National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for microorganisms living active

  1. Microorganism immobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  2. NREL Explains the Higher Cellulolytic Activity of a Vital Microorganism -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Explains the Higher Cellulolytic Activity of a Vital Microorganism Wide range of cellulase modalities in C. thermocellum makes it one of the most efficient biomass degraders February 5, 2016 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) say better understanding of a bacterium could lead to cheaper production of cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels. Their discovery was made during an

  3. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  4. Long-lived activation products in reactor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

  5. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways In this paper, we discuss the results of 2000-2100 simulations with a chemistry-climate model, focusing on

  6. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Jian (East Lansing, MI); Kleff, Susanne (East Lansing, MI); Guettler, Michael V. (Holt, MI)

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  7. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  8. ``Sleeping reactor`` irradiations: Shutdown reactor determination of short-lived activation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerde, E.A.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1998-09-01

    At the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the principal irradiation system has a thermal neutron flux ({phi}) of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s, permitting the detection of elements via irradiation of 60 s or less. Irradiations of 6 or 7 s are acceptable for detection of elements with half-lives of as little as 30 min. However, important elements such as Al, Mg, Ti, and V have half-lives of only a few minutes. At HFIR, these can be determined with irradiation times of {approximately} 6 s, but the requirement of immediate counting leads to increased exposure to the high activity produced by irradiation in the high flux. In addition, pneumatic system timing uncertainties (about {+-} 0.5 s) make irradiations of < 6 s less reliable. Therefore, the determination of these ultra-short-lived species in mixed matrices has not generally been made at HFIR. The authors have found that very short lived activation products can be produced easily during the period after reactor shutdown (SCRAM), but prior to the removal of spent fuel elements. During this 24- to 36-h period (dubbed the ``sleeping reactor``), neutrons are produced in the beryllium reflector by the reaction {sup 9}Be({gamma},n){sup 8}Be, the gamma rays principally originating in the spent fuel. Upon reactor SCRAM, the flux drops to {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s within 1 h. By the time the fuel elements are removed, the flux has dropped to {approximately} 6 {times} 10{sup 8}. Such fluxes are ideal for the determination of short-lived elements such as Al, Ti, Mg, and V. An important feature of the sleeping reactor is a flux that is not constant.

  9. Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buelter, Thomas; Meinhold, Peter; Feldman, Reid M. Renny; Hawkins, Andrew C.; Urano, Jun; Bastian, Sabine; Arnold, Frances

    2012-01-17

    The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  10. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; Levy, Ryan D.; Michel, Joshua K.; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  11. Butanol tolerance in microorganisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramucci, Michael G.; Nagarajan, Vasantha

    2016-03-01

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of fermentation products from a pyruvate utilizing pathway. Yeast host cells provided herein comprise reduced pyruvate decarboxylase activity and modified adenylate cyclase activity. In embodiments, yeast host cells provided herein comprise resistance to butanol and increased biomass production.

  12. Contribution of microorganisms to corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorp, K.E.G.; Crasto, A.S. [Univ. of Dayton Research Inst., OH (United States); Gu, J.D.; Mitchell, R. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences

    1997-08-01

    Current metal primers utilized by the US Air Force contain chromates to inhibit corrosion of the underlying metal. These chromates are both highly toxic and carcinogenic and pose a severe health risk to personnel involved in their application, stripping and disposal. Environmentally-friendly primers with chromate replacements have historically performed poorly with respect to corrosion inhibition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of chromates with microorganisms in an environment not traditionally associated with biologically-enhanced corrosion to determine if corrosion inhibition by a chromate pigment is, in part, through its action as a biocide. Inoculation of panels which had been coated with a nonchromated primer prior to salt fog exposure and storage in humid conditions resulted in a significant growth of filiform corrosion around a scribe mark. The presence of chromate in the primer severely limited the formation of this corrosion. Likewise, in the absence of the inoculation procedure, the extent of corrosion was strongly diminished. These results suggest that the chromate may be acting as a biocide to limit corrosion which is enhanced by the presence of biological activity.

  13. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  14. Live Status

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    For Users Live Status Queue Look Classic Queue Look Scheduled Outages Outage Log Science Gateway Status Login Node Status Filesystem Status My NERSC Move to CRT Getting Started...

  15. Engineered microorganisms having resistance to ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruegg, Thomas Lawrence; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-03-22

    The present invention provides for a method of genetically modifying microorganisms to enhance resistance to ionic liquids, host cells genetically modified in accordance with the methods, and methods of using the host cells in a reaction comprising biomass that has been pretreated with ionic liquids.

  16. Recent activities for ?-decay half-lives and ?-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, Iris; Abriola, Daniel; Singh, Balraj

    2014-05-02

    Beta-delayed neutron (?n) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material ?-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure ?n-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 ?-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 ?-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of ?-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  17. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong; Pak C. (Richland, WA), Wong; Kwong K. (Sugar Land, TX), Foote; Harlan P. (Richland, WA)

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  18. Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann M. Stock

    2009-04-08

    Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and the Cytoskeleton; (4) Motors and Motility; (5) Differentiation and Development; (6) Host/Pathogen and Host/Symbiont Interactions; (7) Intercellular Communication; (8) Microbes and the Environment; and (9) Modeling Signaling Pathways.

  19. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotani, Hirokazu (Muko, JP); Hiraoka, Nobutsugu (Muko, JP); Obayashi, Akira (Uji, JP)

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  20. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  1. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  2. ARM - General Changes in Daily Lives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListGeneral Changes in Daily Lives Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans General Changes in Daily Lives Changes in our daily lives mainly depend on where we live and work. Building styles, working conditions, use of water, energy resources, crops, and leisure activities will need

  3. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through...

  4. Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

    2014-10-21

    The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

  5. Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

    2014-07-29

    The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  6. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this

  7. Material to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganism and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microalgae - Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Material to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganism and Microalgae Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryTechnology provides an economical and efficient process to harvest microorganisms like microalgae from its growth media.Description The interest in using algae as feedstock for biofuel

  8. Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryResearchers at ORNL developed microorganisms that can quickly overcome the resistance of biomass to breakdown, and improved both the cost and efficiency of the biofuel conversion process.DescriptionConventional biomass pretreatment methods release sugars, weak acids, and metabolic by-products that slow down or even stop fermentation, resulting in slower

  9. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from pyrite and ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    The separation of fine coal from ash and pyrite was evaluated using a microorganism Mycobacterium phlei.

  10. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U.; Burlage, R.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  11. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through biological methods, including genetically engineering algae and cyanobacteria. Create a Sustainable Future: Living Living a Sustainable Future How our Not-so-ordinary Workers Keep LANL Green How many times can LANL reuse water? Google Earth Tour: Water Reuse

  12. Liquid Fuel from Heat-Loving Microorganisms: H2-Dependent Conversion of CO2 to Liquid Electrofuels by Extremely Thermophilic Archaea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: NC State is working with the University of Georgia to create Electrofuels from primitive organisms called extremophiles that evolved before photosynthetic organisms and live in extreme, hot water environments with temperatures ranging from 167-212 degrees Fahrenheit The team is genetically engineering these microorganisms so they can use hydrogen to turn carbon dioxide directly into alcohol-based fuels. High temperatures are required to distill the biofuels from the water where the organisms live, but the heat-tolerant organisms will continue to thrive even as the biofuels are being distilledmaking the fuel-production process more efficient. The microorganisms dont require light, so they can be grown anywhereinside a dark reactor or even in an underground facility.

  13. Living in Los Alamos

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    Living in Los Alamos Living in Los Alamos The enchanting surroundings, extraordinary people, and rich history make Los Alamos so much more than just a place to do great work. Discover the many advantages of living and working in Los Alamos. AROUND LOS ALAMOS Communication KRSN Community Radio Los Alamos Daily Post Los Alamos Monitor Education Los Alamos Public Schools Pajarito Environmental Education Center University of New Mexico - Los Alamos The Arts Fuller Lodge Art Center Los Alamos Little

  14. Living With Wildfire

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    Wildfire Our exhibit, Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience, shares personal stories of wildfire so that you can understand the tremendous effect a wildfire has...

  15. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  16. Cofermentation with Cooperative Microorganisms for More Efficient Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion - Energy Innovation Portal Startup America Startup America Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Cofermentation with Cooperative Microorganisms for More Efficient Biomass Conversion Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryIt is well known that biomass has primarily two sources of fermentable carbohydrates, cellulose and hemicelluloses. Research has been underway for decades aimed at both

  17. Use of Stable Isotopes in Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-18

    The use of isotopic signatures for forensic analysis of biological materials is well-established, and the same general principles that apply to interpretation of stable isotope content of C, N, O, and H apply to the analysis of microorganisms. Heterotrophic microorganisms derive their isotopic content from their growth substrates, which are largely plant and animal products, and the water in their culture medium. Thus the isotope signatures of microbes are tied to their growth environment. The C, N, O, and H isotope ratios of spores have been demonstrated to constitute highly discriminating signatures for sample matching. They can rule out specific samples of media and/or water as possible production media, and can predict isotope ratio ranges of the culture media and water used to produce a given sample. These applications have been developed and tested through analyses of approximately 250 samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and over 500 samples of culture media, providing a strong statistical basis for data interpretation. A Bayesian statistical framework for integrating stable isotope data with other types of signatures derived from microorganisms has been able to characterize the culture medium used to produce spores of various Bacillus species, leveraging isotopic differences in different medium types and demonstrating the power of data integration for forensic investigations.

  18. Living SafeLy

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    as safe as the electrical wiring in our homes - or just as danger- ous. The key is learning to act safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live...

  19. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins...

  20. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  1. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  2. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  3. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  4. Fuel Cells Go Live

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    green h y d r o g e n f u e l i n g POWer Fuel Cells Go live A closer look at the requirements to create a hydrogen-based warehouse M anagers of distribution centers are always on the lookout for new ways to gain competitive advantage through increased operational efficiency, productivity and worker safety. Around North America, some are finding success by integrating commercially available hydrogen fuel cell systems into their lift truck fleets. For operations with large fleets of electric lift

  5. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  6. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R. (Winchester, MA); Baumann, Robert (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  7. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  8. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  9. Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals 3/26/2015 Synthetic Biology Joshua S. Yuan Associate Professor and Director Texas A&M University This presentation does contain proprietary information 1 Project Goal: Design of Microorganisms for Lignin Fuel * The proposed research aims to address one of the most challenging issues in biofuel production: the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels. * Project Outcome: A viable biological platform for conversion of lignin into

  10. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  11. Active Shooter Training Workshop | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Active Shooter Training Workshop Active Shooter Training Workshop June 27, 2014 - 1:00pm Addthis Active Shooter Training Workshop | Square Range Diagnostic Live Fire Course Active Shooter Training Workshop | Square Range Diagnostic Live Fire Course Active Shooter Training Workshop | Movement to Contact Live Fire Drill with 3D Targets Active Shooter Training Workshop | Movement to Contact Live Fire Drill with 3D Targets Active Shooter Training Workshop | Decisional Shooting Isolation Drill Active

  12. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor (nitrate), indicating that nutrients are not limiting viral production, but rather substrates that can be converted into energy for host metabolism. Our results also revealed that cell abundance was not correlated to the mineralization of organic carbon, but rather viruses were positively correlated with carbon mineralization. This is a result of viral-mediated cell lysis and demonstrates that viruses are sensitive indicators of microbial activity. Viruses as an indicator of microbial activity was not unique to batch culture studies as results obtained from an in situ field experiment conducted at the DOE Old Rifle Field site. This study revealed that viral abundance increased in response to the injection of oxygenated groundwater and influx of dissolved organic carbon whereas cell abundance changes were minimal. However, the extent to which viral-mediated cell lysis alters organic matter pools subsequently influencing microbial community structure and biogeochemical function remains a critical question in subsurface biogeochemical cycling. The production of significant numbers of viruses in groundwater has implications for nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport in groundwater. We have demonstrated that the virus surface is reactive and will adsorb heavy metals. Thus viruses can promote colloidal contaminant mobility. Interestingly, the presence of heavy metals has a positive effect on infectivity of the phage, increasing phage infection which could lead to further production of viruses. Together, the results indicate that the sorption of metals to the surface of viruses could not only contribute to nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport but could also enhance infectivity further contributing to cell lysis which could subsequently influence biogeochemical cycling. As more viruses infect host microbial populations the high concentration of metals would enhance infection, resulting in cell lysis, and decreasing the metabolically active host population while yielding greater numbers of viruses capable of transporting contaminats. Additional studie

  13. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 2/5/2014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The activation occurred as a result of an emergency incident at the site. More information will be provided as soon as the extent of the emergency is determined. The Joint Information Center (JIC), located at 4021 National Parks Highway, has been

  14. From: Meredith Brown <racer@lanl.gov> Subject: Green Alert: VPP Program Saves Lives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 Feb 1998 09:44:53 -0700 From: Meredith Brown <racer@lanl.gov> Subject: Green Alert: VPP Program Saves Lives Title: GREEN - VPP Program Saves Lives Identifier: INEEL Lessons Learned #98002 Date: January 8, 1998 Lessons Learned: The proactive safety practices and actively caring attitudes that are a part of DOE's VPP Program are designed to extend beyond the workplace into employees' personal lives. The positive behavioral changes can save lives. Summary of Success Story: An employee

  15. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible

  16. Living well, doing good | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Living well, doing good Living well, doing good Posted: June 24, 2015 - 3:22pm Print version Joe Marshall is one of Y-12's cancer survivors who took his victory lap at the Anderson County Relay for Life. What do relays, races and regattas have in common? They're all ways Y-12 employees stay active and support the community. After hours, Y-12ers are all about staying active and supporting their communities. Here's a roundup of the activities Relay for Life, May 16 For numerous years, Joe Kato and

  17. Living Villages Holdings Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holdings Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Living Villages Holdings Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: Shropshire SY9 Product: Living Villages is a residential property...

  18. Solar Living Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Living Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Living Institute Address: 13771 S. Hwy. 101 Place: Hopland, California Zip: 95449 Region: Bay Area Website:...

  19. Living Buildings Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Living Buildings Ltd Place: United Kingdom Sector: Buildings Product: Living Buildings is an installer of small-scale distributed generation...

  20. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, April Z; Wan, Kai-tak

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOEs contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

  1. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Mayes, Melanie; Gu, Lianhong; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  2. Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms: Bioprocess and Microbe Engineering for Total Carbon Utilization in Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The electricity for the process could be supplied from novel means currently in development, or more proven methods such as the combustion of municipal waste, which would also generate the required CO2 and enhance the overall efficiency of MITs biofuel-production system.

  3. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume I: an investigation of live bottom habitats south of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The study areas include nine live bottom areas located off South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  4. Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nevin, KP; Hensley, SA; Franks, AE; Summers, ZM; Ou, JH; Woodard, TL; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Lovley, DR

    2011-04-20

    Microbial electrosynthesis, a process in which microorganisms use electrons derived from electrodes to reduce carbon dioxide to multicarbon, extracellular organic compounds, is a potential strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of readily stored and easily distributed products, such as transportation fuels. To date, only one organism, the acetogen Sporomusa ovata, has been shown to be capable of electrosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if a wider range of microorganisms is capable of this process. Several other acetogenic bacteria, including two other Sporomusa species, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium aceticum, and Moorella thermoacetica, consumed current with the production of organic acids. In general acetate was the primary product, but 2-oxobutyrate and formate also were formed, with 2-oxobutyrate being the predominant identified product of electrosynthesis by C. aceticum. S. sphaeroides, C. ljungdahlii, and M. thermoacetica had high (> 80%) efficiencies of electrons consumed and recovered in identified products. The acetogen Acetobacterium woodii was unable to consume current. These results expand the known range of microorganisms capable of electrosynthesis, providing multiple options for the further optimization of this process.

  5. Living Direct: Order (2011-CE-1904)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered Living Direct, Inc. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Living Direct had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers, refrigerator-freezers and freezers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  6. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Engineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Liao

    2012-05-22

    This project is a collaboration with F. R. Tabita of Ohio State. Our major goal is to understand the factors and regulatory mechanisms that influence hydrogen production. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Our part of the project was to develop a modeling technique to investigate the metabolic network in connection to hydrogen production and regulation. Organisms must balance the pathways that generate and consume reducing power in order to maintain redox homeostasis to achieve growth. Maintaining this homeostasis in the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria is a complex feat with many avenues that can lead to balance, as these organisms possess versatile metabolic capabilities including anoxygenic photosynthesis, aerobic or anaerobic respiration, and fermentation. Growth is achieved by using H{sub 2} as an electron donor and CO{sub 2} as a carbon source during photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic growth, where CO{sub 2} is fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Photoheterotrophic growth can also occur when alternative organic carbon compounds are utilized as both the carbon source and electron donor. Regardless of the growth mode, excess reducing equivalents generated as a result of oxidative processes, must be transferred to terminal electron acceptors, thus insuring that redox homeostasis is maintained in the cell. Possible terminal acceptors include O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, organic carbon, or various oxyanions. Cells possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the activity of the pathways which supply energy, such as photosynthesis, and those that consume energy, such as CO{sub 2} assimilation or N{sub 2} fixation. The major route for CO{sub 2} assimilation is the CBB reductive pentose phosphate pathway, whose key enzyme is ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). In addition to providing virtually all cellular carbon during autotrophic metabolism, RubisCO-mediated CO{sub 2} assimilation is also very important for nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria under photoheterotrophic growth conditions since CO{sub 2} becomes the major electron sink under these conditions. In this work, Ensemble Modeling (EM) was developed to examine the behavior of CBB-compromised RubisCO knockout mutant strains of the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Mathematical models of metabolism can be a great aid in studying the effects of large perturbations to the system, such as the inactivation of RubisCO. Due to the complex and highly-interconnected nature of these networks, it is not a trivial process to understand what the effect of perturbations to the metabolic network will be, or vice versa, what enzymatic perturbations are necessary to yield a desired effect. Flux distribution is controlled by multiple enzymes in the network, often indirectly linked to the pathways of interest. Further, depending on the state of the cell and the environmental conditions, the effect of a perturbation may center around how it effects the carbon flow in the network, the balancing of cofactors, or both. Thus, it is desirable to develop mathematical models to describe, understand, and predict network behavior. Through the development of such models, one may gain the ability to generate a set of testable hypotheses for system behavior.

