. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laser Scanning Two Photon and Confocal Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SP5 is a laser scanning two-photon and confocal microscope equipped with ... nm HeNe, and tunable IR (680 nm - 1060 nm) lasers * 4 internal ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I The TEAM I microscope is a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEMTEM) capable of producing images with 50 pm resolution. The basic...

63

The TEAM Project: What is the TEAM microscope?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the TEAM microscope? The TEAM project will construct a new generation electron microscope designed to incorporate aberration-correcting electron optics, to develop a common...

64

NIST Studies How New Helium Ion Microscope Measures Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are studying helium ion microscopes to improve ... analogous to the scanning electron microscope, which was ... are far larger than electrons, they can ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Instrument Series: Microscopy Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Transmission Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) provides in situ capabilities that enable atomic-resolution imaging and spectroscopic studies of materials under dynamic operating conditions. In contrast to traditional operation of TEM under high vacuum, EMSL's ETEM uniquely allows imaging within high- temperature and gas environments-with a gas pressure up to 20 Torr. With a spherical aberration corrector for the objective lens, the ETEM captures atomic-level processes as they occur, enabling vital research across a range of scientific fields. Research Applications Chemical science and engineering - providing in situ observation of catalytic processes with atomic-level resolution Materials science and engineering - allowing

66

Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA); Batson, Phillip J. (Alameda, CA); Denham, Paul E. (Crockett, CA); Jones, Michael S. (San Francisco, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Microscopic Probes of High-Temperature Superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granularity of the cuprate superconductors limits the effectiveness of many experimental probes that average over volumes containing many atoms. This report presents theoretical studies on muon spin relaxation and positron annihilation, two microscopic experimental techniques that can probe the properties of both high- and low-temperature superconductors on the atomic scale.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OM The One-Angstrom Microscope (OM) is a mid-voltage transmission electron microscope (TEM) capable of producing images with sub-angstrom resolution. The basic instrument is a...

74

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, Prof. Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moore, Tom [OmniProbe, Inc.; Magel, Greg [OmniProbe, Inc.; Hartfield, Cheryl [OmniProbe, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Microscopic Calculation of Fission Fragment Energies for the 239Pu(nth,f) Reaction  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total kinetic and excitation energies of fragments produced in the thermal-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu. This result is a proof-of-principle demonstration for a microscopic approach to the calculation of fission-fragment observables for applied data needs. In addition, the calculations highlight the application of a fully quantum mechanical description of scission, and the importance of exploring scission configurations as a function of the moments of the fragments, rather than through global constraints on the moments of the fissioning nucleus. Using a static microscopic calculation of configurations at and near scission, we have identified fission fragments for the {sup 239}Pu (n{sub th}, f) reaction and extracted their total kinetic and excitation energies. Comparison with data shows very good overall agreement between theory and experiment. Beyond their success as a proof of principle, these calculations also highlight the importance of local constraints on the fragments themselves in microscopic calculations.

Younes, W; Gogny, D

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

Scanning tip microwave near field microscope  

SciTech Connect

A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an endwall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Alameda, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Wei, Tao (Albany, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. (Palo Alto, CA); Parent, Philippe (Chilly-Mazarin, FR); Reinholdtsen, Paul A. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Microscopic Derivation of an Isothermal Thermodynamic Transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain macroscopic isothermal thermodynamic transformations by space-time scalings of a microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics in contact with a heat bath. The microscopic dynamics is given by a chain of anharmonic oscillators subject to a varying tension (external force) and the contact with the heat bath is modeled by independent Langevin dynamics acting on each particle. After a diffusive space-time scaling and cross-graining, the profile of volume converges to the solution of a deterministic diffusive equation with boundary conditions given by the applied tension. This defines an irreversible thermodynamic transformation from an initial equilibrium to a new equilibrium given by the final tension applied. Quasi static reversible isothermal transformations are then obtained by a further time scaling. Heat is defined as the total flux of energy exchanged between the system and the heat bath. Then we prove that the relation between the limit heat, work, free energy and thermodynamic entropy agree with the first and second principle of thermodynamics.

Stefano Olla

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wolter-like high resolution x-ray imaging microscope for Rayleigh Taylor instabilities studies  

SciTech Connect

In the context of the inertial confinement fusion, experiments have been carried out on the Phebus laser facility to study the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) at the ablation front. Premodulated brominated plastic targets (25 {mu}m thick) with a modulation wavelength between 12 and 50 {mu}m were accelerated with a temporally shaped soft x-ray pulse emitted from a hohlraum with a maximum radiation temperature of about 115 eV. The RTI growth was measured by face-on radiography using a microscope coupled with an x-ray streak camera, which has spatial and temporal resolutions of about 5 {mu}m and 50 ps, respectively. The acceleration was derived from side-on velocity measurements. The microscope we have developed is a Wolter-like microscope which consists of two toroiedal mirrors. We will present the experimental and theoretical potentialities of this microscope: characterization with an x-ray generator and plasma laser x-ray source (Phebus facility) for two-dimensional (2D) and 1D time-resolved imaging studies. Spatial resolution of about 4 {mu}m was achieved in the 1-5 keV range. The Wolter-like constitutes an interesting device for laser plasma diagnostics and will be very useful in the Laser Megajoules experiments conducted with more powerful lasers.

Troussel, Ph.; Meyer, B.; Reverdin, R.; Angelier, B.; Lidove, G.; Salvatore, P.; Richard, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DAM-Ile de France, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-les-Chatel (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay 91191 (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CESTA, BP2, 33114 Le Barp (France)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program  

SciTech Connect

This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV--0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MegaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of {approx}80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 {mu}m over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 {mu}m resolution over an 800-{mu}m-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 {mu}m over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

Rosch, R.; Boutin, J. Y.; Le Breton, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Soullie, G.; Lidove, G.; Maroni, R. [CEA/DIF, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss possible avenues to study fission dynamics starting from a time-dependent mean-field approach. Previous attempts to study fission dynamics using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory are analyzed. We argue that different initial conditions may be needed to describe fission dynamics depending on the specifics of the fission phenomenon and propose various approaches towards this goal. In particular, we provide preliminary calculations for studying fission following a heavy-ion reaction using TDHF with a density contraint. Regarding prompt muon-induced fission, we also suggest a new approach for combining the time-evolution of the muonic wave function with a microscopic treatment of fission dynamics via TDHF.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemical Power for Microscopic Robots in Capillaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power available to microscopic robots (nanorobots) that oxidize bloodstream glucose while aggregated in circumferential rings on capillary walls is evaluated with a numerical model using axial symmetry and time-averaged release of oxygen from passing red blood cells. Robots about one micron in size can produce up to several tens of picowatts, in steady-state, if they fully use oxygen reaching their surface from the blood plasma. Robots with pumps and tanks for onboard oxygen storage could collect oxygen to support burst power demands two to three orders of magnitude larger. We evaluate effects of oxygen depletion and local heating on surrounding tissue. These results give the power constraints when robots rely entirely on ambient available oxygen and identify aspects of the robot design significantly affecting available power. More generally, our numerical model provides an approach to evaluating robot design choices for nanomedicine treatments in and near capillaries.

Hogg, Tad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Long working distance incoherent interference microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A full-field imaging, long working distance, incoherent interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. A long working distance greater than 10 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-dimensional height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer while being actively probed, and, optionally, through a transparent window. An optically identical pair of sample and reference arm objectives is not required, which reduces the overall system cost, and also the cost and time required to change sample magnifications. Using a LED source, high magnification (e.g., 50.times.) can be obtained having excellent image quality, straight fringes, and high fringe contrast.

Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); De Boer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Inelastic X-ray Scattering Reveals Microscopic Transport Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inelastic X-ray Scattering Reveals Microscopic Transport Properties of Molten Aluminum Oxide The transport properties of high-temperature oxide melts are of considerable interest...

87

Scanning Electron Microscope 1: Zeiss Ultra-60 FESEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scanning Electron Microscope 1: Zeiss Ultra-60 FESEM. ... Secondary and backscattered electron detectors; Images structures down to 10 nm in size; ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

The TEAM Project: Who is building the TEAM microscope?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who is building the TEAM microscope? Led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National Center for Electron Microscopy, TEAM is an intensive collaborative project with...

89

Shear Viscosity Coefficient from Microscopic Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport coefficient of shear viscosity is studied for a hadron matter through microscopic transport model, the Ultra--relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD), using the Green--Kubo formulas. Molecular--dynamical simulations are performed for a system of light mesons in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Starting from an initial state composed of $\\pi, \\eta ,\\omega ,\\rho ,\\phi$ with a uniform phase--space distribution, the evolution takes place through elastic collisions, production and annihilation. The system approaches a stationary state of mesons and their resonances, which is characterized by common temperature. After equilibration, thermodynamic quantities such as the energy density, particle density, and pressure are calculated. From such an equilibrated state the shear viscosity coefficient is calculated from the fluctuations of stress tensor around equilibrium using Green--Kubo relations. We do our simulations here at zero net baryon density so that the equilibration times depend on the energy density. We do not include hadron strings as degrees of freedom so as to maintain detailed balance. Hence we do not get the saturation of temperature but this leads to longer equilibration times.

Azwinndini Muronga

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms Ralph C. Smith and Andrew G. Hatch of the Philippines Virginia Commonwealth University Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Richmond VA 23284 rcdelros titanate (PZT) devices employed in atomic force microscope stage mechanisms. We focus specifically on PZT

91

Microscopic track structure of equal-LET heavy ions  

SciTech Connect

The spatial distributions of ionization and energy deposition produced by heavy (HZE) ions are crucial to an understanding of their radiation quality as exhibited eg., in track segment experiments of cell survival and chromosome aberrations of mammalian cells. The stopping power (or LET) of a high velocity ion is proportional to the ratio Z**2/v**2, apart from a slowly varying logarithmic factor. The maximum delta-ray energy that an ion can produce is proportional to v**2 (non-relativistically). Therefore, two HZE ions having the same LET, but in general differing Z and v will have different maximum delta-ray energies and consequently will produce different spatial patterns of energy deposition along their paths. To begin to explore the implications of this fact for the microscopic dosimetry of heavy ions, we have calculated radial distributions in energy imparted and ionization for iron and neon ions of approximately equal LET in order to make a direct comparison of their delta-ray track structure. Monte Carlo techniques are used for the charged particle radiation transport simulation. 10 refs., 8 figs.

Wilson, W.E.; Criswell, T.L.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

Zaluzec, Nestor J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.5 0.5 The TEAM 0.5 microscope is a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEM/TEM) capable of producing images with 50 pm resolution. The basic instrument is a modified FEI Titan 80-300 microscope equipped with a special high-brightness Schottky-field emission electron source, a gun monochromator, a high-resolution GIF Tridiem energy-filter, and two CEOS hexapole-type spherical aberration correctors. The illumination aberration corrector corrects coherent axial aberrations up to 4th order, as well as 5th order spherical aberration and six-fold astigmatism. The imaging aberration corrector fully corrects for coherent axial aberrations up to 3rd order and partially compensates for 4th and 5th order aberrations. The microscope has two 2048x2048 slow-scan CCD

94

Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for both production staff who need advice on specific problems and development personnel who seek directions. Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition Methods and Analyses Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound Books Methods - An

95

Geometry-driven visualization of microscopic structures in biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a microscopic resolution, biological structures are composed of cells, red blood corpuscles (RBCs), cytoplasm and other microstructural components. There is a natural pattern in terms of distribution, arrangement and packing density of these components ...

Kishore Mosaliganti; Raghu Machiraju; Kun Huang; Gustavo Leone

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Simulation and characterization of a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mini-SEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), and the ...

Jessica. A. Gaskin; Gregory A. Jerman; Stephanie Medley; Don Gregory; Terry O. Abbott; Allen R. Sampson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High resolution x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I. [Adelphi Technology, Inc. 981-B Industrial Road, San Carlos, California 94070 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Kurchatova 7, Minsk 220064 (Belarus)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Getting the Point: Real-Time Monitoring of Atomic-Microscope ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... done with atomic force microscopy (AFM). ... small scales, so researchers use atomic force microscopes. ... of the tip with an electron microscope, a time ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

Peterson, Randolph S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the South, 735 University Avenue, Sewanee TN 37383 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States); Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

Mathies, Richard A. (Contra Costa, CA); Peck, Konan (Contra Costa, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscope Driving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscope Driving Tests 3010 test.pdf CM 200 test.pdf CM 300 test.pdf Libra test.pdf FIB test.pdf Tecnai test.pdf TEAM 0.5 test.pdf TEAM I test.pdf...

102

Malaria Parasite Detection: Automated Method Using Microscope Color Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthcare Delivery Systems are becoming overloaded in developing countries like India and China. It is imperative that more efficient and cost effective processes are employed. One such requirement is the automatic detection of malaria parasites in ... Keywords: Hue-Saturation-Intensity-Histogram, Image Segmentation, Malaria Parasites, Microscopic Image Analysis, ROI

Anant R. Koppar; Venugopalachar Sridhar

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dynamic microscopic theory of fusion using DC-TDHF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) theory is a fully microscopic approach for calculating heavy-ion interaction potentials and fusion cross sections below and above the fusion barrier. We discuss recent applications of DC-TDHF method to fusion of light and heavy systems.

Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Keser, R.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); RTE University, Science and Arts Faculty, Department of Physics, 53100, Rize (Turkey); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Universitat Erlangen, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Microscopic Calculation of Fusion: Light to Heavy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) theory is a fully microscopic approach for calculating heavy-ion interaction potentials and fusion cross sections below and above the fusion barrier. We discuss recent applications of DC-TDHF method to fusion of light and heavy neutron-rich systems.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; R. Keser

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIBRA LIBRA The 200kV Zeiss monochromated LIBRA 200MC is designed to produce high contrast imaging for TEM and STEM and either convergent beam or parallel beam diffraction using Koehler illumination.In addition, the incorporation of a monochromator into the field emission gun enables energy resolution of ~0.15eV for electron energy loss spectroscopy. The dedicated in-column Omega Filter implemented in this microscope also can be used for both spectroscopic analysis and energy-filtered imaging with a 2048x2048 CCD camera. The high tilt capability of the stage and pole piece accepts various types of analytical holders.This microscope is optimized for soft materials applications that require either the high contrast imaging performance or analytical methods such as EF-TEM and STEM.( Instrument

106

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEM AEM AEME The Analytical Electron Microscope is optimized for elemental microanalysis. The basic instrument is a JEOL 200CX microscope with a side-entry double-tilt goniometer stage and an assortment of specimen holders. This machine can be operated at between 80 and 200 kV in the TEM or STEM mode. Electron energy loss and x-ray signals for elemental microanalysis or spectral imaging can be collected either separately or simultaneously using probe diameters from 6nm to 100nm. Diffraction modes include convergent beam diffraction for three-dimensional structure information and micro-diffraction with a minimum probe size of 20nm. For updates or details, contact Zonghoon Lee or Velimir Radmilovic. The instrument is equipped with two Kevex EDXS detectors and a Gatan PEELS

107

Measurement of Semiconductor Surface Potential using the Scanning Electron Microscope  

SciTech Connect

We calibrate the secondary electron signal from a standard scanning electron microscope to voltage, yielding an image of the surface or near-surface potential. Data on both atomically abrupt heterojunction GaInP/GaAs and diffused homojunction Si solar cell devices clearly show the expected variation in potential with position and applied bias, giving depletion widths and locating metallurgical junctions to an accuracy better than 10 nm. In some images, distortion near the p-n junction is observed, seemingly consistent with the effects of lateral electric fields (patch fields). Reducing the tube bias removes this distortion. This approach results in rapid and straightforward collection of near-surface potential data using a standard scanning electron microscope.

Heath, J. T.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regular Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tips can be Intrinsically Chiral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our discovery that regular scanning tunneling microscope tips can themselves be chiral. This chirality leads to differences in electron tunneling efficiencies through left- and right-handed molecules, and, when using the tip to electrically excite molecular rotation, large differences in rotation rate were observed which correlated with molecular chirality. As scanning tunneling microscopy is a widely used technique, this result may have unforeseen consequences for the measurement of asymmetric surface phenomena in a variety of important fields.

Tierney, Heather L.; Murphy, Colin J.; Sykes, E. Charles H. [Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155-5813 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

In-situ monitoring of electron beam induced deposition by atomic force microscopy in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of atomic force microscope is proposed for atomic force microscopic analysis inside a scanning electron microscope. We attached a piezoresisitive atomic force microscopic cantilever to a micro manipulator to achieve a compact and guidable ... Keywords: atomic force, electron beam induced deposition, in-situ monitoring, local gas injection, micro manipulator, microscope

S. Bauerdick; C. Burkhardt; R. Rudorf; W. Barth; V. Bucher; W. Nisch

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p {<=}10{sup -10} mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Search for microscopic black holes in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for microscopic black holes and string balls is presented, based on a data sample of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12 inverse femtobarns. No excess of events with energetic multiparticle final states, typical of black hole production or of similar new physics processes, is observed. Given the agreement of the observations with the expected standard model background, which is dominated by QCD multijet production, 95% confidence limits are set on the production of semiclassical or quantum black holes, or of string balls, corresponding to the exclusions of masses below 4.3 to 6.2 TeV, depending on model assumptions. In addition, model-independent limits are set on new physics processes resulting in energetic multiparticle final states.

CMS Collaboration

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Underwater microscope for measuring spatial and temporal changes in bed-sediment grain size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater microscope for measuring spatial and temporal changes in bed-sediment grain size David M by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Underwater microscope; Bed sediment; Grain size; In situ measurement; Colorado counts on a small subset of processed images. 2.3. Underwater microscope hardware Digital images of bed

113

Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specimen Preparation Specimen Preparation Preparation of samples with large transparent areas and flat surfaces is a key element of electron microscopy. In particular, the interpretation of lattice or holographic images is often limited by the sample's geometry and surface roughness. These parameters are largely determined by a particular sample preparation procedure. The increasing demand for microscopes with a spatial resolution of better than 1Å increases the need for improved sample preparation techniques. A substantial effort at NCEM is devoted to the development of reliable and specialized thinning techniques. Current programs explore the application of chemicals to shape the surfaces of thin films, the use of nanospheres for observation of small particles, and the

116

Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Gao, Chen (Anhui, CN); Duewer, Fred (Albany, CA); Yang, Hai Tao (Albany, CA); Lu, Yalin (Chelmsford, MA)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

Barnes, Alan V. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Thomas (San Francisco, CA); Hamza, Alex V. (Livermore, CA); Schneider, Dieter H. (Livermore, CA); Doyle, Barney (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

Milas, Mirko (Port Jefferson, NY); Zhu, Yimei (Stony Brook, NY); Rameau, Jonathan David (Coram, NY)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A millikelvin scanning tunneling microscope with two independent scanning systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the design, construction and operation of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two tips that can independently acquire simultaneous scans of a sample. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and the setup includes vibration isolation, rf-filtered wiring, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) sample preparation chamber and sample transfer mechanism. We present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 $\\mu$eV. Atomic resolution topographic images of an Au(100) surface taken with the inner and outer tips were found to have root mean square roughness of 1.75 $\\pm$ 0.01 pm and 3.55 $\\pm$ 0.03 pm respectively.

Roychowdhury, A; Anderson, J R; Lobb, C J; Wellstood, F C; Dreyer, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

Hansen, L.F.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microscopic Study on the Interface Reaction between Ti and Al-Zn ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Microscopic Study on the Interface Reaction between Ti and Al -Zn Alloy during Ultra-Fast Heat Treatment. Author(s), Yue Zhao, David Nolan,...

124

MICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL ANGULAR MOMENTA FOR EXCITED HEAVY NUCLEAR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics and Chemistry of Fission, Vienna 1969 (IAEA, ViennaDeformation energies along the fission path plotted againstMICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL

Diebel, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Microscopic Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particle Aging in the Outflow from Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest National Laboratory. PNNL is operated by the U.S.Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Detailed experimentalelectron microscope at EMSL/PNNL was used for computer

Moffet, R. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

TRIO experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically-resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of perform...

