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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Microelectronics at Sandia Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The microelectronics capability at Sandia Laboratories spans the complete range of component activity from initial design to final assembly into subsystems and systems. Highly reliable, radiation-tolerant devices and integrated circuits can be designed, fabricated, and incorporated into printed circuit assemblies or into thick- or thin-film hybrid microcircuits. Sandia has an experienced staff, exceptional facilities and aggressive on-going programs in all these areas. The authors can marshall a broad range of skills and capabilities to attack and solve problems in design, fabrication, assembly, or production. Key facilities, programs, and capabilities in the Sandia microelectronics effort are discussed in more detail in this booklet.

Spencer, W.J.; Gregory, B.L.; Franzak, E.G.; Hood, J.A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia National Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive water efficiency improvements at its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Since 1949, Sandia has developed science-based technologies that support national security: nuclear weapons, energy and infrastruc- ture assurance, nonproliferation, defense systems and assessments, and homeland security. The laboratory sits on 8,699 acres of land and employs more than 10,000 employees and contractors. Altogether, it owns 871 buildings encompassing more than 5.8 million square feet. The MESA complex houses research in microelectronics, including designing and prototyping microsystem-based components. The complex consumes about 28% of the total water used at Sandia. The processes used to create

3

Lessons Learned from Early Microelectronics Production at Sandia National Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1980s Sandia designed, developed, fabricated, tested, and delivered hundreds of thousands of radiation hardened integrated circuits (IC) for use in weapons and satellites. Initially, Sandia carried out all phases, design through delivery, so that development of next generation ICs and production of current generation circuits were carried out simultaneously. All this changed in the mid-eighties when an outside contractor was brought in to "produce" ICs that Sandia developed, in effect creating a crisp separation between development and production. This "partnership" had a severe impact on operations, but its more damaging effect was the degradation of Sandia's microelectronics capabilities. This report outlines microelectronics development and production in the early eighties and summarizes the impact of changing to a separate contractor for production. This record suggests that low volume production be best accomplished within the development organization. 4 Contents Su...

Weaver Microelectronics Technologies; H. T. Weaver

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High Strength Gold Wire for Microelectronics Miniaturization ...  

ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength gold wire for use in microelectronics that can maintain its electrical and mechanical properties ...

5

MIT integrated microelectronics device experimentation and simulation iLab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We developed the MIT Integrated Microelectronics Device Experimentation and Simulation iLab, a new online laboratory that combines and significantly upgrades the capabilities of two existing online microelectronics labs: ...

Cukalovic, Boris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Microelectronics plastic molded packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

Johnson, D.R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Microelectronics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our goal is to provide technical leadership in R&D for the ... and emerging nanoelectronics industries through research and development of … more. ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Janušonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Kamkorp Microelectronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kamkorp Microelectronics Kamkorp Microelectronics Jump to: navigation, search Name Kamkorp Microelectronics Place Switzerland Sector Solar Product Electric and solar-assisted vehicle manufacturer. References Kamkorp Microelectronics[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kamkorp Microelectronics is a company located in Switzerland . References ↑ "Kamkorp Microelectronics" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kamkorp_Microelectronics&oldid=347901" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

11

Process Development and Integration Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 * 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov * 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 * 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/FS-5200-48351 * June 2011 Process Development and Integration Laboratory Scope. The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) within the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is operated by the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV). The PDIL is a unique collaborative facility where industry and universities can work closely with NREL scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to photovoltaics (PV) development. We work with a wide range of PV materials-from crystalline silicon to thin films (amorphous, nano- and

12

EMSL: Capabilities: Instrument Development Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrument Development Laboratory Instrument Development Laboratory The mission of the Instrument Development Laboratory (IDL) is to design, develop, and deploy advanced state-of-the-art instrument systems and custom application software in support of the ongoing experimental research efforts within EMSL. IDL staff design and develop much of the custom hardware and software used at EMSL, and provide the critical support necessary to rapidly modify or adapt a user's system to help the user achieve the world-class results they expect at EMSL. Additional Information IDL Home Meet the IDL Experts IDL Innovations IDL Brochure IDL staff provide electrical engineering expertise in high-voltage, radiofrequency, and high-speed analog and digital systems; digital signaling processing and FPGA technology; and rapid prototyping. In

13

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Process Development and Integration Laboratory The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) is located within the Science and Technology Facility at the...

14

Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microelectronic Photovoltaics Microelectronic Photovoltaics Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics June 7, 2012 - 9:31am Addthis Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. View the entire YouTube Lab Breakthroughs playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are MEMS? MEMS are microelectromechanical systems. MEMS are made up of components between 1 to 100 micrometers in size. MEMS devices generally range in size from 20 micrometers to a millimeter. Sandia National Lab semiconductor engineer Gregory Nielson and postdoctoral appointee Jose Luis Cruz-Campa recently took some time to discuss their

15

Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include work-life balance, stress management and innovative solutions to career and gender issues. Photo Gallery: Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program Strategic Laboratory...

16

The Meteorological Development Laboratory’s Aviation Weather Prediction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) has developed and implemented an aviation weather prediction system that runs each hour and produces forecast guidance for each hour into the future out to 25 h covering the major forecast period of ...

Judy E. Ghirardelli; Bob Glahn

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microelectronic Thermal Anemometer for the Measurement of Surface Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the development and first prototype results of a microelectronic thermal anemometer without moving parts, for the measurement of velocity and direction of surface wind. The central part of the instrument is an integrated-...

B. W. Van Oudheusden; J. H. Huijsing

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Institutional Research & Development > Laboratory Directed Research &...

19

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities The process development and integration approach used within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) provides numerous capabilities for scientific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Working...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL), which accommodates the process development and integration approach, facilitates collaborative projects...

22

Detecting corrosion in plastic encapsulated micro-electronics packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, most defense microelectronics components were packaged in ceramic, hermetic enclosures. PEMs are not hermetic because the plastic molding compounds are permeable to moisture. This lack of hermeticity creates an unknown liability, especially with respect to corrosion of the metallization features. This potential liability must be addressed to ensure long-term reliability of these systems is maintained under conditions of long-term dormant storage. However, the corrosion process is difficult to monitor because it occurs under the encapsulating plastic and is therefore not visible. The authors have developed techniques that allow them to study corrosion of Al bondpads and traces under relevant atmospheric corrosion conditions. The cornerstone of this capability is the ATC 2.6, a microelectronic test device designed at Sandia National Laboratories. Corrosion tests were performed by exposing test chips to aggressive environments. The electrical response of the ATC indicated an increase in bondpad resistance with exposure time. Note that the change in resistance is not uniform from one bondpad to another. This illustrates the stochastic nature of the corrosion process. The change in resistance correlated with visual observation of corrosion of the bondpads on the unencapsulated test chips.

Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Corrosion in Non-Hermetic Microelectronic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many types of integrated and discrete microelectronic devices exist in the enduring stockpile. In the past, most of these devices have used conventional ceramic hermetic packaging (CHP) technology. Sometime in the future, plastic encapsulated microelectronic (PEM) devices will almost certainly enter the inventory. In the presence of moisture, several of the aluminum-containing metallization features common to both types of packaging become susceptible to atmospheric corrosion (Figure 1). A breach in hermeticity (e.g., due to a crack in the ceramic body or lid seal) could allow moisture and/or contamination to enter the interior of a CHP device. For PEM components, the epoxy encapsulant material is inherently permeable to moisture. A multi-year project is now underway at Sandia to develop the knowledge base and analytical tools needed to quantitatively predict the effect of corrosion on microelectronic performance and reliability. The issue of corrosion-induced failure surfaced twice during the past year because cracks were found in their ceramic bodies of two different CHP devices: the SA371 1/3712 MOSFET and the SA3935 ASIC (acronym for A Simple Integrated Circuit). Because of our inability to perform a model-based prediction at that time, the decision was made to determine the validity of the corrosion concern for these specific situations by characterizing the expected environment and assessing its relative degree of corrosivity. The results of this study are briefly described in this paper along with some of the advancements made with the predictive model development.

Braithwaite, J.W.; Sorensen, N.R.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following investigations being pursued under photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic systems technology; concentrator technology; concentrator arrays and tracking structures; concentrator solar cell development; system engineering; subsystem development; and test and applications.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

Submit completed application (Word doc) to innovation@lbl.gov by October 15, 2013. August 20, 2013. Title: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Author:

26

Raz Microelectronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raz Microelectronics Raz Microelectronics Jump to: navigation, search Name Raz Microelectronics Place Cupertino, California Zip 95014-0701 Product String representation "RMI Corporation ... ecurity market." is too long. Coordinates 37.31884°, -122.029244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.31884,"lon":-122.029244,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007

Hansen, Todd C; editor, Todd C Hansen,

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Day  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs » Programs » Laboratory Directed Research & Development » Laboratory Directed R&D Day Laboratory Directed Research and Development Day National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Contact Andrea Maestas LDRD Program (505) 667-1230 Email LDRD Day 2012 Learn how LDRD innovations benefit our nation Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted its fourth annual Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Day on October 23, 2012, at Buffalo Thunder in Pojoaque, New Mexico. More than 30 scientists and engineers from the Lab presented posters about their LDRD projects, answering questions and

29

Lab Spotlight: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Designing Biocompatible Microelectronics Pioneering work with polymer-based microfabrication methods at Lawrence Livermore National...

30

1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions.

Wellstood, Frederick C. (Berkeley, CA); Kingston, John J. (Oakland, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of microelectronic devices, and basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design. Physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices. Relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes; ...

Fonstad, Clifton G.

34

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

35

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site development plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan briefly describes the 20-year outlook for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Missions, workloads, worker populations, facilities, land, and other resources necessary to fulfill the 20-year site development vision for the INEL are addressed. In addition, the plan examines factors that could enhance or deter new or expanded missions at the INEL. And finally, the plan discusses specific site development issues facing the INEL, possible solutions, resources required to resolve these issues, and the anticipated impacts if these issues remain unresolved.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Summit Microelectronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microelectronics Inc Microelectronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Summit Microelectronics, Inc Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94085-2909 Product Summit Microelectronics designs semiconductors for networking equipment that are designed to manage power consumption and detect component failures. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Metal Silicides: An Integral Part of Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal silicide thin films are integral parts of all microelectronics devices. .... with activation energy around 1–1.5 eV for refractory metal/silicon systems and 0.5 eV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Software developed by DOE contractors, national laboratories...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

by DOE contractors, national laboratories, and other facilities available from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center The Energy Science and Technology Software Center...

42

Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R and D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O and M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R and D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with US geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

Kukacka, L.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development...

44

Using federal technology policy to strength the US microelectronics industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of US and Japanese experiences with using microelectronics consortia as a tool for strengthening their respective industries reveals major differences. Japan has established catch-up consortia with focused goals. These consortia have a finite life targeted from the beginning, and emphasis is on work that supports or leads to product and process-improvement-driven commercialization. Japan`s government has played a key role in facilitating the development of consortia and has used consortia promote domestic competition. US consortia, on the other hand, have often emphasized long-range research with considerably less focus than those in Japan. The US consortia have searched for and often made revolutionary technology advancements. However, technology transfer to their members has been difficult. Only SEMATECH has assisted its members with continuous improvements, compressing product cycles, establishing relationships, and strengthening core competencies. The US government has not been a catalyst nor provided leadership in consortia creation and operation. We propose that in order to regain world leadership in areas where US companies lag foreign competition, the US should create industry-wide, horizontal-vertical, catch-up consortia or continue existing consortia in the six areas where the US lags behind Japan -- optoelectronics, displays, memories, materials, packaging, and manufacturing equipment. In addition, we recommend that consortia be established for special government microelectronics and microelectronics research integration and application. We advocate that these consortia be managed by an industry-led Microelectronics Alliance, whose establishment would be coordinated by the Department of Commerce. We further recommend that the Semiconductor Research Corporation, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers, and relevant elements of other federal programs be integrated into this consortia complex.

Gover, J.E.; Gwyn, C.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

Al-Ayat, R

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive water efficiency improvements at its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) complex in Albuquerque, New...

47

A microelectronic design for low-cost disposable chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept and design of integrated microelectronics for a low-cost disposable chemical sensor. The critical aspects of this chemical sensor are the performance of the microelectronic chip ...

Laval, Stuart S. (Stuart Sean), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report, fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of the several research and development programs having been performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the fiscal year 1995.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video on How Process Development and Integration Works In this video, we provide a narrated animation that explains the process development and integration approach being used by...

50

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 3)  

SciTech Connect

Various laboratory tests were carried at the R & D facility of BJ Services in Tomball, TX with BJ Services staff to predict and evaluate the performance of the Ceramicrete slurry for its effective use in permafrost cementing operations. Although other standards such as those of the American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) and Construction Specification Institute (CSI) exist, all these tests were standardized by the API. A summary of the tests traditionally used in the cement slurry design as well as the API tests reference document are provided in Table 7. All of these tests were performed within the scope of this research to evaluate properties of the Ceramicrete.

See OSTI ID Number 960443

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. The overview is followed by a model program which could serve as the basis for a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. The model covers quality assurance procedures for the testing laboratory and manufacturer, third-party certification and labeling, and testing requirements (performance and reliability). A 30-member Criteria Development Committee was established to guide, review, and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

National Fire Research Laboratory Research Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in height and 2 bays Ś 3 bays in plan, to be tested under fully-developed building fires up to 20 MW using natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, wood ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Economic Development - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

Economic Development Entrepreneurial Programs. Partnerships staff believes that one of the very best ways to translate ORNL R&D into the commercial marketplace is to ...

55

3-2 Instrument Development Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Tailor work to suit the needs of the EMSL scientific community * Maintain code modules (controls) within a library that holds both commercially and locally developed software...

56

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC Software Developer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC Software Developer Discusses Physics Simulation Tool to Make Cancer Therapy Safer By Helen Shen October 20, 2011 Tiny particles are making a big difference in the world of...

57

Lab Breakthrough: Microelectronic Photovoltaics | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 7, 2012 - 9:31am Addthis Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon...