  8. Extending the Operating Lives of Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paul Jablonski

    2010-09-01

    Metallurgist Paul Jablonski discusses his role in developing processes that extend the operating temperatures and operating lives of materials used in energy applications.

  9. Lancaster Live/Work Townhome Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    This case study describes development of a prototype live-work townhome that is highly efficient at 45% energy savings (95% counting photovoltaic system).

  10. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems and the new field of biomimicry. Biomimicry is the science of imitating nature to solve human design problems. The Living Wall concept takes the principles behind...

  11. Live Broadcast on Quadrennial Energy Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watch a live broadcast of the Quadrennial Energy Review public stakeholder meeting on Thursday, February 4, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. EST

  12. Rural Living Canada Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentrural-living-canada-website Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible...

  13. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  14. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  15. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  16. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  17. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  18. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

  19. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

  20. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

  1. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  2. Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recognition | Department of Energy Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National Recognition Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National Recognition May 6, 2014 - 12:24pm Addthis Donna Hawkins Technology Transfer Specialist, Weatherization Assistance Program Harris Walker Communications Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program MORE WEATHERIZATION STORIES Improving Energy Efficiency and Creating Jobs through Weatherization

  3. Method for sustaining microorganism culture in syngas fermentation process in decreased concentration or absence of various substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Stephen S.; Scott, Syrona; Ko, Ching-Whan

    2015-05-19

    The present invention relates to methods for sustaining microorganism culture in a syngas fermentation reactor in decreased concentration or absence of various substrates comprising: adding carbon dioxide and optionally alcohol; maintaining free acetic acid concentrations; and performing the above mentioned steps within specified time.

  4. Nuclear Physics Technology Saves Lives | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Technology Saves Lives January 11, 2006 Listen to this story Ribbon With early ... Group, headed by Stan Majewski, is part of the Physics Division here at Jefferson Lab. ...

  5. Live pathogens: rapid detection technique developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Live Pathogens: Rapid Detection Technique Developed Live pathogens: rapid detection technique developed The technique relies on bacteria being critically dependent upon the key nutrient iron. January 24, 2013 Colorized scanning electron micrograph of E. coli. Colorized scanning electron micrograph of E. coli. Photo credit: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention LANL's new method eliminates the need for laboratory culture and greatly speeds the process. Los Alamos researchers have

  6. Spatially-Resolved Analysis of Glycolipids and Metabolites in Living Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Konopka, Allan; Laskin, Julia

    2013-04-07

    Microorganisms release a diversity of organic compounds that couple interspecies metabolism, enable communication, or provide benefits to other microbes. Increased knowledge of microbial metabolite production will contribute to understanding of the dynamic microbial world and can potentially lead to new developments in drug discovery, biofuel production, and clinical research. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) is an ambient ionization technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of molecules from a specific location on a surface without special sample pretreatment. Due to its ambient nature, living bacterial colonies growing on agar plates can be rapidly and non-destructively analyzed. We performed spatially resolved nano-DESI analysis of living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies on agar plates. We use high resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS analysis of the living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies to detect metabolites and lipids, and confirm their identities. We found that despite the high salt content of the agar (osmolarity ca. 700 mM), nano-DESI analysis enables detailed characterization of metabolites produced by the colony. Using this technique, we identified several glycolipids found on the living colonies and examined the effect of the age of the colony on the chemical gradient of glucosylglycerol secreted onto agar.

  7. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms ({open_quotes}biocolloids{close_quotes}) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories.

  8. Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-30

    In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available unrestrained organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

  9. HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 HMPT: Hazardous ...

  10. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and...

  11. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation ...

  12. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and ...

  13. JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KP Renewables and Living Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name: JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings Place: Brentford, Middlesex, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip:...

  14. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  15. Early Detection Saves Lives | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Early Detection Saves Lives Early Detection Saves Lives September 21, 2012 - 9:49am Addthis What does this mean for me? It can save your life. It can save the life of someone you love. The Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP) is the DOE's Former Worker Medical Screening Program at 13 DOE sites. WHPP provides free medical evaluations for selected occupational diseases every three years to eligible former DOE workers under a national medical protocol established by the DOE. WHPP is funded by

  16. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  17. Fission barriers and half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    We briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. We focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples we choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system. 31 refs., 10 figs.

  18. New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms Print http://csh-asia.com/13image.html August 20-23, 2913; Suzhou, China

  19. New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms Print http:csh-asia.com13image.html August 20-23, 2913; Suzhou, China...

  20. Hanwha L C Hanwha Living and Creative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hanwha L C Hanwha Living and Creative Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanwha L&C (Hanwha Living and Creative) Place: Seoul, Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip: 100-797 Sector: Solar...

  1. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans:...

  2. Green Living, Green Technologies: Things to Be Thankful For

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We live in a time where improvements in technology make it possible to live a happy, healthy, and productive life while using less and less energy. Isn't that something for which we should give thanks?

  3. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  4. The living publication (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The living publication Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The living publication Within the ICSTI Insights Series we offer three articles on the 'living publication' that is already available to practitioners in the important field of crystal structure determination and analysis. While the specific examples are drawn from this particular field, we invite readers to draw parallels in their own fields of interest. The first article describes the present state of the crystallographic living

  5. Live Broadcast on Cyber Distinguished Speaker Series | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Live Broadcast on Cyber Distinguished Speaker Series Live Broadcast on Cyber Distinguished Speaker Series Live streaming video by Ustream Evan D. Wolff, a partner with Crowell & Moring, will discuss data breaches, risk management, and incident response plans as part of the DOE Cyber Distinguished Series. DETAILS: February 16, 2016 at 1:00pm EST Learn More About Evan Wolff DOE Cyber Strategy

  6. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume II: an investigation of live bottom habitats north of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The report describes three study sites at the edge of the continental shelf in a 55-100m depth zone, near Cape Fear, North Carolina.

  7. Secret Lives of Scientists: Matt Kwiatkowski | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secret Lives of Scientists: Matt Kwiatkowski Secret Lives of Scientists &amp; Engineers: Matt Kwiatkowski 1 of 16 Secret Lives of Scientists & Engineers: Matt Kwiatkowski Matt Kwiatkowski is a cyber security manager at Argonne National Lab - and flies over it in a plane he built himself during the weekends. Read the full story &raquo; Photos by Mark Lopez/Argonne National Laboratory. 31296D Secret Lives of Scientists &amp; Engineers: Matt Kwiatkowski 1 of 16 Secret Lives of

  8. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean - Francois; Ams, David; Richmann, M. K.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J. S.

    2010-12-10

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  9. Apparatus and method for transforming living cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.

    2003-11-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for in vitro transformation of living cells. The apparatus, which is formed as a microelectromechanical device by surface micromachining, can be used to temporarily disrupt the cell walls or membrane of host cells one at a time so that a particular substance (e.g. a molecular tag, nucleic acid, bacteria, virus etc.) can be introduced into the cell. Disruption of the integrity of the host cells (i.e. poration) can be performed mechanically or electrically, or by both while the host cells are contained within a flow channel. Mechanical poration is possible using a moveable member which has a pointed or serrated edge and which is driven by an electrostatic actuator to abrade, impact or penetrate the host cell. Electroporation is produced by generating a relatively high electric field across the host cell when the host cell is located in the flow channel between a pair of electrodes having a voltage applied therebetween.

  10. Dynamic Metabolism Studies of Live Bacterial Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.

    2008-11-01

    Bacterial film (biofilm) microbes exist within spatial (nutrient, electron-acceptor, pH, etc.) gradients of their own making. Correspondingly, biofilm bacteria are physiologically and functionally distinct from free-floating bacteria and from their own species at differing biofilm depths. This article describes our efforts to develop noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies for biofilm-metabolism studies. This involves integrating NMR with controlled-cultivation methods to interrogate microbial physiology live and under known growth conditions. NMR is uniquely capable of providing depth-resolved metabolic and transport information in a non-invasive, non-sample-consuming fashion, providing information required for experimental reactive transport studies. We have studied mono-species biofilms relevant to environment remediation and human health. We describe these technologies, discuss their advantages and limitations, and give examples of their application.

  11. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seibert, Michael (Lakewood, CO); Makarova, Valeriya (Golden, CO); Tsygankov, Anatoly A. (Pushchino, RU); Rubin, Andrew B. (Moscow, RU)

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  12. Picture of the Week: Explosive science to save lives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Explosive science to save lives During Homemade Explosives (HME) training courses at Los Alamos National Laboratory, technicians from the Navy, Marines, and Air Force focus on world-wide HME threats including the safety, sensitivity and performance of these explosives, and their synthesis and manufacturing. September 13, 2015 x x Explosive science to save lives Realistic explosive science and detection training gives military personnel the tools to save lives when they encounter explosive

  13. An ultra-sensitive microfluidic immunoassay using living radical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymerization and porous polymer monoliths. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: An ultra-sensitive microfluidic immunoassay using living radical polymerization and porous polymer monoliths. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ultra-sensitive microfluidic immunoassay using living radical polymerization and porous polymer monoliths. We present a platform that combines patterned photopolymerized polymer monoliths with living radical polymerization (LRP) to develop a low cost

  14. Live webcast on groundbreaking results of Algal Biofuels Consortium, June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 Live webcast on Algal Biofuels Consortium Live webcast on groundbreaking results of Algal Biofuels Consortium, June 11 Jose A. Olivares will present an overview of the technologies and processes that are needed to widely produce algae-based liquid transportation fuels. June 10, 2014 Jose A. Olivares Jose A. Olivares Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases

  15. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition: Living Ink Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wins CU Clean Energy Competition Regional Championship | Department of Energy Living Ink Technologies Wins CU Clean Energy Competition Regional Championship National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition: Living Ink Technologies Wins CU Clean Energy Competition Regional Championship May 4, 2015 - 2:51pm Addthis Living Ink Technologies has developed a patent-pending technology that uses algae to transform carbon dioxide into ink that is cheaper, healthier, and more environmentally

  16. Electromicroinjection of particles into living cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, F. Andrew (Los Alamos, NM); Cram, L. Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Galey, William R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for introducing particles into living cells. Fluorescently-stained human chromosomes are introduced into cultured, mitotic Chinese hamster cells using electromicroinjection. The recipient cells frequently survived the physiological perturbation imposed by a successful chromosome injection. Successfully injected recipient cells maintained viability as evidenced by their ability to be expanded. The technique relies on the surface charge of fluorescently stained chromosomes and their ability to be attracted and repelled to and from the tip of a micropipette. The apparatus includes a micropipette having a tip suitable for piercing the membrane of a target cell and an electrode inserted into the lumen thereof. The target cells and suspended particles are located in an electrically conducted solution, and the lumen of the micropipette is filled with an electrically conducting solution which contacts the electrode located therein. A second electrode is also located in the conducting solution containing the target cells and particles. Voltages applied to the electrode within the micropipette attract the particles to the region of the tip thereof. The particles adhere to the surface of the micropipette with sufficient force that insertion of the micropipette tip and attached particle through the membrane of a target cell will not dislodge the particle. By applying a voltage having the opposite polarity of the attraction voltage, the particles are expelled from the micropipette to which is then withdrawn from the cell body.

  17. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite; First quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the progress made during the first quarter of the research project entitled ``A Novel Microorganism for Selective Separation of Coal from Ash and Pyrite,`` DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-93PC93215. The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash-forming minerals. During the reporting period, three different coal samples: Illinois No. 6 coal, Kentucky No. 9 coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, were collected to be used in the investigation. The microorganism, M. phlei, was obtained as freeze-dried cultures and the growth characteristics of the bacteria were studied. Scanning electron microphotographs revealed that M. phlei cells are coccal in shape and are approximately 1 {mu}m in diameter. Electrokinetic measurements showed that the Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal samples had an isoelectric point (IEP) around pH 6 whereas M. phlei had an IEP around pH 1.5. Electrokinetic measurements of the ruptured microorganisms exhibited an increase in IEP. The increase in IEP of the ruputured cells was due to the release of fatty acids and polar groups from the cell membrane.

  18. New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Advances in Optical Imaging of Live Cells and Organisms http://csh-asia.com/13image.html August 20-23, 2913; Suzhou, China

  19. University Teams to Showcase Affordable, Energy Efficient Living...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Efficient Living in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 University Teams to ... appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency. ...

  20. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation ... cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time, without bias. ...

  1. Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters Solar ... | Courtesy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon Team. ...

  2. Dutch Company Powers Streetlights With Living Plants; Will Your...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dutch Company Powers Streetlights With Living Plants; Will Your Cell Phone Be Next? Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 16...

  3. Spontaneous fission half-lives for ground state nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hoffman, D.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of the spontaneous fission half-lives of nuclides of elements Z = 90 to 108 have been compiled and evaluated. Recommended values are presented.

  4. Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion rare earth materialsmthat are critical to the production of clean energy technologies.

  5. Brownsville Public Utilities Board- Green Living Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     Brownsville Public Utilities Board offers residential customers rebates for installation of energy efficient measures. Through the Green Living Rebate program, customers can apply for rebates for...

  6. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  7. Harnessing the Sun: Energy in Our Lives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harnessing the Sun: Energy in Our Lives Harnessing the Sun: Energy in Our Lives Addthis Innovation Workshop: Harnessing the Sun highlights the science and engineering of how radiant energy is transformed into other useful forms of energy. Watch the rest of the videos

  8. Rocky Flats Plant Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolosi, S.L.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of the Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report (RAR) is to provide an authorization basis for operation as required by DOE 5480.16. The existing Live-Fire Range does not have a safety analysis-related authorization basis. EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. has worked with DOE and its representatives to develop a format and content description for development of an RAR for the Live-Fire Range. Development of the RAR is closely aligned with development of the design for a baffle system to control risks from errant projectiles. DOE 5480.16 requires either an RAR or a safety analysis report (SAR) for live-fire ranges. An RAR rather than a SAR was selected in order to gain flexibility to more closely address the safety analysis and conduct of operation needs for a live-fire range in a cost-effective manner.

  9. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  10. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  11. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bavykin, Sergei G. (Darien, IL); Mirzabekova, legal representative, Natalia V. (Westmont, IL); Mirzabekov, deceased, Andrei D. (Westmont, IL)

    2007-12-04

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for using nucleotide sequence variations of 16S and 23S rRNA within the B. cereus group to discriminate a highly infectious bacterium B. anthracis from closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations and discriminate B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed samples, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  12. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bavykin, Sergei G. (Darien, IL); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Moscow, RU)

    2007-10-30

    The present invention is directed to a novel method of discriminating a highly infectious bacterium Bacillus anthracis from a group of closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations. The identification and analysis of these sequence variations enables positive discrimination of isolates of the B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed probes, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  13. Tuesday Talk: Secretary Chu Answers Your Questions LIVE | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Tuesday Talk: Secretary Chu Answers Your Questions LIVE Tuesday Talk: Secretary Chu Answers Your Questions LIVE November 30, 2010 - 12:02pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Later today Secretary Chu will be answering your questions as a part of the White House's Tuesday Talk series. The discussion will be broadcast live starting at 1:15 EST and will build off of the Secretary's speech at the National Press Club yesterday, which

  14. Live Webcast on Recent Wind Energy Technology Advances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled “Recent Wind Technology Advances” on April 16, 2014, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  15. iiESI.org is live! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    live OpenEI maintenance March 8-9, 2013 Research topics related to ESI Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) A Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems(Jain...

  16. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Water Power Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 23, 2014 from11:00 AM-1:00 PM MDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Water Power Manufacturing Funding Opportunity...

  17. Acting Biomass Program Manager Dr. Valerie Reed to Host Live...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 16th, the Energy Department (@energy) will be hosting a live Twitter Q&A on biofuels with Dr. Valerie Reed, Acting Manager of the Biomass Program. Dr. Reed holds a Ph. D....

  18. Spontaneous fission half-lives for ground state nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hoffman, D.C. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the spontaneous fission half-lives of nuclides of elements Z = 90 to 107 have been compiled and evaluated. Recommended values are presented. 126 refs., 96 tabs.

  19. Follow Live Dec 24: Los Alamos National Lab Tracks Rudolph's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    www.santa.lanl.gov"> follow along live as Santa circles the globe this Christmas Eve. | Image credit: Hantz Leger. Thanks to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, you can...

  20. Public invited to share living with wildfire stories with BSM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public invited to share living with wildfire stories with BSM Public invited to share living with wildfire stories with BSM The exhibit provides an opportunity for people to share their stories about the Las Conchas fire and other wildfires. June 11, 2012 Personal experiences and stories around wildfire are part of a new interactive exhibit at the Bradbury. Personal experiences and stories around wildfire are part of a new interactive exhibit at the Bradbury. Contact Steve Sandoval

  1. Long-Living Polymer Electrolytes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Living Polymer Electrolytes Long-Living Polymer Electrolytes 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es094_janke_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Composite Electrolyte to Stabilize Metallic Lithium Anodes Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries

  2. Stent Technology Saves Lives, Creates Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stent Technology Saves Lives, Creates Jobs Stent Technology Saves Lives, Creates Jobs May 8, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis The platinum/chromium alloy used in new coronary stents manufactured by Boston Scientific Corporation was developed by a research team that included metallurgists from NETL. The platinum/chromium alloy used in new coronary stents manufactured by Boston Scientific Corporation was developed by a research team that included metallurgists from NETL. Washington, DC - When people think of

  3. Superior Energy Performance: New Website Live and Ready for Business |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Superior Energy Performance: New Website Live and Ready for Business Superior Energy Performance: New Website Live and Ready for Business January 16, 2014 - 11:17am Addthis Superior Energy Performance(tm) (SEP) announces its new website-a valuable resource for manufacturers who want to prove their achievements in energy management and lower plant energy costs. SEP is a certification program and process applicable to facilities of all sizes in all manufacturing sectors.