Misra, Shashank; Drozdov, Ilya K; Seo, Jungpil; Gyenis, Andras; Kingsley, Simon C J; Jones, Howard; Yazdani, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microscopic scattering theory for interacting bosons in weak random potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a diagrammatic scattering theory for interacting bosons in a three-dimensional, weakly disordered potential. Based on a microscopic N-body scattering theory, we identify the relevant diagrams including elastic and inelastic collision processes that are sufficient to describe diffusive quantum transport. By taking advantage of the statistical properties of the weak disorder potential, we demonstrate how the N-body dynamics can be reduced to a nonlinear integral equation of Boltzmann type for the single-particle diffusive flux. Our theory reduces to the Gross-Pitaevskii mean field description in the limit where only elastic collisions are taken into account. However, even at weak interaction strength, inelastic collisions lead to energy redistribution between the bosons - initially prepared all at the same single-particle energy - and thereby induce thermalization of the single-particle current. In addition, we include also weak localization effects and determine the coherent corrections to the incoherent transport in terms of the coherent backscattering signal. We find that inelastic collisions lead to an enhancement of the backscattered cone in a narrow spectral window for increasing interaction strength.

Tobias Geiger; Andreas Buchleitner; Thomas Wellens

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Braking system for use with an arbor of a microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling device causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, Duane U. (Orinda, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Towards a Microscopic Reaction Description Based on Energy Density Functionals  

SciTech Connect

A microscopic calculation of reaction cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all particle-hole excitations in the target and one-nucleon pickup channels. The particle-hole states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and subsequently to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. Target excitations for {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 90}Zr and {sup 144}Sm were described in a random-phase framework using a Skyrme functional. Reaction cross sections obtained agree very well with experimental data and predictions of a state-of-the-art fitted optical potential. Couplings between inelastic states were found to be negligible, while the pickup channels contribute significantly. The effect of resonances from higher-order channels was assessed. Elastic angular distributions were also calculated within the same method, achieving good agreement with experimental data. For the first time observed absorptions are completely accounted for by explicit channel coupling, for incident energies between 10 and 70 MeV, with consistent angular distribution results.

Nobre, G A; DIetrich, F S; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J; Dupuis, M; Terasaki, J; Engel, J

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Microscopic Approach to Nuclear Matter and Neutron Star Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review a variety of theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at improving our knowledge of the nuclear matter equation of state. Of particular interest are nuclear matter extreme states in terms of density and/or isospin asymmetry. The equation of state of matter with unequal concentrations of protons and neutrons has numerous applications. These include heavy-ion collisions, the physics of rare, short-lived nuclei and, on a dramatically different scale, the physics of neutron stars. The "common denominator" among these (seemingly) very different systems is the symmetry energy, which plays a crucial role in both the formation of the neutron skin in neutron-rich nuclei and the radius of a neutron star (a system 18 orders of magnitude larger and 55 orders of magnitude heavier). The details of the density dependence of the symmetry energy are not yet sufficiently constrained. Throughout this article, our emphasis will be on the importance of adopting a microscopic approach to the many-body problem, which we believe to be the one with true predictive power.

Francesca Sammarruca

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Towards a quantum gas microscope for fermionic atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the achievement of a two-species apparatus for use in an upcoming experiment with fermionic ultracold atomic gases. First, we describe the construction of a laser system capable of cooling and trapping ...

Ramasesh, Vinay (Vinay V.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Biological applications of an LCoS-BASED PROGRAMMABLE ARRAY MICROSCOPE (PAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescence microscope (PAM) for rapid, light efficient 3D imaging of living specimens. The stand-alone module fluorescence microscope. The prototype system currently operated at the Max Planck Institute incorporates a 6-position high-intensity LED illuminator, modulated laser and lamp light sources, and an Andor iXon em

Rieger, Bernd

135

Approved Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle 31OCT97 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 666 Clark Magnetic Rotation in 104Sn 5 667 Janssens Unsafe COULEX of the 240Pu Nucleus 3 670 Smith Exotic Structures in very...

136

X-ray holographic microscopy using the atomic-force microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present authors have been seeking for some time to improve the resolution of holographic microscopy and have engaged in a continuing series of experiments using the X1A soft x-ray undulator beam line at Brookhaven. The principle strategy for pushing the resolution lower in these experiments has been the use of polymer resists as x-ray detectors and the primary goal has been to develop the technique to become useful for examining wet biological material. In the present paper the authors report on progress in the use of resist for high-spatial-resolution x-ray detection. This is the key step in in-line holography and the one which sets the ultimate limit to the image resolution. The actual recording has always been quite easy, given a high-brightness undulator source, but the difficult step was the readout of the recorded pattern. The authors describe in what follows how they have built a special instrument: an atomic force microscope (AFM) to read holograms recorded in resist. They report the technical reasons for building, rather than buying, such an instrument and they give details of the design and performance of the device. The authors also describe the first attempts to use the system for real holography and the authors show results of both recorded holograms and the corresponding reconstructed images. Finally, the authors try to analyze the effect that these advances are likely to have on the future prospects for success in applications of x-ray holography and the degree to which the other technical systems that are needed for such success are available or within reach.

Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jacobsen, C.J.; Lindaas, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microscopic Dynamics in Non-Simple Liquid Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our recent inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments on several non-simple liquid metals have revealed characteristic common features in the collective dynamics. 1) Clear indications for propagating phonon modes were found as in simple liquid metals as liquid alkalis. 2) They exhibit a positive dispersion of about 20 % (except in liquid Ge) again as in liquid simple metals. 3) A very short time (sub-picosecond) retaining of the nearest-neighbor correlation is visualized by a Gaussian component in the quasielastic line shape, which may be related to short living covalent species. In this paper, we review the IXS experiment on liquid Si as a typical non-simple liquid metal, and discuss its dynamic properties in connection with results of an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation.

Hosokawa, S.; Pilgrim, W.-C. [Institut fuer Physikalische-, Kern-, und Makromolekulare Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany)

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

SANE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds. Some...

140

Geek-Up[6.3.2011]: Inked PV, Diagnostic Tools and Tough Microscopes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.2011]: Inked PV, Diagnostic Tools and Tough Microscopes 3.2011]: Inked PV, Diagnostic Tools and Tough Microscopes Geek-Up[6.3.2011]: Inked PV, Diagnostic Tools and Tough Microscopes June 3, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis Novartis Diagnostics scientist Cleo Salisbury and Biological Nanostructures Facility director Ron Zuckermann discuss their collaboration to discover new therapies for Alzheimer's. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Researchers have developed new inorganic nanocrystal arrays created by spraying a new type of colloidal "ink." Scientists have engineered a technique to help doctors identify Alzheimer's in its early stages and discover new therapies for this disease. Scientists have developed a new type of atomic force microscope that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.3.2 and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds....

142

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Or

143

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of

144

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of A

145

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

146

Telecontrol of Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscope over Global IPv6 Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Osaka University has an Ultra-High VoltageElectron Microscope (UHVEM) which can provide highquality specimen images for worldwide researchers. Forusability improvements, we have worked on thetelecontrol of the UHVEM. In this paper, we would liketo introduce ...

Toyokazu Akiyama; Shinji Shimojo; Shojiro Nishio; Yoshinori Kitatsuji; Steven Peltier; Thomas Hutton; Fang-Pang Lin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Progress on PEEM3 - An Aberration Corrected X-Ray Photoemission Electron Microscope at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron Microscope at the ALS A.A.MacDowell 1 , J.Feng 1 ,the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combinedat the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This limit is due to the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Study on Carbon-Nanotube Local Oxidation Lithography Using an Atomic Force Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, nanoscale anodic oxidation lithography using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is systematically studied on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Trends between the produced feature size and the corresponding process parameters, such as applied voltage, ...

K. Kumar; O. Sul; S. Strauf; D. S. Choi; F. Fisher; M. G. Prasad; E. Yang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of

150

Perturbation theory of solid-liquid interfacial free energies of bcc metals  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two subwavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths.The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Youngs experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3010 In-Situ 3010 In-Situ AEME The 300 kV JEOL 3010 offers greater specimen penetration than 200kV instruments, with significantly improved spatial resolution and probe forming capabilities. The side-entry stage allows ±45° tilt and can be operated with piezo-drift compensation. A flexible condenser system permits CBED, LACBED, and imaging with hollow cone and Koehler illumination. In addition to a standard film camera, a Gatan Orius CCD, and a Gatan 622 intensified TV camera and VCR are available for recording experiments at video rates. Specific capabilities include: high-resolution imaging at 2.1Å and ±40° tilt during simultaneous heating; very-high-resolution imaging at 1.7 Å and ±10° tilt during simultaneous heating; and high magnification Lorentz and Foucault imaging of magnetic samples. Various

152

Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ellipsoidal and parabolic glass capillaries as condensers for x-ray microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-bounce ellipsoidal and paraboloidal glass capillary focusing optics have been fabricated for use as condenser lenses for both synchrotron and tabletop x-ray microscopes in the x-ray energy range of 2.5-18 keV. The condenser numerical apertures (NAs) of these devices are designed to match the NA of x-ray zone plate objectives, which gives them a great advantage over zone plate condensers in laboratory microscopes. The fabricated condensers have slope errors as low as 20 {mu}rad rms. These capillaries provide a uniform hollow-cone illumination with almost full focusing efficiency, which is much higher than what is available with zone plate condensers. Sub-50 nm resolution at 8 keV x-ray energy was achieved by utilizing this high-efficiency condenser in a laboratory microscope based on a rotating anode generator.

Zeng Xianghui; Duewer, Fred; Feser, Michael; Huang, Carson; Lyon, Alan; Tkachuk, Andrei; Yun Wenbing

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Quantitative Nanostructure Characterization Using Atomic Pair Distribution Functions Obtained From Laboratory Electron Microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitatively reliable atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) have been obtained from nanomaterials in a straightforward way from a standard laboratory transmission electron microscope (TEM). The approach looks very promising for making electron derived PDFs (ePDFs) a routine step in the characterization of nanomaterials because of the ubiquity of such TEMs in chemistry and materials laboratories. No special attachments such as energy filters were required on the microscope. The methodology for obtaining the ePDFs is described as well as some opportunities and limitations of the method.

Abeykoon M.; Billinge S.; Malliakas, C.D.; Juhas, P.; Bozin, E.S.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Whole-Cell Sensing for a Harmful Bloom-Forming Microscopic Alga by Measuring Antibody-Antigen Forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fawley, Diversity of coccoid algae in shallow lakes duringof small coccoid green algae from Lake Itasca, Minnesota,BLOOM-FORMING MICROSCOPIC ALGA BY MEASURING ANTIBODY

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the oceanic food web the surface, corals and other deepwater OIL AND HUMAN USE Wellhead CORALS · Coral surveys · Tissue collections · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment sampling AQUATIC VEGETATION

157

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

158

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 6C2FB81BF33EA47CEF1B98AD0BE2A9CB Press Downloadable pdf...

159

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 8C45832E2AA310DD11A6FEA4BDB93C6B Press Downloadable pdf...

160

Thin-film thickness measurement using x-ray peak ratioing in the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure used to measure laser target film thickness using a scanning electron microscope is summarized. This method is generally applicable to any coating on any substrate as long as the electron energy is sufficient to penetrate the coating and the substrate produces an x-ray signal which can pass back through the coating and be detected. (MOW)

Elliott, N.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Archuleta, T.A.; Stupin, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Researches of Microscopic Image Segmentation and Recognition on the Cancer Cells Fallen into Peritoneal Effusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Auto-segmentation of cell is one of the most interesting segmentation problems due to the complex nature of the cell tissues and to the inherent problems of video microscopic image. Objects, which are variant, narrow range of gray levels, non-random ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, computer-aided diagnosis, cell image segmentation, cell image recognition, peritoneal effusion

Hongyuan Wang; Shenggen Zeng; Chengang Yu; Xiaogang Wang; Deshen Xia

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples  

SciTech Connect

Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Performance Evaluation of Adaptive Ramp-Metering Algorithms Using Microscopic Traffic Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Evaluation of Adaptive Ramp-Metering Algorithms Using Microscopic Traffic Simulation metering has undergone significant theoretical developments in recent years. However, the applicability been used in an evaluation study of three well-known adaptive ramp-metering algorithms: ALINEA, BOTTLE

Levinson, David M.

164

Polarizing Microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIKON SINGAPORE PTE LTD SINGAPORE Phone: +65-5593618 Fax: +65-5593668 NIKON MALAYSIA SDN. BHD. MALAYSIA ...

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Highly Reproducible Nanolithography by Dynamic Plough of an Atomic-Force Microscope Tip and Thermal-Annealing Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach has been developed to use atomic-force microscope (AFM) to pattern materials at the nanoscale in a controlled manner. By introducing a thermal-annealing process above the glass-transition temperature of poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), the ... Keywords: 2-D electron gas, Atomic-force microscope (AFM), nanolithography, self-switching diodes (SSDs)

Xiaofeng Lu; C. Balocco; Fuhua Yang; A. M. Song

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, cellular trafficking, bacteria taxis, fluid dynamics in microfluidics devices. The 3d position of a fluorescent particle can be determined using 2d imaging alone, by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from particles vicinity. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. Many of the algorithmic concepts introduced can be advantageous in other cases, particularly for sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. The image analysis algorithm, which is an offspring of the full 3d circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of several particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem. The current implementation is robust to ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, which allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is implemented in a microfluidics experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection.

Eldad Afik

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

The R-curve response of ceramics with microscopic reinforcements: Reinforcement and additive effects  

SciTech Connect

Using direct observations with the scanning electron and optical microscopes, simultaneous measurements of fracture resistance versus crack length (R-curve behavior) and crack interactions with microstructural features at the crack tip and in its wake were made. Selecting whisker-reinforced aluminas and self-reinforced silicon nitrides, one can examine the effects of systematic modifications of microstructure and composition on the R-curve response and the mechanisms giving rise to it. Specifically, increases in whisker content and size can increase the R-Curve response, even for short crack lengths. In the self-reinforced silicon nitrides, changes in alumina: yttria additive ratios also modify the R-curve. Modeling of the R-curve response allows one to verify toughening mechanisms and, with experimental studies, to optimize the R-curve behavior in ceramics containing microscopic reinforcements, e.g., whiskers and elongated grain structures.

Becher, P.F.; Sun, E.Y.; Plucknett, K,P.; Hsueh, C.H.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Atmospheric aerosols affect climate by scattering and absorbing sunlight and by modifying the properties of clouds. However, there are gaps in our understanding of chemical processes involving these airborne particulates, and these gaps contribute significantly to uncertainties in predicting future climate change. Developing more- accurate global climate models requires a more complete understanding of the aerosol lifecycle, from initial particle formation to loss through incorporation into precipitating clouds or dry deposition. In research published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, a team of

169

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a

170

Design of a neutron penumbral-aperture microscope with 10-. mu. m resolution  

SciTech Connect

We are currently designing a 10-{mu}m resolution neutron penumbral-aperture microscope to diagnose high-convergence targets at the Nova laser facility. To achieve such high resolution, the new microscope will require substantial improvements in three areas. First, we have designed thick penumbral apertures with extremely sharp cutoffs over a useful ({approx}100 {mu}m) field of view; fabrication of such apertures appears feasible using gold electroplating techniques. Second, the limited field of view and required close proximity of the aperture to the target (2 cm) necessitates a durable mounting and alignment system with {plus}25 {mu}m accuracy. Finally, a neutron detector containing 160,000 scintillator elements is required; readout and optimization of this large array are outstanding issues. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Lane, S.M.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microscopic description of large-amplitude shape-mixing dynamics with local QRPA inertial functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a microscopic approach to derive all the inertial functions in the five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian. Local normal modes are evaluated on the constrained mean field in the quasiparticle random-phase approximation in order to derive the inertial functions. The collective Hamiltonians for neutron-rich Mg isotopes are determined with use of this approach, and the shape coexistence/mixing around the N = 20 region is analyzed.

Hinohara, Nobuo; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microscopic description of large-amplitude shape-mixing dynamics with local QRPA inertial functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a microscopic approach to derive all the inertial functions in the five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian. Local normal modes are evaluated on the constrained mean field in the quasiparticle random-phase approximation in order to derive the inertial functions. The collective Hamiltonians for neutron-rich Mg isotopes are determined with use of this approach, and the shape coexistence/mixing around the N = 20 region is analyzed.

Hinohara, Nobuo; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nakatsukasa, Takashi [Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, Koichi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microscopic surface structure of C/SiC composite mirrors for space cryogenic telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the microscopic surface structure of carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirrors that have been improved for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and other cooled telescopes. The C/SiC composite consists of carbon fiber, silicon carbide, and residual silicon. Specific microscopic structures are found on the surface of the bare C/SiC mirrors after polishing. These structures are considered to be caused by the different hardness of those materials. The roughness obtained for the bare mirrors is 20 nm rms for flat surfaces and 100 nm rms for curved surfaces. It was confirmed that a SiSiC slurry coating is effective in reducing the roughness to 2 nm rms. The scattering properties of the mirrors were measured at room temperature and also at 95 K. No significant change was found in the scattering properties through cooling, which suggests that the microscopic surface structure is stable with changes in temperature down to cryogenic values. The C/SiC mirror with the SiSiC slurry coating is a promising candidate for the SPICA telescope.

Keigo Enya; Takao Nakagawa; Hidehiro Kaneda; Takashi Onaka; Tuyoshi Ozaki; Masami Kume

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microscopic surface structure of C/SiC composite mirrors for space cryogenic telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the microscopic surface structure of carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirrors that have been improved for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and other cooled telescopes. The C/SiC composite consists of carbon fiber, silicon carbide, and residual silicon. Specific microscopic structures are found on the surface of the bare C/SiC mirrors after polishing. These structures are considered to be caused by the different hardness of those materials. The roughness obtained for the bare mirrors is 20 nm rms for flat surfaces and 100 nm rms for curved surfaces. It was confirmed that a SiSiC slurry coating is effective in reducing the roughness to 2 nm rms. The scattering properties of the mirrors were measured at room temperature and also at 95 K. No significant change was found in the scattering properties through cooling, which suggests that the microscopic surface structure is stable with changes in temperature down to cryogenic values. The C/SiC ...

Enya, Keigo; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Ozaki, Tuyoshi; Kume, Masami

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EXPERIMENTS MODEL PK-101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Quizzes 3 Introduction to Basic Components 4 Experiment #1: The Light Bulb 8 More About Resistors 10 Detector 17 Introduction to Capacitors 18 Experiment #8: Slow Light Bulb 20 Experiment #9: Small Dominates Light Bulbs 26 Introduction to Transistors 27 Experiment #14: The Electronic Switch 28 Experiment #15

Kachroo, Pushkin

176

Operating Experience Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operating Experience Summaries The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information...

177

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Experiments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics News Image Bank Fermilab in the News Quantum Diaries In this Section: Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Experiments at the Cosmic Frontier How...

178

A versatile three-contact electrical biasing transmission electron microscope specimen holder for electron holography and electron tomography of working devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile three-contact electrical biasing transmission electron microscope specimen holder to characterize nanoscale materials and devices under operating conditions in the transmission electron microscope in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) at a spatial resolution that can approach the nanometer scale

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

179

Shocking Results from Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments  

Shocked behavior in microscopic samples can consist of the behavior of shocked explosives before chemistry begins or the high density, ...

180

Research and Design of a Sample Heater for Beam Line 6-2c Transmission X-ray Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There exists a need for environmental control of samples to be imaged by the Transmission X-Ray Microscope (TXM) at the SSRLs Beam Line 6-2c. In order to observe heat-driven chemical or morphological changes that normally occur in situ, microscopes require an additional component that effectively heats a given sample without heating any of the microscope elements. The confinement of the heat and other concerns about the heaters integrity limit which type of heater is appropriate for the TXM. The bulk of this research project entails researching different heating methods used previously in microscopes, but also in other industrial applications, with the goal of determining the best-fitting method, and finally in designing a preliminary sample heater.