58

Microelectronic device package with an integral window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices, including an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can include a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package can have an internal stepped structure made of one or more plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratory Directed Research & Development Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

60

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

Dena Tomchak

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High Temperature Solid Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Merit Review Meeting Berkeley, CA, May 20, 2003 #12;Idaho National Engineering integration), W (electricity costs) #12;Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory 3 2. Approach

63

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services *reports to the Director. Sampani Radiation Protection of the Center G. Pantelias* HEALTH PHYSICS & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LABORATORY. Kainourgiakis RADIATION PROTECTION & HEALTH PHYSICS OF THE REACTOR F. Tzika SUPPORT TO GAEC I. A. Papazoglou

64

Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Formally, these Reports respond to the Conference Report (H.R. Rep. No. 106-988 (Conf. Rep.)) accompanying the Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which requested the DOE Chief Financial Officer "develop and execute a financial accounting report of LDRD expenditures by laboratory and weapons production plant." They also respond to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Pub. L. No. 104-201), which requires submission each year of "a report on the funds expended during the preceding fiscal year on [LDRD] activities [...] to permit an assessment of the extent to which such activities

65

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

66

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports Formally, these Reports respond to the Conference Report (H.R. Rep. No. 106-988 (Conf. Rep.)) accompanying the Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which requested the DOE Chief Financial Officer "develop and execute a financial accounting report of LDRD expenditures by laboratory and weapons production plant." They also respond to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Pub. L. No. 104-201), which requires submission each year of "a report on the funds expended during the preceding fiscal year on [LDRD] activities [...] to permit an assessment of the extent to which such activities

67

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

68

NEW LABORATORY DEVELOPMENTS IN THE ZIRCEX PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

A new Zircex flowsheet is proposed in which the nonvolatile products from hydrochlorination of uranium-zirconium alloys are chlorinated with carbon tetrachloride, thereby avoiding the loss of 1 to 6% of the uranium observed in engineering development studies of the older flowsheet for STR fuel in which the hydrochlorination residue was dissolved in nitric acid. Other potential advantages of the new flowsheet include decreased corrosion and elimination of possible explosions between uranium--zirconium alloys and nitric acid. The uranium may be recovered by aqueous dissolution and solvent extraction or by gas- phase fluorination at 200 to 400 deg C of uranium chlorides. (auth)

Gens, T.A.; Jolley, R.L.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process Development and Integration Laboratory (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Development and Integration Laboratory. One-sided sheet that includes Scope, Core Competencies and Capabilities, and Contact/Web information.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Developing and Evaluating an Open Source Network: Laboratory and Curriculum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focused on developing and evaluating an open source software (OSS) network laboratory and curriculum for information technology (IT) program students. A review of literature revealed that to date there have been very few published studies ...

Dongqing Yuan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

Westrich, Henry Roger

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Developing a Web-based Benchmarking Tool for Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Web-based Benchmarking Tool for Laboratories Developing a Web-based Benchmarking Tool for Laboratories Speaker(s): Mayank Singh Date: November 22, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dale Sartor (The EETD Applications Team includes: Satish Kumar, Paul Mathew, Dale Sartor, and Mayank Singh.) Developers of benchmarking tools are confronted with some common issues and some unique challenges. This presentation will describe the challenges faced by us while developing a web-based benchmarking tool for laboratories. Attributes such as the i) analytical and data visualization capability, and ii) flexibility and usability of the tool are common to any benchmarking effort. The various classification scheme and categories of laboratories, each with its own energy signature, posed a design challenge both for the database as well as data input forms,

75

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

76

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tribochemical investigation of microelectronic materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To achieve efficient planarization with reduced device dimensions in integrated circuits, a better understanding of the physics, chemistry, and the complex interplay involved in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is needed. The CMP process takes place at the interface of the pad and wafer in the presence of the fluid slurry medium. The hardness of Cu is significantly less than the slurry abrasive particles which are usually alumina or silica. It has been accepted that a surface layer can protect the Cu surface from scratching during CMP. Four competing mechanisms in materials removal have been reported: the chemical dissolution of Cu, the mechanical removal through slurry abrasives, the formation of thin layer of Cu oxide and the sweeping surface material by slurry flow. Despite the previous investigation of Cu removal, the electrochemical properties of Cu surface layer is yet to be understood. The motivation of this research was to understand the fundamental aspects of removal mechanisms in terms of electrochemical interactions, chemical dissolution, mechanical wear, and factors affecting planarization. Since one of the major requirements in CMP is to have a high surface finish, i.e., low surface roughness, optimization of the surface finish in reference to various parameters was emphasized. Three approaches were used in this research: in situ measurement of material removal, exploration of the electropotential activation and passivation at the copper surface and modeling of the synergistic electrochemical-mechanical interactions on the copper surface. In this research, copper polishing experiments were conducted using a table top tribometer. A potentiostat was coupled with this tribometer. This combination enabled the evaluation of important variables such as applied pressure, polishing speed, slurry chemistry, pH, materials, and applied DC potential. Experiments were designed to understand the combined and individual effect of electrochemical interactions as well as mechanical impact during polishing. Extensive surface characterization was performed with AFM, SEM, TEM and XPS. An innovative method for direct material removal measurement on the nanometer scale was developed and used. Experimental observations were compared with the theoretically calculated material removal rate values. The synergistic effect of all of the components of the process, which result in a better quality surface finish was quantitatively evaluated for the first time. Impressed potential during CMP proved to be a controlling parameter in the material removal mechanism. Using the experimental results, a model was developed, which provided a practical insight into the CMP process. The research is expected to help with electrochemical material removal in copper planarization with low-k dielectrics.

Kulkarni, Milind Sudhakar

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

None

1995-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

Newman,L.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included are a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

FOX,K.J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radiation-hardened microelectronics for accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionization and displacement phenomena in semiconducting materials are reviewed. The different classes of radiation discussed include fast neutron, x-rays and gamma rays and heavy charged particles. Both transient and steady state phenomena will be discussed. How these basic effects lead to change in the electrical characteristics of transistors and diodes and the functionality of intergrated circuits are summarized. The fundamental radiation limits for various semiconductor technologies are summarized. Recommendations and precautions are given regarding the applicability of various microelectronic technologies to different accelerator environments. 14 refs., 7 tabs.

Gover, J.E.; Fischer, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps BNL to respond new scientific opportunities within existing mission areas, as well as to develop new research mission areas in response to DOE and National needs. As the largest expense in BNL's LDRD program is the support graduate students, post-docs, and young scientists, LDRD provides base for continually refreshing the research staff as well as the education and training of the next generation of scientists. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included are a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.J.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE O 413.2B Admin Chg 1, Laboratory Directed Research and Development  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes DOE requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for ...

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Survey Automatic control in microelectronics manufacturing: Practices, challenges, and possibilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in modeling and control will be required to meet future technical challenges in microelectronics manufacturing. The implementation of closed-loop control on key unit operations has been limited due to a dearth of suitable in situ measurements, ... Keywords: End point control, Factory automation, Microelectronics manufacturing, Predictive control, Process control, Quality control, Sensors, Temperature control

Thomas F. Edgar; Stephanie W. Butler; W.Jarrett Campbell; Carlos Pfeiffer; Christopher Bode; Sung Bo Hwang; K. S. Balakrishnan; J. Hahn

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

97

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Silicon Cluster Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Cluster Tool Capabilities Silicon Cluster Tool Capabilities Photo of a cylindrical metal chamber surrounded by numerous other smaller cylindrical or rectangular chambers. Each tool has several flanges and is typically held within a metal frame or rack. A computer is on a table in front of a cabinet of electronic equipment. Silicon cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory. The Silicon cluster tool within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory is a 10-port cluster tool designed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufactured by MVSystems. It handles standard 157-mm x 157-mm samples introduced into the central 10-6 torr vacuum chamber via a load lock. From there, a robotic arm moves samples from one chamber to another within the cluster tool. Contact Qi Wang for more

105

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

Ogeka, G.J.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects described in this report represent the Laboratory's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides, a) a director's statement, b) an overview of the laboratory's LDRD program, including PNNL's management process and a self-assessment of the program, c) a five-year project funding table, and d) project summaries for each LDRD project.

Fisher, Darrell R.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Pearson, Erik W.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

Newman,L.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to meeting all reporting requirements during fiscal year 2009, our LDRD Office continues to enhance its electronic systems to streamline the LDRD management process. You will see from the following individual project reports that Argonne's researchers have once again done a superb job pursuing projects at the forefront of their respective fields and have contributed significantly to the advancement of Argonne's strategic thrusts. This work has not only attracted follow-on sponsorship in many cases, but is also proving to be a valuable basis upon which to continue realignment of our strategic portfolio to better match the Laboratory's Strategic Plan.

Office of the Director

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

Hansen, T. [ed.; Chartock, M.

1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2002. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All Fy 2002 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2003. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2002 was $7 million. The actual allocation totaled $6.7 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High-Energy-Density Science; (11) Laser Inertial-Fusion Energy; (12) Advanced Laser Optical Systems and Applications; (12) Space Security; (13) Stockpile Stewardship Science; (14) National Security; (15) Alternative Energy; and (16) Climatic Change.

Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with universities, industry, and other scientific and research institutions. By keeping the Laboratory at the forefront of science and technology, the LDRD Program enables us to meet our mission challenges, especially those of our ever-evolving national security mission. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2008 (FY08) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: A broad description of the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY08, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY08. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University  

SciTech Connect

We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, 11077, Bowling Green KY 42101 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has at its core a primary national security mission - to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing, and to prevent and counter the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction: nuclear, chemical, and biological. The Laboratory uses the scientific and engineering expertise and facilities developed for its primary mission to pursue advanced technologies to meet other important national security needs - homeland defense, military operations, and missile defense, for example - that evolve in response to emerging threats. For broader national needs, LLNL executes programs in energy security, climate change and long-term energy needs, environmental assessment and management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and for breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. With this multidisciplinary expertise, the Laboratory serves as a science and technology resource to the U.S. government and as a partner with industry and academia. This annual report discusses the following topics: (1) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation; (2) Biological Sciences; (3) Chemistry; (4) Earth and Space Sciences; (5) Energy Supply and Use; (6) Engineering and Manufacturing Processes; (7) Materials Science and Technology; Mathematics and Computing Science; (8) Nuclear Science and Engineering; and (9) Physics.

Jackson, K J

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Copper Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated chambers for depositing, processing, measuring, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. You can read more on the rationale for developing this cluster tool and its capabilities, and check out the National Solar Technology Roadmap for CIGS Photovoltaics. Contact Miguel Contreras for more details on these capabilities. The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide cluster tool, manufactured by DCA Instruments, will be operational in 2009. Techniques will include evaporation; radiofrequency, direct-current (DC), and pulsed DC sputtering;

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121

Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

The design and manufacture of a novel thin-film microelectronic vacuum diode structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for a new microelectronics technology that answers some of the limitations of current semiconductor based technology can no longer be ignored. To this end, vacuum microelectronics based on cold field emission has been explored as an alternative to the silicon transistor. To date, these approaches have been plagued with design-related problems that have retarded their acceptance as a viable technology. This work proposes a new vacuum diode structure, novel in its design. It can be easily expanded to multi-electrode structures, and has application in flat-panel display technology. A process for the manufacture of such a diode is developed herein. Diodes of various sizes are subsequently manufactured and tested. Test results indicate that the devices follow the Fowler-Nordheim model for cold field emission, suggesting successful operation. Suggestions for future work in this area axe discussed, including triode development and application to flat panel displays.

Mason, Mark E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

Hansen (Ed.), Todd

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

NETL: News Release - DOE Laboratory Develops New Processes to Tackle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2007 , 2007 DOE Laboratory Develops New Processes to Tackle Nation's Energy Issues Four Patents Awarded in 2006 for Cleaner, Efficient Fossil Fuel Use WASHINGTON, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory continued its efforts to address the cleaner, more cost-effective use of fossil fuels with the award of four patents in 2006. MORE INFO Learn more about NETL patents "This effort illustrates the caliber of engineers and scientists working toward meeting the goals of our National Energy Policy," said Jeffrey D. Jarrett, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy. "It is our commitment to meet our future energy challenges and to find better ways to ensure that the United States plays a leading role in tackling climate change issues."

126

Energize Your Photovoltaics: NREL's Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique collaborative facility where industry and universities can work closely with NREL scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to photovoltaics (PV). The integrated equipment includes deposition, processing, and characterization tools. We work with a wide range of PV materials, from crystalline silicon to thin-films (amorphous, nano- and microcrystalline silicon, copper indium gallium diselenide, cadmium telluride) to organic PV. The PDIL integrates all the data to: Automate control via recipes; Share data easily and securely; and Facilitate analysis. The PDIL integrates all the tools to: Eliminate air exposure between steps; Sequence steps in any order ; and Incorporate combinatorial techniques. The PDIL integrates all the materials to: Provide greater device flexibility; Allow diverse experts to work together; and Better support industry and universities.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

Los Alamos National Laboratory

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuelsâ?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

Soloiu, Valentin

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Renewable energy technology development at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earths present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing many of these technologies over the last two decades. This paper describes innovative solar, wind and geothermal energy systems and components that Sandia is helping to bring to the marketplace. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are conducted in partnership with non-federal government entities. A number of these partners are from New Mexico.

Klimas, P.C.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

Dena Tomchak

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the 1992 fiscal year. It describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Divisions that report include: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment and Safety and Health, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics and Structural Biology.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as strategic LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions.

Hansen, Todd C.

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as strategic LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions.

Hansen, Todd C.

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory to measure the coherent far-infrared emitted from a bend magnet in the Jefferson Lab

Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009  

SciTech Connect

The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are appropriately handled. The LDRD Program is assessed annually for both output and process efficiency to ensure the investment is providing expected returns on technical capability enhancement. The call for proposals and project selection process for the INL LDRD program begins typically in April, with preliminary budget allocations, and submittal of the technical requests for preproposals. A call for preproposals is made at this time as well, and the preparation of full proposals follows in June and closes in July. The technical and management review follows this, and the portfolio is submitted for DOE-ID concurrence in early September. Project initiation is in early October. The technical review process is independent of, and in addition to the management review. These review processes are very stringent and comprehensive, ensuring technical viability and suitable technical risk are encompassed within each project that is selected for funding. Each proposal is reviewed by two or three anonymous technical peers, and the reviews are consolidated into a cohesive commentary of the overall research based on criteria published in the call for proposals. A grade is assigned to the technical review and the review comments and grade are released back to the principal investigators and the managers interested in funding the proposals. Management criteria are published in the call for proposals, and management comments and selection results are available for principal investigator and other interested management as appropriate. The DOE Idaho Operations Office performs a final review and concurs on each project prior to project authorization, and on major scope/budget changes should they occur during the project's implementation. This report begins with several research highlights that exemplify the diversity of scientific and engineering research performed at the INL in FY 2009. Progress summaries for all projects are organized into sections reflecting the major areas of research focus at the INL. These sections begin with the DOE-NE Nuclear Science and Technology mission support area,

Not Available

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are appropriately handled. The LDRD Program is assessed annually for both output and process efficiency to ensure the investment is providing expected returns on technical capability enhancement. The call for proposals and project selection process for the INL LDRD program begins typically in April, with preliminary budget allocations, and submittal of the technical requests for preproposals. A call for preproposals is made at this time as well, and the preparation of full proposals follows in June and closes in July. The technical and management review follows this, and the portfolio is submitted for DOE-ID concurrence in early September. Project initiation is in early October. The technical review process is independent of, and in addition to the management review. These review processes are very stringent and comprehensive, ensuring technical viability and suitable technical risk are encompassed within each project that is selected for funding. Each proposal is reviewed by two or three anonymous technical peers, and the reviews are consolidated into a cohesive commentary of the overall research based on criteria published in the call for proposals. A grade is assigned to the technical review and the review comments and grade are released back to the principal investigators and the managers interested in funding the proposals. Management criteria are published in the call for proposals, and management comments and selection results are available for principal investigator and other interested management as appropriate. The DOE Idaho Operations Office performs a final review and concurs on each project prior to project authorization, and on major scope/budget changes should they occur during the project's implementation. This report begins with several research highlights that exemplify the diversity of scientific and engineering research performed at the INL in FY 2009. Progress summaries for all projects are organized into sections reflecting the major areas of research focus at the INL. These sections begin with the DOE-NE Nuclear Science and Technology mission support area,

Not Available

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review.

editor, Todd C Hansen

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

Hansen, Todd

2004-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction  

SciTech Connect

The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, but also to provide human factors guidance for all future developments of the nuclear industry.

Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Laboratories » LPE Home » Laboratory Directed Laboratories » LPE Home » Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Department of Energy's Engine of Discovery

144

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Use of heavy-ion accelerators for testing microelectronic components for

145

Multilayered Microelectronic Device Package With An Integral Window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectronic package with an integral window mounted in a recessed lip for housing a microelectronic device. The device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can be formed of a low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) or high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayered material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined (e.g. co-fired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that a light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The result is a compact, low profile package, having an integral window mounted in a recessed lip, that can be hermetically sealed.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Update on Ultrasonic Thermometry Development at Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated an effort to evaluate the viability of using ultrasonic thermometry technology as an improved sensor for detecting temperature during irradiation testing of advanced fuels proposed within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). Ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) work on the principle that the speed at which sound travels through a material (acoustic velocity) is dependent on the temperature of the material. UTs have several advantages over other types of temperature sensors . UTs can be made very small, as the sensor consists only of a small diameter rod which may or may not require a sheath. Measurements may be made up to very high temperature (near the melting point of the sensor material) and, as no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects observed in traditional high temperature thermocouple applications are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce multiple acoustic discontinuities into the sensor, as this enables temperature profiling with a single sensor. The current paper presents initial results from FCR&D UT development efforts. These developments include improved methods for fabricating magnetostrictive transducers and joining them to waveguides, characterization of candidate sensor materials appropriate for use in FCR&D fuels irradiations (both ceramic fuels in inert gas and sodium bonded metallic fuels), enhanced signal processing techniques, and tests to determine potential accuracy and resolution.

Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; John Crepeau

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

MIT Device Simulation WebLab : an online simulator for microelectronic devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the field of microelectronics, a device simulator is an important engineering tool with tremendous educational value. With a device simulator, a student can examine the characteristics of a microelectronic device described ...

Solis, Adrian (Adrian Orbita)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Audit Report on Management of Laboratory DirectedResearch and Development at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, WR-B-99-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (Department) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the only national laboratory dedicated to furthering the development and commercialization of renewable energy...

149

Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development Of Competences Of National Reference Laboratory For Mass Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The national reference laboratory for mass in Bosnia and Herzegovina uses non-automatic weighing scales as a national reference standard. This research was performed in order to prove competences of this laboratory through accreditation in accordance with international standard EN ISO/IEC 17025. The analysis of measurement results obtained by calibration of weighing instruments described in this paper, describes the effects of individual contributions to the combined measurement uncertainty.

Samir Lemeš; Nermina Zaimovi?-Uzunovi?; Šejla Ališi?; Haris Memic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of fiscal year 1993. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. The program advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Reports are given from the following divisions: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment -- Health and Safety, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics, and Structural Biology. (GHH)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sealed symmetric multilayered microelectronic device package with integral windows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sealed symmetric multilayered package with integral windows for housing one or more microelectronic devices. The devices can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the windows being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic devices can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that the light-sensitive sides are optically accessible through the windows. The result is a compact, low-profile, sealed symmetric package, having integral windows that can be hermetically-sealed.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made on all LDRD-funded projects during fiscal year 2009. As a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) national laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has an enduring mission to bring molecular and environmental sciences and engineering strengths to bear on DOE missions and national needs. Their vision is to be recognized worldwide and valued nationally for leadership in accelerating the discovery and deployment of solutions to challenges in energy, national security, and the environment. To achieve this mission and vision, they provide distinctive, world-leading science and technology in: (1) the design and scalable synthesis of materials and chemicals; (2) climate change science and emissions management; (3) efficient and secure electricity management from generation to end use; and (4) signature discovery and exploitation for threat detection and reduction. PNNL leadership also extends to operating EMSL: the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility dedicated to providing itnegrated experimental and computational resources for discovery and technological innovation in the environmental molecular sciences.

Hughes, Pamela J.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S....

157

Moore's law and the impact on trusted and radiation-hardened microelectronics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1965 Gordon Moore wrote an article claiming that integrated circuit density would scale exponentially. His prediction has remained valid for more than four decades. Integrated circuits have changed all aspects of everyday life. They are also the 'heart and soul' of modern systems for defense, national infrastructure, and intelligence applications. The United States government needs an assured and trusted microelectronics supply for military systems. However, migration of microelectronics design and manufacturing from the United States to other countries in recent years has placed the supply of trusted microelectronics in jeopardy. Prevailing wisdom dictates that it is necessary to use microelectronics fabricated in a state-of-the-art technology for highest performance and military system superiority. Close examination of silicon microelectronics technology evolution and Moore's Law reveals that this prevailing wisdom is not necessarily true. This presents the US government the possibility of a totally new approach to acquire trusted microelectronics.

Ma, Kwok Kee

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96  

SciTech Connect

This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

Chase, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moving forward.. Accomplishments To date we’ve focused on four high-impact energy technologies under development at LBNL—advanced biofuels,

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed a piezoelectric energy-converting biomaterial fromPBD-Lee LB11017 Piezoelectric Biomaterials for Novel EnergyPhage-Based Piezoelectric Thin Films for Energy Generation,”

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr. (,; .); Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Multilayered microelectronic device package with an integral window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices is disclosed, wherein the package includes an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can comprise, for example, a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package has an internal stepped structure made of a plurality of plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package, according to some embodiments. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination. The integral window can further include a lens for optically transforming light passing through the window. The package can include an array of binary optic lenslets made integral with the window. The package can include an electrically-switched optical modulator, such as a lithium niobate window attached to the package, for providing a very fast electrically-operated shutter.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An insitu method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T.sub.c superconductor thin films.

Wellstood, Frederick C. (Berkeley, CA); Kingston, John J. (Oakland, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3] ; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T[sub c] superconductor thin films. 14 figures.

Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report  

SciTech Connect

A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

PJ Hughes

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations  

SciTech Connect

We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development & expansion of an industrial control system security laboratory and an international research collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the incremental building of a unique industrial control system laboratory designed to investigate security vulnerabilities and to support development of mitigating tools and techniques. The laboratory has been built over time ... Keywords: SCADA, critical infrastructure security, industrial control systems, test bed

Rayford B. Vaughn; Thomas Morris; Elena Sitnikova

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Developments of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pyroprocessing Technology at Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes research in used fuel pyroprocessing that has been published by Idaho National Laboratory over the last decade. It includes work done both on treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and development of advanced technology for potential scale-up and commercialization. Collaborations with universities and other laboratories is included in the cited work.

Michael F. Simpson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of Facilities Master Plan and Laboratory Renovation Project  

SciTech Connect

Funding from this grant has allowed Morehouse School of Medicine to complete its first professionally developed, comprehensive campus master plan that is in alignment with the recently completed strategic plan. In addition to master planning activities, funds were used for programming and designing research renovations, and also to supplement other research facility upgrades by providing lighting and equipment. The activities funded by this grant will provide the catalyst for substantial improvement in the Schoolâ??s overall facilities for biomedical education and research, and will also provide much of the information needed to conduct a successful campaign to raise funds for proposed buildings and renovations.

Andrea D. Fox

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development of laboratory doubly fed induction generator for wind energy research.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis studies the basic concept of doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) and develops a laboratory model to simulate DFIG wind turbine generators (WTG). “Doubly-fed” refers… (more)

Hu, Zhouxing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design principles for the development of space technology maturation laboratories aboard the International Space Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis formulates seven design principles for the development of laboratories which utilize the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate the maturation of space technologies. The principles are derived from ...

Saenz Otero, Alvar, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cathode Contact Materials for Anode-Supported Cell Development - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Contact Materials for Anode- Cathode Contact Materials for Anode- Supported Cell Development- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of solid oxide

175

Evaluation of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Investment Areas at Sandia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a variety of research projects each year under its Laboratory Research and Development (LDRD) program. Recently, information visualization techniques have been used with corporate data to map several LDRD investment areas for the purpose of understanding strategic overlaps and identifying potential opportunities for future development outside of our current technologies. Tools, techniques, and specific analyses are presented here. We find that these tools and techniques hold great promise for aiding future direction of the science and technology enterprise.

Evaluation Of Laboratory; Kevin W. Boyack; Nabeel Rahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Shaping the library of the future: Digital library developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Research Library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper offers an overview of current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL), to develop digital library services. Current projects of LANL`s Library without Walls initiative are described. Although the architecture of digital libraries generally is experimental and subject to debate, one principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the use of Mosaic as a client for the Research Library`s resources. Several projects under development have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet. Specific efforts via Mosaic include support for preprint databases, providing access to citation databases, and access to a digital image database of unclassified Los Alamos technical reports.

Luce, R.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

FOX, K.J.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT OF A PROCESS FOR SEPARATING BARIUM-140 FROM MTR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

S>The results of all laboratory research and development on the process for separation of barium-140 from MTR fuel elements are presented. The steps include caustic dissolution separation of barium and strontium with fuming nitric acid and removal of strontium by the chromate-acetate method. The results of laboratory and pilot plant corrosion investigations and high radiation level flowsheet tests in the Multicurie Cell are also included. ( auth)

Anderson, E.L.; MacCormack, R.S.; Slansky, C.M.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Steps to Developing the New Orleans Strategic Energy Plan (Presentation), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps to Developing the New Orleans Steps to Developing the New Orleans Strategic Energy Plan Elizabeth Brown National Renewable Energy Laboratory New Orleans City Council Utility Subcommittee Meeting January 17, 2008 NREL/PR-7A20-51650 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Only national laboratory dedicated to renewable energy and energy efficiency R&D Research spans fundamental science to technology to policy and market solutions New Orleans Support: Funded by U.S. DOE to provide technical and policy expertise to assist in developing energy strategies for recovery and rebuild - Schools - Residential - Municipal - Energy Policy Presentation Overview * Strategic energy planning: why and how? * Next Steps for New Orleans Strategy Development * Suggestions for immediate implementation * Next steps for immediate implementation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories, IG-0373  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 1995 19, 1995 IG-1 INFORMATION: "Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories" The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy (DOE) established policies to ensure that Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) enhance U.S. competitiveness in the world economy, provide a reasonable return on resources invested, and enable successful commercialization of technologies developed. DOE's Office of Technology Partnerships issued the General Guidance Memorandum to DOE operations offices establishing policy goals for technology transfer programs, including CRADAs. DISCUSSION: We found that the efforts to manage CRADAs at three DOE national laboratories (Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Lawrence

182

Fossil Energy R&D at Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Fossil Energy Program conducts research and development that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fossil Energy R&D at Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Fossil Energy Program conducts research and development that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy and technologies for the sustainable production and use of fossil energy resources. ORNL works with the US

183

Development and Use of a GIS Workstation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the Department of Energy s (DOE) largest multipurpose science and energy laboratory. As an interdisciplinary research organization, access to information plays a critical part in the success of the many research efforts in progress at the Laboratory. The Research Library, in a supportive role, enables staff to fulfill the Laboratory s mission by making available a myriad of information resources including paper and electronic maps. The Research Library Geographic Information System (GIS) workstation was developed to better serve library customers by providing convenient access to a variety of mapping resources. The GIS workstation functions as a supplement to the paper map collection by providing customers with maps in an electronic format that can easily be inserted into memos, reports, and journal articles. Customer interest, together with the growing availability of low-cost and user-friendly mapping software, led to the development of the GIS workstation, which hosts an array of commercial mapping software that enables customers to produce ready-made topographic maps, current and historical maps, and road maps. Customers may also create customized maps using their own data or data supplied by the software vendor. This article focuses on the development, implementation, and use of the library s GIS workstation by providing a brief description of hardware components, mapping resources, and how these resources are used by Laboratory staff.

Dickey, Mark W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques for microelectronics-related materials studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation play a vital role in the understanding of structural behavior for a wide range of materials important in microelectronics. The extremely high flux of X-rays produced by synchrotron storage rings ...

J. L. Jordan-Sweet

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EA-1958: Future Development in proximity (sic) to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington.

186

Electromechanical battery research and development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts undergirding a funded program to develop a modular electromechanical battery (EMB) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described. Example parameters for EMBs for electric and hybrid-electric vehicles are given, and the importance of the high energy recovery efficiency of EMBs in increasing vehicle range in urban driving is shown.

Post, R.F.; Baldwin, D.E.; Bender, D.A.; Fowler, T.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Laboratory directed research and development: Annual report to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, Brookhaven must continuously foster the development of new ideas and technologies, promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develop new fundable R and D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments are described in this report. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PATH TO NEXRAD: Doppler Radar Development at the National Severe Storms Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this historical paper, we trace the scientific- and engineering-based steps at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and in the larger weather radar community that led to the development of NSSL's first 10-cm-wavelength pulsed Doppler ...

Rodger A. Brown; John M. Lewis

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Ratzel, A.C. III

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NNSA Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program 2008 Symposium--Focus on Energy Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 to fund leading-edge research and development central to the national laboratories core missions. LDRD anticipates and engages in projects on the forefront of science and engineering at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, and has a long history of addressing pressing national security needs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories. LDRD has been a scientific success story, where projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published and cited in peer-reviewed journals, mainstream media coverage, and patents granted. The LDRD Program is also a powerful means to attract and retain top researchers from around the world, to foster collaborations with other prominent scientific and technological institutions, and to leverage some of the world's most technologically advanced assets. This enables the LDRD Program to invest in high-risk and potentially high-payoff research that creates innovative technical solutions for some of our nation's most difficult challenges. Worldwide energy demand is growing at an alarming rate, as developing nations continue to expand their industrial and economic base on the back of limited global resources. The resulting international conflicts and environmental consequences pose serious challenges not only to this nation, but to the international community as well. The NNSA and its national security laboratories have been increasingly called upon to devote their scientific and technological capabilities to help address issues that are not limited solely to the historic nuclear weapons core mission, but are more expansive and encompass a spectrum of national security missions, including energy security. This year's symposium highlights some of the exciting areas of research in alternative fuels and technology, nuclear power, carbon sequestration, energy efficiency, and other energy security research projects that are being conducted under the LDRD Program at the DOE/NNSA national laboratories and under the Site Directed Research and Development Program (SDRD) at the Nevada Test Site. Speakers from DOE/NNSA, other federal agencies, the NNSA laboratories, and the private sector will provide their insights into the national security implications of emerging energy and environmental issues, and the LDRD investments in energy security at the national laboratories. Please take this opportunity to reflect upon the science and engineering needs of our country's energy demands, including those issues posed by climate change, paying attention to the innovative contributions that LDRD is providing to the nation.

Kotta, P R; Sketchley, J A

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANS develop new mentor-protĂ©gĂ©  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New mentor-protégé agreements New mentor-protégé agreements Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANS develop new mentor-protégé agreements LANS, LLC recently entered into mentor-protégé agreements with North Wind, Inc. and Performance Maintenance Inc. July 8, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

192

Monsanto/Mound Laboratory Engineering Development of Tritium-Handling Systems  

SciTech Connect

Mound Laboratory (Mound) has, during the past four years, been actively involved in the development of methods to contain and control tritium during its processing and to recover it from waste streams. Initial bench-scale research was directed mainly toward removal of tritium from gaseous effluent streams and from laboratory liquid wastes. The gaseous effluent investigation has progressed through the developmental stage and has been implemented in routine operations. A test laboratory embodying many of the results of the research phase has been designed and construction has been completed. As the program at Mound has progressed, the scope of the effort has been expanded to include research concerned with handling not only gaseous tritium but also tritiated liquids. A program is presently under way to investigate the detritiation of aqueous wastes encountered in the fuel cycle of the commercial power reactor industry.