  4. Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives April 24, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis The Lab Breakthroughs video series focuses on the array of technological advancements and discoveries that stem from research performed in the National Labs, including improvements in industrial processes, discoveries in fundamental scientific research, and innovative medicines. <a href="http://energy.gov/lab-breakthroughs">See

  5. Live from Greenbuild: From the Industrial Facilities Connect & Learn |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Live from Greenbuild: From the Industrial Facilities Connect & Learn Live from Greenbuild: From the Industrial Facilities Connect & Learn November 18, 2015 - 5:32pm Addthis By Monica Kanojia The industrial industry is filled with unique and dynamic projects with substantially high process loads and resource consumption. This sector faces a different set of challenges in attaining sustainably built campuses. Owners must address compliance, regulations and safety

  6. Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades March 7, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis A weatherization worker drills holes to blow cellulose insulation in the interior walls of this home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL A weatherization worker drills holes to blow cellulose insulation in the interior walls of this home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL Dr. Richard Knaub Project

  7. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  8. Annual report and summaries of FY 1994 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Energy Biosciences program was initiated in 1979 for the purpose of fulfilling the need of basic information about plants and microorganisms relating to varied energy matters. The program generates basic information that contributes significantly to future technologies involving alternate fuel generation, petroleum replacements, sustained industrial activities along with means of improving environmental conditions. The Energy Biosciences program during Fiscal Year 1994 received 139 new research applications following the screening of numerous preapplications. Of the applications received, 21 projects were funded.

  9. Long-Range Untethered Real-Time Live Gas Main Robotic Inspection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagen Schempf; Daphne D'Zurko

    2004-10-31

    Under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) developed an untethered, wireless remote controlled inspection robot dubbed Explorer. The project entailed the design and prototyping of a wireless self-powered video-inspection robot capable of accessing live 6- and 8-inch diameter cast-iron and steel mains, while traversing turns and Ts and elbows under real-time control with live video feedback to an operator. The design is that of a segmented actively articulated and wheel-leg powered robot design, with fisheye imaging capability and self-powered battery storage and wireless real-time communication link. The prototype was functionally tested in an above ground pipe-network, in order to debug all mechanical, electrical and software subsystems, and develop the necessary deployment and retrieval, as well as obstacle-handling scripts. A pressurized natural gas test-section was used to certify it for operation in natural gas at up to 60 psig. Two subsequent live-main field-trials in both cast-iron and steel pipe, demonstrated its ability to be safely launched, operated and retrieved under real-world conditions. The system's ability to safely and repeatably exidrecover from angled and vertical launchers, traverse multi-thousand foot long pipe-sections, make T and varied-angle elbow-turns while wirelessly sending live video and handling command and control messages, was clearly demonstrated. Video-inspection was clearly shown to be a viable tool to understand the state of this critical buried infrastructure, irrespective of low- (cast-iron) or high-pressure (steel) conditions. This report covers the different aspects of specifications, requirements, design, prototyping, integration and testing and field-trialing of the Explorer platform.

  10. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alimena J.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-21

    We report on a search for charged massive long-lived particles (CMLLPs), based on 5.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We search for events in which one or more particles are reconstructed as muons but have speed and ionization energy loss (dE/dx) inconsistent with muons produced in beam collisions. CMLLPs are predicted in several theories of physics beyond the standard model. We exclude pair-produced long-lived gaugino-like charginos below 267 GeV and Higgsino-like charginos below 217 GeV at 95% C.L., as well as long-lived scalar top quarks with mass below 285 GeV.

  11. Secretary Chu Speaks at Washington Post Live | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington Post Live Secretary Chu Speaks at Washington Post Live November 3, 2011 - 9:12am Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy Secretary Chu's remarks, as prepared for delivery, at the Washington Post Smart Energy Conference. Thank you, Mary [Jordan], for that kind introduction. While the focus of this conference is on the future of energy, I want to start with some lessons from America's past. On a windy day at Kitty Hawk on December 17, 1903, the Wright Brothers

  12. Table HC1.2.1. Living Space Characteristics by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Living Space Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total1",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Living Space Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,225.8,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Total

  13. How Will We Live Forever? | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Live Forever? Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Invention Factory: How Will We Live Forever? In this episode of Invention Factory - a partnership between GE and Vice - we probe the cutting edge of medical technology that is making the world a healthier place. From cutting-edge CT scanners, to human genome

  14. Live Chat with the EERE Information Center | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Live Chat with the EERE Information Center Live Chat with the EERE Information Center December 6, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis Amy Foster Parish If you're an Energy Savers blog reader, hopefully you're also taking the opportunity to comment on the posts you read. Not only do the Energy Savers bloggers love to hear your feedback and answer your questions, commenting on the posts gives you a great opportunity to interact online with other folks who are really interested in energy efficiency and renewable

  15. Zombie Replicants to Outperform the Living | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zombie Replicants to Outperform the Living Zombie Replicants to Outperform the Living February 8, 2013 - 5:08pm Addthis The first stage of the "zombie cell" only moderately heated, the cell is now pure silica and needed a gold coating for a scanning electron microscope to image it. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories The first stage of the "zombie cell" only moderately heated, the cell is now pure silica and needed a gold coating for a scanning electron

  16. Interested in Open Energy Data? Watch the Energy Datapalooza Live! |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Interested in Open Energy Data? Watch the Energy Datapalooza Live! Interested in Open Energy Data? Watch the Energy Datapalooza Live! September 27, 2012 - 5:25pm Addthis U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park kicks off the Safety Datapalooza on September 19th. | Photo Courtesy U.S. Department of Labor U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park kicks off the Safety Datapalooza on September 19th. | Photo Courtesy U.S. Department of Labor Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless

  17. Lab Breakthrough: How Energy Department Research Saves Lives | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy How Energy Department Research Saves Lives Lab Breakthrough: How Energy Department Research Saves Lives August 28, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis Researchers at the National Energy Technology Lab have developed a platinum-chromium alloy that is used to make heart stents that are thin, flexible, corrosion resistant and visible on x-rays. Since their introduction in 2010, coronary stents made from the new alloy have generated more than $4 billion in worldwide sales and captured 45 percent of

  18. Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells January 16, 2014 - 3:59pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: Thanks to everyone who participated in our Google+ Hangout on Energy 101: Fuel Cells. We got a lot of great questions, and our experts talked about everything from the future of fuel cell vehicles and how they're being used as backup power to the efficiency benefits

  19. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print Wednesday, 28 October 2015 00:00 A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural

  20. Lead in human blood from children living in Campania, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amodio-Cocchieri, R.; Arnese, A.; Prospero, E.; Roncioni, A.

    1996-03-01

    Blood lead (PbB) levels were determined in children living Campania (in Naples and in a rural zone in the district of Caserta). Atmospheric lead (PbA) concentration in these considered areas was monitored for 1 yr (1993-1994). The children tested were questioned about common sources of lead, other than atmospheric relating to their living and dietary habits. The PbB levels in children living in Naples were at the 50th percentile, 18.8 {mu}g/dl in males and 13.7 {mu}g/dl in females; in children living in the rural area the median PbB levels were 8.9{mu}g/dl in males, and 9.9 {mu}g/dl in females. The annual mean values of atmospheres lead were 1.15 {plus_minus} 0.24 {mu}g/dl in Naples and 0.23 {plus_minus} 0.07 {mu}g/dl in the rural area. Significant and congruent mean differences between urban and rural sites were found in children`s blood and concurrent air lead. Considering the PbB level of 10 {mu}g/dl as the maximum level that is not associated any known adverse effect in children, the Neapolitan group can be considered at risk of chronic intoxication by lead. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Have You Visited the Living Zero Home Tour?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Living Zero Home Tour is on the road, and it may be in a city near you! If you have the chance to see the tour, you may be surprised to discover the small steps that you can take to save energy...

  2. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Lamarque, J.-F. ; Kyle, G. Page ; Meinshausen, Malte ; Riahi, Keywan ; Smith, Steven J. ; Van Vuuren, Detlef ; Conley, Andrew ; Vitt, Francis Publication Date: 2011-08-05 ...

  3. Active-R filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  4. The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Matt Kwiatkowski | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory This article was published in the spring 2016 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory science magazine. Click for the rest of the issue. The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Matt Kwiatkowski March 7, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint This article was originally published in the spring 2016 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory's science magazine. In this series, meet researchers from Argonne with unusual hobbies and interests. Today we're interviewing Matt Kwiatkowski, cyber

  5. The problem of living in a world contaminated with chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, R.L.

    1990-12-31

    The proliferation of xenobiotic chemicals in the global environment poses living problems for each of us aboard {open_quotes}spaceship earth.{close_quotes} Seven case studies are presented that illustrate the magnitude of the problem that can result from waiting to identify toxic hazards until there have been decades of {open_quotes}human guinea pig{close_quotes} exposure. 25 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  7. Single-photon ultrashort-lived radionuclides: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paras, P.; Thiessen, J.W. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to define the current role and state-of-the-art regarding the development, clinical applications, and usefulness of generator-produced single-photon ultrashort-lived radionuclides (SPUSLR's) and to predict their future impact on medicine. Special emphasis was placed on the generator production of iridium-191, gold-195, and krypton-81. This report contains expanded summaries of the included papers. (ACR)

  8. Live from the Lab - SPORT Video | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Live from the Lab - SPORT Video Thanks to the innovation of "single particle orientation and rotation tracking" (SPORT), we now can watch the distinctive movements of drug delivering nanoparticles in real time. Nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize drug delivery. When these particles interact with cell membranes they move in all sorts of ways. They spin, they tumble, they move along and through the membrane. At least that's what we think. But what's really going on? Until

  9. Live from the Clinton Global Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from the Clinton Global Initiative Live from the Clinton Global Initiative September 21, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? We're partnering with the Clinton Global Initiative and other NGOs to bring clean-burning cookstoves to the developing world. Today Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton formally announced the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, a new public-private initiative to create a

  10. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural Basis of Behavior Signals in our brains are propagated with voltage and

  11. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural Basis of Behavior Signals in our brains are propagated with voltage and

  12. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural Basis of Behavior Signals in our brains are propagated with voltage and

  13. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  14. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gambhir; Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA), Pritha; Ray (Mountain View, CA)

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  15. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gambhir, Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA); Pritha, Ray (Mountain View, CA)

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  16. ScienceLive chat page: on the future of fusion research | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab ScienceLive chat page: on the future of fusion research American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: ScienceLive chat page: on the future of fusion research

  17. TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's ...

  18. #AskEnergy: Live Twitter Q&A on Solar Energy | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Live Twitter Q&A on Solar Energy AskEnergy: Live Twitter Q&A on Solar Energy February 10, 2014 - 10:35am Addthis What do you want to know about solar energy? Submit your questions ...

  19. WAC - 232-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    32-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-064 Live...

  20. Wendee Brunish-So that others may live

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wendee Brunish Wendee Brunish-So that others may live At work, this Lab astrophysicist spends long hours searching the planet for concealed weapons of mass destruction. March 10, 2014 Wendee Brunish At work, this Lab astrophysicist spends long hours searching the planet for concealed weapons of mass destruction. After hours-and often for days in dangerous conditions-she's searching steep, heavily wooded mountains for missing persons. "I am most proud of the fact that I am one of the few

  1. Ask a scientist: Nanotech in our lives | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spring 2014 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory science magazine. Ask a scientist: Nanotech in our lives June 1, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Is there nanotechnology already in my consumer products? Carrado Gregar: I just saw a report that named 1,628 products using nanotechnology...so I'd say yes, definitely! When you say nanotech, a lot of people are thinking of tiny machines or robots. There is a long way to go before that becomes reality. But simpler nanomaterials are very much in common use.

  2. Making the "Best Place to Live" Even Better

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For 2010, the appropriately named Eden Prairie, Minnesota was honored as the No. 1 Best Place to Live in the United States by Money Magazine. The highly-coveted civic title reflects many aspects of the family-friendly suburb of 62,000 located 16 miles from downtown Minneapolis, including the advantages of being the home to major employers like Fortune 500 trucking company C.H. Robinson and hearing-aid maker Starkey Labs. The city also hass many natural amenities like 17 lakes and parks with 125 miles of running, hiking, and biking trails.

  3. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Activated-sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Island | Department of Energy Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island

  7. Live wires: direct extracellular electron exchange for bioenergy and the bioremediation of energy-related contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, DR

    2011-12-01

    Microorganisms that can form direct electrical connections with insoluble minerals, electrodes, or other microorganisms can play an important role in some traditional as well as novel bioenergy strategies and can be helpful in the remediation of environmental contamination resulting from the use of more traditional energy sources. The surprising discovery that microorganisms in the genus Geobacter are capable of forming highly conductive networks of filaments that transfer electrons along their length with organic metallic-like conductivity, rather than traditional molecule to molecule electron exchange, provides an explanation for the ability of Geobacter species to grow in subsurface environments with insoluble Fe(III) oxides as the electron acceptor, and effectively remediate groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbon fuels or uranium and similar contaminants associated with the mining and processing of nuclear fuel. A similar organic metallic-like conductivity may be an important mechanism for microorganisms to exchange electrons in syntrophic associations, such as those responsible for the conversion of organic wastes to methane in anaerobic digesters, a proven bioenergy technology. Biofilms with conductivities rivaling those of synthetic polymers help Geobacter species generate the high current densities in microbial fuel cells producing electric current from organic compounds. Electron transfer in the reverse direction, i.e. from electrodes to microbes, is the basis for microbial electrosynthesis, in which microorganisms reduce carbon dioxide to fuels and other useful organic compounds with solar energy in a form of artificial photosynthesis that is more efficient and avoids many of the environmental sustainability concerns associated with biomass-based bioenergy strategies. The ability of Geobacter species to produce highly conductive electronic networks that function in water opens new possibilities in the emerging field of bioelectronics.

  8. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  9. Domestic Health Studies and Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Domestic Health Studies and Activities Domestic Health Studies and Activities Purpose The Atomic Energy Act of 1957 - Section 8(a) requires research and development activities relating to the protection of health during research and production activities. The requirement is fulfilled by conducting and supporting health studies and other research activities to determine if DOE workers and people living in communities near DOE sites are adversely affected by exposures to hazardous materials from

  10. WATCH LIVE: Talking the Higgs Boson with CERN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WATCH LIVE: Talking the Higgs Boson with CERN WATCH LIVE: Talking the Higgs Boson with CERN September 13, 2012 - 2:33pm Addthis WATCH LIVE: Talking the Higgs Boson with CERN Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Where do I watch? To watch this livestream, go to energy.gov/live. Tune in to a special livestream at energy.gov/live on Friday, Sept. 14 at 10 a.m. ET for a science lecture about the Higgs boson with Joe Incandela, head spokesperson

  11. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, D.G.

    1990-11-13

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means. 9 figs.

  12. Firearm equipped with live round inhibiting means and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baehr, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A firearm is disclosed having live round inhibiting means mounted in the barrel of the firearm which permits a blank cartridge to be loaded into a firearm and fired while preventing the loading and firing of a live round. The live round inhibiting means comprise shaft means mounted in the barrel of the firearm and which extends a sufficient length into the barrel at a point just beyond the chamber portion of the firearm to engage the bullet portion of a live round to prevent it from properly chambering, while permitting a blank cartridge to be loaded into the firearm and fired without engaging the live round-inhibiting shaft means.

  13. Network Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics Network Activity Network Activity PDSF Network Uplinks to NERSC (dual 10 Gbps) NERSC Uplink to ESnet Last edited: 2011-03-31 22:20:59...

  14. Uncharted Microbial World: Microbes and Their Activities in the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwood, Caroline; Buckley, Merry.

    2007-12-31

    Microbes are the foundation for all of life. From the air we breathe to the soil we rely on for farming to the water we drink, everything humans need to survive is intimately coupled with the activities of microbes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of disease and the use of microorganisms in the industrial production of drugs, food products and wastewater treatment. However, our understanding of many complicated microbial environments (the gut and teeth), soil fertility, and biogeochemical cycles of the elements is lagging behind due to their enormous complexity. Inadequate technology and limited resources have stymied many lines of investigation. Today, most environmental microorganisms have yet to be isolated and identified, let alone rigorously studied. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium in Seattle, Washington, in February 2007, to deliberate the way forward in the study of microorganisms and microbial activities in the environment. Researchers in microbiology, marine science, pathobiology, evolutionary biology, medicine, engineering, and other fields discussed ways to build on and extend recent successes in microbiology. The participants made specific recommendations for targeting future research, improving methodologies and techniques, and enhancing training and collaboration in the field. Microbiology has made a great deal of progress in the past 100 years, and the useful applications for these new discoveries are numerous. Microorganisms and microbial products are now used in industrial capacities ranging from bioremediation of toxic chemicals to probiotic therapies for humans and livestock. On the medical front, studies of microbial communities have revealed, among other things, new ways for controlling human pathogens. The immediate future for research in this field is extremely promising. In order to optimize the effectiveness of community research efforts in the future, scientists should include manageable systems with features like clear physical boundaries, limited microbial diversity, and manipulability with the goal of understanding fundamental principles that may apply to more complex systems. A great deal of microbial genetic and phenotypic diversity remains to be explored, and the commercial and medical potential locked up in these unknowns should compel the field to move forward. Future microbiology research will build on the successes of the past using new techniques and approaches. Uncultivated microbes hold great promise for industry, medicine, and the recycling of precious resources, and research and technology must make inroads in overcoming the barriers that prevent their study. In many cases, we will no longer be able to rely on isolated, pure cultures of microorganisms, but must use communities of microorganisms, which presently are poorly understood. Indeed, community-level studies can benefit from deconstructing microbial communities and analyzing the component members separately, but this is not feasible in every system. The effects of perturbation on microbial communities also require study. Humans rely on the services of microbes in innumerable ways, but we have little or no predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to disturbance. Research must address current limitations in detecting microscale interactions among microbes by enhancing current technologies and fostering new microscopic tools, biosensors, and gas sensors for appropriate small scales. Genomics, which has enabled great progress in microbiology research of individual species, must be applied to communities of microorganisms. This will require improved methods of DNA extraction and amplification from environmental samples and improved strategies for DNA sequence assembly. In the future, genome sequencing efforts should continue the exploration of evolutionarily diverse microbes, as well as help reveal the mechanisms by which closely related microbes evolve. Technological advances have spurred every great leap in microbial biology, and in order to move forward, new m

  15. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash forming minerals. During the reporting period, the hydrophobicity of different coal samples was studied both in the presence and absence of M. phlei cells. In the absence of M. Phlei, Illinois No. 6 and Pennsylvania No. 8 exhibited higher contact angles as compared to Kentucky No. 9 coal. All the coal samples exhibited a maximum in contact angle around pH 5--7, which roughly coincides with the iso-electric point (iep) of different coals studied in this investigation. In the presence of M. phlei, maximum contact angle shifted to lower pH range of 2--3 which coincides with the iep of the M. phlei. These measurements reinforce the notion that good flocculation of coal with M. phlei can be achieved around pH 2--3. The amount of soluble fraction released during rupturing of M. phlei cells was studied as a function of sonication time. The rupturing experiments showed that the whole cells (unruptured cells) contain nearly 40% by weight of soluble fractions. Also, during the reporting period, the fabrication of the counter-current flocculation device was completed.