Policht, Veronica; /Loyola U., Chicago /SLAC

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

182

A Remote Operation System for the 3MV Electron Microscope with a Both-Direction Conversation Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3MV ultrahigh voltage electron microscope (UHVEM) at the Research Center for UHVEM, Osaka University, has been widely used for microscopy of thick specimens, taking advantage of high penetration power of incident electrons. Recent developments in ...

Hirotaro Mori; Kiyokazu Yoshida; Shinji Shimojo; Hiroki Nogawa; Toyokazu Akiyama; Heishichiro Takahashi; Tamaki Shibayama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High Resolution Quantitative Auto-Radiography to determine microscopic distributions of B-10 in neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is heavily dependent on the microscopic distribution of B-10 in tissue. High Resolution Quantitative Auto-Radiography (HRQAR) is a potentially valuable analytical tool ...

Harris, Thomas C. (Thomas Cameron)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope at the ALS for operation up to 2500eV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Microscope at the ALS for operation up to 2500eV DavidLight Source [2]. In the new ALS facility the energy rangein the two existing STXMs at ALS and a flexible platform for

Kilcoyne, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

One more experiment on "fast-light"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary observational and theoretical studies on the temporal nature of microscopic measurements renewed the discussion about the fundamental constants, leading to the possibility of light speed variation and superluminal pulse propagation. Gain assisted experiments using anomalous dispersion near an absorption line in atomic gas, a "fast - light" medium, seem to lead to a wave group velocity vG exceeding c, the vacuum speed of light; moreover, definition of the information velocity vi sets the question of interpretation of the three speeds: one view is that vi = vG, but this violates Causality; another view is that vi = c in all situations, but this limits, a priori, the transport of information. Another view is that vi, vG and c are distinct. This contribution follows the last possibility. A draft discussion on space-time is given.

R Assumpcao

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spectro-Microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (June 27-29, 2010), when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter) increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30%) was larger than at the CARES urban site (10%) and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro-microscopic measurements will allow for a comprehensive evaluation of aerosol process models used in climate research.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Rodel, Tobias; Kelly, Stephen T.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Carroll, Gregory; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microscopic description of the odd-even effect in cold fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time dependent equations of motion for the pair breaking effect were corroborated with a condition that fixes dynamically the number of particles on the two fission fragment. The single particle level scheme was calculated with the Woods-Saxon superasymmetric two center shell model. This model provides a continuous variation of the energies from one nucleus up to two separated fragments. The dissipated energy resorts from the time dependent pairing equations. A peculiar phenomenon was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd partition yields are favored over the even ones. This odd-even effect for cold fission was explained microscopically.

M. Mirea

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evidence of microscopic effects in fragment mass distribution in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our measurements of variances ($\\sigma_{m}^2$) in mass distributions of fission fragments from fusion-fission reactions of light projectiles (C, O and F) on deformed thorium targets exhibit a sharp anomalous increase with energy near the Coulomb barrier, in contrast to the smooth variation of $\\sigma_{m}^2$ for the spherical bismuth target. This departure from expectation based on a statistical description is explained in terms of microscopic effects arising from the orientational dependence in the case of deformed thorium targets.

T. K. Ghosh; S. Pal; K. S. Gold; P. Bhattacharya

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons, simultaneously measuring the electron dosage and x-ray intensities for each sample of element to determine a "K.sub.AB " value to be used in the equation ##EQU1## where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B, and exposing the multielement sample to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

King, Wayne E. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

Crewe, Albert V. (Palos Park, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Design of a scanning gate microscope in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design.

Pelliccione, Matthew; Bartel, John; Keller, Andrew; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MICROSCOPIC METABOLISM OF CALCIUM IN BONE. III. MICRORADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OF MINERAL DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

The range of microscopic calcium densities in man and in dog does not change wiih the age of the individual. The ranges, however. are not the same in the two species. New bone mineral in the dog is formed at higher density than similar mineral in man, and highly mineralized bone in the dog is more dense than the most dense bone in man. Thus species differcnces in calcium metabolism of bone do exist and should not be overlooked in the intercomparison of the uptake and retention of the alkaline earths in mammalian skeletons. (auth)

Rowland, R.E.; Jowsey, J.; Marshall, J.H.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Quantum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime I: Microscopic Properties of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the first part in a series of two papers, where we consider a specific microscopic model of spacetime. In our model Planck size quantum black holes are taken to be the fundamental building blocks of space and time. Spacetime is assumed to be a graph, where black holes lie on the vertices. In this first paper we construct our model in details, and show how classical spacetime emerges at the long distance limit from our model. We also consider the statistics of spacetime.

Makela, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Simple Quantum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime I: Microscopic Properties of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the first part in a series of two papers, where we consider a specific microscopic model of spacetime. In our model Planck size quantum black holes are taken to be the fundamental building blocks of space and time. Spacetime is assumed to be a graph, where black holes lie on the vertices. In this first paper we construct our model in details, and show how classical spacetime emerges at the long distance limit from our model. We also consider the statistics of spacetime.

J. Makela

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction-diffusion simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is the ghost cell method (GCM). Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step $\\Delta t$ (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter $h$, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered: (i) \\Delta t approaches 0 and h is fixed; and (ii) \\Delta t approaches 0 and h approaches 0 such that \\Delta t/h^2 is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

Mark B Flegg; Stefan Hellander; Radek Erban

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microscopic models and effective equation of state in nuclear collisions at FAIR energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two microscopic models, UrQMD and QGSM, were employed to study the formation of locally equilibrated hot and dense nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions at energies from 11.6 AGeV to 160 AGeV. Analysis was performed for the fixed central cubic cell of volume V = 125 fm**3 and for the expanding cell which followed the growth of the central area with uniformly distributed energy. To decide whether or not the equilibrium was reached, results of the microscopic calculations were compared to that of the statistical thermal model. Both dynamical models indicate that the state of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium is nearly approached at any bombarding energy after a certain relaxation period. The higher the energy, the shorter the relaxation time. Equation of state has a simple linear dependence P = a(sqrt{s})*e, where a = c_s**2 is the sound velocity squared. It varies from 0.12 \\pm 0.01 at E_{lab} = 11.6 AGeV to 0.145 \\pm 0.005 at E_{lab} = 160 AGeV. Change of the slope in a(sqrt{s}) behavior occurs at E_...

Bravina, L; Bleibel, J; Bleicher, M; Burau, G; Faessler, Amand; Fuchs, C; Nilsson, M S; Stcker, H; Tywoniuk, K; Zabrodin, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Real-Time and Post-Reaction Microscopic Structural Analysis of Biomass Undergoing Pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural complexity of unprocessed plant tissues used for thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and energy impedes heat and mass transfer and may increase the occurrence of tar-forming secondary chemical reactions. At industrial scales, gas and liquid products trapped within large biomass particles may reduce net fuel yields and increase tars, impacting industrial operations and increasing overall costs. Real-time microscopic analysis of poplar (Populus sp.) wood samples undergoing anoxic, pyrolytic heat treatment has revealed a pattern of tissue and macropore expansion and collapse. Post-reaction structural analyses of biomass char (biochar) by light and transmission electron microscopy have provided direct structural evidence of pyrolysis product mass-transfer issues, including trapped pyrolysis products and cell wall compression, and have demonstrated the impact of heat-transfer problems on biomass particles. Finally, microscopic imaging has revealed that pyrolyzed/gasified biochars recovered from a fluidized bed reactor retain a similar pre-reaction basic plant tissue structure as the samples used in this study, suggesting that the phenomena observed here are representative of those that occur in larger scale reactors.

Haas, T. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Donohoe, B. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012 CORs who are applying for certification must demonstrate past contracting, acquisition, procurement, program/project management, and general business experience. This experience is based on a set of competencies. Some of the competencies are listed below to use as a reference when you are documenting your previous experience. Use this template to document your experience. Experience should be supported by a written confirmation from the cognizant Contracting Officer/Contract Specialist showing the contract number, title and date(s) to which the experience applied. Once you have completed this document, please forward it and its supporting statement(s) to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application for COR certification.

199

Tropical Ocean Circulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation model of the equatorial Pacific Ocean was forced by realistic wind stress distributions over decades. Results were presented for a set of two experiments. In the first experiment the model was forced by an objectively ...

Mojib Latif

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Particle Physics Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Is A Particle Physics Experiment? The word "experiment" often makes people envision a scientist in white lab coat and goggles walking into the lab, pouring some test tubes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Portable controls experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments for controls classes like MIT's 2.004 require large lab setups and expensive equipment such as oscilloscopes and function generators. We developed a series of controls experiments based on National Instruments' ...

Larson, Richard Winston

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Research Experience for Teachers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at NIST. NIST launches an initiative designed to give middle school science ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fundamental neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review fundamental open problems in neutrino physics and propose two basic experiments for their possible resolution.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

IRLIB: Information Retrieval Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IRLIB logo, INFORMATION RETRIEVAL EXPERIMENT. By Karen Sparck Jones Book published in 1981 that gives an overview ...

205

ON THE MICROSCOPIC AND MACROSCOPIC ASPECTS OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE WITH APPLICATIONS TO SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

The thesis is concerned with the relation between a microscopic approach and a macroscopic approach to the study of the nuclear binding energy as a function of neutron number, proton number and nuclear deformations. First of all we give a general discussion of the potential energy of a system which can be divided into a bulk region and a thin skin layer. We find that this energy can be written down in the usual liquid drop type of expression, i.e., in terms of the volume, the surface area and other macroscopic properties of the system. The discussion is illustrated by a study of noninteracting particles in an orthorhombic potential well with zero potential inside and infinite potential outside. The total energy is calculated both exactly (a microscopic approach) and also from a liquid drop type of expression (a macroscopic approach). It turns out that the latter approach reproduces the smooth average of the exact results very well. We next make a digression to study the saddle point shapes of a charged conducting drop on a pure liquid drop model. We compare the properties of a conducting drop with those of a drop whose charges are distributed uniformly throughout its volume. The latter is the usual model employed in the study of nuclear fission. We also determined some of the more important symmetric saddle point shapes. In the last part of the thesis we generalize a method due to Strutinski to synthesize a microscopic approach (the Nilsson model) and a macroscopic approach (the liquid drop model). The results are applied to realistic nuclei. The possible occurrence of shape isomers comes as a natural consequence of the present calculation. Their trends as a function of neutron and proton members are discussed and the results are tabulated. We also work out the stabilities of the predicted superheavy nuclei with proton number around 114 and neutron number around 184 and 196. Some of these nuclei appear to have extremely long life times. The possible experimental production of these superheavy nuclei are also discussed.

Tsang, Chin-Fu.

1969-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Relativistic Brownian motion: From a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy point-like Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, non-relativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the non-relativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativistic case. There, it is found that the relativistic stochastic force is still $\\gd$-correlated (white noise) but does \\emph{no} longer correspond to a Gaussian white noise process. Explicit results for the friction and momentum-space diffusion coefficients are presented and discussed.

Jrn Dunkel; Peter Hnggi

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

A microscopic model of electronic field noise heating in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motional heating of ions in micro-fabricated traps is a challenge hindering experimental realization of large-scale quantum processing devices. Recently a series of measurements of the heating rates in surface-electrode ion traps characterized their frequency, distance, and temperature dependencies, but our understanding of the microscopic origin of this noise is still vague. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the electric field noise which is associated with a random distribution of adsorbed atoms on the trap electrode surface. By using first principle calculations of the fluctuating dipole moments of the adsorbed atoms we evaluate the distance, frequency and temperature dependence of the resulting electric field fluctuation spectrum.Our theory calculates the noise spectrum beyond the standard scenario of two-level fluctuators, by incorporating all the relevant vibrational states. The $1/f$ noise is shown to commence at roughly the frequency of the fundamental phonon transition rate and the $d^{...

Safavi-Naini, A; Weck, P; Sadeghpour, H R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Scanning Electron Microscope Facility for Characterization of Tritium Containing Materials  

SciTech Connect

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ERTEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. A glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate detector and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed.

Downs, G. L.; Tucker, P. A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The effect of microscopic texture on the direct plasma surface passivation of Si solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Textured silicon surfaces are widely used in manufacturing of solar cells due to increasing the light absorption probability and also the antireflection properties. However, these Si surfaces have a high density of surface defects that need to be passivated. In this study, the effect of the microscopic surface texture on the plasma surface passivation of solar cells is investigated. The movement of 10{sup 5} H{sup +} ions in the texture-modified plasma sheath is studied by Monte Carlo numerical simulation. The hydrogen ions are driven by the combined electric field of the plasma sheath and the textured surface. The ion dynamics is simulated, and the relative ion distribution over the textured substrate is presented. This distribution can be used to interpret the quality of the Si dangling bonds saturation and consequently, the direct plasma surface passivation.

Mehrabian, S. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, G.C., Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Qaemi, A. A. [Physics Department, G.C., Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, G.C., Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, G.C., Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chan, C. S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Division of Microelectronics, School of EEE, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218 Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); School of Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

de Jonge, Niels (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes a method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons. Simultaneously the electron dosage and x-ray intensities are measured for each sample of element to determine a ''K/sub AB/'' value to be used in the equation (I/sub A/I/sub B/) = K/sub AB/ (C/sub A//C/sub B/), where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B. The multielement sample is exposed to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

King, W.E.

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Microscopic Insights into the Electrochemical Behavior of Nonaqueous Electrolytes in Electric Double-Layer Capacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) are electrical devices that store energy by adsorption of ionic species at the inner surface of porous electrodes. Compared with aqueous electrolytes, ionic liquid and organic electrolytes have the advantage of larger potential windows, making them attractive for the next generation of EDLCs with superior energy and power densities. The performance of both ionic liquid and organic electrolyte EDLCs hinges on the judicious selection of the electrode pore size and the electrolyte composition, which requires a comprehension of the charging behavior from a microscopic view. In this Perspective, we discuss predictions from the classical density functional theory (CDFT) on the dependence of the capacitance on the pore size for ionic liquid and organic electrolyte EDLCs. CDFT is applicable to electrodes with the pore size ranging from that below the ionic dimensionality to mesoscopic scales, thus unique for investigating the electrochemical behavior of the confined electrolytes for EDLC applications.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Wu, Jianzhong [University of California, Riverside

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Microscopic Insights into the Electrochemical Behavior of Non-aqueous Electrolytes in Supercapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC) are electrical devices that store energy by adsorption of ionic species at the inner surface of porous electrodes. Compared with aqueous electrolytes, ionic liquid and organic electrolytes have the advantage of larger potential windows, making them attractive for the next generation of EDLC with superior energy and power densities. The performance of both ionic liquid and organic electrolyte EDLC hinges on the judicious selection of the electrode pore size and the electrolyte composition that requires a comprehension of the charging behavior from a microscopic view. In this perspective, we discuss predictions from the classical density functional theory (CDFT) on the dependence of the capacitance on the pore size for ionic-liquid and organic-electrolyte EDLC. CDFT is applicable to electrodes with the pore size ranging from that below the ionic dimensionality to mesoscopic scales, thus unique for investigating the electrochemical behavior of the confined electrolytes for EDLC applications.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Wu, Jianzhong [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Graphical template software for accurate micromanipulation in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Micromanipulation techniques in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) have been utilized for assembling micrometer-sized structures. The precision of the assembled microstructures has been limited by the poor accuracy of the SEM image. We have developed a software to assist the operator in the accurate assembly of microstructures in a SEM, in which computer-generated outlines of the target structure [graphical templates (GTs)] are superimposed on the monitor. The displayed GTs are distorted on the basis of the image properties of the SEM evaluated in advance. As a consequence, the operator can construct microstructures with a high precision only by maneuvering the manipulator so that the outline of each object perfectly overlaps the GT without any alteration of the electron optics or circuits for improving the image accuracy.

Kasaya, Takeshi [Nanotechnology Innovation Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hideki T. [Quantum Dot Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

Gianola, D. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayr, A.; Moenig, R.; Kraft, O. [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Volkert, C. A. [Institute for Materials Physics, Georg-August University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Major, R. C.; Cyrankowski, E.; Asif, S. A. S.; Warren, O. L. [Hysitron, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55344 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

A standard dose of radiation for microscopic disease is not appropriate  

SciTech Connect

Elective irradiation of sites of potential occult tumor spread is often part of a patient's radiation therapy program. The required radiation dose (D) depends on the probability that occult disease exists (P(occ)), the number of sites at risk (A), the number of tumor clonogens present (Ni), their radiation sensitivity, and the desired control rate. An exponential model of cell survival is used to quantify the importance of these factors. Control Probability = (1 - Pocc x (1 - e-Ni x (SF2)D/2))A; SF2 = surviving fraction after 2 Gy. Implications for clinical radiation therapy include: 1. Since the number of clonogens in an occult site may vary from 10 degrees to 10(8), Ni is the major determinant of the required dose. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of the clonogens (SF2) is also extremely important in determining the dose. Other factors are less influential since they vary less. 2. The variability of Ni (8 logs) is larger than the variation in cell number seen with gross disease (1 cm3 versus 1000 cm3, 3 logs). When Ni approximately 10(8), the required dose approaches that needed for small volume gross disease (10(9) cells, 1 cm3). 3. The dose prescribed to elective sites should reflect the risk of occult disease based on the primary tumor site, stage, and grade. 4. Regions where clinicoradiologic evaluation is difficult (e.g., pelvis and obese neck) require higher doses because macroscopic tumor deposits may exist. 5. Relatively low doses (10 to 30 Gy) are often thought to be inadequate for microscopic tumor. However, similar doses have been reported to sterilize microscopic tumor in ovarian, rectal, bladder, breast, and head and neck carcinomas. Relatively low doses should not be discounted since they may be useful in select cases when normal tissue tolerances and/or previous irradiation treatment limit the radiation dose.

Marks, L.B. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microscopic quantum structure of black hole and vacuum versus quantum statistical origin of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Planckon densely piled model of vacuum is proposed. Based on it, the microscopic quantum structure of Schwarzschild black hole and quantum statistical origin of its gravity are studied. It is shown that thermodynamic temperature equilibrium and mechanical acceleration balance make the space-time of the black hole horizon singular and Casimir effect works inside the horizon. This effect makes the inside vacuum have less zero fluctuation energy than the outside vacuum, and a temperature difference as well as gravity as thermal pressure are created. A dual relation between inside and outside regions of the black hole is found. By the dual relation, an attractor behaviour of the horizon surface is unveiled. Outside horizon, there exist thermodynamic non-equilibrium and mechanical non-balance which lead to outward centrifugal energy flow and inward gravitation energy flow, their compensation establishes local equilibrium. The lost vacuum energy in negative gravitation potential regions has been removed to the black hole surface to form a spherical Planckon shell with the thickness of Planckon diameter. All the particles absorbed by the black hole have fallen down to the horizon and converted into spin 1/2 radiation quanta made of standing waves on the horizon sphere with the mean energy related to Hawking-Unruh temperature, thermodynamic equilibrium and mechanical balance keep them stable and be tightly bound in the horizon. The gravitation mass 2M and physical mass $M$ of the black hole are calculated. The entropy of the black hole, calculated from the microscopic state number of the many-body system of radiation fermion quanta, is well consistent with Hawking. A radical modification of the temperature law of the black hole is made. The accelerating expansion of the universe yields the expansion cosmon and its energy density agrees with dark energy density.