Bixel, J. C.; Lamberger, P. H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives, and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2004. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2004 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2005. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2004 was $9.5 million. The actual allocation totaled $8.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

FOX,K.J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2001. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2001 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2002. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2001 was $6 million. The actual allocation totaled $5.3 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2003. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2003 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2004. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2003 was $8.5 million. The actual allocation totaled $7.8 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Development & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center T3E Individual Node Optimization Michael Stewart, SGI/Cray, 4/9/98 * Introduction * T3E Processor * T3E Local Memory * Cache Structure * Optimizing Codes for Cache Usage * Loop Unrolling * Other Useful Optimization Options * References 1 Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Introduction * Primary topic will be single processor optimization * Most codes on the T3E are dominated by computation * Processor interconnect specifically designed for high performance codes, unlike the T3E processor * More detailed information available on the web (see References) * Fortran oriented, but I will give C compiler flag equivalents.

198

History and testimony of competency-based development at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

More than ten years ago, Sandia managers defined a set of traits and characteristics that were needed for success at Sandia. Today, the Sandia National Laboratories Success Profile Competencies continue to be powerful tools for employee and leadership development. The purpose of this report is to revisit the historical events that led to the creation and adaptation of the competencies and to position them for integration in future employee selection, development, and succession planning processes. This report contains an account of how the competencies were developed, testimonies of how they are used within the organization, and a description of how they will be foundational elements of new processes.

Burt, Rebecca A.; Narahara, Sheryl K.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997  

SciTech Connect

New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Flow Model Development for the Idaho National Laboratory OU 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional (2D), steady-state groundwater flow model was developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sitewide groundwater model. A total of 224 wells inside the model domain were used to calibrate the 2D flow model. Three different calibration techniques, zonation approach, pilot point approach and coupled zonation/pilot point approach, were explored and applied during the model development. The pilot point approach allows modelers to model aquifer heterogeneities at various scales, and extract the maximum amount of data from available monitoring data, permitting the best possible representation of flow and transport at the INL.

Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Thomas Wood

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) remove heat from the air and use it to heat water, presenting an energy-saving opportunity for homeowners. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a simulation model to study the inter- actions of HPWHs and space conditioning equipment, related to climate and installa- tion location in the home. This model was created in TRNSYS and is based on data from HPWHs tested at NREL's Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory. The HPWH model accounts for the condenser coil wrapped around the outside of the storage tank, and uses a data-based performance map. Researchers found that simulated energy use was within 2% of lab results, which confirms

205

Generic microelectronic smart sensor platform for detection of toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive work has been performed in the past which demonstrates that various metal alloys can be used to detect different toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases. Work has been performed using Pd, Pt, Ir, PdNi, PdAg and Pt/Pd for detecting things such as Hydrogen, Hydrazine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Deuterium, Tritium, Ethanol and Hexane. Perhaps the most familiar is the use of Pd and PdNi for the detection of Hydrogen. These devices work by examining the effect of the gases on the material properties of the metal alloys. Two of the most common material properties examined in these sensors are the resistance of thin film resistors, and the flatband or threshold voltage shifts of MOS structures fabricated with a particular alloy as the gate material. While research into these sensing techniques has shown much promise, few manufacturable, fieldable devices have resulted. These sensing techniques are prone to drift problems due to temperature variations, and typically have large sample to sample variations in performance due to process control issues. Typically, these sensors require significant external instrumentation for measurement and control, making the systems large and expensive. Sandia National Laboratories has designed, fabricated and demonstrated complete functionality of a generic microelectronic based smart sensor platform intended to effectively exploit the research mentioned above into high performance, manufacturable, fieldable devices. This smart sensor platform technology fabricates 2 {mu}m CMOS digital and analog control electronics, sensing elements, and temperature control elements on the same silicon integrated circuit. Our initial demonstration of this technology incorporates PdNi as the sensing alloy for the detection of hydrogen.

Rodriguez, J.; Corbett, W.; Montague, S.; Knoll, M.; McWhorter, P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments Barry Friedman NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Center May 16, 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum Denver, Colorado NREL/PR-6A20-55130 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Disclaimer 2 DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT These information ("Data") are provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC ("Alliance") for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). It is recognized that disclosure of these Data is provided under the following conditions and warnings: (1) these Data have been prepared for reference purposes only; (2) these Data consist of forecasts, estimates or assumptions made on a best-

207

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Power Transfer Development for Sustainable Campus Initiative  

SciTech Connect

Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a convenient, safe, and autonomous means for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging that has seen rapid growth in recent years for stationary applications. WPT does not require bulky contacts, plugs, and wires, is not affected by dirt or weather conditions, and is as efficient as conventional charging systems. This study summarizes some of the recent Sustainable Campus Initiative activities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in WPT charging of an on-campus vehicle (a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle). Laboratory development of the WPT coils, high-frequency power inverter, and overall systems integration are discussed. Results cover the coil performance testing at different operating frequencies, airgaps, and misalignments. Some of the experimental results of insertion loss due to roadway surfacing materials in the air-gap are presented. Experimental lessons learned are also covered in this study.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

Uribe, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Final report for the protocol extensions for ATM Security Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project  

SciTech Connect

This is the summary report for the Protocol Extensions for Asynchronous Transfer Mode project, funded under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. During this one-year effort, techniques were examined for integrating security enhancements within standard ATM protocols, and mechanisms were developed to validate these techniques and to provide a basic set of ATM security assurances. Based on our experience during this project, recommendations were presented to the ATM Forum (a world-wide consortium of ATM product developers, service providers, and users) to assist with the development of security-related enhancements to their ATM specifications. As a result of this project, Sandia has taken a leading role in the formation of the ATM Forum`s Security Working Group, and has gained valuable alliances and leading-edge experience with emerging ATM security technologies and protocols.

Tarman, T.D.; Pierson, L.G.; Brenkosh, J.P. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with government agencies and industries, is actively engaged in the development, testing, and characterization of high efficiency, low cost modular solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems for stationary, automotive and military applications. Advanced SOFC systems are being developed which will offer ease of operation on a variety of gaseous liquid hydrocarbon and coal-derived fuels as well as "zero emissions" capability. SOFC R&D activities at PNNL continue in the areas of cell component materials, electrochemistry, cell design and modeling, high temperature corrosion, and fuel processing. Specific activities include development of optimized materials and cost effective fabrication techniques for high power density anode-supported cells operating at temperatures below 800 degrees C, characterization of processes responsible for high electrical performance and long term performance degradation, optimization and cell and stack designs using computational engineering models, and hydrocarbon fuel processing using micro technology.

Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Baskaran, Suresh; Chick, Lawrence A.; Chou, Y. S.; Deibler, John E.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Marina, Olga A.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Simner, Steve P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Weil, K. Scott; Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; McVay, Gary L.

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electro-optic transient imaging instrumentation development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Implications for SSC instrumentation development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the underground weapons physics laboratories fielded by LLNL's Nuclear Test and Experimental Sciences (NTES) program have experienced marked change. This change is characterized by a phenomenal growth in the amount of data returned per event. These techniques have been developed as a result of the severe demands placed upon transient instrumentation by the physics requirements of our underground nuclear laboratories. The detector front-ends must quickly detect, process and transmit a large volume of data to recording stations located approximately 1 km from the event. In a recent event, the detector front-ends successfully handled data at a prompt rate of approximately 13 Terabits/sec. Largely, this advance can be attributed directly to the increased use of electro-optic techniques. These highly-parallel high-bandwidth imaging instrumentation systems developed for the test program may have a lot to offer the high-energy physics community tackling the challenge of the unprecedented luminosity and fidelity demands at the SSC. In what follows, we discuss details of a few of our prompt instrumentation techniques and compare these capabilities to the detector requirements for the challenging physics at the SSC. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Lowry, M.; Jacoby, B.; Schulte, H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Audit Report - Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories, OAS-M-13-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooperative Research and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories OAS-M-13-02 March 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 15, 2013 MEMO MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories" BACKGROUND The dissemination of technology developed by the Department of Energy's national laboratories to the general science community and the public, is one of the Department's top priorities. In

213

Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Physical and chemical sensor technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing emphasis on envirorunental issues, waste reduction, and improved efficiency for industrial processes has mandated the development of new chemical and physical sensors for field or in-plant use. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a number of technologies for sensing physical and chemical properties. Table 1 gives some examples of several sensors. that have been developed recently for environmental, industrial, commercial or government applications. Physical sensors of pressure, temperature, acceleration, acoustic vibration spectra, and ionizing radiation have been developed. Sensors developed at LLNL for chemical species include inorganic solvents, heavy metal ions`, and gaseous atoms and compounds. Primary sensing technologies we have employed have been based on optical fibers, semiconductor optical or radiation detectors, electrochemical activity, micromachined electromechanical (MEMs) structures, or chemical separation technologies. The complexities of these sensor systems range from single detectors to more advanced micro-instruments on-a-chip. For many of the sensors we have developed the necessary intelligent electronic support systems for both local and remote sensing applications. Each of these sensor technologies are briefly described in the remaining sections of this paper.

Balch, J.W.; Ciarlo, D.; Folta, J.; Glass, R.; Hagans, K.; Milanovich, F.; Sheem, S.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Progress on the Development of XRF Imaging and Analysis at the Siam Photon Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

XRF imaging and analysis at the Siam Photon Laboratory have been recently developed for supporting various applications in x-ray micro analysis. An experimental setup for white beam x-ray fluorescent imaging has been installed at the beamline BL2 for elemental and quantitative analyses. A white micro beam of 163x170 {mu}m{sup 2}(FWHM) measured by wire scanning has been delivered to samples using a polycapillary x-ray half-lens. The fluorescent emissions of characteristic x-rays (1 keV and above) are detected by a Si-PIN detector. XRF imaging of Ni grids on supporting glass and XRF analysis on a trace-element standard were conducted for testing the apparatus. The test results on these samples as well as the necessary software developed for elemental identification and imaging are presented.

Saengsuwan, V. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Klysubun, W.; Wongprachanukul, N. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, 111, Surapat 3 building, University Avenue, Suranaree district, Muang Nakorn Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Bovornratanaraks, T. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, 10330 (Thailand) and ThEP Center, CHE, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, 10400 (Thailand); Srisatit, T. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Energy-Harvesting Battery Charger for Self-Sustaining Portable Microelectronic Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Harvesting Battery Charger for Self- Sustaining Portable Microelectronic Applications By in the battery is limited, resulting in short lifespan. It is necessary to prolong battery life, and thus device, this energy is utilized to charge an integrated battery, resulting in a self-sustaining battery charger

Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

218

Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microelectronic Systems Research Group The field of biomedical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, are delivering technologies that will help meet the health care challenges facing the nation of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Institutes of Health, and Department of Defense. Users: Scientists and engineers from universities, industry, and government laboratories. Complementary ORNL

220

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of6 of6 Subject: Review of Safety Basis HS: HSS CRAD 45-59 U.S. Department of Development for the Los Alamos Rev: 0 National Laboratory Transuranic Eff. Date: May 6, 2013 Energy Waste Facility - Criteria and Review Approach Document Office of Safety and ~ Emergency Management Acting Djector, Of~e of Safety and Evaluations Emergency Management Evaluations Date: May 6, 2013 firo,~ Page 1of6 Criteria and Review e;dJatnes 0. Low Approach Document Date: May 6, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health, and emergency management systems and practices used by line and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ORNL/PPA-2010/1 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10/1 10/1 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Annual Report DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from

222

Laboratory Directed Research & Development program. Annual report to the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the following projects coordinated at Brookhaven National Laboratory: investigation of the utility of max-entropy methods for the analysis of powder diffraction data; analysis of structures and interactions of nucleic acids and proteins by small angle x-ray diffraction; relaxographic MRI and functional MRI; very low temperature infra-red laser absorption as a potential analytical tool; state-resolved measurements of H{sub 2} photodesorption: development of laser probes of H{sub 2} for in-situ accelerator measurements; Siberian snake prototype development for RHIC; synthesis and characterization of novel microporous solids; ozone depletion, chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols; understanding the molecular basis for the synthesis of plant fatty acids possessing unusual double bond positions; structure determination of outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; low mass, low-cost multi-wire proportional chambers for muon systems of collider experiments; theory of self-organized criticality; development of the PCR-SSCP technique for the detection, at the single cell level, of specific genetic changes; feasibility of SPECT in imaging of F-18 FDG accumulation in tumors; visible free electron laser oscillator experiment; study of possible 2 + 2 TeV muon-muon collider; ultraviolet FEL R & D; precision machining using hard x-rays; new directions in in-vivo enzyme mapping: catechol-O-methyltransferase; proposal to develop a high rate muon polarimeter; development of intense, tunable 20-femtosecond laser systems; use of extreme thermophilic bacterium thermatoga maritima as a source of ribosomal components and translation factors for structural studies; and biochemical and structural studies of Chaperon proteins from thermophilic bacteria and other experiments.

Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than current models. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind plants are becoming wind plants, reduce the cost of wind energy, and save wind plant developers millions of dollars in lostResearchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large

224

Method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window for providing optical access through an aperture in the package. The package is made of a multilayered insulating material, e.g., a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC). The window is inserted in-between personalized layers of ceramic green tape during stackup and registration. Then, during baking and firing, the integral window is simultaneously bonded to the sintered ceramic layers of the densified package. Next, the microelectronic device is flip-chip bonded to cofired thick-film metallized traces on the package, where the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. Finally, a cover lid is attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, flip-chip bonded, hermetically-sealed package having an integral window.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Bi-level multilayered microelectronic device package with an integral window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-level, multilayered package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A second chip can be bonded to the backside of the first chip, with the second chip being wirebonded to the second level of the bi-level package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Solar laboratory development. Final report, September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made on the establishment of a solar laboratory at the University of Illinois is reported. The laboratory will be located in a moving trailer and will demonstrate the operation of a solar water heater and a solar-assisted heat pump using flat plate collector. (WHK)

Simon, H.A.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

228

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, DECEMBER 1998.  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1998, the BNL LDBD Program funded 20 projects, 4 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $2,563,681. The small number of new starts was a consequence of severe financial problems that developed between FY 1997 and 1998. Emphasis was given to complete funding for approved multi-year proposals. Following is a table which lists all of the FY 1998 funded projects and gives a history of funding for each by year. Several of these projects have already experienced varying degrees of success as indicated in the individual Project Program Summaries which follow. A total of 17 informal publications (abstracts, presentations, BNL reports and workshop papers) were reported and an additional 13 formal (full length) papers were either published, are in press or being prepared for publication. The investigators on five projects have filed for a patent. Seven of the projects reported that proposals/grants had either been funded or were submitted for funding. In conclusion, a significant measure of success is already attributable to the FY 1998 LDBD Program in the short period of time involved. The Laboratory has experienced a significant scientific gain by these achievements.

OGEKA,G.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

SFCD Environmental Assessment for Future Development on the South Federal Campus, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for Future Development in Proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office Richland, Washington 99352 July 2013 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1958 This page intentionally left blank. Environmental Assessment July 2013 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1958 Summary The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multi-program U.S. Department of Energy- Office of Science (DOE-SC) national laboratory conducting research to meet DOE strategic objectives. To enable continued research support, DOE-SC is proposing to construct new facilities and infrastructure

230

Development of A Mesoscale Ensemble Data Assimilation System at The Naval Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been adopted and implemented at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for mesoscale and storm-scale data assimilation to study the impact of ensemble assimilation of high-resolution observations, including those ...