  16. Experimental test of whether electrostatically charged micro-organisms and their spores contribute to the onset of arcs across vacuum gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisham, L. R.; Halle, A. von; Carpe, A. F.; Gilton, K. R.; Rossi, Guy; Stevenson, T. N.

    2013-12-15

    Recently it was proposed [L. R. Grisham et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between conducting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which then become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. This note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maximum operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each case preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance.

  17. Experimental Test Of Whether Electrostatically Charged Micro-organisms And Their Spores Contribute To The Onset Of Arcs Across Vacuum Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,; Grisham, Larry R.

    2014-02-24

    Recently it was proposed [L.R. Grisham, A. vonHalle, A.F. Carpe, Guy Rossi, K.R. Gilton, E.D. McBride, E.P. Gilson, A. Stepanov, T.N. Stevenson, Physics of Plasma 19 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between condu cting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which tnen become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. The note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maxium operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance

  18. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  19. Short-lived isomers in {sup 94}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Smith, A. G.; Varley, B. J.; Simpson, G. S.; Urban, W.; Soldner, T.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Scherillo, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Zlomaniec, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Roux, B.

    2008-07-15

    The medium-spin structure of the neutron-rich, odd-odd nucleus {sup 94}Rb was studied by means of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Excited levels were populated in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and {sup 248}Cm. Two isomeric states were found at 1485.2 and 2074.8 keV with half-lives of 18 and 107 ns, respectively. The probable structures of the two isomers involve the fully aligned, proton-neutron configurations [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(g{sub 7/2})]{sub 8{sup +}} and [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(h{sub 11/2})]{sub 10{sup -}}, respectively. These new data give information on the single-particle energies in the region.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  1. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  2. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Wednesday, 31 October 2012 00:00 Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To

  3. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  4. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-30

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  5. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  6. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation and Deployment | Department of Energy Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment October 19, 2011 - 3:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Thursday, October 20th, Richard Kauffman, Senior Adviser to the Secretary of Energy, will host the Department of Energy's third "Energy Matters" live chat. Kauffman will discuss the challenges and

  7. One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives August 8, 2013 - 10:57am Addthis One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives Learn More The coronary stent was developed as part of NETL's Technology Transfer program. NETL's technology portfolio contains a broad range of innovations that have resulted from research in areas such as carbon capture and sequestration, mercury capture, fuel cells, sensors and

  8. Dr. Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency Dr. Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency November 16, 2011 - 9:40am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Kathleen Hogan, Assistant Deputy Secretary for Energy Efficiency, will host the Department of Energy's fourth "Energy Matters" live chat today. Dr. Hogan will discuss how the cost savings associated with industrial energy efficiency measures affect American companies and their

  9. Search for Long-Lived Particles ine+e-Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2015-04-29

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the γ (4S), γ (3S), and γ (2S) resonances and just below the γ (4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of themore »L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B→XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.« less

  10. Search for Long-Lived Particles ine+e-Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2015-04-29

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the γ (4S), γ (3S), and γ (2S) resonances and just below the γ (4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of themore » L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B→XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.« less

  11. Efficient Living in a Small House: Could You Make the Switch?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small House Movement encourages homeowners to reject the huge homes that dominate many suburban neighborhoods and embrace smaller homes and simpler living.

  12. #AskEnergy: Join the Live Q&A on Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AskEnergy: Join the Live Q&A on Wind Energy #AskEnergy: Join the Live Q&A on Wind Energy August 18, 2014 - 8:52am Q&A Submit your wind energy questions for tomorrow's live Twitter Q&A now! Ask Us Addthis Have questions about wind energy? Experts from the Energy Department are answering your questions about wind during a live Twitter Q&A on Tuesday, August 19, at 1 p.m. ET. | Graphic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. Have

  13. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Case Competition: Energy Efficiency in the Restaurant Franchise Model Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "A Side of Savings: Energy Efficiency in the Restaurant Franchise Model Case Study."

  14. Upcoming Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Upcoming Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells January 10, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Join the Energy Department at 2:00 p.m. ET on Thursday, January 16 for the first Energy 101 Google+ Hangout, which will focus on fuel cells.Submit questions for fuel cell experts in advance and during the hangout, and watch the discussion live on energy.gov/live or the Energy Department's Google+ page.Read more about this event and how to submit questions. Addthis

  15. 01-08-1998 - VPP Program Saves Lives | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8-1998 - VPP Program Saves Lives Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1998 File (public): PDF icon 01-08-1998_green

  16. WPN 06-6: Weatherization Whole House Assessment Training Live Feed DVD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To issue the Weatherization Whole-House Training Assessment Training Live Feed DVD to all grantees for use in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  17. TODAY MAY 22ND: Live Tweeting the Apps for Energy Winners Announcement! |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy TODAY MAY 22ND: Live Tweeting the Apps for Energy Winners Announcement! TODAY MAY 22ND: Live Tweeting the Apps for Energy Winners Announcement! May 22, 2012 - 10:09am Addthis TODAY MAY 22ND: Live Tweeting the Apps for Energy Winners Announcement! Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Join us as we live tweet the Apps for Energy winners announcement event. To participate, simply follow

  18. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Case Competition: Taking Commercial PACE Financing to Scale, a Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "A Side of Savings: Energy Efficiency in the Restaurant Franchise Model Case Study."

  19. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; et al

    2015-03-15

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [¹⁸F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmore » of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [¹⁸F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.« less

  20. Catalyst activator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  1. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  2. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  3. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  4. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  5. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  6. Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Activator Keeps the Circadian Clock Ticking Print Most living organisms have adapted their physiology and behavior to match the daily cycle of light and dark generated by the rotation of the earth, operating with a period of approximately 24 hours. Molecular machines in cells ultimately control such rhythmic behavior, the details of which-the "circadian clock"-are largely conserved. To understand the inner workings of the circadian clock, researchers from the University of

  7. Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course at PPPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 5, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A screenshot of the new SULI website where a course in plasma physics will be live-streamed. A screenshot of the new SULI website where a course in plasma physics will be live-streamed. If you've always wanted to learn about the science behind plasma physics and fusion energy, you can listen to the very

  8. Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course at PPPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 5, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A screenshot of the new SULI website where a course in plasma physics will be live-streamed. A screenshot of the new SULI website where a course in plasma physics will be live-streamed. If you've always wanted to learn about the science behind plasma physics and fusion energy, you can listen to the very

  9. TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation | Department of Energy ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation June 28, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Wednesday, June 29, ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar will host the Department of Energy's second "Energy Matters" live chat. Dr. Majumdar will

  10. TOMORROW: Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat TOMORROW: Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat April 19, 2012 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On Friday, April 20, 2012, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a livechat as part of the Energy Department's Earth Day celebrations to highlight the environmental and economic benefits of the Department's investments in clean energy. The live chat will be streamed on www.energy.gov tomorrow, and will feature questions from both in-person and

  11. Our Energy Independence - A Live Chat With Dr. Arun Majumdar | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Energy Independence - A Live Chat With Dr. Arun Majumdar Our Energy Independence - A Live Chat With Dr. Arun Majumdar June 29, 2011 - 11:16am Addthis Dr. Arun Majumdar takes your questions about investments we're making to build the clean energy infrastructure of the future. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Submit a question via E-mail, Facebook or Twitter Watch live at 2 PM [UPDATED with video from

  12. Night of the Living Trash: Bringing Your Waste Back to Life | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Night of the Living Trash: Bringing Your Waste Back to Life Night of the Living Trash: Bringing Your Waste Back to Life October 30, 2015 - 12:33pm Addthis Night of the Living Trash: Bringing Your Waste Back to Life Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Deputy Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office This Halloween season, the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is highlighting how waste can be "brought back to life" and turned into

  13. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Technology Incubator for Wind Energy Innovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 17, 2014, from 1:00 – 3:00 PM MDT, the Wind Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Technology Incubator for Wind Energy Innovations Funding Opportunity.

  14. Live Webcast on the 2014 Farm Bill's Renewable Energy for America Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled “The 2014 Farm Bill's Renewable Energy for America Program” on May 21, 2014, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  15. Scientist Take First X-Ray Portraits of Living Cyanobacteria at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-02-11

    Researchers from Uppsala University working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first X-ray portraits of living bacteria, detecting signals from features as small as 4 nanometers, or 4 billionths of a meter.

  16. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  17. Search for long-lived particles that decay into final states...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtained are the most stringent to date. In the specific case of a model in which a Higgs boson in the mass range 125-1000mathrmGeVc2 decays into a pair of long-lived...

  18. Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anyone can learn about plasma physics through live-streamed course at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 5, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A screenshot of the...

  19. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Wind Forecasting Improvement Project in Complex Terrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 21, 2014 from 3:00 to 5:00 PM EST the Wind Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for this Funding Opportunity Announcement. There is no cost to...

  20. WATCH LIVE: Secretary Chu at 10:45 am ET | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WATCH LIVE: Secretary Chu at 10:45 am ET April 20, 2012 - 9:00am Addthis Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov This morning, at 10:45 am ET, we'll be ...

  1. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  2. The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Bill Gasper | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory This article was published in the spring 2014 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory science magazine. The secret lives of scientists & engineers: Bill Gasper June 1, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint This story was originally published in volume 8, issue 1 of Argonne Now, the laboratory's semiannual science magazine. Meet researchers from Argonne with unusual hobbies and interests in this series from the lab magazine, The Secret Lives of Scientists & Engineers. Today we're interviewing

  3. University Teams to Showcase Affordable, Energy Efficient Living in U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 | Department of Energy to Showcase Affordable, Energy Efficient Living in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 University Teams to Showcase Affordable, Energy Efficient Living in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 September 22, 2011 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Collegiate teams featuring over 4,000 students from around the world have descended on the National Mall's West Potomac Park to showcase the highly energy efficient

  4. Deformation Quantization: Quantum Mechanic Lives and Works in Phase-Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Deformation Quantization: Quantum Mechanic Lives and Works in Phase-Space Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deformation Quantization: Quantum Mechanic Lives and Works in Phase-Space Wigner's 1932 quasi-probability Distribution Function in phase-space is a special (Weyl) representation of the density matrix. It has been useful in describing quantum flows in: quantum optics; nuclear physics; decoherence (eg, quantum computing); quantum chaos;

  5. Join Us Live This Friday: Women in Clean Energy Symposium | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Live This Friday: Women in Clean Energy Symposium Join Us Live This Friday: Women in Clean Energy Symposium September 26, 2012 - 2:19pm Addthis NREL researcher Kirsten Alberi works in the luminescence mapping laboratory at the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). Here she aligns a laser and sample to map the photoluminescence coming off the sample. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. NREL researcher Kirsten Alberi works in the luminescence mapping laboratory at the Solar Energy

  6. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  7. We Want to Hear From You: Live Twitter Q&A Tuesday at Noon | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Want to Hear From You: Live Twitter Q&A Tuesday at Noon We Want to Hear From You: Live Twitter Q&A Tuesday at Noon March 19, 2012 - 11:07am Addthis Visit twitter.com/energy to join our live Twitter Q&A on Tuesday, March 20, at noon ET. Visit twitter.com/energy to join our live Twitter Q&A on Tuesday, March 20, at noon ET. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? To join our live Q&A,

  8. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  9. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-06-01

    The first objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and the role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Nonspecific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. We have previously shown that PO43- accumulation during growth on a model organophosphorus compound was attributable to the overproduction of alkaline phosphatase by genetically modified subsurface pseudomonads [Powers et al. (2002) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 41:115-123]. During this report period, we have extended these results to include indigenous metal resistant subsurface microorganisms cultivated from the Field Research Center (FRC), in Oak Ridge Tennessee.

  10. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A2. Glossary Acid stabilization: A circumstance where the pH of the waste mixture in an animal manure management system is maintained near 7.0, optimal conditions for methane production. Aerobic bacteria: Microorganisms living, active, or occurring only in the presence of oxygen. Aerobic decomposition: The breakdown of a molecule into simpler molecules or atoms by microorganisms under favorable conditions of oxygenation. Aerosols: Airborne particles. Afforestation: Planting of new forests on

  11. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide range of coiled-tubing string designs and pipe environments. Work conducted in the second quarter consisted of: (1) selecting a preferred pan/zoom/tilt camera; (2) initiating design of the digital control electronics and switching power supply for the control and operation of the in-pipe robotic modules; (3) continuing design of the repair sleeve and (4) initial testing of the wall-cleaning device. Most recently, activities in the third quarter included: (1) development of the system's pan/zoom/tilt camera control electronics and operating software, and implementing these in the surface and downhole modules and (2) further testing of the wall-cleaning elements used to clean the inside of the bell and spigot joints. Details of these activities are described in the body of the report along with a summary of events scheduled for the fourth quarter.

  12. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-06-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide range of coiled-tubing string designs and pipe environments. Work conducted in the second quarter consisted of: (1) selecting a preferred pan/zoom/tilt camera; (2) initiating design of the digital control electronics and switching power supply for the control and operation of the in-pipe robotic modules; (3) continuing design of the repair sleeve and (4) initial testing of the wall-cleaning device. Activities in the third quarter included: (1) development of the system's pan/zoom/tilt camera control electronics and operating software, and implementing these in the surface and downhole modules and (2) further testing of the wall-cleaning elements used to clean the inside of the bell and spigot joints. Most recently, fourth quarter developments were centered on designing and testing the pipe-wall cleaning device including the selection of the drive motor and its control electronics. In addition, efforts were also focused on the design of the repair sleeve. Details of these activities are described in the body of the report along with a summary of events scheduled for the next quarter.

  13. "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters November 24, 2014 - 5:06pm Addthis (Editor's Note: the following was originally posted on the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy blog on November 21, 2014.) By Brian Forde, Denice Ross and Derek Frempong In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, seemingly simple tasks such as refueling your car were

  14. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monolayer MoS2 and WS2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 3, 2016 Title: Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley

  15. Table HC1.2.2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace, " " Per Housing Unit and Per Household Member, 2005" ,,"Average Square Feet" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Per Housing Unit",,,"Per Household Member" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,2033,1618,1031,791,630,401 "Total Floorspace (Square

  16. Table HC1.2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441

  17. DOE Tour of Zero: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island 1 of 14 United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation renovated this 1,436-square-foot home in Patchogue, New York, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 14 The 1970s-era home had a HERS score of 162 in its pre-renovation condition, as shown here. When

  18. Follow Live Dec 24: Los Alamos National Lab Tracks Rudolph's Nose,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Santa's Sleigh | Department of Energy Thanks to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, you can <a href="http://www.santa.lanl.gov/"> follow along live</a> as Santa circles the globe this Christmas Eve. | Image credit: Hantz Leger. Thanks to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, you can follow along live as Santa circles the globe this Christmas Eve. | Image credit: Hantz Leger. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What

  19. "Table HC11.2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.4

  20. "Table HC12.2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than

  1. "Table HC13.2 Living Space Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than

  2. "Table HC14.2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1,0.2,0.8 "500 to

  3. Five Ways SLAC's X-ray Laser Can Change the Way We Live: 'The First Five

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Years' Points to a Bright Future of High-impact Discovery at LCLS | Department of Energy Five Ways SLAC's X-ray Laser Can Change the Way We Live: 'The First Five Years' Points to a Bright Future of High-impact Discovery at LCLS Five Ways SLAC's X-ray Laser Can Change the Way We Live: 'The First Five Years' Points to a Bright Future of High-impact Discovery at LCLS March 11, 2016 - 11:29am Addthis News release from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, March 9, 2016 If you've ever stood in a

  4. LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets LiveChat Thurs, 10/20, 2pm ET: Clean Tech Markets October 17, 2011 - 11:30am Addthis Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send an email to newmedia@hq.doe.gov; Tweeting your question to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leaving a question for Kauffman at Facebook.com/energygov. On Energy.gov, we've been showcasing a series of stories about innovations from our National

  5. LIVE Q&A TODAY: Answering Your Wind Energy Questions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LIVE Q&A TODAY: Answering Your Wind Energy Questions LIVE Q&A TODAY: Answering Your Wind Energy Questions August 8, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis On Thursday, August 8, we hosted a Google+ Hangout on wind energy in America. Watch as our clean energy experts take your questions. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Tweet questions to @ENERGY with the hashtag #AskEnergy. Ask us on Facebook and Google+. Email

  6. Tribal Summit Live: 9:30-10 AM ET Today and All Day Tomorrow | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Tribal Summit Live: 9:30-10 AM ET Today and All Day Tomorrow Tribal Summit Live: 9:30-10 AM ET Today and All Day Tomorrow May 4, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs UPDATE: We've added video from the events. Indian Energy Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native leaders kicks off this morning in Arlington, Virginia, with welcoming remarks from ARPA-E Director and Senior Advisor to the

  7. Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wake of Disasters | Department of Energy Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters August 18, 2011 - 6:26pm Addthis The Re_house is nearing completion. | Courtesy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon Team. The Re_house is nearing completion. | Courtesy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon Team. April Saylor