Shun-Jin Wang

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

The r-Process in Supernovae: Impact of New Microscopic Mass Formulas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The astrophysical origin of $r$-process nuclei remains a long-standing mystery. Although some astrophysical scenarios show some promise, many uncertainties involved in both the astrophysical conditions and in the nuclear properties far from the $\\beta$-stability have inhibited us from understanding the nature of the $r$-process. The purpose of the present paper is to examine the effects of the newly-derived microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulas on the $r$-process nucleosynthesis and analyse to what extent a solar-like $r$-abundance distribution can be obtained. The $r$-process calculations with the HFB-2 mass formula are performed, adopting the parametrized model of the prompt explosion from a collapsing O-Ne-Mg core for the physical conditions and compared with the results obtained with the HFB-7 and droplet-type mass formulas. Due to its weak shell effect at the neutron magic numbers in the neutron-rich region, the microscopic mass formulas (HFB-2 and HFB-7) give rise to a spread of the abundance distribution in the vicinity of the $r$-process peaks ($A = 130$ and 195). While this effect resolves the large underproduction at $A \\approx 115$ and 140 obtained with droplet-type mass formulas, large deviations compared to the solar pattern are found near the third $r$-process peak. It is shown that a solar-like $r$-process pattern can be obtained if the dynamical timescales of the outgoing mass trajectories are increased by a factor of about 2-3, or if the $\\beta$-decay rates are systematically increased by the same factor.

Shinya Wanajo; Stephane Goriely; Mathieu Samyn; Naoki Itoh

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microscopic models and effective equation of state in nuclear collisions at FAIR energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two microscopic models, UrQMD and QGSM, were employed to study the formation of locally equilibrated hot and dense nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions at energies from 11.6 AGeV to 160 AGeV. Analysis was performed for the fixed central cubic cell of volume V = 125 fm**3 and for the expanding cell which followed the growth of the central area with uniformly distributed energy. To decide whether or not the equilibrium was reached, results of the microscopic calculations were compared to that of the statistical thermal model. Both dynamical models indicate that the state of kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrium is nearly approached at any bombarding energy after a certain relaxation period. The higher the energy, the shorter the relaxation time. Equation of state has a simple linear dependence P = a(sqrt{s})*e, where a = c_s**2 is the sound velocity squared. It varies from 0.12 \\pm 0.01 at E_{lab} = 11.6 AGeV to 0.145 \\pm 0.005 at E_{lab} = 160 AGeV. Change of the slope in a(sqrt{s}) behavior occurs at E_{lab} = 40 AGeV and can be assigned to the transition from baryon-rich to meson-dominated matter. The phase diagrams in the T - mu_B plane show the presence of kinks along the lines of constant entropy per baryon. These kinks are linked to the inelastic (i.e. chemical) freeze-out in the system.

L. Bravina; I. Arsene; J. Bleibel; M. Bleicher; G. Burau; Amand Faessler; C. Fuchs; M. S. Nilsson; H. Stoecker; K. Tywoniuk; E. Zabrodin

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Superconducting qubit as a quantum transformer routing entanglement between a microscopic quantum memory and a macroscopic resonator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate experimentally the creation and measurement of an entangled state between a microscopic two-level system (TLS), formed by a defect in an oxide layer, and a macroscopic superconducting resonator, where their indirect interaction is mediated by an artificial atom, a superconducting persistent current qubit (PCQB). Under appropriate conditions, we found the coherence time of the TLS, the resonator, and the entangled state of these two are significantly longer than the Ramsey dephasing time of PCQB itself. This demonstrates that a PCQB can be used as a quantum transformer to address high coherence microscopic quantum memories by connecting them to macroscopic quantum buses.

Kemp, Alexander; Saito, Shiro; Semba, Kouichi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Munro, William J. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Nemoto, Kae [National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microscopic linear liquid streams in vacuum: Injection of solvated biological samples into X-ray free electron lasers  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic linear liquid free-streams offer a means of gently delivering biological samples into a probe beam in vacuum while maintaining the sample species in a fully solvated state. By employing gas dynamic forces to form the microscopic liquid stream (as opposed to a conventional solid-walled convergent nozzle), liquid free-streams down to 300 nm diameter have been generated. Such 'Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzles' (GDVN) are ideally suited to injecting complex biological species into an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) to determine the structure of the biological species via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX). GDVN injector technology developed for this purpose is described.

Doak, R. B.; DePonte, D. P.; Nelson, G.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Weierstall, U. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba, 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

The GLUEX Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GLUEX experiment to be constructed in the new Hall D at Jefferson Lab as part of the 12 GeV upgrade

M. R. Shepherd; on behalf of the GLUEX Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Transformer Ratio Enhancement Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSFORMER RATIO ENHANCEMENT EXPERIMENT A. Kanareykin, Euclid Concepts LLC, Solon, OH 44139, USA W. Gai, J. G. Power. ANL, Argonne, IL, 60439, USA E. Nenasheva, Ceramics Ltd., St....

225

Sharing Smart Grid Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback March 31, 2011 DOENETL- DE-FE0004001 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability...

226

A NEW FAILURE MECHANISM BY SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE INDUCED ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN OF TUNGSTEN WINDOWS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WINDOWS IN INTEGRATED CIRCUIT PROCESSING BY DAVID M. SHUTTLEWORTH A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE.............................................................................10 2.1.2 Mechanics of the Window Liner.4. THE PROCEDURE - EXPERIMENT ONE:WINDOW-1........ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED. 3.5. THE PROCEDURE: EXPERIMENT 2

Pearton, Stephen J.

227

Experiments and Theory - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... The limitation of spatial resolution of orientation imaging via electron backscattered diffraction analysis in the scanning electron microscope...

228

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Franklin: User Experiences  

SciTech Connect

The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experiment 2 Meter Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Experiment 2 Meter Circuits Even in these days of digital circuitry, the d'Arsonval meter to stress a spring. The strain of the spring is read as a deflection of a scale. Most d'Arsonval meter the meter. In this experiment, the basic d'Arsonval meter movement and simple passive circuitry will be used

King, Roger

231

2003The Royal Microscopical Society Journal of Microscopy,Vol. 212, Pt 3 December 2003, pp. 254263  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The Netherlands Key words. Bioluminescence measurements, embedded instrumentation, fluorescence measurements fluid volume per well in real-time, and for monitoring the fluorescence associated with the production in ATP assays). We show that our detection limit for NADH fluorescence is 5 µm with a microscope

van Vliet, Lucas J.

232

Correction of distance-dependent blurring in projection data for fully three-dimensional electron microscopic reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a method of correction for distance-dependent blurring, which is one of the limiting factors to achieving higher resolution in 3D reconstructions of biological specimens from 2D projections obtained by an electron microscope. Our proposed ... Keywords: contrast transfer function, distance-dependent blurring, electron microscopy, stationary phase

Joanna Klukowska; Gabor T. Herman; Ivan G. Kazantsev

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Measuring charge trap occupation and energy level in CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using a scanning tunneling microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a scanning tunneling microscope to probe single-electron charging phenomena in individual CdSe/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) at room temperature. The QDs are deposited on top of a bare Au thin film and form a ...

Bulovic, Vladimir

234

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) added a requirement for past COR experience to qualify for FAC-COR Level II (journeyman level) and III (senior/expert level). At least 1 year of COR experience is required to qualify for Level II; 2 years for Level III. OFPP strongly advises that applicants for Level III have prior experience at Level II. Applicants with no prior experience as an appointed COR must demonstrate proficiency in the specific competencies listed below for the same time period, validated by a cognizant Contracting Officer or Contract Specialist by signature below or an accompanying e-mail. Submit this form to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application

235

Microscopic mechanism of charged-particle radioactivity and generalization of the Geiger-Nuttall law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear relation for charged-particle emissions is presented starting from the microscopic mechanism of the radioactive decay. It relates the logarithms of the decay half-lives with two variables, called {chi}{sup '} and {rho}{sup '}, which depend upon the Q values of the outgoing clusters as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. This relation explains well all known cluster decays. It is found to be a generalization of the Geiger-Nuttall law in {alpha} radioactivity, and therefore we call it the universal decay law. Predictions of the most likely emissions of various clusters are presented by applying the law over the whole nuclear chart. It is seen that the decays of heavier clusters with nonequal proton and neutron numbers are mostly located in the trans-lead region. The emissions of clusters with equal protons and neutrons, like {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O, are possible in some neutron-deficient nuclei with Z{>=}54.

Qi, C. [School of Physics, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Alba Nova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Xu, F. R. [School of Physics, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R. [KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Alba Nova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, M. Y.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Hu, D. [School of Physics, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

A microscopic model of electronic field noise heating in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motional heating of ions in micro-fabricated traps is a challenge hindering experimental realization of large-scale quantum processing devices. Recently a series of measurements of the heating rates in surface-electrode ion traps characterized their frequency, distance, and temperature dependencies, but our understanding of the microscopic origin of this noise is still vague. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the electric field noise which is associated with a random distribution of adsorbed atoms on the trap electrode surface. By using first principle calculations of the fluctuating dipole moments of the adsorbed atoms we evaluate the distance, frequency and temperature dependence of the resulting electric field fluctuation spectrum.Our theory calculates the noise spectrum beyond the standard scenario of two-level fluctuators, by incorporating all the relevant vibrational states. The $1/f$ noise is shown to commence at roughly the frequency of the fundamental phonon transition rate and the $d^{-4}$ dependence with distance of the ion from the electrode surface is established.

A. Safavi-Naini; P. Rabl; P. Weck; H. R. Sadeghpour

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Generalized microscopic theory of ion selectivity in voltage-gated ion channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion channels are specific proteins present in the membranes of living cells. They control the flow of specific ions through a cell, initiated by an ion channel's electrochemical gradient. In doing so, they control important physiological processes such as muscle contraction and neuronal connectivity, which cannot be properly activated if these channels go haywire, leading to life-threatening diseases and psychological disorders. Here, we will develop a generalized microscopic theory of ion selectivity applicable to KcsA, Na$_{\\rm v}$Rh and Ca$_{\\rm v}$ (L-type) ion channels. We unambiguously expose why and how a given ion-channel can be highly selective, and yet has a conductance of the order of one million ions per second, or higher. We will identify and prove the correct physico-biochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the high selectivity of a particular ion in a given ion channel. The above mechanisms consist of five conditions, which can be directly associated to these parameters - (i) dehydration energy, (ii) concentration of the "correct" ions (iii) Coulomb-van-der-Waals attraction, (iv) pore and ionic sizes, and indirectly to (v) the thermodynamic stability and (vi) the "knock-on" assisted permeation.

Andrew Das Arulsamy

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Microcanonical Thermostatistics as Foundation of Thermodynamics. The microscopic origin of condensation and phase separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional thermo-statistics address infinite homogeneous systems within the canonical ensemble. However, some 150 years ago the original motivation of thermodynamics was the description of steam engines, i.e. boiling water. Its essential physics is the separation of the gas phase from the liquid. Of course, boiling water is inhomogeneous and as such cannot be treated by canonical thermo-statistics. Then it is not astonishing, that a phase transition of first order is signaled canonically by a Yang-Lee singularity. Thus it is only treated correctly by microcanonical Boltzmann-Planck statistics. This is elaborated in the present article. It turns out that the Boltzmann-Planck statistics is much richer and gives fundamental insight into statistical mechanics and especially into entropy. This can even be done to some extend rigorously and analytically. The microcanonical entropy has a very simple physical meaning: It measures the microscopic uncertainty that we have about the system, i.e. the number of points in $6N$-dim phase, which are consistent with our information about the system. It can rigorously be split into an ideal-gas part and a configuration part which contains all the physics and especially is responsible for all phase transitions. The deep and essential difference between ``extensive'' and ``intensive'' control parameters, i.e. microcanonical and canonical statistics, is exemplified by rotating, self-gravitating systems.

D. H. E. Gross

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ?350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO{sub 2} , precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral surface in scCO{sub 2}; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10{overbar 1}4) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solidfluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, A.S.; Higgins, S.R.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosso, K.M.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in-situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~ 350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in-situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (1014) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in-situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, Alan S.; Higgins, Steven R.; Knauss, Kevin G.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solving the Accelerator-Condenser Coupling Problem in a Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a modification to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) that allows it to briefly (using a pulsed-laser-driven photocathode) operate at currents in excess of 10 mA while keeping the effects of condenser lens aberrations to a minimum. This modification allows real-space imaging of material microstructure with a resolution of order 10 nm over regions several {micro}m across with an exposure time of 15 ns. This is more than 6 orders of magnitude faster than typical video-rate TEM imaging. The key is the addition of a weak magnetic lens to couple the large-diameter high-current beam exiting the accelerator into the acceptance aperture of a conventional TEM condenser lens system. We show that the performance of the system is essentially consistent with models derived from ray tracing and finite element simulations. The instrument can also be operated as a conventional TEM by using the electron gun in a thermionic mode. The modification enables very high electron current densities in {micro}m-sized areas and could also be used in a non-pulsed system for high-throughput imaging and analytical TEM.

Reed, B W; LaGrange, T; Shuttlesworth, R M; Gibson, D J; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Microscopic Description of Entanglements in Polyethylene Networks and Melts: Strong, Weak, Pairwise, and Collective Attributes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two Polyethylene systems where all entanglements are trapped: a perfect network, and a melt with grafted chain ends. We examine microscopically at what level topological constraints can be considered as a collective entanglement effect, as in tube model theories, or as certain pairwise uncrossability interactions, as in slip-link models. A pairwise parameter, which varies between these limiting cases, shows that, for the systems studied, the character of the entanglement environment is more pairwise than collective. We employ a novel methodology, which analyzes entanglement constraints into a complete set of pairwise interactions, similar to slip links. Entanglement confinement is assembled by a plethora of links, with a spectrum of confinement strengths, from strong to weak. The strength of interactions is quantified through a link `persistence', which is the fraction of time for which the links are active. By weighting links according to their strength, we show that confinement is imposed mainly by the strong ones, and that the weak, trapped, uncrossability interactions cannot contribute to the low frequency modulus of an elastomer, or the plateau modulus of a melt. A self-consistent scheme for mapping topological constraints to specific, strong binary links, according to a given entanglement density, is proposed and validated. Our results demonstrate that slip links can be viewed as the strongest pairwise interactions of a collective entanglement environment. The methodology developed provides a basis for bridging the gap between atomistic simulations and mesoscopic slip link models.

Stefanos D. Anogiannakis; Christos Tzoumanekas; Doros N. Theodorou

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evidence for the microscopic formation of mixed-symmetry states from magnetic moment measurements  

SciTech Connect

Using the transient field technique, the magnetic moments of the second excited 2{sup +} states in {sup 92,94}Zr have been measured for the first time. The large positive g factors, g(2{sub 2}{sup +};{sup 92}Zr)=+0.76(50) and g(2{sub 2}{sup +};{sup 94}Zr)=+0.88(27), which are in contrast to the known negative g factors of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states, are found to be a consequence of weak proton-neutron coupling combined with the Z=40 subshell closure. From their large M1 transition strengths to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states, in earlier works an assignment to the 2{sub 2}{sup +} states as proton-neutron symmetric and mixed-symmetry states has been made, which are now found to be polarized in their proton-neutron content. This fact allows to identify the underlying microscopic main configurations in the wave functions, which form the building blocks of symmetric and mixed-symmetry states in this region as valence nucleons are added and shell structure changes.

Werner, V.; Ai, H.; Casperson, R. J.; Casten, R. F.; Eckel, S.; Heinz, A.; Lambie-Hanson, C.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Qian, J.; Schmidt, A.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States); Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G.; Boutachkov, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Holt, J. D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Stefanova, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Perry, M. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Florida (United States); Pietralla, N. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] (and others)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ?SN nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ? Sn nuclei within the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Random-Phase-Approximation (HF-RPA) theory. Such characteristic features of the Isoscalar Giant Resonance as strength function, transition density and cross-sections for ??Ca and ?Sn nuclei are obtained. In this analysis, the SL1 Skyrme interaction associated with 230 MeV for the value of nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient K is chosen. The selection of nuclei is based on the availability of recent experimental results from Texas A&M University. The coordinate space formulation of the RPA in terms of Green's function is employed to obtain isoscalar monopole and dipole transition strength distributions for ??Ca and ?Sn nuclei. Calculations are performed with the discretized single-particle continuum. Theoretical transition strength distributions are used to find quantities of interest such as energy positions of resonance states, sum rules and average resonance energies. The cross-section of 240 MeV ?-particle scattering on the above nuclei are analysed within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) using transition densities obtained from the HF-RPA calculations. From this analysis the cross-sections for ISGDR excitations are obtained and compared with the recent experimental data obtained at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University.

Karki, Bhishma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Study of Elementary Excitations of Liquid Helium-4 Using Macro-orbital Microscopic Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy of elementary excitations and the anomalous nature of small Q phonons in He-II are studied by using our macro-orbital microscopic theory of a system of interacting bosons (cond-mat/0606571). It is observed that : (i) the experimental E(Q) of He-II not only agrees with our theoretical relation $E(Q) = \\hbar^2Q^2/4mS(Q)$ but also supports an important conclusion of Price that S(0) should have zero value for quantum fluids, and (ii) Feynman's energy of excitations $E(Q)_{Fyn} = \\hbar^2Q^2/2mS(Q)$ equals approximately to $2E(Q)_{exp}$ even at low Q. Three problems with the Feynman's inference that $E(Q)_{Fyn}$ has good agreement with $E(Q)_{exp}$ at low Q are identified. It is argued that the theory can also be used to understand similar spectrum of the BEC state of a dilute gas reported by O'Dell et al.

Yatendra S. Jain

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

Russian Grouting Experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report on Russian Grouting experience provided an opportunity for international cooperation and access to Russian grouting/waste form experience. the data on radiolytic gas generation from grout mixtures was already used in evaluation of the source of hydrogen and methane generation detected in the sampling ports around the SRS high-level waste tanks in 2002. The concept of venting the radiolytic gases from a waste form by adding porous aggregate is being considered for future cement-based TRU waste forms at SRS. The objectives of this work were to document the Russian experience on grouting for waste forms and tank closures or other decommissioning applications.

Langton, C.A.

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

Jun Cao

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

251

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

252

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

253

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

254

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

255

Hershey-Chase experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hershey-Chase experiment Hershey-Chase experiment Name: pei01 Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I would like to know the characteristics of Griffth's experiment, and Hershey-Chase experiment. Replies: For the H-C experiment: It was designed to show that the type of virus known as a bacteriophage infected bacteria by injecting its DNA, and not by incorporating the entire virus into the bacterium. This was important because it showed that the entire replication of the virus could be coded for in the DNA of the virus, and not in the coat protein. They labeled with radioactivity the coat of the virus using one type of label 35-S, and the DNA with another, 32-P and then infected bacteria. After infection, the bacteria contained only 32-P, and no 35-S. The viruses went on to destroy the bacteria and reproduce, and the new viruses contained no 35-S in their coats. Source: Biology, 3rd ed., by Solomon et al., although the same information is in almost all texts at the college level

256

A new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope at the ALS for operation up to 2500eV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the design and construction of a higher energy Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope on a new bend magnet beam line at the Advanced Light Source. Previously we have operated such an instrument on a bend magnet for C, N and O 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The new instrument will have similar performance at higher energies up to and including the S 1s edge at 2472eV. A new microscope configuration is planned. A more open geometry will allow a fluorescence detector to count emitted photons from the front surface of the sample. There will be a capability for zone plate scanning in addition to the more conventional sample scanning mode. This will add the capability for imaging a massive sample at high resolution over a limited field of view, so that heavy reaction cells may be used to study processes in-situ, exploiting the longer photon attenuation length and the longer zone plate working distances available at higher photon energy. The energy range will extend down to include the C1s edge at 300eV, to allow high energy NEXAFS microscopic studies to correlate with the imaging of organics in the same sample region of interest.

Kilcoyne, David; McKean, Pat; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Warwick, Tony [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Ade, Harald [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Attwood, David [Center for Xray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Hitchcock, Adam [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mitchell, Gary [DOW Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan (United States); Monteiro, Paulo [Dept. Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

A new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope at the ALS for operation up to 2500eV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the design and construction of a higher energy Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope on a new bend magnet beam line at the Advanced Light Source. Previously we have operated such an instrument on a bend magnet for C, N and O 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The new instrument will have similar performance at higher energies up to and including the S 1s edge at 2472eV. A new microscope configuration is planned. A more open geometry will allow a fluorescence detector to count emitted photons from the front surface of the sample. There will be a capability for zone plate scanning in addition to the more conventional sample scanning mode. This will add the capability for imaging a massive sample at high resolution over a limited field of view, so that heavy reaction cells may be used to study processes in-situ, exploiting the longer photon attenuation length and the longer zone plate working distances available at higher photon energy. The energy range will extend down to include the C1s edge at 300eV, to allow high energy NEXAFS microscopic studies to correlate with the imaging of organics in the same sample region of interest.