Qingyun Zhao; Fuqing Zhang; Teddy Holt; Craig H. Bishop; Qin Xu

231

Development of a Fan-Filter Unit Test Standard, Laboratory Validations, and its Applications across Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Performance of Fan-Filter Units, Version 1.3 (2005).Energy Performance of Fan-Filter Units, Version 2.0 (2006).Laboratory Evaluation of Fan-filter Units’ Aerodynamic and

Xu, Tengfang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document reports status and technical progress for Los Alamos National Laboratories 94-1 Research and Development projects. An introduction to the project structure and an executive summary are included. Projects described include Electrolytic Decontamination, Combustibles, Detox, Sand, Slag, and Crucible, Surveillance, and Core Technology.

Dinehart, M. [comp.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SFCD Environmental Assessment for Future Development on the South Federal Campus, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for Future Development on the South Federal Campus, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office Richland, Washington 99352 May 2013 DOE/EA-1958 U.S. Department of Energy DRAFT This page intentionally left blank. Environmental Assessment May 2013 DOE/EA-1958 U.S. Department of Energy DRAFT Summary The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multi-program U.S. Department of Energy- Office of Science (DOE-SC) national laboratory conducting research to meet DOE strategic objectives. To enable continued research support, DOE-SC is proposing to construct new facilities and infrastructure

234

Work in progress - using insights from non-engineers to help develop laboratory projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A group from engineering programs at both four and two year colleges has been assembled to explore creating laboratory modules with an emphasis on activities and perspectives shown to be successful in technological literacy courses for nonengineering ... Keywords: engineering for all students, engineering for non-engineers, introduction to engineering, technological literacy

John Krupczak; Kate Disney; Scott VanderStoep

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of the environmental management integrated baseline at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is one of many Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories that has been performing environmental cleanup and stabilization, which was accelerated upon the end of the cold war. In fact, the INEL currently receives two-thirds of its scope to perform these functions. However, the cleanup is a highly interactive system that creates an opportunity for systems engineering methodology to be employed. At the INEL, a group called EM (Environmental Management) Integration has been given this charter along with a small core of systems engineers. This paper discusses the progress to date of converting the INEL legacy system into one that uses the systems engineering discipline as the method to ensure that external requirements are met.

Murphy, J.A.; Caliva, R.M.; Wixson, J.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Audit of Management of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CR-B-98-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department's national laboratories, since their establishment, have been permitted to conduct a limited amount of discretionary research activities. The Department's Defense Program...

237

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorys (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a...

239

Construction and Changes in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank(Glass Apparatus Development Laboratory)  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), at the Savannah River Site is processing and immobilizing the radioactive high level waste sludge slurry at SRS into a durable borosilicate glass for final geological disposal. Each time a new batch of radioactive sludge is to be processed by the DWPF, the process flow sheet is to be tested and demonstrated to ensure an acceptable melter feed and glass can be made. These demonstrations are completed in the Shielded Cells Facility in the Savannah River National Laboratory at SRS.

DOBOS, JAMES

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laboratories, the laboratories responsible for the development, testing, and production of specialized nonnuclear components. Laboratories: The NNSA Sandia National...

242

Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory geothermal energy program. A status report on the development of the Total-Flow concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology development activities of the Geothermal Energy Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are summarized. Significant progress toward development of the Total-Flow concept was made during FY 1978. The results show that the original goal of 70% engine efficiency for the Total-Flow impulse turbine is achievable, that a Total-Flow system is competitive economically with conventional systems, and that the Total-Flow concept offers the benefit of more efficient utilization of geothermal resources for electric power production. The evaluation of several liquid expanders designed for low-temperature (including geopressured) resources suggests that if development were continued, these expanders could be used in combination with conventional systems to increase overall system efficiency. Although the program was terminated before complete field testing of prototype systems could be carried out, the concepts have been adopted in other countries (Japan and Mexico), where development is continuing.

Austin, A.L.; Lundberg, A.W.

1978-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

245

Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 2: Operation and Control of a Two-Inverter Microgrid  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the second year of a three-year project to develop control software for microsource distributed generation systems. In this phase, a laboratory-scale microgrid was expanded to include: (1) Two emulated distributed resources; (2) Static switchgear to allow rapid disconnection and reconnection; (3) Electronic synchronizing circuitry to enable transient-free grid interconnection; (4) Control software for dynamically varying the frequency and voltage controller structures; and (5) Power measurement instrumentation for capturing transient waveforms at the interconnect during switching events.

Illindala, M. S.; Piagi, P.; Zhang, H.; Venkataramanan, G.; Lasseter, R. H.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Final report for the virtual channel encryptor laboratory directed research and development project  

SciTech Connect

A workstation with a single physical connection to a data communications network may have a requirement for simultaneous `virtual` communication channels to more than one destination. This report describes the development of techniques based on the Data Encryption Standard (DES) which encrypt these virtual channels to secure the data being transmitted against unauthorized access. A software module has been developed for the UNIX operating system using these techniques for encryption, and some development has also been done on a hardware device to be included between the workstation and network which can also provide these functions. The material presented in this report will be useful to those with a need to protect information in data communications systems from unauthorized access.

Gibson, D.J.; Sarfaty, R.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 December 7, 2011 page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Dimensional X-ray Spectroscopy and Coherent Diffractive Imaging 332 Benedetti Novel Laser-plasma Storage Ring in a Protein Matrix 206 Haxton The End Station: Developing New Nuclear and Computer Science Techniques for Hot and Rapid Assembly of New Biological Function 336 Jansson,C CYANOALKANES: Engineering Cyanobacteria

248

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cold Crucible Induction Melter Technology: Results of Laboratory Directed Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a review of cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology and presents summaries of alternatives and design issues associated with major system components. The objective in this report is to provide background systems level information relating to development and application of cold crucible induction-heated melter technology for radiological waste processing. Included is a detailed description of the bench-top melter system at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute currently being used for characterization testing

Gombert, Dirk; Richardson, John Grant

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia National Laboratories: Best Management Practice, Case Study #13 - Other Water Use (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of alternative financing mechanisms avaiable to Federal agencies to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NREL Demonstrates Game-Changing Air Conditioner Technology (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of DEVAP prototype validates modeled Testing of DEVAP prototype validates modeled predictions of 40% to 85% energy savings. Researchers in the NREL Buildings group are moving the award-winning desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air conditioning technol- ogy further toward commercialization by demonstrating that its energy-saving perfor- mance matches closely with thermodynamic model predictions. Industry partners Synapse Product Development and AIL Research built two prototypes of DEVAP based on NREL's design and modeling, which were tested in NREL's Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory. Experiments added confidence to the predicted energy savings of 40% in humid climates and 85% in dry climates, empowering the model as a tool for developing marketable designs, and illustrating the potential of DEVAP to transform

252

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Final Report Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 2 Acknowledgments Thanks to Don Sheaffer, Department 8120, Mark Powell, Department 9611, and Marcey Abate, Department 12323, for their contributions to this final report. Thanks to Tony Bryce, and Dennis Clingan, Department 1484, Phil Skogmo, Department 2645, and Charles Steinhaus, Department 8240, for their assistance in writing this report. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 3 Contents 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................

Naomi Christensen Precision; Naomi G. Christensen; Lane D. Harwell; Andrew Hazelton

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved. These were: 1) homogenization of the cottonseed oil-IPA miscella with caustic solution; 2) centrifugation; 3) separation of miscella layers; 4) desolventization, 5) water washing and drying; and 6) bleaching. In neutralization, the miscella was mixed with 20 Be' caustic solution (50% excess) by using a Sonolator for 15 times. The refined oils from both the bottom and top layers were water washed using 12.5% and 20% (w/w) hot water, respectively. The water washing efficiently recovered the oil from the top layer miscella and reduced the soap and phosphorus content. The water washed and dried oils from the bottom and top layers were treated with 0.5% and 4% (w/w) acid activated bleaching clay, respectively. Good quality refined and bleached oil was obtained. However, the quality of the bleached oil produced from bottom layer was better than that from the top layer. Comparative experiments with both IPA and hexane systems showed that the new refining process developed in this study could produce a higher quality refined oil from the cottonseed oil-IPA miscella than from the cottonseed oil-hexane miscella.

Chau, Chi-Fai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond monitoring and mapping. The potential uses, within the nuclear sector alone, are both numerous and significant in terms of the proceeding effort to clean up the UK's nuclear waste legacy.

Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

256

Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development of laboratory studies on the off-gassing of wood pellets  

SciTech Connect

In the present study three sealed containers (304.8 mm inside diameter and 609.6 mm height) were developed to investigate the concentration of off-gases accumulated in the headspace as well as changes in some of the physical properties of wood pellets during storage. Pellets occupied 75% of the container volume leaving 25% headspace. The outside wall of the steel containers was wrapped with electric heating tapes and fiber glass insulation. The storage studies were carried out at room temperature of about 22 degrees C and at elevated temperatures of 30, 40 and 50 degrees C. The off-gases were collected and analyzed using micro gas chromatography. The accumulations of CO (5000 ppmv) and CO2 (10000 ppmv) were relatively high at room temperature of about 22 degrees C for a storage period of 24 days. These accumulations increased sharply at storage temperatures greather than 30 degrees C. At 50 degrees C, the maximum measured concentration of CO, CO2 and CH4 was about17,000, 70,000 and 3,000 ppmv, respectively. Storage temperature had a significanteffect (PB0.01) on all of the pellet properties, including pellet durability, which dropped by about 20% at the end of 60 days of storage.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Xingya Kuang; Shahab Sokhansanj; C. Jim Lim; Tony Bi; Staffan Melin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

SUMMARY REPORT, 1954-1959 RAW MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS AND GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the research work performed by the National Lead Company on the recovery of U from its ores is presented. A bibliography is presented which includes all reports on raw materials published by National Lead Company through Dec. 1958. Also included is a list of complete publications on raw materials from 1944 to 1954. (W.L.H.) low conditions at room temperature. Emphasis was placed on the effect of reaction parameters and mercury-recovery techniques on the Hg/sup 202/ content of the solid calomel formed in the reaction. For pure hydrogen chloride the Hg/sup 202/ content of the Calomel was found to be 39.9 plus or minus 0.3%, compared to the natural abundance of 29.8%. With 20 to 40 mole% of butadiene-1,3 in the hydrogen chloride, calomels containing 83 to 84% of Hg/sup 202/ were consistently obtained. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was found to increase markedly when unsaturated hydrocarbons were added to the hydrogen chloride stream. The addends studied included butadiene - 1,3, benzene, isoprene, acetylene, propylene, and ethylene in order of decreasing effectiveness. From steady-state calculations the effectiveness of the addend can be shown to be determined by the rate ratio, k/sub 8// k/sub 4/. For the maximally enriching mixture of hydrogen chloride and butadiene, the effect of variations in lamp temperature and reaction pressure was studied. At lamp temperatures exceeding approximately 35 deg 'C, reduced enrichments were obtained owing to emission-line broadening. A progressive reduction in enrichment was also observed with substrate pressures greater than 25 mm, owing presumably to Lorentz-broadening of the hyperfine absorption contours of the Hg/sup N/ in the reaction cell. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was determined by resonance radiation absorbiometry. The apparent Hg/sup 202/ abundances of the mercury recovered from the calomel product were found to depend strongly on the method used for isolating the enriched mercury from the calomel. Evidence was obtained for the occurrence of isotopically degradative exchange reactions during the recovery process. A recovery technique was developed which appeared to eliminate this exchange degradation. (auth)

Beverly, R.G. ed.

1959-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New test facility will be used to accelerate the New test facility will be used to accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation wind energy technologies. This fall, the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will open a new dynamometer test facility. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the new facility will offer wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests on the mechanical and electrical power producing systems of a wind turbine including generators, gearboxes, power converters, bearings, brakes, lubrication, cooling, and control systems. Dynamometers enable industry and testing agencies to verify the performance and reliability

262

NREL Identifies Investments for Wind Turbine Drivetrain Technologies (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

examines current U.S. manufacturing and supply examines current U.S. manufacturing and supply chain capabilities for advanced wind turbine drivetrain technologies. Innovative technologies are helping boost the capacity and operating reliability of conventional wind turbine drivetrains. With the proper manufacturing and supply chain capabilities in place, the United States can better develop and deploy these advanced technologies- increasing the competitiveness of the U.S. wind industry and reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers conducted a study for the U.S. Department of Energy to assess the state of the nation's manufacturing and supply chain capabilities for advanced wind turbine drivetrain technologies. The findings helped determine the

263

NREL Tests Dehumidifiers, Defines Simplified Simulation Model (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential dehumidifiers residential dehumidifiers results in practical performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools. Dehumidifiers remove moisture from a home's indoor environment, thereby increasing occupant comfort, improving air quality, and reducing the likelihood of mold, rot, and dust mites. To help energy professionals more easily evaluate this technology for the market, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers tested the efficiency and capacity of a variety of dehumidifiers and developed a generalized approach to simulate any residential dehumidifier. The test results and modeling method are documented in a new report. Typically, dehumidifiers are only rated at a single temperature and humidity, so rating data alone cannot determine whether a product will meet the moisture removal

264

Improving Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools that calculate optimal packages of efficiency measures. To improve the accuracy of energy analysis for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting errors in building energy audit software and calibration procedures. BESTEST-EX consists of building physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which soft-

265

New Pathway Developed to Silicon Quantum Dot Devices (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers create a way to prepare doped nanocrystal Researchers create a way to prepare doped nanocrystal solutions for solar thin films that are nontoxic and less expensive than heavy metal-based thin films. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Minnesota have developed a method for preparing doped colloids (solutions) of silicon nanocrystals (NCs) as potential nontoxic infrared-absorbing and -emitting alternatives to metal chalcogenide quantum dots. Significant progress in the methods for preparing thin films of semiconductor NCs has recently led to very promising results in which metal chalcogenide (cadmium selenide, lead sulfide, etc.) NC thin films are used as the photoactive layer in solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and related technologies.

266

Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

Greenfield, Bryce A.

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

A review of vacuum insulation research and development in the Building Materials Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the development work on flat-vacuum insulation performed by the Building Materials Group (BMG) in the Metals and Ceramics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the last two years. A historical review of the technology of vacuum insulation is presented, and the role that ORNL played in this development is documented. The ORNL work in vacuum insulation has been concentrated in Powder-filled Evacuated Panels (PEPs) that have a thermal resistivity over 2.5 times that of insulating foams and seven times that of many batt-type insulations, such as fiberglass. Experimental results of substituting PEPs for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foal insulation in Igloo Corporation ice coolers are summarized. This work demonstrated that one-dimensional (1D) heat flow models overestimated the increase in thermal insulation of a foam/PEP-composite insulation, but three-dimensional (3D) models provided by a finite-difference, heat-transfer code (HEATING-7) accurately predicted the resistance of the composites. Edges and corners of the ice coolers were shown to cause the errors in the 1D models as well as shunting of the heat through the foam and around the PEPs. The area of coverage of a PEP in a foam/PEP composite is established as an important parameter in maximizing the resistance of such composites. 50 refs., 27 figs,. 22 tabs.

Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.; Childs, K.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Graduate Research Assistant Program for Professional Development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southeast is a highly suitable environment for establishing a series of nuclear safety, security and safeguards 'professional development' courses. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides expertise in the research component of these subjects while the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex handles safeguards/security and safety applications. Several universities (i.e., University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), North Carolina State University, University of Michigan, and Georgia Technology Institute) in the region, which offer nuclear engineering and public policy administration programs, and the Howard Baker Center for Public Policy make this an ideal environment for learning. More recently, the Institute for Nuclear Security (INS) was established between ORNL, Y-12, UTK and Oak Ridge Associate Universities (ORAU), with a focus on five principal areas. These areas include policy, law, and diplomacy; education and training; science and technology; operational and intelligence capability building; and real-world missions and applications. This is a new approach that includes professional development within the graduate research assistant program addressing global needs in nuclear security, safety and safeguards.

Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Shelander Jr, Bruce R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Laboratory Coordinating Council  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's network of DOE Laboratories and Facilities hold an extensive store of research and development expertise and unique equipment developed for their various missions. The Laboratory Coordinating Council (LCC) gives US industry access to a ``virtual'' laboratory that can be tailored to meet the specific requirements of almost any research project. Established in 1995, the LCC responds to the major process industries' R and D needs with the capabilities of 16 DOE Laboratories and Facilities.

Chum, H.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of ...

272

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

273

Porous Diblock Copolymer Thin Films in High-Performance Semiconductor Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The engine fueling more than 40 years of performance improvements in semiconductor integrated circuits (ICs) has been industry's ability to pattern circuit elements at ever-higher resolution and with ever-greater precision. Steady advances in photolithography - the process wherein ultraviolet light chemically changes a photosensitive polymer resist material in order to create a latent image - have resulted in scaling of minimum printed feature sizes from tens of microns during the 1980s to sub-50 nanometer transistor gate lengths in today's state-of-the-art ICs. The history of semiconductor technology scaling as well as future technology requirements is documented in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). The progression of the semiconductor industry to the realm of nanometer-scale sizes has brought enormous challenges to device and circuit fabrication, rendering performance improvements by conventional scaling alone increasingly difficult. Most often this discussion is couched in terms of field effect transistor (FET) feature sizes such as the gate length or gate oxide thickness, however these challenges extend to many other aspects of the IC, including interconnect dimensions and pitch, device packing density, power consumption, and heat dissipation. The ITRS Technology Roadmap forecasts a difficult set of scientific and engineering challenges with no presently-known solutions. The primary focus of this chapter is the research performed at IBM on diblock copolymer films composed of polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) (PS-b-PMMA) with total molecular weights M{sub n} in the range of {approx}60K (g/mol) and polydispersities (PD) of {approx}1.1. These materials self assemble to form patterns having feature sizes in the range of 15-20nm. PS-b-PMMA was selected as a self-assembling patterning material due to its compatibility with the semiconductor microelectronics manufacturing infrastructure, as well as the significant body of existing research on understanding its material properties.

Black, C.T.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10{sup 8} rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10{sup 9} rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology.

Winokur, P.S.; Lum, G.K.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Scott, L.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of Idaho National Laboratory Reseach and Development at a Science and Technology Campus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATION AND EXPANSION OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AT A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: DOE prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of the Idaho National Laboratory Research and Development at a Science and Technology Campus (STC) (DOEIEA-1555). The proposed action consists of consolidating and expanding existing laboratory and business capabilities and operations within a single geographic area, or central campus. The proposed action would accommodate anticipated program growth while allowing for the consolidation of various activities located in the Idaho

276

DOE/EA-1083; Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 April 1997 Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR A NEW SILT/CLAY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND USE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing its current silt/clay source and opening as many as three new sources with volumes sufficient to support potential Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) projects through 2005. The current source, Spreading Area B

277

The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Argonne National Laboratory - Office of Technology Transfer  

argonne national laboratory's office of technology transfer offers licensable technologies developed at the Laboratory and oversees other agreements with research ...

279

Laboratory Reagents  

SciTech Connect

Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

CARLSON, D.D.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

New Modeling Tool Analyzes Floating Platform Concepts for Offshore Wind Turbines (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a new complex modeling and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze land-based wind turbines with the comprehensive hydrodynamic computer programs developed for offshore oil and gas industries. This new coupled dynamic simulation tool will enable the development of cost-effective offshore technologies capable of harvesting the rich offshore wind resources at water depths that cannot be reached using the current technology. Currently, most offshore wind turbines are installed in shallow water, less than 30 meters deep, on bottom-mounted substructures. But these substructures are not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Argonne Tribology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory CemeCon coating chamber CemeCon coating chamber Engineers in Argonne's Tribology Laboratory conduct research on advanced tribological systems (surface engineered materials, lubricants, fuels, and fuel/lubricant additives) for use in aggressive environments (for example, where two surfaces are rubbing together). The Laboratory is equipped with a full range of coating development, friction and wear testing, and characterization facilities. Evaluation of Coatings and Systems The Tribology Laboratory evaluates high performance coatings primarily intended to protect engine-component surfaces that undergo sliding and rolling contact in advanced transportation systems. Also tested are systems powered by diesel and gasoline engines, as well as

282

Virtual Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. OpenLabs: Promoting Clean Energy Development Through Access to Tools, Data, and Expertise Across U.S. National Laboratories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

To assist in global access to cutting-edge clean energy analysis tools, databases, and other resources, the U.S. government has established the U.S. OpenLabs Web site. OpenLabs provides access to a broad array of resources across the U.S. national laboratory network organized to answer specific technical needs and questions related to clean energy development and deployment.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NREL Solves Residential Window Air Conditioner Performance Limitations (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 Denver West Parkway 13 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 | www.nrel.gov Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Comprehensive performance tests lead to enhanced modeling capability and affordable methods to increase energy efficiency. Window air conditioners are inexpensive, portable, and can be installed by home occupants, making them a good solution for supplemental cooling, for installing air conditioning into homes that lack ductwork, and for renters. As a result, 7.5 million window air conditioners are purchased each year in the United States-more than all other home cooling equipment

287

Safeguards Laboratory (SL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards Laboratory Safeguards Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Safeguards Laboratory is a Department of Energy user facility equipped with a comprehensive set of field-deployable instrumentation for safeguards system development and personnel training. Mock-ups using industrial equipment and reference nuclear materials simulate real-world conditions for training, testing, and evaluations. The lab's openness and availability to the private sector enable development of new technologies that combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Applications Training and International Outreach Nondestructive Analysis Measurements Instrument Evaluations Integrated Safeguards Methodologies Measurement Technique Development Specifications Gamma and X-ray detection systems Handheld survey instruments

288

Vehicle Research Laboratory - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Laboratory Expertise The overall FEERC team has been developed to encompass the many disciplines necessary for world-class fuels, engines, and emissions-related research, with experimental, analytical, and modeling capabilities. Staff members specialize in areas including combustion and thermodynamics, emissions measurements, analytical chemistry, catalysis, sensors and diagnostics, dynamometer cell operations, engine controls and control theory. FEERC engineers have many years of experience in vehicle research, chassis laboratory development and operation, and have developed specialized systems and methods for vehicle R&D. Selected Vehicle Research Topics In-use investigation of Lean NOx Traps (LNTs). Vehicle fuel economy features such as lean operation GDI engines,

289

Development of high temperature secondary Li-Al/FeS/sub x/ batteries at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general introduction to the battery program is given first. Subsequent sections discuss cell development, results of cell testing, and materials and component development - electrical feedthrough, electrode separators, materials for current collectors, and post-test cell examination (cell failure mechanisms, copper deposition in electrode separators, lithium gradient in negative electrodes). The Mark IA battery developed a short circuit in one of the modules that resulted in complete failure of the module; the other module was unaffected. 10 tables. (RWR)

Battles, J.E.; Gay, E.C.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Barney, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)...

291

Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D. [eds.] [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Breckenridge, R.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A legacy of the ""megagoule committee,"" thirty years of explosive pulsed power research and development at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, Los Alamos formed the 'Megajoule Committee' with the expressed goal of developing a one Megajoule plasma radiation source. The ensuing research and development has given rise to a wide variety of high explosive pulsed power accomplishments, and there is a continuous stream of work that continues to the present. A variety of flux compression generators (FCGs or generators) have been designed and tested, and a number of pulse shortening schemes have been investigated. Supporting computational tools have been developed in parallel with experiments. No fewer that six unique systems have been developed and used for experiments. This paper attempts to pull together the technical details, achievements, and wisdom amassed during the intervening thirty years, and notes how we would push for increased performance in the future.

Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, D. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, P. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

Ramsey, James L., Jr. (.,; .); Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of Washington, D.C. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program:

295

Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic development in Northern New Mexico focus of new podcast from Los Alamos National Laboratory November 25, 2013 Podcast part of Lab's new multi-channel effort to better...

296

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming Introduction Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state. Modeling Inputs New infrastructure projects considered in this analysis would be developed for the purpose of exporting Wyoming wind and natural gas

297

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Limit LIWG Line Implementation Working Group MDL Microelectronics Development Laboratory MOU Memorandum of Understanding mrem Millirem MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet NCAR...

298

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health FY Fiscal Year HAD Hazards Assessment Document ISM Integrated Safety Management KAFB Kirtland Air Force Base MDL Microelectronics Development Laboratory NNSA...

299

Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THREE SITE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS AT THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN SITE July 2007 U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y G o l d e n F i e l d O f f i c e N a t i o n a l R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y L a b o r a t o r y 1 6 1 7 C o l e B o u l e v a r d G o l d e n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 4 0 1 DOE/EA-1573 Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind Until now, wind turbine controls that reduce the impacts of wind gusts and turbulence were always reactive-responding to the wind rather than anticipating it. But with today's laser-based sensors and new controls developed by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their industry partners, the wind speed can be measured ahead of the turbine, thereby improving performance, reducing structural loads, and increasing energy capture. The world's first field tests of these controls are currently underway at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL. As utility-scale wind turbines become more sophisticated, their components become bigger,

302

Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

303-275-4311 Manufacturing Laboratory The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will...

303

National Laboratories - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

304

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sandia Laboratories energy programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As one of the multiprogram laboratories of the Energy Research and Development Administration, Sandia Laboratories applies its resources to a number of nationally important programs. About 75 percent of these resources are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons--the principal responsibility of the Laboratories. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those requiring resources that are also used in nuclear weapon and other national security programs. Examples of such energy programs and activities are research into nuclear fusion, protection of nuclear materials from theft or diversion, and the disposal of radioactive waste. A number of technologies and disciplines developed for the weapon program are immediately applicable for the development of various energy sources. Instruments developed to detect, measure, and record the detonation of nuclear devices underground, now being used to support the development of in-situ processing of coal and oil shale, are examples. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of these and other energy programs being conducted by these laboratories in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. Energy programs are undertaken when they require capabilities used at the Laboratories for the weapon program, and when they have no adverse effect upon that primary mission. The parallel operation of weapon and energy activities allows optimum use of facilities and other resources.

Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.; Gillespie, R.S. (eds.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gas sensor technology at Sandia National Laboratories: Catalytic gate, Surface Acoustic Wave and Fiber Optic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia`s gas sensor program encompasses three separate electronic platforms: Acoustic Wave Devices, Fiber Optic Sensors and sensors based on silicon microelectronic devices. A review of most of these activities was presented recently in a article in Science under the title ``Chemical Microsensors.`` The focus of the program has been on understanding and developing the chemical sensor coatings that are necessary for using these electronic platforms as effective chemical sensors.

Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Jenkins, M.W.; Rodriguez, J.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Waste-form development for conversion to portland cement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process used at TA-55 to cement transuranic (TRU) waste has experienced several problems with the gypsum-based cement currently being used. Specifically, the waste form could not reliably pass the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) prohibition for free liquid and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) standard for chromium. This report describes the project to develop a portland cement-based waste form that ensures compliance to these standards, as well as other performance standards consisting of homogeneous mixing, moderate hydration temperature, timely initial set, and structural durability. Testing was conducted using the two most common waste streams requiring cementation as of February 1994, lean residue (LR)- and oxalate filtrate (OX)-based evaporator bottoms (EV). A formulation with a pH of 10.3 to 12.1 and a minimum cement-to-liquid (C/L) ratio of 0.80 kg/l for OX-based EV and 0.94 kg/L for LR-based EV was found to pass the performance standards chosen for this project. The implementation of the portland process should result in a yearly cost savings for raw materials of approximately $27,000 over the gypsum process.

Veazey, G.W.; Schake, A.R.; Shalek, P.D.; Romero, D.A.; Smith, C.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Current Projects with the Russian Federation Project Title: Development of Models of Energy Transfer in Nanostructured Materials. Russian Institute: Institute for Problems in Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPME RAS), St. Petersburg. Brief Description: To develop modeling approaches and simulations to examine energy transport and transfer in materials with structural features at the nanoscale. Tasks include developing such a model for thin crystal structures subjected to short duration laser excitation, and using atomic-scale simulations to evaluate microscopic expressions for stress and heat flux in crystals containing defects such as vacancies, dislocations and bi-material interfaces.

310

Mark Peters | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Core Capabilities Leadership Message from the Director Board of Governors Organization Chart Argonne Distinguished Fellows Emeritus Scientists & Engineers History Discoveries Prime Contract Contact Us Mark Peters, Deputy Lab Director for Programs Mark Peters Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs Dr. Mark Peters is the Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs at Argonne National Laboratory. He is responsible for the management and integration of the Laboratory's science and technology portfolio, strategic planning, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and technology transfer. Dr. Peters also serves as a senior advisor to the Department of Energy on nuclear energy technologies and research and development programs, and nuclear waste policy.

311

NRELs Wind Powering America Team Helps Indiana Develop Wind Resources (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Wind Powering NREL's Wind Powering America Team Helps Indiana Develop Wind Resources How does a state advance, in just five years, from having no wind power to having more than 1000 megawatts (MW) of installed capacity? The Wind Powering America (WPA) initiative, based at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), employs a state-focused approach that has helped accelerate wind energy deployment in many states. One such state is Indiana, which is now home to the largest wind plant east of the Mississippi. Since 1999, WPA has helped advance technology acceptance and wind energy deployment across the United States through the formation of state wind working groups (WWGs). The WWGs facilitate workshops, manage anemometer loan programs, conduct outreach, and

312

NREL Technical Reports Guide the Way to 50% Energy Savings in Hospitals, Office Buildings (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing technologies, designers and operators of large existing technologies, designers and operators of large buildings could slash national energy use across a broad range of climates. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed two technical reports that provide recommendations to help designers and opera- tors of large office buildings and hospitals achieve at least a 50% energy savings using existing technology. Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings found that a 50% energy savings can be realized in both low- and high-rise office buildings in a broad range of U.S. climates. Large Hospital 50% Energy Savings details how energy savings from 50.6% to 61.3% can be attained in large hospitals across all eight U.S. climate zones. To reach these energy efficiency

313

Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

Cal Ozaki

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solar Control Thin Films Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sputtering equipment Solar Control Thin Films Laboratory The Solar Control Thin Films lab develops novel thin film coatings, deposition technologies, and device systems for...

315

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(SRNL) have developed the expertise necessary to be the premier laboratory for tritium processing and its relation to new reservoir design. SRNL is the bridge between the...