  8. WEDNESDAY: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation WEDNESDAY: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation January 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host the Department of Energy's inaugural "Energy Matters" online town hall on President Obama's clean energy and innovation agenda as a follow-up to the State of the Union. He will speak to and answer questions from an online and

  9. Ask the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hubs | Department of Energy the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation Hubs Ask the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation Hubs March 5, 2012 - 12:32pm Addthis Secretary Chu is accepting questions on Facebook, Twitter and e-mail for the Energy Innovation Hub directors -- who are working to build better nuclear reactors, obtain fuel from sunlight and design the most energy efficient buildings to date. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former

  10. #askEnergy: Live Twitter Chat with A Solar Expert | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    askEnergy: Live Twitter Chat with A Solar Expert #askEnergy: Live Twitter Chat with A Solar Expert June 5, 2012 - 11:51am Q&A What questions do you have about solar energy? Ask Us Addthis Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Join us for a Solar Twitter Chat this Friday, June 8 at 2 pm EDT. To participate, leave a comment on Facebook. Send

  11. Photo of the Week: Living Large -- Argonne's First Computer | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Living Large -- Argonne's First Computer Photo of the Week: Living Large -- Argonne's First Computer August 31, 2012 - 9:58am Addthis Before there was Google, or even the Internet, there was the computer -- and the earliest computers were so large that just one could occupy an entire room. AVIDAC was the first digital computer at Argonne National Laboratory, and began operating in 1953. It was built by the Physics Division for $250,000. Pictured here, with AVIDAC, is pioneer Argonne

  12. Five Efficient-Living Lessons from Student-Built Houses | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Five Efficient-Living Lessons from Student-Built Houses Five Efficient-Living Lessons from Student-Built Houses November 8, 2013 - 10:59am Addthis Team Austria of the Vienna Institute of Technology created an energy-efficient bathroom for Solar Decathlon 2013. | Photo from Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Team Austria of the Vienna Institute of Technology created an energy-efficient bathroom for Solar Decathlon 2013. | Photo from Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of

  13. DOE Tour of Zero: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: Options for Community Living by United Way of Long Island Addthis 1 of 14 United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation renovated this 1,436-square-foot home in Patchogue, New York, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 14 The 1970s-era home had a HERS score of 162 in its pre-renovation condition, as shown here. When

  14. LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence June 27, 2011 - 9:29am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Submit a question via E-mail, Facebook or Twitter Watch live on June 29 at 2 PM ET As many of us hit the road to celebrate America's independence this upcoming 4th of July weekend, we must once again confront the reality of our country's economy, environment and

  15. Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live November 4, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Sen. Menendez, Rep. Pascrell, John Lushetsky and other officials at the ribbon cutting. Sen. Menendez, Rep. Pascrell, John Lushetsky and other officials at the ribbon cutting. John Lushetsky Strategic Programs Director A couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to participate in a ribbon cutting event for the

  16. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the fines fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  17. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the...

  18. Live Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status...

  19. A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E.; Tucker, Mark David; Kaiser, Julia N.; Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

    2012-02-01

    In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

  20. EECBG Success Story: Making the "Best Place to Live" Even Better

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One advantage that Eden Prairie, Minnesota, will have going into next year’s Best Place to Live competition will be the energy efficiency upgrades taking place across the city thanks to $626,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Learn more.

  1. Method of freezing living cells and tissues with improved subsequent survival

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hirsch, Gerald P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for freezing red blood cells, ther living cells, or tissues with improved subsequent survival, wherein constant-volume freezing is utilized that results in significantly improved survival compared with constant-pressure freezing; optimization is attainable through the use of different vessel geometries, cooling baths and warming baths, and sample concentrations.

  2. Geological Repository Layout for Radioactive High Level Long Lived Waste in Argilite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaussen, J.L.

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of the 1991 French radioactive waste act, ANDRA has studied the feasibility of a geological repository in the argillite layer of the Bure site for high-level long-lived waste. This presentation is focused on the underground facilities that constitute the specific component of this project. The preliminary underground layout, which has been elaborated, is based on four categories of data: - the waste characteristics and inventory; - the geological properties of the host argillite; - the long term performance objectives of the repository; - the specifications in term of operation and reversibility. The underground facilities consist of two types of works: the access works (shafts and drifts) and the disposal cells. The function of the access works is to permit the implementation of two concurrent activities: the nuclear operations (transfer and emplacement of the disposal packages into the disposal cells) and the construction of the next disposal cells. The design of the drifts network which matches up to this function is also influenced by two other specifications: the minimisation of the drift dimensions in order to limit their influence on the integrity of the geological formation and the necessity of a safe ventilation in case of fire. The resulting layout is a network of 4 parallel drifts (2 of them being dedicated to the operation, the other two being dedicated to the construction activities). The average diameter of these access drifts is 7 meters. 4 shafts ensure the link between the surface and the underground. The most important function of the disposal cells is to contribute to the long-term performance of the repository. In this regard, the thermal and geotechnical considerations play an important role. The B wastes (intermediate level wastes) are not (or not very) exothermic. Consequently, the design of their disposal cells result mainly from geotechnical considerations. The disposal packages (made of concrete) are piled up in big cavities the diameter of which is about 10 meters and the length of which is about 250 meters. On the other hand, the design of the C waste disposal cells (vitrified waste) is mainly derived from their thermal power (about 500 W after a 60 year period of interim storage). The disposal cell is a tunnel the diameter of which is about 0,70 m and the length of which is about 40 m. The number of the disposal packages (made of steel) per cell, the spacing between two adjacent canisters within a given cell and the spacing between two adjacent cells are adjusted to limit the peak of temperature in the host formation at 100 deg. C. The disposal cells are also characterized by favourable design factors that would facilitate the potential retrieval of the wastes. The whole underground layout would represent a surface area of several km{sup 2}. (authors)

  3. RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVAE HAVE SHORTER-LIVED CENTRAL ENGINES OR MORE EXTENDED PROGENITORS: THE CASE OF SN2012ap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Soderberg, A. M.; Sanders, N.; Chakraborti, S.; Kamble, A.; Drout, M.; Parrent, J.; Zauderer, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Morsony, B. J.; Ray, A.; Chomiuk, L.

    2014-12-20

    Deep, late-time X-ray observations of the relativistic, engine-driven, type Ic SN2012ap allow us to probe the nearby environment of the explosion and reveal the unique properties of relativistic supernova explosions (SNe). We find that on a local scale of ?0.01 pc the environment was shaped directly by the evolution of the progenitor star with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate of M-dot <510{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}, in line with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the other relativistic SN 2009bb. Like sub-energetic GRBs, SN2012ap is characterized by a bright radio emission and evidence for mildly relativistic ejecta. However, its late-time (?t ? 20 days) X-ray emission is ?100 times fainter than the faintest sub-energetic GRB at the same epoch, with no evidence for late-time central engine activity. These results support theoretical proposals that link relativistic SNe like 2009bb and 2012ap with the weakest observed engine-driven explosions, where the jet barely fails to break out. Furthermore, our observations demonstrate that the difference between relativistic SNe and sub-energetic GRBs is intrinsic and not due to line-of-sight effects. This phenomenology can either be due to an intrinsically shorter-lived engine or to a more extended progenitor in relativistic SNe.

  4. FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO ESTIMATE FATIGUE LIVES OF WELDED LAP-SHEAR SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.; Michigan, J.

    2014-04-25

    A full range of stress intensity factor solutions for a kinked crack is developed as a function of weld width and the sheet thickness. When used with the associated main crack solutions (global stress intensity factors) in terms of the applied load and specimen geometry, the fatigue lives can be estimated for the laser-welded lap-shear specimens. The estimations are in good agreement with the experimental data. A classical solution for an infinitesimal kink is also employed in the approach. However, the life predictions tend to overestimate the actual fatigue lives. The traditional life estimations with the structural stress along with the experimental stress-fatigue life data (S-N curve) are also provided. In this case, the estimations only agree with the experimental data under higher load conditions.

  5. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  6. "Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit

  7. Feb. 7 Science Series Lecturer to Discuss Living & Working in the Arctic |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab 7 Science Series Lecturer to Discuss Living & Working in the Arctic NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Jan. 19, 2012 - The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility hosts its next Science Series lecture on Tuesday, Feb. 7, with a discussion about carrying out research in a freezer - the extreme cold of the Arctic. Guest speaker Victoria Hill, an oceanographer with Old Dominion University's bio-optics group, will talk about the work she and colleagues have undertaken to try to explain

  8. In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into MDCK Cells In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine into MDCK Cells Sulfur is essential for life. It plays important roles in the amino acids methionine and cysteine, and has a structural function in disulfide bonds. As a component of iron-sulfur clusters it takes part in electron and sulfur transfer reactions.1 Glutathione, a sulfur-containing tripeptide, is an important part of biological antioxidant systems.2 Another example for the biological

  9. Savannah River Site "Live Burn" Training Sharpens Skills | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration "Live Burn" Training Sharpens Skills | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  10. Live Q&A: Celebrating Black History Month and STEM Education | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Q&A: Celebrating Black History Month and STEM Education Live Q&A: Celebrating Black History Month and STEM Education February 22, 2013 - 3:14pm Q&A What questions do you have about STEM education & careers? Ask our experts Addthis Join our Google+ Hangout on increasing diversity in science, technology, engineering & math disciplines. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Join our Google+ Hangout on increasing diversity in science, technology, engineering & math

  11. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  12. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05-0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolismmore » in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (<0.5°C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.« less

  13. Ultrafast nanolaser device for detecting cancer in a single live cell.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, Paul Lee; McDonald, Anthony Eugene

    2007-11-01

    Emerging BioMicroNanotechnologies have the potential to provide accurate, realtime, high throughput screening of live tumor cells without invasive chemical reagents when coupled with ultrafast laser methods. These optically based methods are critical to advancing early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The first year goals of this project are to develop a laser-based imaging system integrated with an in- vitro, live-cell, micro-culture to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions. In the second year, the system will be used to elucidate the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in the normal cell respiration state and in the disease state for normal and disease states of the cell. In this work we designed and built an in-vitro, live-cell culture microsystem to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions of pH, temp, CO2, Ox, humidity, on engineered material surfaces. We demonstrated viability of cell culture in the microsystem by showing that cells retain healthy growth rates, exhibit normal morphology, and grow to confluence without blebbing or other adverse influences of the material surfaces. We also demonstrated the feasibility of integrating the culture microsystem with laser-imaging and performed nanolaser flow spectrocytometry to carry out analysis of the cells isolated mitochondria.

  14. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  15. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  16. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about Secondary Energy Infobook, 19 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12.

  17. Lab active in support of science activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active in support of science activities Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab active in support of science activities Los Alamos High Schools wins regional event February 1, 2014 Left to Right: Katherine Wang; William Wang; Alexander Swart; Alexandr Wang; William Zhao, Team Captain; and Kathleen Boerigter, Coach Los Alamos High School wins the regional Science Bowl. Left to Right:

  18. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wei

    2010-12-15

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian cells. New rotational information was obtained: (1) during endocytosis, cargoes lost their rotation freedom at the late stage of internalization; (2) cargoes performed train-like motion when they were transported along the microtubule network by motor proteins inside live cells; (3) During the pause stage of fast axonal transport, cargoes were still bound to the microtubule tracks by motor proteins. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is another non-invasive and far-field optical imaging technique. Because of its near-field illumination mechanism, TIRFM has better axial resolution than epi-fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. In this work, an auto-calibrated, prism type, angle-scanning TIRFM instrument was built. The incident angle can range from subcritical angles to nearly 90{sup o}, with an angle interval less than 0.2{sup o}. The angle precision of the new instrument was demonstrated through the finding of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle of metal film coated glass slide. The new instrument improved significantly the precision in determining the axial position. As a result, the best obtained axial resolution was {approx} 8 nm, which is better than current existing instruments similar in function. The instrument was further modified to function as a pseudo TIRF microscope. The illumination depth can be controlled by changing the incident angle of the excitation laser beam or adjusting the horizontal position of the illumination laser spot on the prism top surface. With the new technique, i.e., variable-illumination-depth pseudo TIRF microscopy, the whole cell body from bottom to top was scanned.

  19. Microorganism genomics, compositions and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo (Madison, WI); Goodman, Robert M. (Madison, WI); Rondon, Michelle R. (Madison, WI)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for accessing, in a generally unbaised manner, a diverse genetic pool for genes involved in biosynthetic pathways. The invention also provides compounds which can be identified by cloning biosynthetic pathways.

  20. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  1. System, device, and methods for real-time screening of live cells, biomarkers, and chemical signatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, S Kamakshi [Richland, WA; Riley, Brian J [West Richland, WA; Weber, Thomas J [Richland, WA; Sacksteder, Colette A [West Richland, WA; Addleman, R Shane [Benton City, WA

    2011-06-07

    An ATR-FTIR device and system are described that defect live-cell responses to stimuli and perturbations in real-time. The system and device can monitor perturbations resulting from exposures to various physical, chemical, and biological materials in real-time, as well as those sustained over a long period of time, including those associated with stimuli having unknown modes-of-action (e.g. nanoparticles). The device and system can also be used to identify specific chemical species or substances that profile cellular responses to these perturbations.

  2. Table HC6.2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 1.7 0.8 0.4 0.3 Q 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 10.2 6.4 3.4 2.3 1.5 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 5.5 6.3 3.0 3.3 2.6 1,500 to

  3. Installation of 2 7/8-in. coiled-tubing tailpipes in live gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Bayes, K.P.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a technique for installing 2 7/8-in. coiled tubing as tailpipe extensions below existing production packers in live gas wells. It also covers the use of coiled tubing as a way to complete wells. Large savings in rig time and deferred production have been realized with this technique. Fluid losses to the formation do not occur, and no expensive rig time is needed to kill or clean up the wells, as required for conventional workovers below existing production packers. This technique is particularly applicable in depleted reservoirs that could be impaired by traditional workover methods.

  4. LiveChat Wed, 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency LiveChat Wed, 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency November 14, 2011 - 1:40pm Addthis Do you have questions or ideas about how the U.S. Department of Energy can contribute to global competitiveness through industrial efficiency? Dr. Kathleen Hogan would like to hear them. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Send an email to Dr. Hogan at

  5. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-Kilovolt power line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levallois, P.; Gauvin, D.; St. Laurent, J.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line`s right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 Mg, p=0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p=0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r=0.8, p+0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold F(2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure. Percentage of time above 20 V/m was significantly different, but percentage of time above 78 V/m was rare and comparable for the two groups. Variability of exposure was very low. This study demonstrates that a 735-kV line contributes significantly to residential 60-Hz magnetic field exposure and, to a lesser extent, electric fields for people living at the edge of the right way. Because of the limited size of our sample, caution is recommended before generalizing these results. Nevertheless, due to the uncertainty on the risks associated with such an unusual high residential exposure, research is needed on its possible effects. 30 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  6. Acting Biomass Program Manager Dr. Valerie Reed to Host Live Twitter Q&A on Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. – On Friday, December 16th, the Energy Department (@energy) will be hosting a live Twitter Q&A on biofuels with Dr. Valerie Reed, Acting Manager of the Biomass Program.

  7. Fixed Monthly Living Expense Payments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, INS-L-11-05

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fixed Monthly Living Expense Payments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory INS-L-11-05 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 21, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR MANAGER, LIVERMORE SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Fixed Monthly Living Expense Payments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) is a

  8. Method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small bio-chemical samples, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biologist host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  9. Method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-11-22

    Disclosed is a method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biologist host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figs.

  10. Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

    2007-09-24

    Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

  11. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  12. Retrieval Activities - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farms Retrieval Activities Office of River Protection Tank Farms Retrieval Activities PHOENIX - Tank Monitoring Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant 222-S Laboratory 242-A...

  13. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

    2003-02-01

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someones back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

  14. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

    2003-02-25

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

  15. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a Materials World' was one of the fifteen content strands offered at the institute. The summer institute participants were pre/post tested on their comfort with STEM, their perceptions of STEM education, their pedagogical discontentment, their implementations of inquiry, their attitudes toward student learning of STEM, and their content knowledge associated with their specific content strand. The results from our research indicate a significant increase in content knowledge (t = 11.36, p < .01) for the Living in a Materials World strand participants. Overall the summer institute participants were found to have significant increases in their comfort levels for teaching STEM (t = 10.94, p < .01), in inquiry implementation (t = 5.72, p < .01) and efficacy for teaching STEM (t = 6.27, p < .01) and significant decrease in pedagogical discontentment (t = -6.26, p < .01).

  16. Long-lived light mediator to dark matter and primordial small scale spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-05-06

    We calculate the early universe evolution of perturbations in the dark matter energy density in the context of simple dark sector models containing a GeV scale light mediator. We consider the case that the mediator is long-lived, with lifetime up to a second, and before decaying it temporarily dominates the energy density of the universe. We show that for primordial perturbations that enter the horizon around this period, the interplay between linear growth during matter domination and collisional damping can generically lead to a sharp peak in the spectrum of dark matter density perturbation. As a result, the population of the smallest DM halos gets enhanced. Possible implications of this scenario are discussed.

  17. Removal of long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Cushman, P.; Pepin, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

    2013-08-08

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 ?m from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screeners energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

  18. Enhanced-locality fiber-optic two-photon-fluorescence live-brain interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Anokhin, K. V.; Kilin, S. Ya.; Sakoda, K.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-02-24

    Two-photon excitation is shown to substantially enhance the locality of fiber-based optical interrogation of strongly scattering biotissues. In our experiments, a high-numerical-aperture, large-core-are fiber probe is used to deliver the 200-fs output of a 100-MHz mode-locked ytterbium fiber laser to samples of live mouse brain, induce two-photon fluorescence of nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond markers in brain sample. Fiber probes with a high numerical aperture and a large core area are shown to enable locality enhancement in fiber-laser–fiber-probe two-photon brain excitation and interrogation without sacrificing the efficiency of fluorescence response collection.