Kilcoyne, David; Ade, Harald; Attwood, David; Hitchcock, Adam; McKean, Pat; Mitchell, Gary; Monteiro, Paulo; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Warwick, Tony

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.

260

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Semantics, experience and time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational hypothesis, with its inherent representationalism, and the dynamical hypothesis, with its apparent absence of representations and its commitment to continuous time, stand at an impasse. It is unclear how the dynamical stance can handle ... Keywords: Computation, Experience, Invariance, Semantics, Situatedness, Time

Stephen E. Robbins

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ganges valley aerosol experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Magical experiences in interaction design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a description of design experiments performed to investigate the use of magical experiences in interaction design of consumer electronics. Magical experiences are usually associated with a passive audience watching a magician, but it is ...

Sam de Jongh Hepworth

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

266

ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faculty Research Experiences Faculty Research Experiences The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides short- and long-term programs for either faculty or faculty-student teams to collaborate with ORISE's science and engineering partners. The length of the faculty programs can vary-from summer internships to year-long sabbaticals-but all programs enable faculty members to broaden their professional outlook beyond the classroom to the application of laboratory research. For example, these researchers have taken advantage of ORISE opportunities: Dr. Miguel Castro Dr. Miguel Castro Dr. Miguel Castro, of the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez, spent three months conducting research on surface tension in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Faculty Student Team Research program.

267

Electronics for Satellite Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Physics Experiments on NIF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 ! LLNL Progress towards Ignition & Weapons Physics Experiments on NIF Presentation to: SEAB October 12, 2011 Ed Moses Director, NIF and Photon Science LLNL-PRES-506751 May 30, 2011 Moses_BOG_92811 NIF has broad array of technical and operational capabilities Moses_BOG_92811 Moses_BOG_92811 Laser bay NIF-0210-18489.ppt Moses presentation to Professor Mohamed Abdou, Neil Morley, Alice Ying, Robert Reed UCLA 5 Moses_All_Hands_100511 We are steadily increasing the laser energy and power available for ignition experiments: fy09 Moses_All_Hands_100511 We are steadily increasing the laser energy and power available for ignition experiments: fy10

269

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

APS Experiment Safety Review Board  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charter for the APS Experiment Safety Review Board May 12, 2011 1. Purpose The APS Experiment Safety Review Board (ESRB) advises the AES Division Director on the safe implementation of experiments performed by APS users on the experiment hall floor. The ESRB reviews each experiment that is submitted to the APS via the APS Experiment Safety Assessment System (ESAF). These experiments are conducted in beamline endstations in the APS Experiment Hall. 2. Membership The ESRB members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the ESRB are: Bruce Glagola AES - Chair Edmund Chang AES Paul Rossi XSD Nena Moonier AES Tom Barkalow PSC Patricia Pedergnana AES Wendy VanWingeren AES 3. Method After an experiment is submitted to the APS Experiment Safety Review system

272

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe-phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe-phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

HPCToolsExperiences.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences w ith T ools a t N ERSC Richard G erber NERSC User Services Programming w eather, c limate, a nd e arth---system m odels on h eterogeneous m ul>---core p la?orms September 7 , 2 011 a t t he N a>onal C enter f or A tmospheric R esearch i n B oulder, C olorado 2 * Thanks f or t he i nvita>on * My p rofessional g oal i s t o e nable s cien>sts t o u se H PC easily a nd e ffec>vely * Contribute t o i mportant d iscoveries a bout h ow o ur natural w orld w orks * Make a d ifference * So i t i s a n h onor & m eaningful t o m e t o p ar>cipate i n this c onference * One o f m y p rimary r oles i s a s d eputy o n o ur n ext procurement t eam & w e a re e xtremely i nterested i n learning a bout y our e xperiences w ith h ybrid s ystems and p rogramming 3 * Recent e xperiences p roviding t ools *

275

ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8MAY98 8MAY98 Exp # Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry Measurements of Natural 236U Concentrations with the ECR-ATLAS System 4 667-2 Janssens Unsafe Coulex of the 238,239Pu Nuclei 4 669-2 Carpenter Excited States Associated with Different Shapes in 178Hg and Neighboring Odd-A Nuclei 4 673-2 Lister A Study of Radiative Decay from High Lying States in 24Mg 5 689-2 Freeman Spectroscopy of Odd Tin Isotopes Approaching 100Sn 5 693-2 Reiter Structure and Formation Mechanism of Heavy Elements - Request for additional beam time for Experiment 693 - 6 706 Kwok Heavy-Ion Lithography on High Temperature Superconductors 2 708 Yu In-Beam Spectroscopy Study of the Proton Emitter 109I with Recoil-Decay Tagging Technique

276

Stirling machine operating experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

Ross, B. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States); Dudenhoefer, J.E. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Exact microscopic theory of electromagnetic heat transfer between a dielectric sphere and plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-field electromagnetic heat transfer holds great potential for the advancement of nanotechnology. Whereas far-field electromagnetic heat transfer is constrained by Planck's blackbody limit, the increased density of states in the near-field enhances heat transfer rates by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional limit. Such enhancement opens new possibilities in numerous applications, including thermal-photo-voltaics, nano-patterning, and imaging. The advancement in this area, however, has been hampered by the lack of rigorous theoretical treatment, especially for geometries that are of direct experimental relevance. Here we introduce an efficient computational strategy, and present the first rigorous calculation of electromagnetic heat transfer in a sphere-plate geometry, the only geometry where transfer rate beyond blackbody limit has been quantitatively probed at room temperature. Our approach results in a definitive picture unifying various approximations previously used to treat this problem, and provides new physical insights for designing experiments aiming to explore enhanced thermal transfer.

Clayton Otey; Shanhui Fan

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

A UNIFIED MICROSCOPIC-MACROSCOPIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF GAS-GRAIN CHEMISTRY IN COLD DENSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

For the first time, we report a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo simulation of gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar clouds in which both the gas-phase and the grain-surface chemistry are simulated by a stochastic technique. The surface chemistry is simulated with a microscopic Monte Carlo method in which the chemistry occurs on an initially flat surface. The surface chemical network consists of 29 reactions initiated by the accreting species H, O, C, and CO. Four different models are run with diverse but homogeneous physical conditions including temperature, gas density, and diffusion-barrier-to-desorption energy ratio. As time increases, icy interstellar mantles begin to grow. Our approach allows us to determine the morphology of the ice, layer by layer, as a function of time, and to ascertain the environment or environments for individual molecules. Our calculated abundances can be compared with observations of ices and gas-phase species, as well as the results of other models.

Chang Qiang [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Herbst, Eric [Also at Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Generator-coordinate-method with conjugate parameters and the unification of microscopic theories for large amplitude collective motion  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic theory of large amplitude collective motion of many particle systems is presented which is relevant, for example, to nuclear fission. The theory is microscopic and makes use of a collective path, i.e. a suitably constructed set of distorted nonequilibrium Slater determinants. The approach is a generalization of the generator coordinate method (GCM) and improves its dynamic aspects by extending it to a pair of conjugate generator parameters q and p (DGCM). The problems connected with redundancy and superfluous degrees of freedom are solved by prediagonalizing the local oscillations about each point of the dynamic collective basis vertical-barq,p>. For adiabatic large amplitude collective motion a Schroedinger equation is derived which appears to be nearly identical to the one obtained by a consistent quantization of semiclassical approaches as e.g. the adiabatic time dependent Hartree-Fock theory (ATDHF). In turn a collective path constructed by ATDHF proves to be particularly suited for being used in the present DGCM formalism. Altogether the formalism unifies two classes of microscopic approaches to collective motion, viz. the quantum mechanical GCM and the classical theories like cranking and ATDHF.

Goeke, K.; Reinhard, P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recent radon transient experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radon transient analysis is being developed as a method complementary to pressure transient analysis for evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. The method is based on the observations of Stoker and Kruger (1975) that radon concentration in produced geothermal fluids is related to geothermal reservoir type, production flow rates, and time. Stoker and Kruger showed that radon concentrations were markedly different in vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated systems, and varied not only among wells of different flow rate in an individual reservoir, but also varied timewise in individual wells. The potential uses of radon as an internal tracer for geothermal reservoir engineering were reviewed by Kruger, Stoker, and Umana (1977). Also included were results of the first transient test performed with rapid flow rate change in a vapor-dominated field. The results of the next four radon-flow rate transient experiments were summarized by Kruger (1978) in which effects of well interference and startup production in a new well were demonstrated. Four of these first five radon transient experiments have been carried out in vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and Serrazzano in Italy. The systematics of the transients of radon concentration following abrupt changes in flow rate is being evaluated by Warren and Kruger (1978). The fifth test was at the HGP-A well in Hawaii, the first transient test in a liquid-dominated reservoir. Three additional radon transient tests have been carried out, each in a different type of geothermal resource. The first test was in a petrothermal resource, the reservoir created by hydraulic fracturing by LASL in the hot, dry rock experiment in New Mexico. The results of this first 75-day production test of continuous forced circulation, during January-April, 1978, are given by Tester, et al (1978). The results of the radon concentration measurements made during this test are summarized by Kruger, Cederberg, and Semprini (1978). The second test was a second transient test at the HGP-A well in the liquid-dominated reservoir at Pohoiki, Hawaii, and the third test was a second transient test at the Grottitana well in the Serrazzano field at Larderello, Italy. The general observations of these tests are listed in Table 1. A summary of each of these three tests follows. During the LASL hot dry rock flow test, five samples of recirculating production fluid were obtained by wellhead sampling. Two samples were obtained during the following shutin and venting periods of the test, and one sample of makeup water was analyzed during the test.

Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Cederberg, G.; Macias, L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Experience Report for WOPR  

SciTech Connect

One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This paper focuses on the fault density aspect of goodness and reliability of the codes in particular. The approach taken was to use multiple fault density prediction methods and compare results to actual experimentation and other industry studies on fault density. As a result of the predictions and experiments our confidence in the prediction methods was increased and our confidence in the goodness of the code from a fault density perspective was given more context. A large unintended benefit of these experiments was to find defects hidden for years in the codes when using the Monte Carlo reliability testing results to develop heuristic based bug driven tests.

Pope, G

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Research Experience Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs Research Programs Found in Profiling Teacher Research Participation Programs: An Approach to Formative Evaluation, The National Center for Improving Science Edcuation of the NETWORK, Inc. with support from the United States Department of Energy, November, 1993. Gottfried, S.: Brown, C.; Markovits, P.; and Changar, J. Undated. "Scientific Work Experience Programs for Science Teachers: A Focus on Research-Related Internships." Unpublished Manuscript. The authors found five factors related to effective implementation of a research internship program: (1) mentors, project staff, and teachers share goals and expectations, have open, frequent communication; (2) teachers have articulated project or research assignment; (3) curriculum development component facilitated by expert, focus on process rather than product; (4)

283

Assessment of Project Management Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Project Management Experience PMCDP for CEG Competency 1.12.2 Assessment of Project Management Experience PMCDP for CEG Competency 1.12.2 Applicant Name: Applicant Supervisor: Date (mm/dd/yyyy): Directions: Step 1: Use this template to show project management experience for CEG competency 1.12.2. Rate your experience (0 - 5) in the following project management related activities using the scale below. Step 2: Sign the completed form and have your supervisor review and sign it. Step 3: Once approved by your supervisor, submit the form as part of your Level I certification package. Note: Project management experience is distinguished from FPD experience and applies to general project management activities and experience. Positions that do not count towards experience in project management include: program manager, property manager, health, safety and security (HSS) positions, and

284

The German Front Experiment 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The German Front Experiment, 1987 (GFE87) is a field experiment using aircraft, radar, surface, and upper-air observations to determine the influence of the European Alps on cold fronts. Measurements are concentrated in the Rhine Valley and in ...

Klaus P. Hoinka; Hans Volkert

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimal designs for conjoint experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conjoint experiments, each respondent receives a set of profiles to rate. Sometimes, the profiles are expensive prototypes that respondents have to test before rating them. Designing these experiments involves determining how many and which profiles ... Keywords: Conjoint experiments, D-optimality, Optimal block design, Optimal block sizes, Prototype testing

Roselinde Kessels; Peter Goos; Martina Vandebroek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Operating experience at CEBAF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, is a 5-pass, recirculating, superconducting rf linac designed to provide exceptional beam quality at 4 GeV up to 200 {mu}A CW. It is made up of an injector, two 400-MeV linacs, and 9 recirculation arcs having a total beamline length of more than 4.5 km. On Nov. 5, 1995, CEBAF delivered a 4 GeV, 25-{mu}A CW electron beam to the first of 3 experimental halls and the experimental physics program was started 10 days later. Accelerator availability during the first month of the experimental run exceeded 75%. Beam properties measured in the experimental hall to date are a one sigma momentum spread of 5{times}10{sup -5} and an rms emittance of 0.2 nanometer-radians, better than design specification. CW beam has been provided from all 5 passes at 800 MeV intervals. Outstanding performance of the superconducting linacs suggests a machine energy upgrade to 6 GeV in the near term with eventual machine operation at 8-10 GeV. Results from commissioning and operations experience since the last conference are presented.

Legg, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

288

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

289

A compact, sample-in-atmospheric-pressure soft x-ray microscope developed at Pohang Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope (TXM) was developed at the Pohang Light Source. With a 2 mm diameter condenser zone plate and a 40 nm outermost-zone-width objective zone plate, the TXM's achieved spatial resolution is better than 50 nm at the photon energy of 500 eV (wavelength: 2.49 nm). The TXM is portable and mounted in tandem with a 7B1 spectroscopy end station. The sample position is outside the vacuum, allowing for quick sample changes and enhanced in situ experimental capability. In addition, the TXM is pinhole-free and easy to align, having commercial mounts located outside the vacuum components.

Lim, Jun; Shin, Hyun-Joon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Keun Hwa [Materials Science and Technology Research Division, KIST, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chan-Cuk; Hwang, Han-Na [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microscopically-based energy density functionals for nuclei using the density matrix expansion: Implementation and pre-optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent series of papers, Gebremariam, Bogner, and Duguet derived a microscopically based nuclear energy density functional by applying the Density Matrix Expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock energy obtained from chiral effective field theory (EFT) two- and three-nucleon interactions. Due to the structure of the chiral interactions, each coupling in the DME functional is given as the sum of a coupling constant arising from zero-range contact interactions and a coupling function of the density arising from the finite-range pion exchanges. Since the contact contributions have essentially the same structure as those entering empirical Skyrme functionals, a microscopically guided Skyrme phenomenology has been suggested in which the contact terms in the DME functional are released for optimization to finite-density observables to capture short-range correlation energy contributions from beyond Hartree-Fock. The present paper is the first attempt to assess the ability of the newly suggested DME functional, which has a much richer set of density dependencies than traditional Skyrme functionals, to generate sensible and stable results for nuclear applications. The results of the first proof-of-principle calculations are given, and numerous practical issues related to the implementation of the new functional in existing Skyrme codes are discussed. Using a restricted singular value decomposition (SVD) optimization procedure, it is found that the new DME functional gives numerically stable results and exhibits a small but systematic reduction of our test $\\chi^2$ function compared to standard Skyrme functionals, thus justifying its suitability for future global optimizations and large-scale calculations.

M. Stoitsov; M. Kortelainen; S. K. Bogner; T. Duguet; R. J. Furnstahl; B. Gebremariam; N. Schunck

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

GNF2 Operating Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem{sup TM} and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to validate the adequacy/expected behavior of the design. (authors)

Schardt, John [GE Energy, Nuclear, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28402 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state using large track multiplicity with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search is presented for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state in proton--proton collisions at sqrt(s)= 8 TeV. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Using a high track multiplicity requirement, 0.6 +- 0.2 background events from Standard Model processes are predicted and none observed. This result is interpreted in the context of low-scale gravity models and 95% CL lower limits on microscopic black hole masses are set for different model assumptions.

ATLAS Collaboration

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tracking in Antiproton Annihilation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major ingredient of the planned new accelerator complex FAIR, to be constructed at the GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, is the availability of antiproton beams with high quality and intensity. Among the experiments which will make use of this opportunity is PANDA, a dedicated experiment to study antiproton annihilations on nucleons and nuclei. This article gives an overview on the foreseen techniques to perform charged particle tracking in the high rate environment of this experiment.

O. N. Hartmann

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin?dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB

Ubi Wichoski; The PICASSO Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experiment Hazard Class 9 - Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazard classification applies to all experiments involving magnets, magnetic fields, and electric fields. Other hazard classifications such as electrical safety and their...

296

Window Functions for CMB Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability and derivation of window functions for cosmic microwave background experiments on large and intermediate angular scales. These window functions describe the response of the experiment to power in a particular mode of the fluctuation spectrum. We give general formulae, illustrated with specific examples, for the most common observing strategies.

Martin White; Mark Srednicki

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Nature of the Distinctive Microscopic Features in R5(SixGe1-x)4 Magnetic Refrigeration Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic refrigeration is a promising technology that offers a potential for high energy efficiency. The giant magnetocaloric effect of the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}, Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} alloys (where R=rare-earth and O {le} x {le} 1), which was discovered in 1997, make them perfect candidates for magnetic refrigeration applications. In this study the microstructures of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} alloys have been characterized using electron microscopy techniques, with the focus being on distinctive linear features first examined in 1999. These linear features have been observed in R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}, Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} alloys prepared from different rare-earths (Gd, Tb, Dy and Er) with different crystal structures (Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type orthorhombic, monoclinic and Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type orthorhombic). Systematic scanning electron microscope studies revealed that these linear features are actually thin-plates, which grow along specific directions in the matrix material. The crystal structure of the thin-plates has been determined as hexagonal with lattice parameters a=b=8.53 {angstrom} and c=6.40 {angstrom} using selected area diffraction (SAD). Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis, carried out in both scanning and transmission electron microscopes, showed that the features have a composition approximating to R{sub 5}(Si{sub x},Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 3}.phase. Orientation relationship between the matrix and the thin-plates has been calculated as [- 1010](1-211){sub p}//[010](10-2){sub m}. The growth direction of the thin plates are calculated as (22 0 19) and (-22 0 19) by applying the Ag approach of Zhang and Purdy to the SAD patterns of this system. High Resolution TEM images of the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} were used to study the crystallographic relationship. A terrace-ledge structure was observed at the interface and a 7{sup o} rotation of the reciprocal lattices with respect to each other, consistent with the determined orientation relationship, was noted. Both observations are consistent with the stated hypothesis that the growth direction of the thin-plates is parallel to an invariant line direction. Based on the terrace-ledge structure of the thin-plate interface a displacive-diffusional growth mechanism has been proposed to explain the rapid formation of the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x},Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 3} plates.

Ozan Ugurlu

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

In Situ Tensile Testing of Single Crystal Molybdenum Alloy Fibers with Various Dislocation Densities in a Scanning Electron Microscope  

SciTech Connect

In-situ tensile tests have been performed in a dual beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope on as-grown and prestrained single-crystal molybdenum-alloy (Mo-alloy) fibers. The fibers had approximately square cross sections with submicron edge lengths and gauge lengths in the range of 9-41 {mu}m. In contrast to previously observed yield strengths near the theoretical strength of 10 GPa in compression tests of {approx}1-3-{mu}m long pillars made from similar Mo-alloy single crystals, a wide scatter of yield strengths between 1 and 10 GPa was observed in the as-grown fibers tested in tension. Deformation was dominated by inhomogeneous plastic events, sometimes including the formation of Lueders bands. In contrast, highly prestrained fibers exhibited stable plastic flow, significantly lower yield strengths of {approx}1 GPa, and stress-strain behavior very similar to that in compression. A simple, statistical model incorporating the measured dislocation densities is developed to explain why the tension and compression results for the as-grown fibers are different.