316

Biology Department - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burr Brookhaven National Laboratory From: Frances 4676- 93005, Ben 10176-32905 Past BNL Research Interests We have developed two recombinant inbred families to facilitate...

317

Biology Department - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Van't Hof Brookhaven National Laboratory From: 1962-1999 Research Interests The cell biology and cytogenetics of higher plants; specifically the development of commercial fiber in...

318

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL-SA-34741 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is addressing cognition and learning to the development of student- centered, scenario-based training. PNNL's Pachelbel (PNNL) has developed a cognitive-based, student-centered approach to training that is being applied

319

Development of a Laboratory Verified Single-Duct VAV System Model with Fan Powered Terminal Units Optimized Using Computational Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Duct Variable Air Volume (SDVAV) systems use series and parallel Fan Powered Terminal Units to control the air flow in conditioned spaces. This research developed a laboratory verified model of SDVAV systems that used series and parallel fan terminal units where the fan speeds were controlled by either Silicon Controlled Rectifiers (SCR) or Electronically Commutated Motors (ECM) motors. As part of the research, the model was used to compare the performance of the systems and to predict the harmonics generated by ECM systems. All research objectives were achieved. The CFD model, which was verified with laboratory measurements, showed the potential to identify opportunities for improvement in the design of the FPTU and accurately predicted the static pressure drop as air passed through the unit over the full operating range of the FPTU. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of typical a FPTU were developed and used to investigate opportunities for optimizing the design of FPTUs. The CFD model identified key parameters required to conduct numerical simulations of FPTU and some of the internal components used to manufacture the units. One key internal component was a porous baffle used to enhance mixing when primary air and induced air entered the mixing chamber. The CFD analysis showed that a pressure-drop based on face velocity model could be used to accurately predict the performance of the FPTU. The SDVAV simulation results showed that parallel FPTUs used less energy overall than series systems that used SCR motors as long as primary air leakage was not considered. Simulation results also showed that series ECM FPTUs used about the same amount of energy, within 3 percent, of parallel FPTU even when leakage was not considered. A leakage rate of 10 percent was enough to reduce the performance of the parallel FPTU to the level of the series SCR system and the series ECM FPTUs outperformed the parallel FPTUs at all weather locations used in the study.

Davis, Michael A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, Jan. 3, 2013-In commemoration of its 70th anniversary, Los Alamos National Laboratory kicks off a yearlong lecture series on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 p.m. with a presentation about homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos. - 2 - The inaugural lecture is based on a book by local writers Dorothy Hoard, Judy Machen and Ellen McGehee about the area's settlement between 1887 and 1942. On hikes across the Pajarito Plateau, Hoard envisioned the Los Alamos area before modern roads and bridges made transportation much easier. The trails she walked

323

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

324

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Idaho National Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Department of Energy National Laboratories. Laboratory or Facility Website ...

325

Process development for the fabrication of light emitting vacuum field emission triodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to be widely accepted by industry, the field of vacuum microelectronics is in need of a highly manufacturable and integrable device. A vacuum diode meeting these requirements has been developed at Texas A&M University by Weichold, et al. Legg has extended the diode structure by designing a vacuum triode. This work deals with development of a process for fabricating the triode structure using current microelectronic processing techniques. Subsequently, triodes are fabricated for testing. Light emitting diodes and triodes are also fabricated to address the feasibility of their application to flat panel displays.

Williams, Roger T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on recent decisions made by Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning the development of site-wide National Environmental Policy Act documents, an effort was undertaken to develop a Pilot Safety Information Document (PSID) for the replacement Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. The PSID documents risk analysis for the proposed facility and some of the alternatives, accident analysis, radioactive and hazardous material doses to off-site individuals, and the cumulative safety risk from adjacent facilities. In addition, this study also compared two methods for calculating the consequences of a radioactive spill. The methods compared were the Superfund model and the release fraction model. It was determined that the release fraction model gives a more realistic estimate of the doses incurred as the result of an accident, and that the Superfund model should be used for estimating the dose before and during the remediation effort. The cumulative safety risk was determined by calculating the exceedance probability if the individual dose from four geographically related facilities. The risk for cancer fatalities was determined to be within the DOE's Nuclear Safety Policy Goals.

Selvage, Ronald Derek

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Laboratory Partnering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Partnering Laboratory Partnering Laboratory Partnering The Department of Energy operates multiple laboratories and facilities that conduct Technology Transfer through partnerships with industry, universities and non-profit organizations. Technology transfer involves deployment of newly generated technology intended for commercial deployment, and making unique resources in the form of collaborations with laboratory staff and unique equipment available for use by third parties. Technology transfer is done through a variety of legal instruments from technical assistance agreements to solve a specific problem, user agreements, licensing of patents and software, exchange of personnel, work for others agreements and cooperative research and development agreements. The most appropriate mechanism will depend on the objective of each

329

Estimation of hydraulic properties and development of a layered conceptual model for the Snake River plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho INEL Oversight Program, in association with the University of Idaho, Idaho Geological Survey, Boise State University, and Idaho State University, developed a research program to determine the hydraulic properties of the Snake River Plain aquifer and characterize the vertical distribution of contaminants. A straddle-packer was deployed in four observation wells near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Pressure transducers mounted in the straddle-packer assembly were used to monitor the response of the Snake River Plain aquifer to pumping at the ICPP production wells, located 2600 to 4200 feet from the observation wells. The time-drawdown data from these tests were used to evaluate various conceptual models of the aquifer. Aquifer properties were estimated by matching time-drawdown data to type curves for partially penetrating wells in an unconfined aquifer. This approach assumes a homogeneous and isotropic aquifer. The hydraulic properties of the aquifer obtained from the type curve analyses were: (1) Storativity = 3 x 10{sup -5}, (2) Specific Yield = 0.01, (3) Transmissivity = 740 ft{sup 2}/min, (4) Anisotropy (Kv:Kh)= 1:360.

Frederick, D.B.; Johnson, G.S.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Technology ...  

R&D 100 Awards; International Programs; Laboratory Directed Research & Development; Technology Deployment Centers; Working With Sandia. PROCUREMENT; Opportunities;

331

Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Procurement ...  

R&D 100 Awards; International Programs; Laboratory Directed Research & Development; Technology Deployment Centers; Working With Sandia. PROCUREMENT; Opportunities;

332

Sandia National Laboratories : Licensing/Technology Transfer ...  

Technology Summary Sandia National Laboratories has developed a new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms. Description. These mechanisms utilize floating pivot ...

333

NIST: Physical Measurement Laboratory - William R. Ott  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... space experiments, from the first Skylab measurements of solar radiation to ... the Physics Laboratory's development of measurement methods and ...

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Argonne TDC: Ceramicrete - Argonne National Laboratory  

Ceramicrete: Chemically Bonded Ceramic. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a novel, versatile phosphate ceramic, called Ceramicrete, with many different ...

335

Historical Photographs: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory [Small Image] 1. A whole body counter (circa 1964) at the Berkeley Donner Laboratory. Such counters were used in human radiation tracer studies and for measuring AEC worker radiation exposure. (294Kbytes) [Small Image] 2. Early treatment for Parkinson's disease at the Berkeley Donner Laboratory (134Kbytes) [Small Image] 3. Donner Laboratory carbon-14 metabolic study apparatus (146Kbytes) [Small Image] 4. Respiration analysis using injected radioactive tracers at Donner Laboratory (circa 1968). (217Kbytes) [Small Image] 5. A patient under a positron camera. The camera was a diagnostic tool developed at Donner Laboratory, Berkeley, to photograph radioactive tracer concentrations. Unlike a whole body scanner, this device photographs a single, specific area of the body. (146Kbytes)

336

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

engineering laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will serve as a testbed for new home-scale energy technologies. ... used to develop models to better predict energy output of ... Green Technology and ...

2013-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microelectronics Manufacturing Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... But the manufacturing infrastructure is aging. ... to create an integrated infrastructure for manufacturing ... will enhance the value and utility of portable ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

General Issues in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013... of Industrial Technology; 3Korea Institute of Industrial Technology; ... a reductive atmosphere (200°C, H2 / N2 atmosphere) in a reflow oven.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Microelectronics Manufacturing Infrastructure (MMI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MMI) 1998 Focused Program Paper Supplemental Information for ... of the various industry white papers submitted to ... By using light sources from ever ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) You are here: DOE-ID Home > Inside ID > Brief History Site History The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), an 890-square-mile section of desert in southeast Idaho, was established in 1949 as the National Reactor Testing Station. Initially, the missions at the INL were the development of civilian and defense nuclear reactor technologies and management of spent nuclear fuel. Fifty-two reactors—most of them first-of-a-kind—were built, including the Navy’s first prototype nuclear propulsion plant. Of the 52 reactors, three remain in operation at the site. In 1951, the INL achieved one of the most significant scientific accomplishments of the century—the first use of nuclear fission to produce a usable quantity of electricity at the Experimental Breeder Reactor No.

343

Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erik Gottschalk (F); Devin Hodge (A); Jeff Chamberlain (A); Brad Ullrick (A); Bill Rainey (J). Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Strategic Laboratory Leadership...

344

Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Illustration of integrated circuit Figure 1. An application-specific integrated circuit being developed for advanced artificial retinas. Click on image to enlarge. Microscale Enablers More advanced artificial retinas are relying on miniaturized electronics for processing incoming images and activating the corresponding electrodes to communicate with retinal cells and ultimately the brain. The goal of these devices, being developed through a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) collaboration, is to continually improve their visual resolution so that implanted individuals eventually will be able to read large print, recognize faces, and move about without aid. Sandia National Laboratories' expertise in the development, fabrication, and production

345

Biotransformation of PCBs in Substation Soils: A Review of Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Testing for the Development of an In Situ Proc ess for PCB Biotransformation in Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ methods are desirable for remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to prevent disruption of activities at industrial sites such as substations. This study follows the development, from laboratory testing through pilot-scale demonstration, of an in situ soil irrigation process for biotransformation of PCBs in soils.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY is....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering June 12-18, 2010 - Argonne National Laboratory June 19-26, 2010 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory...

347

State Laboratory Contacts IL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information IL. Idaho. ... State of Iowa Metrology Laboratory Ellsworth Community College 1100 College Ave. ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Analysis Laboratory Compositional Analysis Laboratory * Provide customized analytical method development for a wide variety of feedstocks and process intermediates * Derive comprehensive biomass analysis results backed by 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry * Write publicly available Laboratory Analytical Procedures, several of which have been adapted by ASTM International and used and referenced worldwide * Provide training classes on biomass analysis and method development to help companies and institutions rapidly improve their analytical results * For analyzing solid samples to measure structural carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, galactose, arabinose, and mannose), lignin, extractable materials, protein, and ash * For analyzing liquid samples to measure oligomeric and monomeric

349

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | July 2011 Aerial View Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | July 2011 Aerial View Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a nuclear weapons design laboratory, LLNL has responsibilities in nuclear stockpile stewardship. LLNL also applies its expertise to prevent the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction and strengthen homeland security. Other areas include advanced defense technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science. Enforcement July 22, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-03 Issued to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC related to Programmatic

350

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.californiasolarcenter.org/history_pv.html http://www.eere.energy.gov/basics/renewable_energy/solar.html http://www.nrel.gov/ncpv/ http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/index.htm http://www.nrel.gov/data/pix/searchpix.html http://www.ases.org/ http://www.seia.org/cs/about_solar_energy and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

Oregon, University of

351

Development of Green Box sensor module technologies for rail applications  

SciTech Connect

Results of a joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work, supported by the New Mexico State Transportation Authority, examines a family of smart sensor products that can be tailored to the specific needs of the user. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. Advances in sensor microelectronics and digital signal processing permit us to produce a class of smart sensors that interpret raw data and transmit inferred information. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and consequence of hazardous materials incidents. The system would be capable of numerous activities including: monitoring cargo integrity, controlling system braking and vehicle acceleration, recognizing component failure conditions, and logging sensor data. A cost-benefit analysis examines the loss of revenue resulting from theft, hazardous materials incidents, and accidents. Customer survey data are combined with the cost benefit analysis and used to guide the product requirements definition for a series of specific applications. A common electrical architecture is developed to support the product line and permit rapid product realization. Results of a concept validation, which used commercial hardware and was conducted on a revenue-generating train, are also reported.

Rey, D.; Breeding, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hogan, J.; Mitchell, J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); McKeen, R.G. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brogan, J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Other National Laboratories - Argonne TDC: Links to DOE ...  

Technology Development and Commercialization : Argonne Home > Technology Development and Commercialization> : Other DOE National Laboratories. Local Sites of Interest

354

Smart Grid Integration Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

Wade Troxell

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to the development of next-generation vehicles. Revolutionary advances in transportation are critical to reducing our nation's petroleum consumption and the environmental impact of our vehicles. Some of the most exciting new vehicle technologies are being ushered along by research conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. Our Transportation Technology R&D Center (TTRDC) brings together scientists and engineers from many disciplines across the laboratory to work with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), automakers and other industrial partners. Our goal is to put new transportation technologies on the road that improve

356

Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

359

Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) technology Researchers John Carlisle (left) and Orlando Auciello (right) are developing an ultrathin biocompatible coating for the device. Creating Diamond Coatings for the Retinal Implant Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) plays a critical role in the success of the electrode implants used in the Artificial Retina Project. That's where researchers Orlando Auciello and colleague John Carlisle are using their patented ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) technology to apply a revolutionary new coating to the retinal prosthetic device. The new packaging promises to provide a very thin, ultrasmooth film that will be far more compact and biocompatible than the bulky materials used to encase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

362

Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Additives for Reducing CO 2 Capture Costs Yang Li Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Lawrence...

363

BATT Fabrication Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientist working in battery lab BATT Fabrication Laboratory The BATT Fab Lab (Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Fabrication Laboratory) conducts battery cell...

364

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY - Energy  

Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June2,2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Accelerating Innovation Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012

365

ARM - Laboratory Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of...

366

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

367

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

368

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

369

Laboratory.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pharmaceutical Industry's Approach Pharmaceutical Industry's Approach to Safe Handling of New Molecular Entities Donna S. Heidel, CIH The findings and conclusions in this presentation have not been formally disseminated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy 2 Pharma IH Process Overview Focus on R&D laboratories * Occupational Health Hazard Characterization - "Default" Health Hazard Band for Discovery labs - Health Hazard Banding for Development labs - Occupational Exposure Limits * Control Selection - Graded approach for engineering controls * Exposure Verification - Applicability to Engineered Nanoparticles 3 Pharma's Philosophy and Rationale for Health Hazard/Control Banding * Possible to group together

370

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Progress in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory program to develop thermochemical processes for hydrogen production. [Oxide-sulfate cycles; sulfuric acid cycles; bromide-sulfate cycles; sulfuric acid-sulfur cycles; hybrid cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Program to develop thermochemical processes for hydrogen production is based on attempts to develop criteria required of an ideal process and to search for types of thermochemical cycles that approximate these criteria. The advantages of reactions with large entropy changes have been demonstrated. The necessity for experimental verification of conceptual cycles has become apparent from the program. This necessity has been stressed in the paper. It should be emphasized that any comparison of conceptual cycles or of engineering or cost analyses must eventually be based on real, rather than assumed, data. (auth)

Bowman, M.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technologies Available for ...  

The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory works with collaborators across the globe to develop fusion as an energy source for the world, ...