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-01

    In this project, Building Science Corporation worked with production homebuilder K. Hovnanian to evaluate air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multipoint fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing measured the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  20. Biomass growth restriction in a packed bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, William L.; Compere, Alicia L.

    1978-01-01

    When carrying out continuous biologically catalyzed reactions with anaerobic microorganisms attached to a support in an upflow packed bed column, growth of the microorganisms is restricted to prevent the microorganisms from plugging the column by limiting the availability of an essential nutrient and/or by the presence of predatory protozoa which consume the anaerobic microorganisms. A membrane disruptive detergent may be provided in the column to lyse dead microorganisms to make them available as nutrients for live microorganisms.

  1. Realistic fission models, new beta-decay half-lives and the r-process in neutron star mergers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibagaki, S.; Kajino, T. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan and National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, S. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8850 (Japan); Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Almost half of heavy nuclei beyond iron are considered to be produced by rapid neutron capture process (r-process). This process occurs in the neutron-rich environment such as core-collapse supernovae or neutron star mergers, but the main production site is still unknown. In the r-process of neutron star mergers, nuclear fission reactions play an important role. Also beta-decay half-lives of magic nuclei are crucial for the r-process. We have carried out r-process nucleosynthesis calculations based upon new theoretical estimates of fission fragment distributions and new beta-decay half-lives for N=82 nuclei measured at RIBF-RIKEN. We investigate the effect of nuclear fission on abundance patterns in the matter ejected from neutron star mergers with two different fission fragment mass distributions. We also discuss how the new experimental beta-decay half-lives affect the r-process.

  2. "Table HC10.2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.9,1 "500 to 999",23.8,4.6,3.9,9,6.3

  3. "Table HC15.2 Living Space Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Living Space Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5 "500

  4. "Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  5. "Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  6. The secret lives of Cepheids: evolutionary changes and pulsation-induced shock heating in the prototype classical Cepheid ? Cep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward F. [Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Neilson, Hilding R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Box 70652, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Evans, Nancy Remage, E-mail: scott.engle@villanova.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS 4, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Over the past decade, the Secret Lives of Cepheids (SLiC) program has been carried out at Villanova University to study aspects and behaviors of classical Cepheids that are still not well understood. In this, the first of several planned papers on program Cepheids, we report the current results for ? Cep, the Cepheid prototype. Ongoing photometry has been obtained to search for changes in the pulsation period, light-curve morphology, and amplitude. Combining our photometry with the times of maximum light compilation by Berdnikov et al. returns a small period change of dP/dt ?0.1006 0.0002 s yr{sup -1}. There is also evidence for a gradual light amplitude increase of ?0.011 mag (V band) and ?0.012 mag (B band) per decade over the last ?50 years. In addition, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) UV spectrophotometry and XMM-Newton X-ray data were carried out to investigate the high-temperature plasmas present above the Cepheid photospheres. In total, from the five visits (eight exposures) with XMM-Newton, ? Cep is found to be a soft X-ray source (L {sub X} (0.3-2 keV) ?4.5-13 10{sup 28} erg s{sup -1}) with peak flux at kT = 0.6-0.9 keV. The X-ray activity is found to vary, possibly in phase with the stellar pulsations. From 2010-2013, nine observations of ? Cep were carried out with HST-COS. The UV emissions are also variable and well phased with the stellar pulsations. Maximum UV line emissions occur near, or slightly before, maximum optical light, varying by as much as 20 times. This variability shows that pulsation-induced shock heating plays a significant role in Cepheid atmospheres, possibly in addition to a quiescent, magnetic heating. The results of this study show Cepheid atmospheres to be rather complex and dynamic.

  7. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  8. VOLUNTEER ACTIVITY 5

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Energy Conservation: Did I remember to...? Activity Type: Craft and Game Supports Lesson Five: Global Warming Grades 4-6

  9. Interactive Activity Detection Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Detection Tools Interactive Activity Detection Tools Tools for detecting specified activities in video data provide a key intelligence capability. High numbers of false alarms, however, reduce tool effectiveness and analyst patience. User feedback reduces false alarms * This project will reduce the number of false alarms generated by activity detection tools (including single vehicle start / stop, multi-vehicle meetings and coordinated driving patterns) by exploiting user feedback in a

  10. Efficient Analysis of Live and Historical Streaming Data and itsApplication to Cybersecurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiss, Frederick; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng; Shoshani, Arie; Hellerstein, Joseph M.

    2007-04-06

    Applications that query data streams in order to identifytrends, patterns, or anomalies can often benefit from comparing the livestream data with archived historical stream data. However, searching thishistorical data in real time has been considered so far to beprohibitively expensive. One of the main bottlenecks is the update costsof the indices over the archived data. In this paper, we address thisproblem by using our highly-efficient bitmap indexing technology (calledFastBit) and demonstrate that the index update operations aresufficiently efficient for this bottleneck to be removed. We describe ourprototype system based on the TelegraphCQ streaming query processor andthe FastBit bitmap index. We present a detailed performance evaluation ofour system using a complex query workload for analyzing real networktraffic data. The combined system uses TelegraphCQ to analyze streams oftraffic information and FastBit to correlate current behaviors withhistorical trends. We demonstrate that our system can simultaneouslyanalyze (1) live streams with high data rates and (2) a large repositoryof historical stream data.

  11. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  12. Search for long-lived particles in e+e- collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-04-29

    In this study, we present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb1 collected by the BABAR detector at the ?(4S), ?(3S), and ?(2S) resonances and just below the ?(4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B ? XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  13. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

  14. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E.; Robison, W. L.

    1998-09-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the United States as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 Mt (Mt TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for 10's of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently about 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is dominated by the natural radionuclides, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb. Man-made radionuclides presently contribute less than 0.3% of the dose from these natural radionuclides in the marine food chain.

  15. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  17. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  18. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Carl W. (Stony Brook, NY); Mangel, Walter F. (Shoreham, NY)

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  19. Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Activities Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources. Peer Exchange Call Summaries Voluntary Initiatives Events PEER EXCHANGE CALL Summaries Catch up on past Peer Exchange Calls by accessing more than 100 call summaries on the following topics: Market Position and Business Model Program Design and Customer Experience Evaluation and Data

  20. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the world's most powerful technology without consuming excessive energy or creating waste? January 30, 2014 Active stewardship: sustainable future What if you could power your life using pond scum? Los Alamos researchers are creating many innovations to support a sustainable future. Energy sustainability is a daunting task:

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report

  3. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  4. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Report to Congress August 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2015 Energy Conservation Standards Activities | i Message from the Assistant Secretary I am pleased to provide you with the semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation Standards Activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report meets the requirements of section 141 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) and sections 305 and 321 of the

  5. Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activities Activities Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources. Peer Exchange Call Summaries Voluntary Initiatives Events PEER EXCHANGE CALL Summaries Catch up on past Peer Exchange Calls by accessing more than 150 call summaries on the following topics: Market Position and Business Model Program Design and Customer Experience Evaluation and Data

  6. National Service Activation Checklist

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Service Activation Checklist You have just received information that you are being activated for national service. Covered or Not Covered If you have received notice to report for active duty - Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, Public Health Service, or Coast Guard and you are a Federal employee, you have employment and reemployment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 (USERRA). Basics - Telling People What is Happening 1. Have you told your

  7. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles Using the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yunhe; /Brown U.

    2009-05-01

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data. The speed of the particle has been calculated based on the time-of-flight and position information in the muon system. The present research is limited to direct pair-production of the charged massive long-lived particles. We do not consider CMSPs that result from the cascade decays of heavier particles. In this analysis, the exact values of the model parameters of the entire supersymmetric particle mass spectrum, relevant for cascade decays, are not important. We found no evidence of the signal. 95% CL cross-section upper limits have been set on the pair-productions of the stable scaler tau lepton, the gaugino-like charginos, and the higgsino-like charginos. The upper cross section limits vary from 0.31 pb to 0.04 pb, for stau masses in the range between 60 GeV and 300 GeV. We use the nominal value of the theoretical cross section to set limits on the mass of the pair produced charginos. We exclude the pair-produced stable gaugino-like charginos with mass below 206 GeV, and higgsino-like charginos below 171 GeV, respectively. Although the present sensitivity is insufficient to test the model of the pair produced stable staus, we do set cross section limits which can be applied to the pair production of any charged massive stable particle candidates with similar kinematics. These are the most restrictive limits to the present on the cross sections for CMSPs and the first published from the Tevatron Collider Run II. The manuscript has been published by Physical Review Letters in April 2009 and is available at arXiv as.

  8. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation, and mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMSs tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.

  9. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation,more »and mini-split SUSY. We then explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMS’s tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. By adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.« less

  10. MIXING AND TRANSPORT OF SHORT-LIVED AND STABLE ISOTOPES AND REFRACTORY GRAINS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-08-10

    Analyses of primitive meteorites and cometary samples have shown that the solar nebula must have experienced a phase of large-scale outward transport of small refractory grains as well as homogenization of initially spatially heterogeneous short-lived isotopes. The stable oxygen isotopes, however, were able to remain spatially heterogeneous at the {approx}6% level. One promising mechanism for achieving these disparate goals is the mixing and transport associated with a marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU) disk, a likely cause of FU Orionis events in young low-mass stars. Several new sets of MGU models are presented that explore mixing and transport in disks with varied masses (0.016 to 0.13 M{sub Sun }) around stars with varied masses (0.1 to 1 M{sub Sun }) and varied initial Q stability minima (1.8 to 3.1). The results show that MGU disks are able to rapidly (within {approx}10{sup 4} yr) achieve large-scale transport and homogenization of initially spatially heterogeneous distributions of disk grains or gas. In addition, the models show that while single-shot injection heterogeneity is reduced to a relatively low level ({approx}1%), as required for early solar system chronometry, continuous injection of the sort associated with the generation of stable oxygen isotope fractionations by UV photolysis leads to a sustained, relatively high level ({approx}10%) of heterogeneity, in agreement with the oxygen isotope data. These models support the suggestion that the protosun may have experienced at least one FU Orionis-like outburst, which produced several of the signatures left behind in primitive chondrites and comets.

  11. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation,moreand mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMSs tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.less

  12. Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Burkett; Hagen Schempf

    2006-01-31

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design of the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main NDE and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and recovery of the system using custom fittings and a (to be developed) launch-chamber/-tube. The battery modules are used to power the system, by providing power to the robot's bus. The support modules perform the functions of centration for the rest of the train as well as odometry pickups using incremental encoding schemes. The electronics architecture is based on a distributed (8-bit) microprocessor architecture (at least 1 in ea. module) communicating to a (one of two) 32-bit SBC, which manages all video-processing, posture and motion control as well as CAN and wireless communications. The operator controls the entire system from an off-board (laptop) controller, which is in constant wireless communication with the robot train in the pipe. The sensor modules collect data and forward it to the robot operator computer (via the CAN-wireless communications chain), who then transfers it to a dedicated NDE data-storage and post-processing computer for further (real-time or off-line) analysis. CMU has fully designed every module in terms of the mechanical, electrical and software elements (architecture only). Substantial effort has gone into pre-prototyping to uncover mechanical, electrical and software issues for critical elements of the design. Design requirements for sensor-providers were also detailed and finalized and provided to them for inclusion in their designs. CMU is expecting to start 2006 with a detailed design effort for both mechanical and electrical components, followed by procurement and fabrication efforts in late winter/spring 2006. The assembly and integration efforts will occupy all of the spring and summer of 2006. Software development will also be a major effort in 2006, and will result in porting and debugging of code on the module- and train-levels in late summer and Fall of 2006. Final pipe mock-up testing is expected in late fall and early winter 2006 with an acceptance demonstration of the robot train (with a sensor-module mock-up) planned to DoE/NGA towards the end of 2006.

  13. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average. Graphs for the last 8 days. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Storage Concurrency Transfer Activity This graph shows the number of transfers to the storage systems...

  14. Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated and inquiry-based activities that provide a comprehensive understanding of the scientific, economic, environmental, technological, and societal aspects of hydropower to secondary students

  15. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  16. Activation.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Information Center Activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 2/15/2014 3:09 PM1:30 PM (MST) - The Joint Information Center (JIC) has been activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The activation occurred as a precautionary measure. More information will be provided as it becomes available. The Joint Information Center (JIC), located at 4021 National Parks Highway, has been activated to provide public information. For

  17. Residential Building Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  18. Low Specific Activity (LSA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of Low Specific Activity (LSA) material.  This...

  19. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  20. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  1. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  2. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide acceptor–donor–acceptor molecule (PDI–DPP–PDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in τ = 3.1 ± 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in τ = 340 ± 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in τ < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, uponmore » CH₂Cl₂ vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electron–hole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 μs. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donor–acceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.« less

  3. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimidediketopyrrolopyrroleperylenediimide molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimidediketopyrrolopyrroleperylenediimide acceptordonoracceptor molecule (PDIDPPPDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in ? = 3.1 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in ? = 340 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in ? < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, upon CH?Cl? vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electronhole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 ?s. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donoracceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.

  4. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  5. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic biological building blocks such as amino acids and DNA. Globally the largest reservoir for nitrogen is the atmosphere, with an N2 content of roughly 78%. However, as a highly unreactive gas, most organisms are unable to directly utilize dinitrogen due to the severe energy barrier required

  6. Study Guides and Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for considering fossil energy education in your classroom curriculum. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy is excited to present printable study guides and activities...

  7. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  8. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  9. Filter Replacement Activities Complete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2014 Filter Replacement Activities Complete This week, filter replacements were safely and successfully completed. The high efficiency filters on the second filter unit were replaced on June 20, and employees replaced the moderate filters on June 23. Decontamination and cleanup of the work areas in the filter building will complete all activities currently scheduled for WIPP's ventilation system. Employees are also restoring higher airflow levels now that both filter units are operational.

  10. WINDExchange: Deployment Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Deployment Activities Recent years have seen major growth in wind energy, and deployment projections indicate this trend will continue for all parts of the wind industry, from small distributed and community wind projects to massive land-based and offshore utility-scale facilities. Record numbers of Americans see wind energy as an important contributor to a secure and clean energy

  11. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the Assistant Secretary I am pleased to provide you with the semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation Standards Activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report meets the requirements of Section 141 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) and Sections 305 and 321 of the Energy Independence and

  12. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biomass Federal Biomass Activities Activities Dana Arnold Dana Arnold Office of the Federal Environmental Office of the Federal Environmental Executive Executive September 10, 2009 September 10, 2009 OFEE OFEE Established in the Clinton Administration Established in the Clinton Administration Part of the White House Council on Environmental Part of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Quality Works with Federal agencies to make the operations Works with Federal agencies to make the

  13. Interaction of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields with living systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1991-11-01

    The sources and physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are described in this paper. Biological effects and mechanisms through which ELF fields interact with humans and other organisms are discussed, including several aspects of this subject that are presently under active laboratory investigation. Studies on the potential health effects of ELF fields present in the home and workplace are also summarized, including a critical evaluation of evidence for a possible linkage between exposure to ELF fields and cancer risk. 53 refs.

  14. Work Force Restructuring Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Force Restructuring Activities December 10, 2008 Note: Current updates are in bold # Planned Site/Contractor HQ Approved Separations Status General * LM has finalized the compilation of contractor management team separation data for the end of FY07 actuals and end of FY08 and FY09 projections. LM has submitted to Congress the FY 2007 Annual Report on contractor work force restructuring activities. The report has been posted to the LM website. *LM conducted a DOE complex-wide data call to the

  15. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Bandwidth and Transfer Activity Data Rate vs. File Size The graph below shows the bandwidth for individual file transfers for one day. The graph also gives a quick overview of the traffic and maximum bandwidth and file size for a given day. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Rate vs. Size Aggregate Transfer Bandwidth This graph shows the aggregate transfer rate to the storage systems as a function of time of day. The red line is the peak bandwidth observed within each one minute

  16. Watch it Live at 1pm: Secretary Chu Talks "Sputnik Moment" at Press Club |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy At 1pm ET today, Secretary Chu will deliver a speech at the National Press Club in DC calling on the United States to sharply accelerate innovations in clean energy -- citing China and other countries' recent advances in clean technology as a critical "Sputnik Moment" for the U.S. The event will begin at 12:30, and Chu will deliver his remarks at 1, followed by a question and answer session. You'll be able to watch live online here. UPDATE: Follow along with

  17. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2016 Title: Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and...

  18. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 ???± 0.7% and 8.8 ???± 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 ???± 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 ???± 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 ???± 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  19. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; Nevin, K.P.; Franks, A.; Englert, A.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-11-15

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density ({<=}50 mA/m{sup 2}) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control electrode not exposed to acetate produced low, steady currents ({<=}0.2 mA/m{sup 2}). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode, and these results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. Thus it is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  20. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  1. Activities and Accomplishments

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities and Accomplishments Denver * May 11, 2011 Working Groups * Financial Guidance * PSR Improvements * Notification * Communications Webinars * RFID Demonstration and TRANSCOM Enhancements - November 17, 2010 - ARG-US RFID/TRANSCOM Real-time Tracking System - TRANSCOM Enhancements * Communications for Waste Movements - February 24, 2011 - Mixed/LLW Forecast: Baseline Disposition Data and Waste Information Management System (WIMS) - Prospective Shipment Report Improvements Wiki Site *

  2. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  3. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  4. Final Project Report - Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloriethylene Co-Metabolism: Co-Metabolic Enzyme Activity Probes and Modeling Co-Metabolism and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, Robert C; Orr, Brennon R; Lee, M Hope; Delwiche, Mark

    2010-02-26

    Trichloroethene (TCE) (also known as trichloroethylene) is a common contaminant in groundwater. TCE is regulated in drinking water at a concentration of 5 g/L, and a small mass of TCE has the potential to contaminant large volumes of water. The physical and chemical characteristics of TCE allow it to migrate quickly in most subsurface environments, and thus large plumes of contaminated groundwater can form from a single release. The migration and persistence of TCE in groundwater can be limited by biodegradation. TCE can be biodegraded via different processes under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Anaerobic biodegradation is widely recognized, but aerobic degradation is less well recognized. Under aerobic conditions, TCE can be oxidized to non hazardous conditions via cometabolic pathways. This study applied enzyme activity probes to demonstrate that cometabolic degradation of TCE occurs in aerobic groundwater at several locations, used laboratory microcosm studies to determine aerobic degradation rates, and extrapolated lab-measured rates to in situ rates based on concentrations of microorganisms with active enzymes involved in cometabolic TCE degradation. Microcosms were constructed using basalt chips that were inoculated with microorganisms to groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory Test Area North TCE plume by filling a set of Flow-Through In Situ Reactors (FTISRs) with chips and placing the FTISRs into the open interval of a well for several months. A parametric study was performed to evaluate predicted degradation rates and concentration trends using a competitive inhibition kinetic model, which accounts for competition for enzyme active sites by both a growth substrate and a cometabolic substrate. The competitive inhibition kinetic expression was programmed for use in the RT3D reactive transport package. Simulations of TCE plume evolution using both competitive inhibition kinetics and first order decay were performed.