George, Easo P [ORNL; Johanns, K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sedlmayr, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Phani, P. Sudharshan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Monig, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Kraft, O. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Pharr, George M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Theory and use of modern microscopical methods with applications to studies of wetlands microbial community dynamics. Final performance reports  

SciTech Connect

Funds were granted to the University of Southwestern Louisiana to coordinate and offer a summer enhancement institute for science teachers. Following are highlights from that institute: (1) 20 teachers from Louisiana attended the institute as students; (2) institute faculty included staff members from USL`s Departments of Biology, Mathematics, and Education and 3 principal scientists plus technicians from the Southern Science Center; (3) the institute began June 5, 1995 and ended June 30, 1995, and it featured daily lectures, laboratory exercises, examinations, and field trips--assignments for students included journal keeping, lesson plan development, and presentations, the student`s journal entries proved valuable for evaluating institute activities, students received copies of lesson plans developed at the institute, videos entitled ``Pond Life Diversity`` and ``Chesapeake: The Twilight Estuary,`` a guide to ``Free-lining Freshwater Protozoa,`` a graphing calculator, 2 x 2 slide set of pond life, software or hardware (selected by the teacher to meet specific needs), a field manual for water quality monitoring laboratory exercises (Project Green), and a book on Benchmarks for Science Literacy; (4) follow-up measures included the following--a newsletter disseminated by USL but written with teacher input; making equipment (such as a trinocular compound microscope and video monitor) and materials and supplies available to the teachers and their students in the classroom; and mentoring between USL and SSC staff and the teachers during the school year. Attached to this report are copies of the institute agenda and lesson plans developed in the institute.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CIIR Experiments for TREC Legal 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Four baseline experiments using standard In- dri retrieval facilities and simple query formula- tion techniques and two experiments using more ...

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Abstract: Experiment Design for Scientists and Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education and Training: Experiment Design for Engineers and ... Experiment design is a systematic, rigorous, data-based approach to scientific ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

304

A Better Microscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

microscopio mejor microscopio mejor Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Cuando Ud. utiliza ondas para detectar el mundo físico el problema con el que se enfrenta es que la calidad de la imagen está limitada por la longitud de onda que usted use. Nuestros ojos son sensibles a la luz visible, que tiene una longitud de onda del orden de los 0.0000005 metros. Esta longitud de onda es lo suficientemente pequeña como para que en nuestra vida diaria no notemos el problema de resolución asociado con la longitud de onda, ya que en general no necesitamos ver objetos que tengan tamaños del orden de los 0.0000005 metros. Sin embargo, la longitud de onda de la luz visible es demasiado grande para analizar cualquier objeto más pequeño que una célula. Para observar objetos bajo grandes aumentos, se deben usar ondas con menor longitud de

305

Analytical Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a conventional parallel electron energy-loss spectrometer (EELS) to record spectra of the energy losses experienced by the beam electrons as they ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The FIFE Data Publication Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) provided an opportunity to test the concept of data publication for long-term access to valuable scientific data. In analogy with the procedures used in research publication, the FIFE Information System ...

Donald E. Strebel; David R. Landis; K. Fred Huemmrich; Jeffrey A. Newcomer; Blanche W. Meeson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Computer Experiments in Finite Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experiments described here concern an initial design for a computer system specifically for the handling of finite groups, rings, fields, semigroups, and vector spaces. The usefulness of such a system was discussed in ...

Maurer, W.D.

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

LANL | Physics | Dynamic Plutonium Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic plutonium experiments Dynamic plutonium experiments Since the end of nuclear testing the nation has had to rely on sophisticated computer models to ensure the safety and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile. This program is known as science-based stockpile stewardship. Despite possessing the world's fastest computers and most advanced modeling capability, the behavior of materials under dynamic loads that occur in a nuclear weapon are difficult to accurately model. The Dynamic Plutonium experimental program carries out experiments at the Nevada National Security Site on plutonium driven by high explosives. These experiments are needed to measure and understand the behavior of plutonium under extreme conditions. Physics Division has unique capabilities in high-speed x-ray imaging and velocimetry (measuring the

309

San Antonio Mountain Experiment (SAMEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The San Antonio Mountain Experiment (SAMEX) involves a 3325 m. conically shaped, isolated mountain in north-central New Mexico where hourly observations of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, and precipitation are being ...

Morris H. McCutchan; Douglas G. Fox; R. William Furman

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to refine the system details, interfaces and the requirements for remote handling. Table 1. FIRE RadialInsulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM objectives and subsystem requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in

311

Essays in macroeconomics and experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

Shurchkov, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Crucial Experiments in Climate Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses the interplay between computational experiments and scientific advancement in dynamical meteorology and climate dynamics. In doing so, the emphasis is on the dual role of computations in prediction and experimentation, ...

A. Navarra; J. L. Kinter III; J. Tribbia

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

Dolan, Thomas James

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experiment  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the TFTR is given in terms of the physical size of the experiment in relation to existing and future tokamaks. Some break-even criteria are mentioned. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Manhattan Project: Fast Neutron Experiment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

An experiment to determine the cross section of uranium-235 for fast neutrons. The target is the small pile of cubes of uranium hydride. The uranium target is surrounded by larger...

316

Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. RESULTS: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2x10^5 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

Q. Chang; H. M. Cuppen; E. Herbst

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Retail Choice Experiments: Comparing Early-AdopterExperience  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the experience with retail choice of non-residential electricity customers during the period from early 1998 through the first few months of 2000. Key findings include: (1) customers in California received a significantly smaller discount from utility tariffs than customers in other competitive markets; (2) this sample of large commercial/industrial customers believed they were benefiting significantly more from commodity savings from contracts with retail electricity service providers (RESP) than from value-added services; and,(3) market rules appear to be critical to customer experiences with retail competition, yet the relationship between market rules and market development is inadequately understood.

Golove, William

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mass modification experiment definition study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an attempt to find an experiment that would test the Haisch, Rueda, and Puthoff (HRP) conjecture that the mass and inertia of a body are induced effects brought about by changes in the quantum-fluctuation energy of the vacuum. It was not possible, however, to identify a definitive experiment. But, it was possible to identify an experiment that might be able to prove or disprove that the inertial mass of a body can be altered by making changes in the vacuum surrounding the body. Other experiments, which do not involve mass modification, but which teach something about the vacuum, were also defined and included in a ranked list of experiments. This report also contains an annotated bibliography. An interesting point raised by this paper is this: We can estimate the `vacuum energy density` to be 10{sup 108} J/cc, and the vacuum mass density to be 10{sup 94} g/cc, much higher numbers than those associated with nuclear energy. Although the field of `electromagnetic fluctuation energy of the vacuum` is admittedly an esoteric, little-understood field, it does seem to have definite potential as an energy source. 47 refs.

Forward, R.L. [Forward Unlimited, Malibu, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Next generation Stage IV dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors. Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

Tyson, J. Anthony [University of California, Davis

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Maine Yankee Decommissioning - Experience Report: Detailed Experiences 1997-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants began the decommissioning process in the 1990s. Based on current information, it will be several years before the next group of plant licenses expires, and the plants begin decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor, Maine Yankee, in order to document their experience for future plants.

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

UNIRIB Participant Experiences: Ron Goans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Goans Ron Goans Ron Goans Ron Goans Ron Goans is a graduate research assistant working on the thesis component of his master's degree in physics while performing experiments at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His thesis research specifically relates to the field of radioactive ion beam development. The purpose of radioactive ion beam development is to study and produce high-intensity, high-purity beams of radioactive nuclides. These beams are used by nuclear physicists to study the structure of short-lived nuclei. Below is a question and answer dialog about Goans' experience in Oak Ridge. The video featured on the right side of this page also spotlights his experience with the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB)

324

D and D Operational Experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the operational experience gained from more than 25 million man-hours of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) work on both Department of Energy sites and commercial nuclear facilities in the United States. Nuclear D and D activities encompass some of the most hazardous activities imaginable - protecting workers from a huge range and endless combinations of industrial safety, radiological, nuclear safety, and industrial hygiene issues which challenges managers and safety professionals. Performing D and D activities safely is essential to project success. Managers must ensure that work is properly planned and executed, that hazards are identified and mitigated, and that operational experience is captured and utilized on future projects. Many of the lessons learned directly relate to the principles of behavioral-based safety. Our experience indicates that improved safety performance leads to improved productivity. (authors)

Meyer, K.A.; Smith, C.B. [BNG America, 9781 S. Meridian Blvd., Suite 100, Englewood, CO 80112 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Solar neutrino experiments: An update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The situation in solar neutrino physics has changed drastically in the past few years, so that now there are four neutrino experiments in operation, using different methods to look at different regions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. These experiments are the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl Homestake detector, the realtime Kamiokande detector, and the different forms of radiochemical {sup 71}Ga detectors used in the GALLEX and SAGE projects. It is noteworthy that all of these experiments report a deficit of observed neutrinos relative to the predictions of standard solar models (although in the case of the gallium detectors, the statistical errors are still relatively large). This paper reviews the basic principles of operation of these neutrino detectors, reports their latest results and discusses some theoretical interpretations. The progress of three realtime neutrino detectors that are currently under construction, SuperKamiok, SNO and Borexino, is also discussed.

Hahn, R.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Lead Radius Experiment PREX  

SciTech Connect

The proposed PREX experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV and a scattering angle of 6 degrees. Since the Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of R{sub n} with a projected experimental precision of 1 %. In addition to being a fundamental test of nuclear theory, a precise measurement of R{sub n} pins down the density dependence of the symmetry energy of neutron rich nuclear matter which has impacts on neutron star structure, heavy ion collisions, and atomic parity violation experiments.

Robert Michaels

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Home Experiment in Elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze a simple problem in elasticity: the \\emph{initial} motion of an elastic bar that after being hanged from an end is suddenly released. In a second problem a point mass is attached on the top of the bar. The analytical solutions uncover some unexpected properties, which can be checked, with a digital camera or camcorder, in an alternative setup in which a spring is substituted for the bar. The theoretical model and the experiments are useful to understand the similarities and differences between the elastic properties of bar and spring. Students can take advantage of the home experiments to improve their understanding of elastic waves.

J. M. Aguirregabiria; A. Hernndez; M. Rivas

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Economics of quality of experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the recent strong increase of interest in Quality of Experience both in industry and academia has managed to place the end user again into the center of service quality evaluation, corresponding economic implications have not received similar attention ... Keywords: WQL hypothesis, Weber-Fechner law, charging for QoE, telecommunication ecosystem, utility function

Peter Reichl; Bruno Tuffin; Patrick Maill

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Status of the MEG Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MEG experiment which searches for ?? e ? decays at the sensitivity level of 10 ?13 is now in its final stage of the preparation. Some data run is expected by the end of the year 2007. The statuses of each detector components are described.

Aki Maki; MEG Group

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Connecticut Yankee Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor - Connecticut Yankee, in order to provide their experience for future plants.

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Industrial experience with design patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design pattern is a particular prose form of recording design information such that designs which have worked well in the past can be applied again in similar situations in the future. The availability of a collection of design patterns can help both ... Keywords: best practices, design information recording, design patterns, design reuse, industrial experience, information sharing, software architecture documentation, software reusability, system documentation

Kent Beck; Ron Crocker; Gerard Meszaros; John Vlissides; James O. Coplien; Lutz Dominick; Frances Paulisch

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The MAXIMA and MAXIPOL experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MAXIMA is a balloon-based bolometric experiment to measure the temperature anisotropy of the CMB over spatial frequency range 36?l?1235. The MAXIMA-1 flight produced a 124 square degree temperature anisotropy map with a beam diameter of 10 arcmin. These data have been used to produce a power spectrum which is in excellent agreement with data from BOOMERANG and DASI

P. L. Richards; M. Abroe; P. Ade; A. Balbi; J. Bock; J. Borrill; A. Boscaleri; J. Collins; P. G. Ferreira; S. Hanany; V. V. Hristov; A. H. Jaffe; B. Johnson; A. T. Lee; T. Matsumu; P. D. Mauskopf; C. B. Netterfield; E. Pascale; B. Rabii; G. F. Smoot; R. Stompor; C. D. Winant; J. H. P. Wu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Experiment 7: Heat Phase Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiment 7: Heat Phase Changes Matter has 4 phases or states: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. This lab looks at the phase transitions from solid to liquid to gas. 1. Obtain the following materials: 600mL beaker of ice, thermometer, hot plate, timer. 2. Add a very small amount of water to the ice so

Peterson, Blake R.

334

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Analysis of a Bose-Einstein Condensate Double-Well Atom Interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by an open theoretical question in Bose-Einstein condensate atom interferometry, we introduce a novel computational method to describe the condensate order parameter in the presence of a central barrier. We are able to follow the full dynamics of the system during the raising of a barrier, from a single macroscopically occupied ground state to a state where imaging shows a split density and, finally, to the observation of a phase-controlled interference pattern. We are able to discriminate between a mean-field and a two-mode state via the Penrose-Onsager criterion. By simulating the first such experiment, where in spite of the observed splitting of the condensate density there is never more than a single macroscopically occupied state, we provide a definitive interpretation of these systems as a novel many-body form of Young's double-slit experiment.

Faust, Douglas K. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Reinhardt, William P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

The New Zealand Southern Alps Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Alps Experiment is being mounted to study the influence of New Zealand's Southern Alps on local weather and climate. This paper describes these alpine influences and outlines proposed field and modeling experiments. Experiment goals ...

D. S. Wratt; R. N. Ridley; M. R. Sinclair; H. Larsen; S. M. Thompson; R. Henderson; G. L. Austin; S. G. Bradley; A. Auer; A. P. Sturman; I. Owens; B. Fitzharris; B. F. Ryan; J-F. Gayet

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Design and Analysis of Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations with numerical models are often referred to as numerical experiments, by analogy to classical laboratory experiments. Usually, many numerical experiments are carried out to determine the response of a numerical model to variations of ...

Kenneth P. Bowman; Jerome Sacks; Yue-Fang Chang

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April...

339

Fermilab at Work | Experiments and Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group U.S. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study U.S. Lattice QCD Very Large Hadron Collider WFIRST Accelerator Experiments FermilabNICADD Photoinjector Laboratory...

340

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - LCLS Graphite Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCLS Graphite Experiment Poses New Questions for Researchers By Glenn Roberts Jr. May 21, 2012 In experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a powerful X-ray laser...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS  

SciTech Connect

A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to light baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoprodcution experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams and frozen spin polarized targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. This combination of experimental tools gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will facilitate model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experimental program and its current status together with recent results on double polarization measurements in ?{sup +} photoproduction are presented.

Eugene Pasyuk

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclide-migration field experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Human Radiation Experiments: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment Related Sites Related Links Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX Multimedia Related Sites Federal DOE DOE Sites & National Laboratories Federal Other The following are organizations which provide related information and links to databases, electronic documents, and servers. FEDERAL - DOE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) homepage (http://www.doe.gov/)contains information on DOE's Departmental Resources, Programs, Offices, National Labs and other DOE related topics. DOE's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Technical Information Services (TIS) homepage (http://nattie.eh.doe.gov/) is a collection of information services designed to provide safety and health professionals with reliable, accurate and current information to assist them in performing their jobs.

344

UNIRIB Participant Experiences: Cara Jost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cara Jost Cara Jost Cara Jost Cara Jost Cara Jost is a Ph.D. student in chemistry from the University of Mainz in Germany, and is involved with ion source development at the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium as a research scholar. Jost and UNIRIB team members are researching new ways to develop radioactive ion beams for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Below is a question and answer dialog about Jost's experience in Oak Ridge. The video featured on the right side of this page also spotlights Jost's experience with UNIRIB. What is your research focus at UNIRIB? My focus is on chemical reactions in the transfer line of the target-ion source, which can be used to improve the purity of radioactive beams.

345

Reactor Internals Segmentation Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants will not begin this process for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on projects involving the segmentation of the Reactor Vessel Internal Subassemblies conducted at a number of plants undergoing decommissioning. Utilities have found this task very challenging from both a technological and radiation exposure perspective. This report documents the experience...

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design of the START experiment  

SciTech Connect

The START experiment (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) is a low-budget device under construction that is specifically intended to investigate MHD behavior at extremely tight aspect ratios (as low as R/a-1.2) as well as the effectiveness of a major radius compression technique to produce high toroidal current in such plasmas. The main components of the START assembly are described along with the mode of operation.

Smith, R.T.C. [UKAEA Fusion, Culham UK; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMIE AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment) Planning Meeting AMIE Science Steering Committee Chuck Long, Tony DelGenio, Bill Gustafson, Bob Houze, Mike Jensen, Steve Klein, Ruby Leung, Xaihong Liu, Ed Luke, Peter May, Sally McFarlane, Pat Minnis, Courtney Schumacher, Andy Vogelmann, Yi Wang, Xiaoqing Wu, Shaohong Xie Agenda * Proposal due May 1 !!!!!! * Primary purpose of this meeting is discussions and planning in support of

349

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of debonds and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directory structure. Di- rectories are arranged according to experiments, metadata characteristics, organization

Balman, Mehmet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Experiments Advance Hydrogen ...  

Recent experiments by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researcher Heli Wang, however, ...

352

NIST Experiments Challenge Fundamental Understanding of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Experiments Challenge Fundamental Understanding of Electromagnetism. From NIST Tech Beat: November 27, 2012. ...

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Deuterium Experiments in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we report on the results of isotope exchange experiments in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). We have compared {approx}500 deuterium discharges with similar discharges in hydrogen. Typically, we produce plasmas with peak toroidal currents in the range of 0.6 MA, electron temperatures (T{sub e}) of {approx}200 eV and energy confinement times ({tau}{sub E}) of {approx}200 {micro}s. The D{sub 2} fueled discharges show similar results to those with H{sub 2} fueling with no obvious differences in confinement time. Electron temperatures of {approx}200 eV with similar electron densities were observed. Both the deuterium and hydrogen fueled discharges have a calculated thermal conduction below {chi}{sub e}<10 m{sup 2}/s. However, the D{sub 2} fueled discharges had a modest increase in high-Z (titanium) impurity content suggesting an increase of physical sputtering. We find no significant mass scaling effects.

Wood, R; Hill, D N; Hooper, E; McLean, H; Ryutov, D; Woodruff, S

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

HFIR Experiment Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Facilities Experiment Facilities HFIR Experiment Facilities Neutron Scattering Facilities Target Positions Experiment Facilities in the Beryllium Reflector Large Removable Beryllium Facilities Small Removable Beryllium Facilities Control-Rod Access Plug Facilities Small Vertical Experiment Facilities Large Vertical Experiment Facilities Hydraulic Tube Facility Peripheral Target Positions Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory and Pneumatic Tube Facilities Slant Engineering Facilities Gamma Irradiation Facility Quality Assurance Requirements Contact Information Neutron Scattering Facilities The fully instrumented HFIR will eventually include 15 state-of-the-art neutron scattering instruments, seven of which will be designed exclusively for cold neutron experiments, located in a guide hall south of the reactor

356

Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

Campbell, Sorcha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Poon, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Poon@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Davidson, Jean [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin [Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Experiments with the Dragon Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic characteristics of a self-sustaining chain reaction were demonstrated with the Chicago Pile in 1943, but it was not until early 1945 that sufficient enriched material became available to experimentally verify fast-neutron cross-sections and the kinetic characteristics of a nuclear chain reaction sustained with prompt neutrons alone. However, the demands of wartime and the rapid decline in effort following the cessation of hostilities often resulted in the failure to fully document the experiments or in the loss of documentation as personnel returned to civilian pursuits. When documented, the results were often highly classified. Even when eventually declassified, the data were often not approved for public release until years later.2 Even after declassification and approval for public release, the records are sometimes difficult to find. Through a fortuitous discovery, a set of handwritten notes by ''ORF July 1945'' entitled ''Dragon - Research with a Pulsed Fission Reactor'' was found by William L. Myers in an old storage safe at Pajarito Site of the Los Alamos National Laboratory3. Of course, ORF was identified as Otto R. Frisch. The document was attached to a page in a nondescript spiral bound notebook labeled ''494 Book'' that bore the signatures of Louis Slotin and P. Morrison. The notes also reference an ''Idea LS'' that can only be Louis Slotin. The discovery of the notes led to a search of Laboratory Archives, the negative files of the photo lab, and the Report Library for additional details of the experiments with the Dragon machine that were conducted between January and July 1945. The assembly machine and the experiments were carefully conceived and skillfully executed. The analyses--without the crutch of computers--display real insight into the characteristics of the nuclear chain reaction. The information presented here provides what is believed to be a complete collection of the original documentation of the observations made with the Dragon Machine in early 1945.