373

Budget Office, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directorate. The mission of the Business Development & Analysis Office (formerly the Budget Office) at Brookhaven is to provide the Laboratory an efficient, cost-effective, and...

374

NREL: Advanced Power Electronics - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Key to making hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles practical is the development of low-cost, high-power integrated power electronics devices. The research...

375

2.672 Projects Laboratory, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written ...

Cheng, Wai Kong

376

Ethyl Lactate Solvents - Argonne National Laboratory  

Technology Development and Commemrcialization ETHYL LACTATE SOLVENTS: Low-Cost and Environmentally Friendly Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy

377

Sandia SAR Firsts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Firsts Sandia National Laboratories is proud of its history of developing cutting-edge synthetic aperture radar technologies. Below is a short list detailing Sandia's...

378

Sandia SAR Capabilities -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Sandia National Laboratories offers state-of-the-art capability in the design and development of Synthetic Aperture Radars, from system design through system...

379

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Fund Overview The Seed Money Fund of the ORNL LDRD program supports innovative ideas that have the potential of enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical...

380

About Berkeley Lab: Laboratory Director, Associate Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009, replacing former laboratory Director Steve Chu, who was sworn in as U.S. Energy Secretary. Before becoming interim director, Alivisatos was the deputy director of Berkeley...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging creative research to innovate solutions for our nation's greatest challenges. National laboratories have been entrusted with the role of serving as incubators for...

382

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research determines optimal HVAC system design for research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evalu- ated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air tempera-

383

Second-Use Li-Ion Batteries to Aid Automotive and Utility Industries (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repurposing lithium-ion batteries at the end of useful life Repurposing lithium-ion batteries at the end of useful life in electric drive vehicles could eliminate owners' disposal concerns and offer low-cost energy storage for certain applications. Increasing the number of plug-in electric drive vehicles (PEVs) is one major strategy for reduc- ing the nation's oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, the high up-front cost and end-of-service disposal concerns of their lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries could impede the proliferation of such vehicles. Re-using Li-ion batteries after their useful automotive life has been proposed as a way to remedy both matters. In response, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners are conducting research to identify, assess, and verify profitable

384

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is plasma research using small-scale laboratory experiments, where low-density plasmas are generated

Haviland, David

385

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

386

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

State Laboratory Contacts AC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information AC. Alabama. Mailing Address, ... PDF. Alaska. Mailing Address, Contact Information. Alaska ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Office of Science laboratory National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory Office of Fossil Energy laboratory Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

390

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven ...

391

Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven National Laboratory

393

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Center for Function- al Nanomaterials (CFN) ­ and in part on its and energy technology, the life sciences, Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials nanoscience facilities, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source, Center for Func- tional Nanomaterials

394

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

395

National Laboratories Supporting Building America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Laboratories Supporting Building America National Laboratories Supporting Building America The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories work very closely with the Building America research teams to achieve program goals. The laboratories offer extensive scientific and technical R&D expertise for building technologies and improved building practices. Following is a brief description of the laboratories involved with Building America. Logo for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) performs analysis, research, and development leading to improved energy technologies and reduction of adverse energy-related environmental impacts. EETD conducts research in advanced energy

396

HID Laboratories Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HID Laboratories Inc HID Laboratories Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name HID Laboratories, Inc. Place Menlo Park, California Zip 94025 Product HID Laboratories develops commercial-grade, high intensity lighting products that manage lighting demand and reduce energy use. References HID Laboratories, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. HID Laboratories, Inc. is a company located in Menlo Park, California . References ↑ "HID Laboratories, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=HID_Laboratories_Inc&oldid=346520" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

397

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Research and Development Engineering Research and Development 1997 Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation, 1997, Development of a More Fish-Tolerant Turbine Runner, Advanced Hydropower Turbine Project, ARL Report No. 13-97/M63F, DOE/ID-10571. Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish-tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single-bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of this research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and

398

Efficient Combustion for Renewable FuelsEfficient Combustion for Renewable Fuels Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Collaboration with universities and other national labs · Biofuels development (weeds-to-wheels) · KIVA of Spray Biofuels present technical challenges when used in advanced combustion. Simulation coupled

399

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Workforce Development Oregon Academic Research Facilities Research Expertise Oregon was the first statein the U.S. to install photovoltaics on its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College's (PCC) microelectronics program to develop graduates who specialize in solar cell manufacturing conservation systems and to install photovoltaic and solar domestic hot water systems. LCC offers the nation materials for pin double-heterojunction thin-film solar cells with funding from the National Renewable

Oregon, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

Chadwick, Mark B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Savannah River National Laboratory - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art Top Menu Bar SRNL Update: Embassy Fellows Report A report co-authored by Savannah River National Laboratory Senior Advisory Engineer, Dr. Robert Sindelar, has been released. The report to the Government of Japan - Ministry of the Environment provides observations and recommendations on decontamination work and progress... >>MORE Portable Power Research at SRNL Hadron Technologies, Inc., a microwave technology and systems development and manufacturing company with offices in Tennessee and Colorado, has signed a license for a Hybrid Microwave and Off-Gas Treatment System developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's applied science laboratory located at the Savannah River Site. >>MORE

406

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

407

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Leading Testing Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fax: 86-20-6196-8925 E-Mail: york.li@ledtestlab.com Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Leading Testing Laboratories ... [22/S14] EPA Integral LED Lamps v ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

410

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Chemical Additives for Reducing CO 2 Capture Costs Yang Li Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab at a Glance 13 - Nobel Laureates; 55 - Nobel Laureates trained here; 13 - National Medal of Science members; 900 - University students trained each year; 4,200 - Employees; 202 - Site acreage Bringing Science Solutions to the World Research areas Climate Change and Environmental Sciences Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Energy Biological Sciences for Energy Research and Health Computational Science and Networking Matter and Force in the Universe Soft X-Ray Science for Discovery Project Status * Funding: DOE $ 1,250 K * Project period: 6/1/08 - 5/31/13 * Participants: Ted Chang - PI Participants: Y. Li - Chemist Project Scientist/Engr Participants: C. Y. Liao -

412

State Laboratory Contacts DH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information DH. District of Columbia. ... Lab Closed See State Director's List. No Certificate. Delaware. ...

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

Lisheng Safety Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lisheng Safety Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200882-0. Address and Contact Information: Electronic & Lighting (Xiamen) Co. Ltd. No. ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

State Laboratory Contacts M  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Maine Department of Agriculture Metrology Laboratory Div. QA&R 28 Station House Road Augusta, ME 04333, 333 Cony Rd. ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Price Sound Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price Sound Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200874-0. Address and Contact Information: 638 RALEIGH STREET WINNIPEG ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

417

Engineering Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and InfrastructureDisaster-Resilient Buildings, Infrastructure, and ... of the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. ... Net-Zero Energy Residential Test ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam Plant with Efficient Biomass Cogeneration

419

Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ICE SLURRY PHASE-CHANGE COOLANTS FOR ICE SLURRY PHASE-CHANGE COOLANTS FOR INDUSTRIAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS K. Kasza*, Y. Wu, J. Heine, D. Sheradon, and Steve Lake * Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne Illinois, 60439, USA kasza@anl.gov Abstract Over the last 15 years, interest in using phase-change ice slurry coolants has grown significantly. Because of the high energy content of ice slurry, which is due to the phase change (melting) of the ice particles under a cooling load, the cooling capacity of ice slurry is many times greater than that of single phase fluids. Research is focused on understanding ice slurry behavior and developing highly-loaded, storable, and pumpable ice slurry coolants. Research has shown that the ice slurry must be engineered to have the correct

420

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Blood samples are shipped at room temperature to the laboratory. White blood cells, lymphocytes, are cultured under sterile conditions in an incubator for 48 hours using a standard growth medium. Culture tubes are centrifuged, and cells are re-suspended in a weak salt solution, which allows the chromosomes to separate and spread evenly on slides.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microelectronics development laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Division of Laboratory Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing

422

Technique Reveals Critical Physics in Deep Regions of Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's improved time-resolved photoluminescence NREL's improved time-resolved photoluminescence method measures minority-carrier lifetime deep within photovoltaic samples to help develop more efficient solar cells. When developing a solar photovoltaic (PV) cell, designers benefit from having tools that can characterize bulk properties of samples. For measuring minority-carrier lifetime, analysis tools such as time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) are available. Unfortunately, meth- ods that use above-bandgap laser excitation are dominated by surface effects because of the very strong absorption and very shallow penetration depth of above-bandgap excita- tion. Therefore, the near-surface region of the sample can be examined, but the bulk proper- ties are usually dominated by the effects of the surface.

423

Sandia National Laboratories | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories | July 2009 Aerial View Sandia National Laboratories | July 2009 Aerial View Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) primary mission is to provide scientific and technology support to national security programs. SNL focuses on developing technologies to sustain, modernize, and protect the nuclear arsenal; prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; defend against terrorism; protect the national infrastructure; ensure stable energy and water supplies; and provide new capabilities to the DOD. SNL also performs R&D in science, technology, and engineering programs. Enforcement November 27, 2013 Enforcement Letter, WEL-2013-04 Issued to National Renewable Energy Laboratory related to a drum rupture

424

Laboratories and Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities National Energy Technology Laboratory - The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is the lead field center for the Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program. Scientists at its Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV, campuses conduct onsite research while contract administrators oversee nearly 700 federally-sponsored projects conducted by private sector research partners. The Houston, TX, office is part of the Laboratory's Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil. NETL's Arctic Energy Office in Anchorage, AK, facilitates energy research related to fossil energy resources and remote electrical power generation to address the State of Alaska's unique energy needs. Researchers at NETL-Albany, in

425

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

426

Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 1--Single Inverter in Island Mode Operation: Base Year Report, December 2000 -- November 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the first year of a three-year project to develop control software for micro-source distributed generation systems. The focus of this phase was on internal energy storage requirements, the modification of an off-the-shelf motor drive system inverter to supply utility-grade ac power, and a single inverter system operating in island mode. The report provides a methodology for determining battery energy storage requirements, a method for converting a motor drive inverter into a utility-grade inverter, and typical characteristics and test results of using such an inverter in a complex load environment.

Venkataramanan, G.; Illindala, M. S.; Houle, C.; Lasseter, R. H.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Leadership | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Board of Governors Organization Chart Argonne Distinguished Fellows Emeritus Scientists & Engineers History Discoveries Prime Contract Contact Us Leadership Argonne integrates world-class science, engineering, and user facilities to deliver innovative research and technologies. We create new knowledge that addresses the scientific and societal needs of our nation. Eric D. Isaacs Eric D. Isaacs, Director, Argonne National Laboratory Director, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Eric D. Isaacs, a prominent University of Chicago physicist, is President of UChicago Argonne, LLC, and Director of Argonne National Laboratory. Mark Peters Mark Peters, Deputy Lab Director for Programs Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs

428

SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Photovoltaics National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Diversity in Science and Technology Advances National Clean Energy in Solar Grid Engineering for Accelerated Renewable Energy Deployment

429

SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Concentrating National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage

430

Argonne National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Argonne National Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), November 2011 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of UChicago Argonne, LLC at the Argonne National Laboratory, October 3, 2011 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Argonne National Laboratory, August 2011 Review Reports 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at Argonne National Laboratory, Summary Report, Vol. 1, May, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005

431

Laboratory Computing Resource Center  

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Computing DOE Logo Computing DOE Logo Search BIO ... Search Argonne Home > BIO home > Laboratory Computing Resource Center BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Logo Laboratory Computing Resource Center In 2002 Argonne National Laboratory established the Laboratory Computing Project to enable and promote the use of high-performance computing (HPC) across the Laboratory in support of its varied research missions. The Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) was established, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne’s first teraflops computing cluster, Jazz. In 2010 Jazz was replaced by Fusion, with a peak performance of 30 teraflops (and still growing). We just acquired Blues which will a performance of 100 teraflops.

432

NREL Launches Collaborative Resource for Field Test Best Practices (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

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Dynamic portal documents and shares state-of-the-art Dynamic portal documents and shares state-of-the-art residential field test tools and techniques. Field testing is a science and an art-a tricky process that develops through a lot of trial and error. Researchers in the Advanced Residential Buildings group at the National Renewable Energy Labora- tory (NREL) regularly conduct field experiments and long-term monitoring in occupied and unoc- cupied houses throughout the United States. The goal is to capture real-world performance of energy- efficient systems, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Build- ing America program. In addition to the technical challenges of making accurate field measurements, NREL researchers realized another problem: the vast body of field test know-how based on years of collective experience is currently scattered throughout the

433

Use of Laboratory Drag Measurements in Evaluating Hot-Gas Filtration of Char from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial objective of this study was to better understand the reasons for the substantial increase in filter DP that was observed after the gasifier recycle loop modifications. Beyond this specific objective, a secondary goal was to develop a meaningful method of evaluating the effect of particle size and other particle properties on dustcake drag and filter DP. As mentioned earlier, the effect of particle size on dustcake drag and filter DP can be a very important consideration in the selection and specification of a precleaner cyclone for use upstream of the hot-gas filter. Installing a cyclone ahead of a hot-gas filter will reduce the transient areal loading of dust to the filter, but the beneficial effect of the reduced areal loading may be offset by an increase in drag associated with a finer particle-size distribution. The overall goal of this study was to better understand these tradeoffs and to ultimately develop a procedure that would be useful in analyzing the performance of hot-gas filters and in sizing new hot-gas filters. In addition to the obvious effects of a cyclone on dust loading and particle size, other indirect effects on particulate properties and flow resistance may occur when the cyclone is incorporated into the gasifier recycle loop as was the case at the PSDF. To better understand the importance of these other effects, this study sought to separate the particle-size effect from these other effects by measuring the drag of size-fractionated char samples collected before and after the recycle loop modifications.

Dahlin, R.S.; Landham, E.C.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Betsy Sutherland - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

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Betsy M. Sutherland (Deceased) Brookhaven National Laboratory From: 07/01/1977 - 10/7/2009 Passed Areas of Interest Betsy Sutherland heads the Biology Department's User Support Team for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. The NSRL project, carried out jointly with BNL's Collider-Accelerator and Medical Departments, provides the only source in the US of high energy heavy charged particles, used in assessing the effects of space radiation on biological systems, materials and instruments. The Biology Department NSRL support team consists of eight scientific, professional and administrative staffers. They provide scientific and facilities support to over 200 User groups from all over the world, and collaborate in development and maintenance of the NSRL. Betsy Sutherland also chairs the BNL Scientific Advisory Committee for Radiation Research, advisory to NASA and to the BNL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear and Particle Physics on research at the NSRL.

435

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800șC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

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Systems Process and Systems Process and Components Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds

437

Smart Power Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Smart Power Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. Research at NREL's Smart Power Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the development and integration of smart technologies including the integration of distributed and renewable energy resources through power electronics and smart energy management for building applications. The 5,300 sq. ft. laboratory is designed to be highly flexible and configurable, essential for a large variety of smart power applications that range from developing advanced inverters and power converters to testing residential and commercial scale meters and control technologies. Some application scenarios are: (1) Development of power converters for integration of distributed and renewable energy resources; (2) Development of advanced controls for smart power electronics; (3) Testing prototype and commercially available power converters for electrical interconnection and performance, advanced functionality, long duration reliability and safety; and (4) Hardware-in-loop development and testing of power electronics systems in smart distribution grid models.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z