  5. Principal Building Activities--1995 CBECS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables > Principal Building Activities Table Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities,...

  6. Activ Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activ Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Activ Solar Address: Vienna, Wipplingerstrasse 35 Place: Austria Zip: 1010 Sector: Solar Product: The company's main business areas...

  7. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Zia Haq, Senior Analyst, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  8. The role of pyrimidine and water as underlying molecular constituents for describing radiation damage in living tissue: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuss, M. C.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; Blanco, F.; Muoz, A.; Limo-Vieira, P.; Garca, G.

    2015-06-07

    Water is often used as the medium for characterizing the effects of radiation on living tissue. However, in this study, charged-particle track simulations are employed to quantify the induced physicochemical and potential biological implications when a primary ionising particle with energy 10?keV strikes a medium made up entirely of water or pyrimidine. Note that pyrimidine was chosen as the DNA/RNA bases cytosine, thymine, and uracil can be considered pyrimidine derivatives. This study aims to assess the influence of the choice of medium on the charged-particle transport, and identify how appropriate it is to use water as the default medium to describe the effects of ionising radiation on living tissue. Based on the respective electron interaction cross sections, we provide a model, which allows the study of radiation effects not only in terms of energy deposition (absorbed dose and stopping power) but also in terms of the number of induced molecular processes. Results of these parameters for water and pyrimidine are presented and compared.

  9. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George C. Vradis; Dr. Hagen Schempf

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this program is to construct and demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6-inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The system, which was designed in an earlier effort, is built in a modular fashion in order to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system to be built under this project will include all the basic modules needed by the system, i.e. the locomotion, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. This module, which incorporates technology developed by NASA, has been designed, constructed and tested in the earlier effort. In the current effort, the full prototype system will be tested in the laboratory followed by two field demonstrations in real applications in NYGAS member utilities' pipes. The purpose for EXPLORER is to be able to access live gas mains, insert the system in the piping network, and remotely ''drive'' it within the gas main and its laterals through distances of five to ten thousand feet. Its adaptable locomotion system allows the robot to function through varying diameter pipes (150 - 200 mm or 6- to 8-inches) and is powered via on-board battery-banks. The presence of fish-eye cameras in both ends of the robot allows the operator to view the forward and circumferential views of the internals live using an above-ground TV. Communication takes place via wireless link between the robot and the launch-chamber used to insert/retrieve the system. This link is based on commercial technology presently employed in wireless telecommunication networks. Communication over long distances as well as battery re-charging will be accomplished without retrieving the robot but through the use of auxiliaries, to be developed in a follow-on phase, that will allow insertion of additional antennas and battery recharge plugs into the pipe under live conditions through inexpensive keyhole sized excavations. The proposed system significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the New York Gas Group (NYGAS; a trade association of the publicly owned gas utilities in New York State), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this project is $499,023 out of a total of $780,735 (not including NASA's contribution). The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during the first six months since funding from DOE commenced. The project has achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. Currently the fabrication of the prototype is in progress and it should be completed by late-summer 2002. Testing of the prototype in the lab is expected to be completed by November 2002, to be followed by two field demonstrations in early 2003.

  10. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  11. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  12. Geothermal Energy (5 Activities)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy (Five Activities) Grades: 5-8 Topic: Geothermal Authors: Laura J. W. Butterfield, Ph.D., Brandon A. Gillette, and Richard Shin Owner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Geothermal Energy Laura J. W. Butterfield, Ph.D. Brandon A. Gillette Richard Shin Middle School For the Teacher Deep inside the Earth, at depths near 150 kilometers, the temperature

  13. NREL: International Activities - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster Please enter your name and email address in the boxes provided, then type your message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version International Activities Home Bilateral Partnerships Multilateral Partnerships Assessments & Tools Working with Us Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your

  14. BETO Active Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Active Project Management Bioenergy Technologies Office - Program Management Review 6/25/15 Liz Moore Technology Manager eere.energy.gov Program Managers * Manages portfolio within their technology area * Establishes technical and cost goals * Strategic planning for technology area * Budget preparation/justification for technology portfolio * Identifies needs for workshops and FOAs * Oversees portfolio reviews including high-level project status Technology Managers * Plans/conducts

  15. Better Buildings Workforce Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETTER BUILDINGS WORKFORCE ACTIVITIES  Benjamin Goldstein, Better Buildings Workforce Project Manager, U.S. Department of Energy April 24, 2014 Housekeeping and Overview 1) Restroom location 2) Cell phones-silent please 3) Presentation format  15 min presentation; 15 minute Q&A (reviewers first, then audience) 4) Presenters  Phil Coleman, LBNL: Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines (Energy Manager and Federal Facility Manager)  Marta Milan, Waypoint Building: Commercial Buildings

  16. Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students learn about saving energy and encourage their families to conserve by completing the following activities

  17. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  18. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  19. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  20. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  1. Identifying Low pH Active and Lactate-Utilizing Taxa within Oral Microbiome Communities from Healthy Children Using Stable Isotope Probing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Majors, Paul D.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Allen, Lisa Z.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2012-03-05

    Many human microbial infectious diseases including dental caries are polymicrobial in nature and how these complex multi-species communities evolve from a healthy to a diseased state is not well understood. Although many health- or disease-associated oral microbes have been characterized in vitro, their physiology in vivo in the presence of the complex oral microbiome is difficult to determine with current approaches. In addition, about half of these oral species remain uncultivated to date and little is known except their 16S rRNA sequence. Lacking culture-based physiological analyses, the functional roles of uncultivated microorganisms will remain enigmatic despite their apparent disease correlation. To start addressing these knowledge gaps, we applied a novel combination of in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) with RNA and DNA based Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to oral plaque communities from healthy children for temporal monitoring of carbohydrate utilization, organic acid production and identification of metabolically active and inactive bacterial species.

  2. Formation of a long-lived hot field reversed configuration by dynamically merging two colliding high-{beta} compact toroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Barnes, D.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Sevier, L.; Tuszewski, M.; Anderson, M. G.; Andow, R.; Bonelli, L.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Bystritskii, V.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.

    2011-05-15

    A high temperature field reversed configuration (FRC) has been produced in the newly built, world's largest compact toroid (CT) facility, C-2, by colliding and merging two high-{beta} CTs produced using the advanced field-reversed {theta}-pinch technology. This long-lived, stable merged state exhibits the following key properties: (1) apparent increase in the poloidal flux from the first pass to the final merged state, (2) significantly improved confinement compared to conventional {theta}-pinch FRCs with flux decay rates approaching classical values in some cases, (3) strong conversion from kinetic energy into thermal energy with total temperature (T{sub e} + T{sub i}) exceeding 0.5 keV, predominantly into the ion channel. Detailed modeling using a new 2-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, LamyRidge, has demonstrated, for the first time, the formation, translation, and merging/reconnection dynamics of such extremely high-{beta} plasmas.

  3. Synchrotron based infrared imaging and spectroscopy via focal plane array on live fibroblasts in D2O enriched medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaroni, Luca; Zlateva, Theodora; Sarafimov, Blagoj; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wehbe, Katia; Hegg, Eric L.; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2014-03-26

    We tested the viability of using synchrotron based infrared imaging to study biochemical processes inside living cells. As a model system, we studied fibroblast cells exposed to a medium highly enriched with D2O. We could show that the experimental technique allows us to reproduce at the cellular level measurements that are normally performed on purified biological molecules. We can obtain information about lipid conformation and distribution, kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and the formation of concentration gradients of H and O isotopes in water that are associated with cell metabolism. The implementation of the full field technique in a sequential imaging format gives a description of cellular biochemistry and biophysics that contains both spatial and temporal information.

  4. Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and diseases in schoolchildren living in a polluted and in a low polluted area in Israel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goren, A.I.; Hellmann, S.

    1988-02-01

    Second and fifth grade schoolchildren living in two communities with different levels of air pollution were studied. The parents of these children filled out ATS-NHLI health questionnaires. The prevalence of reported respiratory symptoms and pulmonary diseases was found to be significantly higher among children growing up in the polluted community (Ashdod) as compared with the low-pollution area (Hadera). Logistic models fitted for the respiratory conditions which differed significantly between both areas of residence also included background variables that could be responsible for these differences. Relative risk values, which were calculated from the logistic models, were in the range of 1.47 for cough without cold to 2.66 for asthma for children from Ashdod, as compared with 1.00 for children from Hadera.

  5. Building America Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  6. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may help to weigh down the microorganisms, which live on rock substrates. Scanning electron microscopy image of two intracellularly calcifying cyanobacterial cells. Ca-, Mg-,...

  7. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The precipitation of U(VI) must be mediated by biological activity as less than 3% soluble U(VI) was removed either from the abiotic or the heat-killed cell controls. Interestingly, the pH has a strong effect on growth and U(VI) biomineralization rates by Rahnella. Thermodynamic modeling identifies autunite-type minerals [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2] as the precipitate likely formed in the synthetic FRC groundwater conditions at all pH investigated. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements have recently confirmed that the precipitate found in these incubations is an autunite and meta-autunite-type mineral. A kinetic model of U biomineralization at the different pH indicates that hydrolysis of organophosphate can be described using simple Monod kinetics and that uranium precipitation is accelerated when monohydrogen phosphate is the main orthophosphate species in solution. Overall, these experiments and ongoing soil slurry incubations demonstrate that the biomineralization of U(VI) through the activity of phosphatase enzymes can be expressed in a wide range of geochemical conditions pertaining to the FRC site.

  8. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hunter, Scott R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  9. NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL Climate Activities (Redirected from Climate Activities at NREL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL AgencyCompany...

  10. Financial and Activity Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial and Activity Reports Financial and Activity Reports June 30, 2013 Financial and Activity Report - June 30, 2013 May 31, 2013 Financial and Activity Report - May 31, 2013 ...

  11. Social Activities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    means taking time for social activities. The lab offers a variety of on-site clubs, sports activities and outreach opportunities for you to make the most of your non-work time....

  12. WIPP Activates Emergency Operations Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 5, 2015 WIPP Activates Emergency Operations Center At approximately 7:00 p.m. MDT on Tuesday, August 4, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) activated the Emergency...

  13. 2006 ALARA Activities at DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE 2006 Report 4- Section Four ALARA Activities at DOE 4 ALARA Activities at DOE In past years, the published annual report has included descriptions of ALARA activities at DOE for the purposes of sharing strategies and techniques that have shown promise in the reduction of radiation exposure. For 2006, these ALARA activity descriptions have been moved to the HSS REMS Web site to facilitate the dissemination among DOE radiation protection managers and others interested in these project

  14. GTT Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activities GTT Activities GTT Activities Activities To receive input and feedback on the development of the future grid vision and other GTT documents, the GTT hosts targeted workshops and meetings to inform its deliberations. 2014 Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop, September 30-October1 2013 HVDC Workshop, April 22 2013 ARPA-E Summit, February 25-27 2012 Transmission Workshop, November 1-2 Distribution Workshop, September 24-25 2012 ARPA-E Summit,

  15. Wonders of Wind (10 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Hands-on investigation that introduce scientific concepts of wind energy to elementary students with the following activities

  16. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Activities Key Activities Key Activities Bringing Innovative Manufacturing Technologies and Materials to Full "To Scale" Industrial Use Innovation is inherent in all of AMO's investment activities helping small, medium, and large manufacturers develop cutting-edge clean energy products and technology that reduce energy consumption in every stage or place it is used in industry. Built upon a foundation of strong public-private partnerships, our support of advanced manufacturing

  17. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  18. International Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation.

  19. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  20. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  1. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Active Sites (large) EM Active Sites (large) Center Map View All Maps Addthis

  2. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Ionically Active Solids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionically Active Solids

  3. Living in Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Center University of New Mexico - Los Alamos The Arts Fuller Lodge Art Center Los Alamos Little Theatre Reel Deal Movie Theater County Services Aquatic...

  4. Efficient Living Energy Grant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many of the Office of Energy and Recycling programs, including this one, are currently closed and are not accepting applications. When funding is available, it will be announced here and on the...

  5. Women @ Energy: Kelly Lively

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Dive in. Don’t be afraid to do the work and ask questions. Initially, I was intimidated going into college, having been out for so long; but I encourage others to go back, it is never too late to learn things.When in the workforce, you have to ask questions and engage. You have to take that risk—to follow the engineering work in the field and be okay with making mistakes."

  6. Observation of new spontaneous fission activities from elements 100 to 105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerville, L.P.

    1982-03-01

    Several new Spontaneous Fission (SF) activities have been found. No definite identification could be made for any of the new SF activities; however, half-lives and possible assignments to element-104 isotopes consistent with several cross bombardments include /sup 257/Rf(3.8 s, 14% SF), /sup 258/Rf(13 ms), /sup 259/Rf(approx. 3 s, 8% SF), /sup 260/Rf(approx. 20 ms), and /sup 262/Rf(approx. 50 ms). The 80-ms SF activity claimed by the Dubna group for the discovery of element 104 (/sup 260/104) was not observed. A difficulty exists in the interpretation that /sup 260/Rf is a approx. 20-ms SF activity: in order to be correct, for example, the SF activities with half-lives between 14 and 24 ms produced in the reactions 109- to 119-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 248/Cm, 88- to 100-MeV /sup 15/N + /sup 249/Bk, and 96-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 249/Cf must be other nuclides due to their large production cross sections, or the cross sections for production of /sup 260/Rf must be enhanced by unknown mechanisms. Based on calculated total production cross sections a possible approx. 1% electron-capture branch in /sup 258/Lr(4.5 s) to the SF emitter /sup 258/No(1.2 ms) and an upper limit of 0.05% for SF branching in /sup 254/No(55 s) were determined. Other measured half-lives from unknown nuclides produced in respective reactions include approx. 1.6 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 248/CM), indications of a approx. 47-s SF activity (75-MeV /sup 12/C + /sup 249/Cf), and two or more SF activities with 3 s less than or equal to T/sub 1/2/ less than or equal to 60 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 249/Bk). The most exciting conclusion of this work is that if the tentative assignments to even-even element 104 isotopes are correct, there would be a sudden change in the SF half-life systematics at element 104 which has been predicted theoretically and attributed to the disappearance of the second hump of the double-humped fission barrier.

  7. Centralized Analysis of Local Data, With Dollars and Lives on the Line: Lessons From The Home Radon Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, PhillipN.; Gelman, Andrew

    2014-11-24

    In this chapter we elucidate four main themes. The first is that modern data analyses, including "Big Data" analyses, often rely on data from different sources, which can present challenges in constructing statistical models that can make effective use of all of the data. The second theme is that although data analysis is usually centralized, frequently the final outcome is to provide information or allow decision-making for individuals. Third, data analyses often have multiple uses by design: the outcomes of the analysis are intended to be used by more than one person or group, for more than one purpose. Finally, issues of privacy and confidentiality can cause problems in more subtle ways than are usually considered; we will illustrate this point by discussing a case in which there is substantial and effective political opposition to simply acknowledging the geographic distribution of a health hazard. A researcher analyzes some data and learns something important. What happens next? What does it take for the results to make a difference in people's lives? In this chapter we tell a story - a true story - about a statistical analysis that should have changed government policy, but didn't. The project was a research success that did not make its way into policy, and we think it provides some useful insights into the interplay between locally-collected data, statistical analysis, and individual decision making.

  8. Explorer-II: Wireless Self-Powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnegie Mellon University

    2008-09-30

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design, field-trial and Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) sensor evaluation program for the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The resulting robot-train system with CAD renderings of the individual modules. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and recovery of the system using custom fittings and a (to be developed) launch-chamber/-tube. The battery modules are used to power the system, by providing power to the robot's bus. The support modules perform the functions of centration for the rest of the train as well as odometry pickups using incremental encoding schemes. The electronics architecture is based on a distributed (8-bit) microprocessor architecture (at least 1 in ea. module) communicating to a (one of two) 32-bit SBC, which manages all video-processing, posture and motion control as well as CAN and wireless communications. The operator controls the entire system from an off-board (laptop) controller, which is in constant wireless communication with the robot train in the pipe. The sensor modules collect data and forward it to the robot operator computer (via the CAN-wireless communications chain), who then transfers it to a dedicated NDE data-storage and post-processing computer for further (real-time or off-line) analysis. The prototype robot system was built and tested indoors and outdoors, outfitted with a Remote-Field Eddy Current (RFEC) sensor integrated as its main NDE sensor modality. An angled launcher, allowing for live launching and retrieval, was also built to suit custom angled launch-fittings from TDW. The prototype vehicle and launcher systems are shown. The complete system, including the in-pipe robot train, launcher, integrated NDE-sensor and real-time video and control console and NDE-data collection and -processing and real-time display, were demonstrated to all sponsors prior to proceeding into final field-trials--the individual components and setting for said acceptance demonstration are shown. The launcher-tube was also used to verify that the vehicle system is capable of operating in high-pressure environments, and is safely deployable using proper evacuating/purging techniques for operation in the po

  9. The Potential Role of the Thorium Fuel Cycle in Reducing the Radiotoxicity of Long-Lived Waste - 13477

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesketh, Kevin; Thomas, Mike

    2013-07-01

    The thorium (or more accurately the Th-232/U-233) fuel cycle is attracting growing interest world wide and one reason for this is the reduced radiotoxicity of long-lived waste, with the Th- 232/U-233 fuel cycle often being justified partly on the grounds of low radiotoxicity for long cooling times. This paper considers the evolution of heavy metal radiotoxicity in a Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) operating a closed Th-232/U-233 cycle during different operational phases. The paper shows that even in the MSFR core, the equilibrium radiotoxicity of the thorium fuel cycle is only reached after almost 100 years of operation. MSFR was chosen because it has many theoretical advantages that favour the Th-232/U-233 fuel cycle. Conventional solid fuel systems would be expected to behave similarly, but with even longer timescales and therefore the MSFR cycle can be used to define the limits of what is practically achievable. The results are used to argue the case that a fair approach to justifying the Th-232/U-233 breeder cycle should not quote the long term equilibrium radiotoxicity, but rather the somewhat less favourable radiotoxicity that could be achieved within the operational lifetime of the first generation of Th-232/U-233 breeder reactors. (authors)

  10. Search for Heavy, Long-Lived Neutralinos that Decay to Photons at CDF II Using Photon Timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The authors present the results of the first hadron collider search for heavy, long-lived neutralinos that decay via {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{tilde G} in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking models. Using an integrated luminosity of 570 {+-} 34 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, they select {gamma}+jet+missing transverse energy candidate events based on the arrival time of a high-energy photon at the electromagnetic calorimeter as measured with a timing system that was recently installed on the CDF II detector. They find 2 events, consistent with the background estimate of 1.3 {+-} 0.7 events. While the search strategy does not rely on model-specific dynamics, they set cross section limits and place the world-best 95% C.L. lower limit on the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 101 GeV/c{sup 2} at {tau}{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}} = 5 ns.