R.E. Malenfant

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The sub-detector integration in recent milestone weeks is described. Cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6 included simultaneous data-taking and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector, as well as combined analysis of muon detector and muon trigger. The calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The high-level-trigger infrastructure is being installed and algorithms tested in technical runs.

Juergen Thomas; for the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

ALSNews Vol. 284  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Print 4 Print In This Issue Director's Update: FY08 Budget UEC Corner: Looking Forward to the BES Review and Beyond Topo II: An Enzyme Target For Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet Register Now for the 2008 Beam Instrumentation Workshop Operations News Links Possible Breakthrough for Sufferers of Huntington's Breaking Down Huntington's Disease One Protein At A Time DOE's Disappointing Budget Makes It Harder to Stick to the Basics More Information About ALSNews ALSNews Archive To subscribe/unsubscribe, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Director's Update: FY08 Budget This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

360

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Quantum bouncer: theory and experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum bouncer (QB) concept is a known QM textbook example of confined particle, namely, a solution to the 1D Schroedinger equation for a linear potential (the so-called Airy equation). It would be a great methodological challenge to create such a QM object in laboratory. An attempt of observation of the QB ``running'' in the horizontal direction was recently made by the international team at the Laue-Langevin Institute, Grenoble. The experiment was performed with ultra-cold neutrons. In this paper, the experiment is analyzed in view of the authors' claim that ``neutron quantum states in Earth gravitational field'' are observed. The experimental apparatus is designed for measurements of horizontal flux of neutrons passing through an absorbing wave guide with a variable height of absorber. From our analysis, it follows, however, that in such a layout measured data are not sensitive to quantum probability density in the vertical direction. The overall conclusion is made that the experimental data do not contain sufficient information to justify the claim.

Anatoli Andrei Vankov

2009-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Polarized SRF Gun Experiment  

SciTech Connect

RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

Kewisch, Joerg; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Rao, Triveni; Burrill, Andrew; Pate, David; Grover, Ranjan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Todd, Rob; Bluem, Hans; Holmes, Doug; Schultheiss, Tom [Advanced Energy Systems, Medford, NY 11763 (United States)

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

The polarized SRF gun experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Grover, R.; Todd, R.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Special Experiments: AES-UES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Experiments at the APS Special note is made of the following experimental activities. (Updated 2/19/2012 17:00) BEAMLINE DATES SPOKESPERSON COMMENTS 2BM-B rad #92404 2/24- 2/27 Patrick LaReviere U of C *Approvals pending *No special procedure, samples must be surveyed before and after experiment by APS-HP. 10ID-B #92409 2/29- 3/05 Ken Kemner ANL-203 *Approvals pending *Samples may be left unattended for up to 12 hours with beam ON when hutch door is secured with lock and chain. 10BM-B rad #92408 3/01- 3/06 Ken Kemner ANL-203 *Approvals Pending *Samples may be left unattended for up to 12 hours with beam ON when hutch door is secured with lock and chain. 1ID-B rad #91277 3/07- 3/12 Don Brown- LANL Mark Daymond Queen's University *Approvals Pending 3ID-B #92107 3/10- 3/19 Valentin Iota UNLV

367

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Note: Direct measurement of the point-to-point resolution for microns-thick specimens in the ultrahigh-voltage electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

We report on a direct measurement method and results of the point-to-point resolution for microns-thick amorphous specimens in the ultrahigh-voltage electron microscope (ultra-HVEM). We first obtain the ultra-HVEM images of nanometer gold particles with different sizes on the top surfaces of the thick epoxy-resin specimens. Based on the Rayleigh criterion, the point-to-point resolution is then determined as the minimum distance between centers of two resolvable tangent gold particles. Some values of resolution are accordingly acquired for the specimens with different thicknesses at the accelerating voltage of 2 MV, for example, 18.5 nm and 28.4 nm for the 5 {mu}m and 8 {mu}m thick epoxy-resin specimens, respectively. The presented method and results provide a reliable and useful approach to quantifying and comparing the achievable spatial resolution for the thick specimens imaged in the mode of transmission electron including the scanning transmission electron microscope.

Wang Fang; Cao Meng; Zhang Haibo [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Nishi, Ryuji; Takaoka, Akio [Research Center for Ultrahigh-Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment):  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan ARM Climate Research Facility Tropical Western Pacific Manus Site October 2011-March 2012 C Long Principal Investigator A DelGenio P May W Gustafson S McFarlane R Houze P Minnis C Jakob C Schumacher M Jensen A Vogelmann S Klein Y Wang L Ruby Leung X Wu X Liu S Xie E Luke March 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S Government Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

370

Experiment Profile: Mu2e  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mu2e Mu2e NAME: Muon-to-electron conversion, or Mu2e WHAT IS THE EXPERIMENT LOOKING FOR? A muon that does not follow the traditional weak- force decay pattern into a lighter electron and two neutrinos, but converts wholly into an electron. WHAT WILL THIS TELL US ABOUT THE WORLD? * Observing Mu2e conversion would point the way to a unification of all the forces of nature controlling the interactions of matter. This unification of the four existing forces we observe today - gravity, the electromagnetic force, and the weak and strong forces - is considered Albert Einstein's dream of "grand unification. * Finding signs of this "grand unification" could explain how the universe evolved from being

371

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island (AMIE-Gan) Science Plan October 2011-March 2012 C Long Principal Investigator A Del Genio P May M Deng S McFarlane X Fu P Minnis W Gustafson C Schumacher R Houze A Vogelmann C Jakob Y Wang M Jensen P Webster R Johnson S Xie X Liu C Zhang E Luke April 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

373

Fermilab SRF cryomodule operational experience  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing an Advanced Accelerator Research and Development facility at New Muon Lab. The cryogenic infrastructure in support of the initial phase of the facility consists of two Tevatron style standalone refrigerators, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2K operations with supporting purification systems. During this phase of the project a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule was installed, cooled and tested. Design constraints of the cryomodule required that the cryomodule individual circuits be cooled at predetermined rates. These constraints required special design solutions to achieve. This paper describes the initial cooldown and operational experience of a 1.3 GHz cryomodule using the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; White, M.; Johnson, G.S.; /Fermilab

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Review of Solar Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the constraints on the solar neutrino mixing parameters with data collected by the Homestake, SAGE, GALLEX, Kamiokande, SuperKamiokande, and SNO experiments. An emphasis will be given to the global solar neutrino analyses in terms of matter-enhanced oscillation of two active flavors. The results to-date, including both solar model dependent and independent measurements, indicate that electron neutrinos are changing to other active types on route to the Earth from the Sun. The total flux of solar neutrinos is found to be in very good agreement with solar model calculations. Future measurements will focus on greater accuracy for mixing parameters and on better sensitivity to low neutrino energies.

Alain Bellerive

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX) is a multi-institutional, all-India coordinated program to study the atmospheric boundary-layer processes in the monsoon trough (MT) area of northern India. The experiment is being organized ...

Malti Goel; H. N. Srivastava

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The BMRC Australian Monsoon Experiment: AMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) willbe conducting a major research effort in the Australian tropics during 1986-1988 including a two-phase field experiment, the Australian Monsoon Experiment (AMEX). This will be done in ...

Greg J. Holland; John L. McBride; Roger K. Smith; David Jasper; Thomas D. Keenan

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Experiments Concerning Variability among Subjective Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of subjective (hand) analyses is explored by examining the results of two synoptic laboratory experiments. Two groups of analysts participated in the first experiment, one consisting of 13 senior meteorology students (1977), the ...

Dayton G. Vincent; Herbert Borenstein

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Monterey Area Ship Track Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1994 the Monterey Area Ship Track (MAST) experiment was conducted off the coast of California to investigate the processes behind anthropogenic modification of cloud albedo. The motivation for the MAST experiment is described here, as ...

Philip A. Durkee; Kevin J. Noone; Robert T. Bluth

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experiment Hall & Beamline | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Hall & Beamlines The ratchet-shaped radiation-shielding wall between the APS storage ring and the experiment hall serves as a line of demarcation. Thirty-five "sectors"...

380

The Lidars in Flat Terrain (LIFT) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe and present early results from the July_August 1996 Lidars in Flat Terrain (LIFT) experiment. LIFT was a boundary layer experiment that made use of recently developed Doppler, aerosol backscatter, and ozone lidars, along with ...

Stephen A. Cohn; Shane D. Mayor; Christian J. Grund; Tammy M. Weckwerth; Christoph Senff

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Experience with Commissioning New Generation Gas Suspension ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Alumina and Bauxite. Presentation Title, Experience with Commissioning...

384

Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Institute of Computer Science Computational experience with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Computational experience with modified. conjugate gradient methods for.

386

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

387

Neutrino properties from reactor and accelerator experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk, I discuss the general theory of neutrino oscillation experiments, putting special emphasis on the momentum distribution of the incoming neutrino beam. Then I discuss recent neutrino oscillation experiments, viz., LSND, KARMEN and CHOOZ. Experiments foreseeable in the near future have also been discussed at the end.

Pal, P B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Toward an experiment engine for lightweight grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study conducted on the Grid'5000 platform, a lightweight grid. The goal was to make a rather simple experiment, and study how difficult it was to carry out correctly. This means it had to be correct, reproducible and efficient. ... Keywords: experiment framework, experiment methodology, lightweight grid, performance study

Brice Videau; Corinne Touati; Olivier Richard

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment Home | Staff | Search | Advisory Committee | User Facilities | Laboratories | Congress | Budget Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment http://web.archive.org/web/20000902074635/www.er.doe.gov/production/bes/YuanLee_Exp.html (1 of 4)4/7/2006 2:46:13 PM Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment The above illustration was drawn by Professor Yuan T. Lee, who shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. It shows the design for his crossed molecular beam experiment described in the story beginning on page 27 of "Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments" (DOE/ER-0455P, May 1990); the story is also copied below. The purpose of this experiment was to study the chemical reaction of sodium atoms with oxygen molecules. In the experiment, a beam of sodium atoms (green,

391

LCLS CDR Chapter 3 - Scientific Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Scientific Basis for Optical Systems TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) has recommended experiments in five scientific disciplines for the initial operation of the LCLS. These experiments cover a variety of scientific disciplines: atomic physics, plasma physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. The x-ray optics and detectors needed to verify the LCLS capability to address these five disciplines will be constructed and installed as part of the LCLS project. The experiments are described in detail in the document "LCLS: The First Experiments" referenced earlier. Two classes of experiments are proposed for the LCLS. The first class consists of experiments where the x-ray beam is used to probe the sample, as is done in most experiments at current

392

Non-destructive observation of in-grown stacking faults in 4H-SiC epitaxial layer using mirror electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Mirror electron microscope (MEM) observation has been conducted for a 4-{mu}m-thick n-doped 4H-SiC epitaxial layer. If the sample is simultaneously illuminated with ultraviolet (UV) light of a slightly greater energy than the bandgap energy of 4H-SiC, in-grown stacking faults (IGSFs) can be clearly observed in MEM images. These observations were performed non-destructively, as almost all irradiated electrons returned without impinging the sample surface due to the negative voltage applied to the sample. High spatial resolution observation via MEM showed that multiple IGSFs were stacked up. The phenomenon in which the contrast of the IGSFs vanished in the absence of UV illumination and under UV illumination with a lower energy than the bandgap energy revealed that the origin of the contrast was the negative charging of IGSFs trapping electrons excited by UV light.

Hasegawa, Masaki; Ohno, Toshiyuki [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 1-280, Higashi-koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/.s.

Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

1976-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning MOKE microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast `white light' supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of t...

Henn, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The BigBoss Experiment  

SciTech Connect

BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)  

SciTech Connect

This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Software engineering: What do experiments need?  

SciTech Connect

This paper will review the use of software engineering in High Energy Physics experiments and will suggest ways in which that use will change significantly in the future. In Principle, experiments do not need software engineering. We can verify this by looking at a long series of experiments that have succeeded without it. Some experiments that have tried to apply formal engineering methods have given them up before the software was complete. Future experiments, however, face many new challenges in the larger data samples, larger and more distributed collaborations and longer time scales. In addition, new tools are available to aid in the development of complex software systems. It is appropriate, therefore, to examine whether there is now a better match between software engineering and the needs of experiments.

Loken, S.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Software engineering: What do experiments need  

SciTech Connect

This paper will review the use of software engineering in High Energy Physics experiments and will suggest ways in which that use will change significantly in the future. In Principle, experiments do not need software engineering. We can verify this by looking at a long series of experiments that have succeeded without it. Some experiments that have tried to apply formal engineering methods have given them up before the software was complete. Future experiments, however, face many new challenges in the larger data samples, larger and more distributed collaborations and longer time scales. In addition, new tools are available to aid in the development of complex software systems. It is appropriate, therefore, to examine whether there is now a better match between software engineering and the needs of experiments.

Loken, S.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The XENON100 experiment is searching for WIMPs, which are particles that may consist dark matter. It is located in the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy at a depth of {approx}3600 m.w.e.. The experiment description, its performance and the expected background based on Monte Carlo simulations and material screening along with the projected sensitivities of the experiment are presented. In addition, a brief description of the upgrade XENON100 detector is given.

Tziaferi, E. [Physics Institute, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, Zuerich (Switzerland)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Kilauea Iki lava lake experiment plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve experimental studies are proposed to complete field laboratory work at Kilauea Iki lava lake. Of these twelve experiments, eleven do not require the presence of melt. Some studies are designed to use proven techniques in order to expand our existing knowledge, while others are designed to test new concepts. Experiments are grouped into three main categories: geophysics, energy extraction, and drilling technology. Each experiment is described in terms of its location, purpose, background, configuration, operation, and feasibility.

Dunn, J.C.; Hills, R.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Systematic errors in long baseline oscillation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives a brief overview of long baseline neutrino experiments and their goals, and then describes the different kinds of systematic errors that are encountered in these experiments. Particular attention is paid to the uncertainties that come about because of imperfect knowledge of neutrino cross sections and more generally how neutrinos interact in nuclei. Near detectors are planned for most of these experiments, and the extent to which certain uncertainties can be reduced by the presence of near detectors is also discussed.

Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

WIPP Gas-Generation Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750 ml headspace in each vessel was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure estimated in the repository were it to be inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generated by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6 1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. Up to 4.2% hydrogen, by volume, was measured. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in vessels containing carbon steel. Visual examination of carbon-steel coupons confirmed the correspondence between the extent of observable corrosion and hydrogen generation. Average corrosion penetration rates in carbon-steel of up to 2.3 microns per year were deduced. Conversion of carbon to carbon dioxide was calculated to be as high as 4.7 g mol/yr/g carbon. Carbon monoxide was detected in only two waste compositions, and methane was detected in only one. In all three of these cases, the concentrations of these lesser gases detected were barely above the detection limits. No hydrogen sulfide was ever detected. Initial rates of hydrogen generation measured in the carbon-steel-bearing wastes during the first year of testing did not always correspond to rates measured over the longer term. Compared to the long-term trends, the initial gas-generation rates for some waste types were higher, for some lower, and for others remained constant. Although carbon-steel corrosion was clearly the dominant hydrogen generator, the rates of generation were found to be reduced in test vessels where the same quantity of carbon steel was co-mingled with other waste types. This is a beneficial phenomenon relative to performance of the WIPP repository. Statistical analyses of the results were made to quantify these negative interaction effects. Electron microscopy analyses of the carbon-steel coupons revealed that corrosion products were predominantly iron chlorides and oxides. Iron, chlorine, oxygen, uranium, magnesium, calcium, aluminum, silicon were all present in the corrosion products. No americium nor neptunium, both present in the wastes, were detected in any of the corrosion products. All

Frank S. Felicione; Steven M. Frank; Dennis D. Keiser

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

407

Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience curves for wind farms. Energy Policy 33, 133-150.curves for wind power. Energy Policy 30, 1181- Jakob, M. ,

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Martin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is trying to improve emergency response by developing computer codes to fuse together two different kinds of satellite...

409

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. E. Wolfe, and E. G. O'Neill. 2001. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and...

410

Roadmap to the Project: Experiments List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the environment. These releases were designed to characterize the dispersion of radiation. The purpose of the experiment was to enable scientists to determine the fraction...

411

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Experiment Finds Ulcer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have revealed a potential new way to attack common...

412

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier...

413

Current experiments in elementary particle physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Office of Human Radiation Experiments - Archived Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

documents cold war metabolism of lethal dose studies with rates dose experiments medical research program Iodine-131 Iron-59 For further information regarding information...

415

Spatial Patterns Confound Experiments in Orchard Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns differ among sites, crops, and process of interest,currently lacking in the tree crops, specifically, and thecommonly used in tree crop experiments and in fertilizer

Rosenstock, Todd S; Plant, Richard E; Brown, Patrick H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Efficient designs for constrained mixture experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many practical experiments on mixtures (where the components sum to one) include additional lower or upper bounds on components, or on linear combinations of them. Usually theory cannot be used to obtain a good design, and algorithmic methods are necessary. ... Keywords: Algorithms, mixture experiments, optimal design

R. J. Martin; M. C. Bursnall; E. C. Stillman

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Title of dissertation: ROTATING, HYDROMAGNETIC LABORATORY EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding, and if I live a decade beyond that, everything I paint -- every dot and line -- will be alive. I experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads, and around the age of fifty, I began to work in earnest, producing numerous designs. It was not until after

Lathrop, Daniel P.

419

Operating and maintenance experience in tritium environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of practical experience gained over more than twenty years from analyzing failures of process equipment operated in tritium and deuterium environments. Significant improvements have been achieved in design and procurement of new equipment, testing and selection of materials, and gradually more favorable maintenance experience. Preferred materials and inspection methods are described. 6 tabs.

Tuer, G.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Experiences of Wiki use in Finnish companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our study was two-fold. The first and most important objective was to gather experiences on the use of wiki software in Finnish companies. The second objective was to study the frequency of the use of wikis among Finland's 50 biggest ... Keywords: adoption, company use, motivation, user experience, wiki software

Jani Henriksson; Teemu Mikkonen; Tere Vadn

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

User Experience Design Guidelines for Windows Phone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

User Experience Design Guidelines for Windows Phone The UI Design and Interaction Guide for Windows superseded by the User Experience Design Guidelines for Windows Phone on MSDN ® . There are six parts to the new guidelines: 1. The Windows Phone Platform: Takes a brief look at the types of applications

Narasayya, Vivek

422

Ris-M-2874 Neutron Diffraction Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;1. Introduction The nuclear spin systems in metals provide ideal models to test theoretical ideas by experiments Roskilde, Denmark August 1990 #12;Abstract Nuclear spins in silver constitute an ideal antiferromagnetic study the feasibility of neutron diffraction experiments on nuclear magnetic order in silver

423

Preliminary results of the echo-seeding experiment at SLAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiment at NLCTA, SLAC LDRD programme, http://EEHG experiment (ECHO-7) at SLAC has gone from the designgeneration experiment at SLAC, These proceedings, [9] J.H.

Xiang, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Harnik, Roni; /Fermilab; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Defect microstructural evolution in ion irradiated metallic nanofoils: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation versus cluster dynamics modeling and in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments  

SciTech Connect

Understanding materials degradation under intense irradiation is important for the development of next generation nuclear power plants. Here we demonstrate that defect microstructural evolution in molybdenum nanofoils in situ irradiated and observed on a transmission electron microscope can be reproduced with high fidelity using an object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulation technique. Main characteristics of defect evolution predicted by OKMC, namely, defect density and size distribution as functions of foil thickness, ion fluence and flux, are in excellent agreement with those obtained from the in situ experiments and from previous continuum-based cluster dynamics modeling. The combination of advanced in situ experiments and high performance computer simulation/modeling is a unique tool to validate physical assumptions/mechanisms regarding materials response to irradiation, and to achieve the predictive power for materials stability and safety in nuclear facilities.

Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Li Meimei [Division of Nuclear Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kirk, Marquis A. [Division of Materials Science, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cornell Center for Materials Research Research Experience for Teachers 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electron microscopes · Television and computer monitors · The light bulb · Current electricity · Series ** Making a light bulb 6-inch piece of braided picture wire, with individual wires separated Play-doh Paper clip connecting wires 6- or 9-volt battery ** Conservation of Energy Miniature light bulbs in sockets

Cohen, Itai

428

Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microscopic evidence for a partially gapped density wave state in {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} in high magnetic fields.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present NMR measurements on {alpha}-(BEDt-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}, in which the six inner carbon sites of BEDT-TTF are labeled with the {sup 13}C isotope, at low temperatures and in magnetic fields up to 28.8 T. We find, based on microscopic measurements which probe the center of the primary molecular orbital, that the density wave ground state of this system persists up to fields well above the so-called 'kink field', a hysteretic transition observed in transport near 23 T below 6 K. The main implication of this result is that in the low temperature limit, the ground state of this material is not fully metallic, but still partially gapped, even to 28.8 T. We obtain a BCS-like relationship between the transition temperature and the energy gap, as derived from the spin relaxation measurements using a simple model. Further, the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum is relatively insensitive to crossing the phase boundary, a result that does not support the notion that the ground state is a conventional spin density wave ground state.

Kuhns, P. L.; Brooks, J. S.; Caldwell, T.; Moulton, W. G.; Reyes, A. P.; Biskup, N.; Kini, A. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Wang, H. H.; Geiser, U.; Williams, J. M.; Florida State Univ.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nanosecond in situ transmission electron microscope studies of the reversible Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} crystalline <==> amorphous phase transformation  

SciTech Connect

Chalcogenide-based phase-change materials have wide use in optical recording media and are growing in importance for use in non-volatile electronic memory. For both applications, rapid switching between the amorphous and crystalline phases is necessary, and understanding the changes during rapidly driven phase transitions is of scientific and technological significance. Laser-induced crystallization and amorphization occur rapidly and changes in atomic structure, microstructure, and temperature are difficult to observe experimentally and determine computationally. We have used nanosecond-scale time-resolved diffraction with intense electron pulses to study Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} during laser crystallization. Using a unique and unconventional specimen geometry, cycling between the amorphous and crystalline phases was achieved, enabling in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of both microstructural and crystallographic changes caused by repeated switching. Finite element analysis was used to simulate interactions of the laser with the nano-structured specimens and to model the rapidly changing specimen temperature. Such time-resolved experimental methods combined with simulation of experimentally inaccessible physical characteristics will be fundamental to advancing the understanding of rapidly driven phase transformations.

Santala, M. K.; Reed, B. W.; LaGrange, T.; Campbell, G. H.; Browning, N. D. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Topuria, T. [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Raoux, S. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Meister, S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Cui, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Correlation between resistance-change effect in transition-metal oxides and secondary-electron contrast of scanning electron microscope images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conductive atomic-force microscopy (C-AFM) writing is attracting attention as a technique for clarifying the switching mechanism of resistive random-access memory by providing a wide area filled with filaments, which can be regarded as one filament with large radius. The writing area on a nickel-oxide (NiO) film formed by conductive atomic-force microscopy was observed by scanning electron microscope, and a correlation between the contrast in a secondary-electron image (SEI) and the resistance written by C-AFM was revealed. In addition, the dependence of the SEI contrast on the beam accelerating voltage (V{sub accel}) suggests that the resistance-change effect occurs near the surface of the NiO film. As for the effects of electron irradiation and vacuum annealing on the C-AFM writing area, it was shown that the resistance-change effect is caused by exchange of oxygen with the atmosphere at the surface of the NiO film. This result suggests that the low-resistance and high-resistance areas are, respectively, p-type Ni{sub 1+{delta}}O ({delta} =} 0).

Kinoshita, K.; Kishida, S. [Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan); Tottori University Electronic Display Research Center, 522-2 Koyama-Kita, Tottori 680-0941 (Japan); Yoda, T. [Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

Huang Hu; Zhao Hongwei; Shi Chengli; Wu Boda; Fan Zunqiang; Wan Shunguang; Geng Chunyang [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Renmin Street 5988, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Requirements for the GCFR plenum streaming experiment  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the experiment objectives and generic descriptions of experimental configurations for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) plenum shield experiment. This report defines four experiment phases. Each phase represents a distinct area of uncertainty in computing radiation transport from the GCFR core to the plenums, through the upper and lower plenum shields, and ultimately to the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) liner: (1) the shield heterogeneity phase; (2) the exit shield simulation phase; (3) the plenum streaming phase; and (4) the plenum shield simulation phase.

Perkins, R.G.; Rouse, C.A.; Hamilton, C.J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Scanning and Mapping Strategies for CMB Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CMB anisotropy experiments seeking to make maps with more pixels than the 6144 pixels used by the COBE DMR need to address the practical issues of the computer time and storage required to make maps. A simple, repetitive scan pattern reduces these requirements but leaves the experiment vulnerable to systematic errors and striping in the maps. In this paper I give a time-ordered method for map-making with one-horned experiments that has reasonable memory and CPU needs but can handle complex COBE-like scans paths and 1/f noise.

Edward L. Wright

1996-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microscopic Description of Induced Fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected aspects of the description of neutron-induced fission in 240Pu in the framework of the nuclear energy density functional theory at finite temperature are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects pertaining to the choice of thermodynamic state variables, the evolution of fission barriers as function of the incident neutron energy, and the temperatures of the fission fragments.

N. Schunck

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

Simulating scanning tunneling microscope measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the largest problems in scanning tunneling microscopy design is noise control. It is the burden of the designer to determine if money should be used to build a floating room for vibration isolation or for top-of-the-line ...

Venkatachalam, Vivek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The microscopic theory of fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fission-fragment properties have been calculated for thermal neutron-induced fission on a $^{239}\\textrm{Pu}$ target, using constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with a finite-range effective interaction. A quantitative criterion based on the interaction energy between the nascent fragments is introduced to define the scission configurations. The validity of this criterion is benchmarked against experimental measurements of the kinetic energies and of multiplicities of neutrons emitted by the fragments.

W. Younes; D. Gogny

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Networked Scanning Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Featured Overview. A New ParadigmMulti-User Scanning Electron Microscopy. L.S. Chumbley, M. Meyer, K. Fredrickson, and F.C. Laabs. Introduction; System...

440

Microscopic Models for Chemical Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce an infinite particle system dynamics, which includes stochastic chemical kinetics models, the classical Kac model and free space movement. We study energy redistribution between two energy types (kinetic and chemical) in different time scales, similar to energy redistribution in the living cell. One example is considered in great detail, where the model provides main formulas of chemical thermodynamics.

Malyshev, V A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microscopic Models for Chemical Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce an infinite particle system dynamics, which includes stochastic chemical kinetics models, the classical Kac model and free space movement. We study energy redistribution between two energy types (kinetic and chemical) in different time scales, similar to energy redistribution in the living cell. One example is considered in great detail, where the model provides main formulas of chemical thermodynamics.

V. A. Malyshev

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Heating Graphene in a Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , The Vasek Vitek Honorary Symposium on Crystal Defects, Computational...

443

Student Career Experience Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Jobs > Opportunities for Students > Student Our Jobs > Opportunities for Students > Student Career Experience Program Student Career Experience Program The Student Career Experience Program (SCEP) is a great way to start your NNSA career while pursuing your studies in college or graduate school. This program gives you the opportunity to combine your academic studies with on-the-job training and experience directly related to your academic program. You will have the opportunity to work on exciting NNSA projects, earn money while serving your nation and take advantage of an excellent benefits package, all while maintaining your student status and completing your education. SCEP allows our managers to evaluate your performance in real work situations and discover first-hand your abilities as a potential

444

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus PSSC NOTE01 15-Jan-2013 When bringing a piece of apparatus to the APS for an experiment that will involve pressure, whether it is to be used on a beamline during a measurement or in a laboratory to prepare the sample prior to the experiment, the hazards associated with the equipment must be reviewed. To review the equipment and make any recommendations, a certain level of documentation must be provided by the experimenter. The length and depth of the documentation should be commensurate with the complexity of the system. 1. Description of apparatus a. Description of the assembly and operation of the system. b. State the maximum working pressure, working fluid (liquid or gas) used to

445

From design experiments to formative interventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion of design experiments has largely ignored the Vygotskian tradition of formative interventions based on the principle of double stimulation. This tradition offers a radical approach to learning reasearch which focuses on the agency of the ...

Yrj Engestrm

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Confined volume blasting experiments: Description and analysis  

SciTech Connect

A series of bench-scale blasting experiments was conducted to produce rubble beds for use in retorting experiments. The experiments consisted of blasting oil shale with explosives within a confined volume containing 25% void. A variety of blasting geometries was used to control the fragment size distribution and void distribution in the rubble. The series of well controlled tests provided excellent data for use in validating rock fragmentation models. Analyses of the experiments with PRONTO, a dynamic finite element computer code, and a newly developed fracturing model provided good agreement between code predictions and experimental measurements of fracture extent and fragment size. CAROM, a dynamic distinct element code developed to model rock motion during blasting, was used to model the fully fragmented tests. Calculations of the void distribution agreed well with experimentally measured values. 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Gorham-Bergeron, E.; Kuszmaul, J.S.; Bickel, T.C.; Shirey, D.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Oceanographic Experiment Design by Simulated Annealing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceanographic experiment design problem is discussed in the context of several simple examples drawn from acoustic tomography. The optimization of an objective functionchosen to characterize the array design is carried out using the ...

Norman Barth; Carl Wunsch

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

GNSS radio occultation constellation observing system experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments within the operational ECMWF data assimilation framework have been performed for summer 2008 when the largest recorded number of GNSS radio occultation observations from both operational and experimental satellites ...

Peter Bauer; Gbor Radnti; Sean Healy; Carla Cardinali

449

State of work on the AMBAL experiment  

SciTech Connect

A diagram of the AMBAL tandem mirror experiment is given. The main topics discussed are the vapor jet, titanium vaporizer, plasma gun, startup injectors, main injectors, diagnostics, and numerical modeling. (MOW)

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Students gain work experience at WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students Gain Work Experience at WIPP Students Gain Work Experience at WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 -- Students from two Eddy County high schools are gaining valuable experience by spending time with employees of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division and Day & Zimmermann, LLC at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Six students from Carlsbad High School and four students from Loving High School are participating in the 1999-2000 WIPP Shadow Program. A "shadow" is a student who teams up with an employee to gain hands-on experience in the workplace. This activity helps the students identify career options and develop confidence. Each student spends three days during the school year with a volunteer mentor at the work location. "This program offers our employees the opportunity to share their knowledge and

451

HEPEX: The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX) is an international project to advance technologies for hydrological forecasting. Its goal is to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to demonstrate ...

John C. Schaake; Thomas M. Hamill; Roberto Buizza; Martyn Clark

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Lagged Average Predictions in a Predictability Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagged average predictions are examined here within the context of an idealized predictability experiment. Lagged predictions contribute to making better forecasts than the forecasts obtained from using only the latest initial state. Analytic ...

John O. Roads

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - CERN: Experiments Observe...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERN: Experiments Observe Particle Consistent with Long-sought Higgs Boson July 5, 2012 from CERN At a seminar held at CERN as a curtain raiser to the year's major particle physics...

454

TELEX The Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field program of the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) took place in central Oklahoma, MayJune 2003 and 2004. It aimed to improve understanding of the interrelationships among microphysics, kinematics, ...

Donald R. MacGorman; W. David Rust; Conrad L. Ziegler; Edward R. Mansell; Terry J. Schuur; Michael I. Biggerstaff; Jerry M. Straka; Eric C. Bruning; Kristin M. Kuhlman; Nicole R. Lund; Clark Payne; Nicholas S. Biermann; William H. Beasley; Larry D. Carey; Paul R. Krehbiel; William Rison; Kenneth B. Eack

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Lindsay Gabbert  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, accepts scientists at all levels and provides them with laboratory experience and...

456

The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset describing tropical cloud systems and their environmental setting and impacts has been collected during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and Aerosol and Chemical Transport in Tropical ...

Peter T. May; James H. Mather; Geraint Vaughan; Keith N. Bower; Christian Jakob; Greg M. McFarquhar; Gerald G. Mace

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Early Experiences with the EGrid Testbed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Testbed and Applications working group of the European Grid Forum (EGrid) is actively building and experimenting with a grid infrastructure connecting several research-based supercomputing sites located in Europe. This paper reports on our first ...

Gabrielle Allen; Thomas Dramlitsch; Tom Goodale; Gerd Lanfermann; Thomas Radke; Ed Seidel; Thilo Kielmann; Kees Verstoep; Zoltan Balaton; Peter Kacsuk; Ferenc Szalai; Joern Gehring; Axel Keller; Achim Streit; Ludek Matyska; Miroslav Ruda; Ales Krenek; Harald Knipp; Andr Merzky; Alexander Reinefeld; Florian Schintke; Bogdan Ludwiczak; Jarek Nabrzyski; Juliusz Pukacki; Hans-Peter Kersken; Giovanni Aloisio; Massimo Cafaro; Wolfgang Ziegler; Michael Russell

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) is a coordinated international project, composed of an observational field campaign and a research program, focused on the investigation of atmospheric rotors and closely related phenomena in complex ...

Vanda Grubii?; James D. Doyle; Joachim Kuettner; Richard Dirks; Stephen A. Cohn; Laura L. Pan; Stephen Mobbs; Ronald B. Smith; C. David Whiteman; Stanley Czyzyk; Simon Vosper; Martin Weissmann; Samuel Haimov; Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Fotini Katopodes Chow

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition ExperimentASTEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic Stratocumulus Experiment (ASTEX) was conducted over the northeast Atlantic Ocean during June 1992 with substantial international collaboration. The main goal of ASTEX was to study the climatologically important transition between ...

Bruce A. Albrecht; Christopher S. Bretherton; Doug Johnson; Wayne H. Scubert; A. Shelby Frisch

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The THORPEX Observation Impact Intercomparison Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is being conducted to directly compare the impact of all assimilated observations on short-range forecast errors in different forecast systems using an adjoint-based technique. The technique allows detailed comparison of observation ...

Ronald Gelaro; Rolf H. Langland; Simon Pellerin; Ricardo Todling

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plasma Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium 5 th June 2013 Wednesday, June 5, 13 So many dynamos (s men dnuh-mz), 1. a phrase which reads the same backwards and...

462

ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Student Career Experience Program | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

This program gives you the opportunity to combine your academic studies with on-the-job training and experience directly related to your academic program. You will have the...

464

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bruninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzn; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodrguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

User experience design of complex systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over recent years, the global marketplace and its consumers have developed a mutual recognition for the rising prominence of design that delivers high quality user experience. For the provider of products and services, ...

Reily, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments LBNE Mu2e Project X NOvA MicroBooNE MICE Dark Energy Survey LSST The MINERvA Full Module Prototype plane moves into the NuMI...

468

The First Experiment at the LCLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed The First Experiment at the LCLS SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 Bookmark and Share Standing left to right: Elliot Kanter, Robin...

469

Exploring the user experience through collage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the use of collage in requirements elicitation, as a tool to support potential end-users in expressing their impressions, understanding, and emotions regarding a system. Keywords: cultural probes, experience-centered design, phenomenology, requirements elicitation, thematic analysis

Dana McKay; Sally Jo Cunningham; Kirsten Thomson

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market Douglas Durst Faculty of Social Work April 2008 #12;© April 2008, Douglas Durst All rights reserved Douglas Durst doug.durst

Argerami, Martin

471

Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAME) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 19911993. Enormous ...

Chung-Chieng A. Lai; Wen Qian; Scott M. Glenn

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Operating Experience Summary 2003-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPERATING EXPERIENCE SUMMARY U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health OE Summary 2003-17 August 25, 2003 * Underrated and unmaintained hoist used to lift...

473

Large-Scale Hydrogen Combustion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale combustion experiments show that deliberate ignition can limit hydrogen accumulation in reactor containments. The collected data allow accurate evaluation of containment pressures and temperatures associated with hydrogen combustion.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

The CarboEurope Regional Experiment Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantification of sources and sinks of carbon at global and regional scales requires not only a good description of the land sources and sinks of carbon, but also of the synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An experiment was performed in Les ...

A. J. Dolman; L. Tolk; R. Ronda; J. Noilhan; C. Sarrat; A. Brut; B. Piguet; P. Durand; A. Butet; N. Jarosz; Y. Brunet; D. Loustau; E. Lamaud; F. Miglietta; B. Gioli; V. Magliulo; M. Esposito; C. Gerbig; S. Krner; P. Glademard; M. Ramonet; P. Ciais; B. Neininger; R. W. A. Hutjes; J. A. Elbers; R. Macatangay; O. Schrems; G. Prez-Landa; M. J. Sanz; Y. Scholz; G. Facon; E. Ceschia; P. Beziat

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Summer Monsoon ExperimentA Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a short summary of the Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX). The review is largely based on those papers that have made use of the summer MONEX observations during 1979. 0bservational aspects of this study emphasize the annual ...

T. N. Krishnamurti

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

477

Experiments with interacting Bose and Fermi gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past few years, the study of trapped fermionic atoms evolved from the first cooling experiments which produced quantum degenerate samples to becoming one of the most exciting branches of current atomic physics ...

Stan, Claudiu Andrei

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

479

Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

Benage, J.F. Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The KATRIN Experiment: Status and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment, presently under construction in Karlsruhe, Germany, will improve on previous laboratory limits on the neutrino mass by a factor of ten. KATRIN will use a high-activity, gaseous T2 source and a very high-resolution spectrometer to measure the shape of the high-energy tail of the tritium-decay beta spectrum. The shape measurement will also be sensitive to new physics, including sterile neutrinos and Lorentz violation. This report summarizes recent progress in the experiment.

Parno, D S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microscopic double-slit experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The KATRIN Experiment: Status and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment, presently under construction in Karlsruhe, Germany, will improve on previous laboratory limits on the neutrino mass by a factor of ten. KATRIN will use a high-activity, gaseous T2 source and a very high-resolution spectrometer to measure the shape of the high-energy tail of the tritium-decay beta spectrum. The shape measurement will also be sensitive to new physics, including sterile neutrinos and Lorentz violation. This report summarizes recent progress in the experiment.

D. S. Parno

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

482

The ATLAS Experiment on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The ATLAS detector is searching for new discoveries in the head-on collisions of protons of extraordinarily high energy. ATLAS will learn about the basic forces that have shaped our Universe since the beginning of time and that will determine its fate. Among the possible unknowns are the origin of mass, extra dimensions of space, unification of fundamental forces, and evidence for dark matter candidates in the Universe [copied from http://atlas.ch/]. Approximately 700 physicists, engineers and graduate students from 44 U.S. institutions, including four DOE laboratories, participate in the ATLAS collaboration. In addition to the Collaboration's home page and numerous ATLAS-related pages at the various research organizations involved, there are two primary ATLAS websites that provide the full range of information about this experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in at CERN, Switzerland. The main ATLAS Experiment page hosted by CERN is found at http://atlas.ch/, while the home page specifically for the U.S. contribution to ATLAS is at http://www.uslhc.us/The_US_and_the_LHC/Experiments/ATLAS. Likewise, videos and multimedia from the inception and construction of ATLAS and continuing on through current operations and scientific discoveries are found everywhere from Brookhaven Lab to YouTube to an official collection at the ATLAS Experiment page at CERN. This DDE record guides you to the ATLAS Experiment Channel on YouTube.

483