  11. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  12. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  13. MicroChip Imager Module for Recognition of Microorganisms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    The MicroChip Reader for Cereus Group takes the table of intensities of hybridization signals produced by the MicroChip Imager software and evokes a series of steps designed to recognize the pattern of intensities specific to a particular Cereus subgroup. Seven subgroups of the Cereus group can be identified by particular features of their RNA sequence. The Reader also provides statistics documenting how well its conclusion is confirmed by the hybridization signals. At the user’s request,more »the Reader can list every recognition step utilized so that the user can verify the recognition process manually if desired.« less

  14. Closer look at microorganism provides insight on carbon cycling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian Grabowski at media@anl.gov or (630) 252-1232. Connect Find an Argonne expert by subject. Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on...

  15. Transfer Activity Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Last 8 Days Transfer Activity Last 8 Days These graphs show the transfer activity statistics for the past eight days with the most recent day shown first. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems)

  16. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    About the Bioenergy Technologies Office » Key Activities Key Activities The Bioenergy Technologies Office's key activities are aimed at producing a viable, sustainable domestic biomass industry that produces renewable biofuels, bioproducts and biopower; enhances U.S. energy security; reduces U.S. oil dependence; provides environmental benefits (e.g., reduced greenhouse gas emissions); and creates nationwide economic opportunities. Meeting these goals requires significant and rapid advances in

  17. Outreach Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Conflict Prevention and Resolution » Outreach Activities Outreach Activities The OCPR staff engages in various outreach activities within the DOE complex and the greater federal ADR community to promote the use of alternative dispute resolution techniques. To that end, OCPR staff are members of the Interagency Alternative Dispute Resolution Working Group (IADRWG) Workplace Conflict Management Section ("Workplace Section"). This group provides guidance on "best

  18. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Activities Key Activities The SunShot Initiative issues competitive solicitations that fund selective research projects aimed at transforming the ways the United States generates, stores, and utilizes solar energy. The targeted strategies supported by the SunShot Initiative include activities that seek to: Shorten the amount of time needed to move promising new solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies from development to commercialization Increase efficiency, reduce

  19. 1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  20. Exploring Wind Energy (12 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Hands-on activities that provide a comprehensive understanding of the scientific, economic, environmental, technological, and societal aspects of wind energy to secondary students

  1. Wind is Energy (17 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    A nonfiction test to be read with primary student with basic information about wind as an energy source and hands-on, wind-related activities including

  2. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Mr. Pete Devlin U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Market Transformation Manager Stationary Fuel Cell Applications First National Bank of Omaha...

  3. Water and Energy (18 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    An inquiry-based curriculum that introduces students to the properties of water and using water as an energy source with the following activities

  4. Wonders of Water (14 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    An inquiry-based curriculum that introduces scientific concepts of electricity, water, and hydropower to elementary students with the following activities

  5. WIPP Begins Underground Decontamination Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used underground to direct or block ventilation flow in open panels. It is a low permeability polyethylene (plastic) cloth. These activities will continue for the next several...

  6. NSLS 2009 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta K.; Mona R.

    2009-05-01

    2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

  7. Lubricants Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Lubricants Activities 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ft012_fenske_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Engine Friction Reduction Technologies DOE/DOD Parasitic Energy Loss Collaboration Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: DOE/DOD Parasitic Energy Loss

  8. Microgrid Activities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrids » Microgrid Activities Microgrid Activities Federal programs, institutions, and the private sector are increasing microgrid development and deployment. The number of successfully deployed microgrids will verify the benefits and decrease implementation risks further expanding the market for microgrids. Federal programs, institutions, and the private sector are increasing microgrid development and deployment. The number of successfully deployed microgrids will verify the benefits and

  9. Activities and Accomplishments | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Accomplishments Activities and Accomplishments PDF icon Activities and Accomplishments More Documents & Publications Overview for Newcomers NTSF Activities and Accomplishments NTSF Spring 2011 Agenda

  10. NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL Climate Activities Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL AgencyCompany Organization National Renewable Energy...

  11. Active Financial Assistance Letters | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Active Financial Assistance Letters Active Financial Assistance Letters Below is a list of all active Financial Assistance Letters with the most recent FALs on top. FAL Number FAL ...

  12. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates for long-term, nontoxic imaging and nuclear targeting in living cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Fanqing; Gerion, Daniele

    2004-06-14

    One of the biggest challenges in cell biology is the imaging of living cells. For this purpose, the most commonly used visualization tool is fluorescent markers. However, conventional labels, such as organic fluorescent dyes or green fluorescent proteins (GFP), lack the photostability to allow the tracking of cellular events that happen over minutes to days. In addition, they are either toxic to cells (dyes), or difficult to construct and manipulate (GFP). We report here the use of a new class of fluorescent labels, silanized CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates, for imaging the nuclei of living cells. CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or so called quantum dots (qdots), are extremely photostable, and have been used extensively in cellular imaging of fixed cells. However, most of the studies about living cells so far have been concerned only with particle entry into the cytoplasm or the localization of receptors on the cell membrane. Specific targeting of qdots to the nucleus of living cells ha s not been reported in previous studies, due to the lack of a targeting mechanism and proper particle size. Here we demonstrate for the first time the construction of a CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugate that carries the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal (NLS), and the transfection of the complex into living cells. By a novel adaptation of commonly used cell transfection techniques for qdots, we were able to introduce and retain the NLS-qdots conjugate in living cells for up to a week without detectable negative cellular effects. Moreover, we can visualize the movement of the CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates from cytoplasm to the nucleus, and the accumulation of the complex in the cell nucleus, over a long observation time period. This report opens the door for using qdots to visualize long-term biological events that happen in the cell nucleus, and provides a new nontoxic, long-term imaging platform for cell nuclear processes.

  13. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  14. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  15. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at ?s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a DrellYan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  16. Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natarajan, Mohan; Xu, Nancy R; Mohan, Sumathy

    2013-06-03

    In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10 cGy on coverslips will be examined for (a) low LET radiation-induced alterations of cellular function and its physiological relevance in real time; and (b) radiation damage triggered bystander effect on the neighboring unirradiated cells. First, to determine the low LET radiation induced alteration of cellular function we will examine: (i) the real time transformation of single membrane transporters in single living cells; (ii) the pump efficiency of membrane efflux pump of live cells in real time at the molecular level; (iii) the kinetics of single-ligand receptor interaction on single live cell surface (Figure C); and (iv) alteration in chromosome replication in living cell. Second, to study the radiation triggered bystander responses, we will examine one of the key signaling pathway i.e. TNF- alpha/NF-kappa B mediated signaling. TNF-alpha specific nano particle sensors (green) will be developed to detect the releasing dynamics, transport mechanisms and ligand-receptor binding on live cell surface in real time. A second sensor (blue) will be developed to simultaneously monitor the track of NF-kB inside the cell. The proposed nano-particle optics approach would complement our DOE funded study on biochemical mechanisms of TNF-alpha- NF-kappa B-mediated bystander effect.

  17. Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, RAP March 6, 2013 Presented by: John Morse DEEP VADOSE ZONE ACTIVITIES Page 2 Deep Vadose Zone Areas Page 3 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities FY 2014 Fieldwork Began in 2011 Page 4 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities, Continued Page 5 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Cumulative Gallons Removed Weekly Gallons Removed Perched Water Removal Shut down to address increased contamination levels and replace submersible pump Page 6 0

  18. Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Presentation on INEENL's analysis...

  19. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  20. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention...

  1. Search for long-lived particles that decay into final states containing two electrons or two muons in proton-proton collisions at s=8TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    A search is performed for long-lived particles that decay into final states that include a pair of electrons or a pair of muons. The experimental signature is a distinctive topology consisting of a pair of charged leptons originating from a displaced secondary vertex. Events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 (20.5)  fb⁻¹ in the electron (muon) channel were collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8  TeV. No significant excess is observed above standard model expectations. Upper limits on the product of the cross section and branching fraction of such a signal are presentedmore » as a function of the long-lived particle’s mean proper decay length. The limits are presented in an approximately model-independent way, allowing them to be applied to a wide class of models yielding the above topology. Over much of the investigated parameter space, the limits obtained are the most stringent to date. In the specific case of a model in which a Higgs boson in the mass range 125–1000  GeV/c² decays into a pair of long-lived neutral bosons in the mass range 20–350  GeV/c², each of which can then decay to dileptons, the upper limits obtained are typically in the range 0.2–10 fb for mean proper decay lengths of the long-lived particles in the range 0.01–100 cm. In the case of the lowest Higgs mass considered (125  GeV/c²), the limits are in the range 2–50 fb. These limits are sensitive to Higgs boson branching fractions as low as 10⁻⁴.« less

  2. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-14

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.1 fb-1 from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan β between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production ismore » considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. As a result, R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squark or top squark, are excluded up to a mass of 1270, 845 and 900 GeV, respectively, using the full detector; and up to a mass of 1260, 835 and 870 GeV using an approach disregarding information from the muon spectrometer.« less

  3. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-14

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.1 fb-1 from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan ? between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production is considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. As a result, R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squark or top squark, are excluded up to a mass of 1270, 845 and 900 GeV, respectively, using the full detector; and up to a mass of 1260, 835 and 870 GeV using an approach disregarding information from the muon spectrometer.

  4. EM international activities. February 1997 highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    EM International Highlights is a brief summary of on-going international projects within the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). This document contains sections on: Global Issues, activities in Western Europe, activities in central and Eastern Europe, activities in Russia, activities in Asia and the Pacific Rim, activities in South America, activities in North America, and International Organizations.

  5. Active Project Justification Statement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Active Project Justification Statement Active Project Justification Statement As of: March 2016 Provides a table of Active Project Justification Statements PDF icon Active Project Justification Statement More Documents & Publications All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Project Registration Number Assignments (Active

  6. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Program Educational Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    Description of educational activities including: EcoCAR2: Plugging In to the Future, EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge, Green Racing, Automotive X Prize, Graduate Technology Automotive Education (GATE), and Hydrogen Education.

  8. Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    States may or may not elect to fund emergency management activities with AIP money. If they do, the AIP should include an Emergency Management section. This section may be implemented at any time ...

  9. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy FEDERAL INTERAGENCY GEOTHERMAL ACTIVITIES Updated JUNE 2011 WORKING DRAFT 2 FEDERAL INTERAGENCY GEOTHERMAL ACTIVITIES D R A F T The principal organizers of this updated document were Arlene Anderson of the Geothermal Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy, and Loretta Prencipe, Richard M. Todaro (technical editor), New West Technologies, LLC, and David Cuyler, Distinguished Technical Fellow, Sandia

  10. Con Edison Energy Storage Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Con Edison Energy Storage Activities June 15, 2015 EIA Conference Con Edison Energy Storage (ES) 2 Presentation Overview * Introduction to Con Edison * Potential benefits of storage on our system * Unique urban challenges * Con Edison storage related activities * Going forward Con Edison: Overview 3 Customers Infrastructure Service Territory Electric 3.4 million One of the worlds largest underground electric systems All 5 boroughs of NYC and Westchester County Gas 1.1 million 4,333 miles of gas

  11. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting Americas wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  12. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Program » Key Activities Key Activities The Water Power Program conducts work in four key areas at the forefront of water power research. The Program is structured to help the United States meet its growing energy demands sustainably and cost-effectively by developing innovative renewable water power technologies, breaking down market barriers to deployment, building the infrastructure to test new technologies, and assessing water power resources for integration into our nation's

  13. Comparison of doubly labeled water with respirometry at low- and high-activity levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Brouns, F.; Saris, W.H.; ten Hoor, F.

    1988-07-01

    In previous studies the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure in free-living humans has been validated against respirometry under sedentary conditions. In the present investigation, energy expenditure is measured simultaneously with doubly labeled water and respirometry at low- and high-activity levels. Over 6 days, five subjects were measured doing mainly sedentary activities like desk work; their average daily metabolic rate was 1.40 +/- 0.09 (SD) times sleeping metabolic rate. Four subjects were measured twice over 3.5 days, including 2 days with heavy bicycle ergometer work, resulting in an average daily metabolic rate of 2.61 +/- 0.25 (SD) times sleeping metabolic rate. At the low-activity level, energy expenditures from the doubly labeled water method were on the average 1.4 +/- 3.9% (SD) larger than those from respirometry. At the high-activity level, the doubly labeled water method yielded values that were 1.0 +/- 7.0% (SD) lower than those from respirometry. Results demonstrate the utility of the doubly labeled water method for the determination of energy expenditure in the range of activity levels in daily life.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Active Transit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts

  15. Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Historical Yearly Peak Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak The plots below show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for the current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In

  16. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zia Haq, Department of Energy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy 2 DOE Joins Farm to Fly 2.0 * We appreciate the hard work in approving alternative fuels and commitment to sustainable growth made by the aviation industry. * DOE is actively committed to accelerating the adoption of alternative fuels by this market. * In 2013, USDA and FAA made a commitment to the aviation industry to help meet their goals with the Farm to Fly 2.0 agreement. This effort seeks to enable the use of commercially

  17. DEEPWATER SUBSEA LIQUID/GAS SEPARATION PROCESS UNDER LIVE OIL PRODUCTION CONDITIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. T. Cousins

    2003-04-24

    This report includes technical progress made during the period October 2001 to October 2002. At the end of the first technical progress report the project was moving from feasibility of equipment design work to application of this equipment to the actual site for potential demonstration. The effort focuses on reservoir analysis cost estimations of not only the sub-sea processing unit but also the wells, pipelines, installation costs, operating procedures and economic modeling of the development scheme associated with these items. Geologic risk analysis was also part of the overall evaluation, which is factored into the probabilistic economic analysis. During this period two different potential sites in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed and one site in Norway was initiated but not completed during the period. A summary of these activities and results are included here.

  18. Macroeconomic Activity Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2014 (AEO2014). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

  19. Extracurricular Activities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracurricular Activities Argonne Club African American Black Club Aikido Club Chess Club Chinese Association at Argonne Choral Group Engineering Golf League (AEGL) Exercise Club Garden Club Hispanic/Latino Club Jazz Club Music Club Pool League Running Club Soccer Club Toastmasters Women in Science and Technology (WIST)

  20. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Roy A. (Livermore, CA); von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  1. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  2. Form:ExplorationActivity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    add an "Exploration Activity'. If the activity already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit Exploration Activity Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Secondary Energy Infobook and Secondary Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The teacher's infobook contains dozens of fact sheets about the major energy sources, electricity, energy efficiency, energy conservation, transportation, and emerging technologies. Detailed information covers an introduction to energy, the forms of energy, global climate change, the history of electricity, and information about the major energy sources. The companion book of student activities reinforces the vocabulary, concepts, and facts about energy. Answer keys are provided.

  4. Intermediate Energy Infobook and Intermediate Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Teacher Infobook provides fact sheets about energy, the major energy sources, electricity, energy consumption, and energy efficiency and conservation. The background section includes an introduction to energy and details about individual energy sources. There are also sections on global climate change and several detailed fact sheets on electricity and energy consumption and efficiency. The companion student activities book reinforces the general information and facts about the energy sources.

  5. Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Active Sensors page? For detailed information on exploration...

  6. Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and additional activities in Germany Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and...

  7. Sandia Energy - IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Modeling & Analysis IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities IEA PVPS Task 13...

  8. Environmental Justice Activities: Tribal Training Complies with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Justice Activities: Tribal Training Complies with DOE Order 144.1 and EO 12898 for Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Activities: Tribal Training Complies with DOE Order ...

  9. Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity Chris Tindal, Director for Operational Energy, U.S. Department of Navy

  10. Indonesia-IEA Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia-IEA Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-IEA Activities AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional...

  11. Active Seismic Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  12. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 October 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities...

  13. Operational Awareness Records and Activity Reports | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 18, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities HIAR...

  14. Operational Awareness Records and Activity Reports | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operational Awareness Records and Activity Reports Operational Awareness Records and Activity Reports December 10, 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the...

  15. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2012 Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory - August 2012 August 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Visit and Site Lead Planning Activities...

  16. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HIAR-PORTS-2011-08-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness activity conducted by Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety...

  17. Independent Activity Report, New Brunswick Laboratory - July...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HIAR NBL-2012-07-20 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness activity conducted by Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Safety and...

  18. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Article: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED...

  19. Overview of Network Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and NREL are leading an activity to promote further integration of web portals and databases related to climate and development. This will include targeted outreach activities...

  20. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition ...