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1

Photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Lenox, Carl J. S. (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Module/array interface study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. has conducted a study of alternate module, panel, and array designs for use in large scale applications such as central station photovoltaic power plants. The objective of the study is to identify design features that will lead to minimum plant costs. Several aspects of module design are evaluated, including glass superstrate and metal substrate module configurations, the potential for hail damage, light absorption in glass superstrates, the economics of glass selection, and electrical design. Also, three alternate glass superstrate module configurations are evaluated by means of finite element computer analyses. Two panel sizes, 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft) and 2.4 by 4.8 m (8 by 16 ft), are used to support three module sizes, 0.6 by 1.2 m (2 by 4 ft), 1.2 by 1.2 m (4 by 4 ft), and 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft), for design loadings of +- 1.7 kPa (35 psf), +- 2.4 kPa (50 psf), and +- 3.6 kPa (75 psf). Designs and cost estimates are presented for twenty panel types and nine array configurations at each of the three design loadings. Structural cost sensitivities of combined array configurations and panel cases are presented.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates has conducted a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to residential photovoltaic array installations. Four installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in residential arrays. However, there is no applicable building code category for residential photovolttaic modules and arrays and early additional work is needed with standards writing organizations to develop residential module and array requirements.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 18 Photovoltaic Arrays & Modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 18 Photovoltaic Arrays & Modules Dr. Todd J. Kaiser tjkaiser@ece.montana.edu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University - Bozeman Photovoltaic Arrays PV PV Open Circuit Current reduced from this block by 25 % Current reduced from this cell by 25 % 3

Kaiser, Todd J.

6

Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe modules and array at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Residential photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-Cost Solar Array Project engineering area. Final report appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices to a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Appendices include: (1) codes, standards, and manuals of accepted practice-definition and importance; (2) regional code variations-impact; (3) model and city codes-review; (4) National Electric Code (NEC)-review; (5) types of standards-definition and importance; (6) federal standards-review; (7) standards review method; (8) manuals of accepted practice; (9) codes and referenced standards-summary; (10) public safety testing laboratories; (11) insurance review; (12) studies approach; (13) mounting configurations; (14) module/panel size and shape cost analysis; (15) grounding, wiring, terminal and voltage studies; (16) array installation cost summary; (17) photovoltaic shingle/module comparison; (18) retrofit application; (19) residential photovoltaic module performance criteria; (20) critique of JPL's solar cell module design and test specifications for residential applications; and (21) CSI format specification. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A solar array module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs  

SciTech Connect

We describe a fabrication process to manufacture high power to weight ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). A span-loaded flying wing vehicle, known as the RAPTOR Pathfinder, is being employed as a flying test bed to expand the envelope of solar powered flight to high altitudes. It requires multiple light weight flexible solar array modules able to endure adverse environmental conditions. At high altitudes the solar UV flux is significantly enhanced relative to sea level, and extreme thermal variations occur. Our process involves first electrically interconnecting solar cells into an array followed by laminating them between top and bottom laminated layers into a solar array module. After careful evaluation of candidate polymers, fluoropolymer materials have been selected as the array laminate layers because of their inherent abilities to withstand the hostile conditions imposed by the environment.

Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Thompson, J.B.; Williams, K.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

Zhu, Xiangdong

10

TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS David L. King, Jay A. Kratochvil, and William E. Boyson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 0 ABSTRACT The term "temperature coefficient" has been applied to several different photovoltaic performance parameters, including voltage, current, and power. The procedures for measuring the coefficient(s) for modules and arrays are not yet standardized, and systematic influences are common in the test methods used to measure them. There are also misconceptions regarding their application. Yet, temperature coefficients, however obtained, play an important role in PV system design and sizing, where often the worst case operating condition dictates the array

11

Photovoltaic module and array performance characterization methods for all system operating conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides new test methods and analytical procedures for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays. The methods use outdoor measurements to provide performance parameters both at standard reporting conditions and for all operating conditions encountered by typical photovoltaic systems. Improvements over previously used test methods are identified, and examples of the successful application of the methodology are provided for crystalline- and amorphous-silicon modules and arrays. This work provides an improved understanding of module and array performance characteristics, and perhaps most importantly, a straight- forward yet rigorous model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of- incidence, and temperature coefficients are all addressed in a practical way that will benefit both designers and users of photovoltaics.

King, D.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Standard Test Methods for Electrical Performance of Nonconcentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules and Arrays Using Reference Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays under natural or simulated sunlight using a calibrated reference cell. 1.1.1 These test methods allow a reference module to be used instead of a reference cell provided the reference module has been calibrated using these test methods against a calibrated reference cell. 1.2 Measurements under a variety of conditions are allowed; results are reported under a select set of reporting conditions (RC) to facilitate comparison of results. 1.3 These test methods apply only to nonconcentrator terrestrial modules and arrays. 1.4 The performance parameters determined by these test methods apply only at the time of the test, and imply no past or future performance level. 1.5 These test methods apply to photovoltaic modules and arrays that do not contain series-connected photovoltaic multijunction devices; such module and arrays should be tested according to Test Methods E 2236. 1.6 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MBA has been working on the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Solar Array project. A baseline sequence for the manufacture of solar cell modules is specified. Starting with silicon wafers, the process goes through damage etching, texture etching, junction formation, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, and screen printed metallization to produce finished solar cells which are then series connected on a ribbon and bonded into a finished glass, PVB, tedlar module. A number of steps required additional developmental effort to verify technical and economic feasibility. These steps include texture etching, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, array layup and interconnect, and module edge sealing and framing.

Witham, C.R.

1979-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Temperature coefficients for PV modules and arrays: Measurement methods, difficulties, and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The term temperature coefficient has been applied to several different photovoltaic performance parameters, including voltage, current, and power. The procedures for measuring the coefficient(s) for modules and arrays are not yet standardized, and systematic influences are common in the test methods used to measure them. There are also misconceptions regarding their application. Yet, temperature coefficients, however obtained, play an important role in PV system design and sizing, where often the worst case operating condition dictates the array size. This paper describes effective methods for determining temperature coefficients for cells, modules, and arrays; identifies sources of systematic errors in measurements; gives typical measured values for modules; and provides guidance for their application in system engineering.

King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

PVSIM{copyright}: A simulation program for photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrical simulation model for photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays has been developed that will be useful to a wide range of analysts in the photovoltaic industry. The Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} based program can be used to analyze individual cells, to analyze the effects of cell mismatch or reverse bias(`hot spot`) heating in modules and to analyze the performance of large arrays of modules including bypass and blocking diodes. User defined statistical variance can be applied to the fundamental parameters used to simulate the cells and diodes. The model is most appropriate for cells that can be accurately modeled using a two-diode equivalent circuit. This paper describes the simulation program and illustrates its versatility with examples.

King, D.L.; Dudley, J.K.; Boyson, W.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Coherent destruction of tunneling in a lattice array under selective in-phase modulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) in a lattice array under selective in-phase harmonic modulations, in which some selected lattice sites are driven by in-phase harmonic oscillating fields and other lattice sites are undriven. Due to the occurrence of CDT, if the driving amplitude A and the driving frequency {omega} are tuned to satisfy the zeroth-order Bessel function J{sub 0}(A/{omega})=0, the driven lattice sites are approximately decoupled from the undriven lattice sites. The CDT even takes place in lattice systems with high-order couplings between non-nearest-neighbor lattice sites. By using the CDT induced by selective in-phase harmonic modulations, we propose a scheme for realizing directed transport of a single particle. It is possible to observe the CDT in an engineered optical waveguide array, which provides an opportunity for controlling light propagation and designing switchlike couplers.

Luo, Xiaobing [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an 343009 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Huang, Jiahao; Lee, Chaohong [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of work under this contract involves specifying a process sequence which can be used in conjunction with automated equipment for the mass production of solar cell modules for terrestrial use. This process sequence is then critically analyzed from a technical and economic standpoint to determine the technological readiness of each process step for implementation. The process steps are ranked according to the degree of development effort required and according to their significance to the overall process. Under this contract the steps receiving analysis were: back contact metallization, automated cell array layup/interconnect, and module edge sealing. For automated layup/interconnect both hard automation and programmable automation (using an industrial robot) were studied. The programmable automation system was then selected for actual hardware development. Economic analysis using the SAMICS system has been performed during these studies to assure that development efforts have been directed towards the ultimate goal of price reduction. Details are given. (WHK)

Hagerty, J.J.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Binary Pseudo-Random Gratings and Arrays for Calibration of Modulation Transfer Functions of Surface Profilometers  

SciTech Connect

A technique for precise measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF), suitable for characterization of a broad class of surface profilometers, is investigated in detail. The technique suggested in [Proc. SPIE 7077-7, (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)]is based on use of binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays as standard MTF test surfaces. Unlike most conventional test surfaces, BPR gratings and arrays possess white-noise-like inherent power spectral densities (PSD), allowing the direct determination of the one- and two-dimensional MTF, respectively, with a sensitivity uniform over the entire spatial frequency range of a profiler. In the cited work, a one dimensional realization of the suggested method based on use of BPR gratings has been demonstrated. Here, a high-confidence of the MTF calibration technique is demonstrated via cross comparison measurements of a number of two dimensional BPR arrays using two different interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer. We also present the results of application of the experimentally determined MTF correction to the measurement taken with the MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope of the surface roughness of a super-polished test mirror. In this particular case, without accounting for the instrumental MTF, the surface rms roughness over half of the instrumental spatial frequency bandwidth would be underestimated by a factor of approximately 1.4.

Barber, Samuel K.; Anderson, Erik D.; Cambie, Rossana; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Stover, John C.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Walker, Bennett N. (Washington, DC)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work has been divided into five phases. The first phase is to modify existing hardware and controlling computer software to: (1) improve cell-to-cell placement accuracy, (2) improve the solder joint while reducing the amount of solder and flux smear on the cell's surface, and (3) reduce the system cycle time to 10 seconds. The second phase involves expanding the existing system's capabilities to be able to reject broken cells and make post-solder electrical tests. Phase 3 involves developing new hardware to allow for the automated encapsulation of solar modules. This involves three discrete pieces of hardware: (1) a vacuum platen end effector for the robot which allows it to pick up the 1' x 4' array of 35 inter-connected cells. With this, it can also pick up the cover glass and completed module, (2) a lamination preparation station which cuts the various encapsulation components from roll storage and positions them for encapsulation, and (3) an automated encapsulation chamber which interfaces with the above two and applies the heat and vacuum to cure the encapsulants. Phase 4 involves the final assembly of the encapsulated array into a framed, edge-sealed module completed for installation. For this we are using MBA's Glass Reinforced Concrete (GRC) in panels such as those developed by MBA for JPL under contract No. 955281. The GRC panel plays the multiple role of edge frame, substrate and mounting structure. An automated method of applying the edge seal will also be developed. The final phase (5) is the fabrication of six 1' x 4' electrically active solar modules using the above developed equipment. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Hagerty, J. J.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of high efficiency (14%) solar cell array module. Final report, November 1979-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

More effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. dia) high efficiency (16.5% AM1, 28/sup 0/C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5%). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of an optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices. A promising process sequence was identified. A reasonably large number of fairly efficient (13.5% average) 3 in. P+NN+ cells were made and combined with no problems with the module design developed for this project. In the module, one hundred and twenty (120) cells were connected, eight (8) in parallel and fifteen (15) in series. Six (6) modules were delivered with an average power output (per total module area of 6890 cm/sup 2/) of 75.3 watts and a module overall average efficiency of 10.9%.

Iles, P.A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W.J.; Ling, K.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Safety-related requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underwriters Laboratories has conducted a study to identify and develop safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations for residential, intermediate, and large scale applications. Concepts for safety systems, where each system is a collection of subsystems which together address the total anticipated hazard situation, are described. Descriptions of hardware, and system usefulness and viability are included. This discussion of safety systems recognizes that there is little history on which to base the expected safety related performance of a photovoltaic system. A comparison of these systems, as against the provisions of the 1984 National Electrical Code covering photovoltaic systems is made. A discussion of the UL investigation of the photovoltaic module evaluated to the provisions of the Proposed UL Standard for Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules and Panels is included. Grounding systems, their basis and nature, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are described. The meaning of frame grounding, circuit grounding, and the type of circuit ground are covered. The development of the Standard for Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules and Panels has continued, and with both industry comment and a product submittal and listing, the Standard has been refined to a viable document allowing an objective safety review of photovoltaic modules and panels. How this document, and other UL documents would cover investigations of certain other photovoltaic system components is described.

Levins, A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Terrestrial solar cell module automated array assembly, Task 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

It was proposed to establish a cost effective design and manufacturing process that would produce solar cell modules capable of meeting the JPL qualification test criteria. The basic design consisted of a glass/polyvinyl butyral/Mylar laminate mounted in either aluminum or stainless steel frames. To achieve a satisfactory power output margin, the production 36 three-inch solar cell design was expanded to 41 cells interconnected with standard dual redundant contacts. Aluminum paste as a back contact has both performance and cost advantages which warranted its production evaluation. The major effort involved firing the aluminum in a large belt furnace. Prior to this time, cells were successfully fired by hand in diffusion tube type furnaces. When printed aluminum was belt fired in small lots, i.e., less than 200 wafers, acceptable cells were produced. However, when implemented into production, i.e., 1,000 wafer lots, resistance increased a factor of two. Based on this result, production of the aluminum back contact in the existing muffle type furnace was stopped, awaiting installation of a new infrared furnace. Results of qualification testing are reported.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Binary pseudo-random gratings and arrays for calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers: recent developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major problem of measurement of a power spectral density (PSD) distribution of the surface heights with surface profilometers arises due to the unknown Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the instruments. The MTF tends to distort the PSD at higher spatial frequencies. It has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7, (2007), Opt. Eng. 47 (7), 073602-1-5 (2008)] that the instrumental MTF of a surface profiler can be precisely measured using standard test surfaces based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) patterns. In the cited work, a one dimensional (1D) realization of the suggested method based on use of BPR gratings has been demonstrated. Here, we present recent achievements made in fabricating and using two-dimensional (2D) BPR arrays that allow for a direct 2D calibration of the instrumental MTF. The 2D BPRAs were used as standard test surfaces for 2D MTF calibration of the MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope with all available objectives. The effects of fabrication imperfections on the efficiency of calibration are also discussed.

Barber, Samuel K.; Soldate, Paul; Anderson, Erik H.; Cambie, Rossana; Marchesini, Stefano; McKinney, Wanye R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitry L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Calibration of Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with 1D and 2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudo-random Grating Standard for Calibration of SurfaceBinary Pseudorandom Grating as a Standard Test Surface for2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards Valeriy V. Yashchuk,

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Photovoltaic array performance model.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of high efficiency (14%) solar cell array module. Third quarterly report, July 15, 1979-November 15, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3'' diameter) high efficiency (approx. 15.5% AM1, 28/sup 0/C) P/N solar cells. These efficiencies had been obtained for 2 x 2 cm area cells, but tests showed that the problem was not reduced silicon quality near the edges of the larger slices. The problems were in optimizing the back-surface field (BSF) process, and its possible interaction with the shallow P+ layer formation. Towards the end of this reporting period a promising process sequence had been identified and is being tested. The module design has been finalized. One hundred and twenty (120) cells will be connected eight (8) in parallel and fifteen (15) in series. The designs and tooling phases have been completed and are awaiting completion of the cells.

Iles, P.A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W.J.; Ling, K.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the state-of-the-art and to develop some of the technology required to allow for large volume and low cost terrestrial solar panel production. The baseline production facility being studied would provide for production of 200 megawatts of solar panels per year from an input commodity as sawn Czochralski wafers. Initial analysis of available automation equipment applicable to the 1986 goals shows that most of the equipment will have to be of special design. The currently available equipment is designed for the semiconductor industry where process volumes are low. Maximum speeds are of the range of 100 to 200 wafers per hour. Using special equipment it appears feasible to produce the solar cells with 6 to 8 parallel production lines operating three shifts per day, seven days per week and to produce the encapsulated modules with 1 to 3 parallel production lines. Preliminary costs analyses show promise for reaching the 1986 price goals assuming a SAMICS wafer price of $0.28/wafer (1986 dollars). Initial work has been done to study the applicability of a plasma process to perform back etch of the cells. This area shows promise for eliminating wet chemical etching procedures with attendant rinse and dry equipment and time required.

Witham, C.R.

1978-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

40 kW of solar cell modules for the Large Scale Production Task, a Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Forty kilowatts of solar cell modules was produced in this program. This is equivalent to 4123 modules. The average power output per module was 9.7 watts at 16.5 volts, 60/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/. The peak production rate was 200 modules per week which is equal to 1.9 kW per week. This rate was sustained for over four and one-half months and is equivalent to 100 kW per year. The solar cell module design, electrical and power performance, module preproduction environmental test results, production and shipping schedule, program summary, and delivery are described. A cost analysis section is written. Particular emphasis on the percentage of labor and material utilized in constructing a solar cell module is presented. Also included are cost reduction recommendations. It was concluded from this program that volume production on the order of hundreds of kilowatts per year per company as a minimum is required to significantly reduce the price per watt for solar cell modules. Sensor Technology more than doubled its solar cell module manufacturing facilities since the completion of the JPL Block II procurement. Plans are being made for large scale expansion of our facilities to meet growing JPL/DOE procurements.

Jones, G.T.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Accordion arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present accordion arrays, a straight-forward and effective memory compression technique targeting Unicode-based character arrays. In many non-numeric Java programs, character arrays represent a significant fraction (30-40% on average) ... Keywords: Java, array, character, compression, memory management, polymorphism, unicode

Craig Zilles

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Definition: PV array | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PV array PV array Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PV array An interconnected system of PV modules that function as a single electricity-producing unit. In smaller systems, an array can consist of a single module.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A Photovoltaic system (informally, PV system) is an arrangement of components designed to supply usable electric power for a variety of purposes, using the Sun (or, less commonly, other light sources) as the power source. PV systems may be built in various configurations: Off-grid without battery (Array-direct) Off-grid with battery storage for DC-only appliances Off-grid with battery storage for AC & DC appliances Grid-tie without battery Grid-tie with battery storage A photovoltaic array (also called a solar array) consists of multiple photovoltaic modules, casually

35

Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

Campbell, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager  

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager ... The field emission current of each cesiated carbon nanoflake structure is modulated by the

37

Polycrystalline thin-film module and system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Module and System Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of photovoltaic (PV) modules and systems (arrays). These evaluations on module/array performance and stability are conducted at the NREL Photovoltaic Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) in Golden, CO. The modules and arrays are located at 39.7{degree}N latitude, 105.2{degree}W longitude, and at 1,782 meters elevation. Currently, two polycrystalline thin-film technologies are the focus of the research presented here. The module structures are copper indium diselenide (CIS) from Siemens Solar Industries and cadmium telluride (CdTe) from Solar Cells, Inc. The research team is attempting to correlate individual module performance with array performance for these two polycrystalline thin-film technologies. This is done by looking at module and array performance over time. Also, temperature coefficients are determined at both the module and array level. Results are discussed.

Strand, T.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; Mrig, L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Process of making solar cell module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for the manufacture of solar cell modules. A solution comprising a highly plasticized polyvinyl butyral is applied to a solar cell array. The coated array is dried and sandwiched between at last two sheets of polyvinyl butyral and at least two sheets of a rigid transparent member. The sandwich is laminated by the application of heat and pressure to cause fusion and bonding of the solar cell array with the rigid transparent members to produce a solar cell module.

Packer, M.; Coyle, P.J.

1981-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S. [Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2Elab), 961, rue Houille Blanche BP 46, 38402 St Martin d'Heres (France); de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J. [Grupo de Investigacion IDEA, Departamento de Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Automated array assembly. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the ERDA/JPL LSSA program of $0.50/W selling price for array modules in 1986 turns out to have been remarkably appropriate. An extensive and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing was completed and a minimum manufacturing cost in a highly automated line of $0.30/W was found assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated AR layer. The least expensive junction formation technology appears to be ion implantation; however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. Based on the required investment, a profit of $0.05/W appears reasonable. If silicon wafers are available at a price of $20 to 40/M/sup 2/, a selling price for these array modules of $0.50 to 0.66/W is projected. An analysis of the impact of factory size has been made. For a production level of 500 MW/yr, the price above is derived. For comparison, a factory processing 50 MW/yr using the same technology would sell modules for $0.54/W to $0.70/W. An analysis of the impact of wafer size indicates that with traditional metallization and panel designs there is no advantage in increasing wafer size from 3 in. to 5 in., and, in fact, there is some penalty (10% in $/W) due to increasedmetallization costs and reduced system performance. There is a premium placed on high efficiency due to its impact, not only on array module cost, but on system cost. For the near term goals of this program, wafers cut from single-crystal material seem the most likely sheet configuration.

Williams, B.F.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Module Safety Issues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

CX-001635: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

635: Categorical Exclusion Determination 635: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar American Institute Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-Based Module Array CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office DOE funding would be used by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support the Solar American Initiative (SAl) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator. The program is structured to allow innovative approaches targeted at research and development of PV cells and module prototypes. The primary objective of this SAl PV Technology Incubator project is to shorten the timeline for companies to transition prototype and pre-commercial PV

43

Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules  

SciTech Connect

An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

English, Jr., Ronald E. (Tracy, CA); Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

Alignment method for solar collector arrays  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

Driver, Jr., Richard B

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

46

PDSF Modules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modules Modules Modules Modules Approach to Managing The Environment Modules is a system which you can use to specify what software you want to use. If you want to use a particular software package loading its module will take care of the details of modifying your environment as necessary. The advantage of the modules approach is that the you are not required to explicitly specify paths for different executable versions and try to keep their related man paths and environment variables coordinated. Instead you simply "load" and "unload" specific modules to control your environment. Getting Started with Modules If you're using the standard startup files on PDSF then you're already setup for using modules. If the "module" command is not available, please

47

RECIPIENT:Semprius  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Semprius Semprius u.s. DEPARTr-IEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMEN T CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: NC PROJECT TITLE: SAl Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-based Module Array; NREl Tracking No. 09- 036a Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procur~mtnt Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number NREL-09-036a G010337 Based on my review of the information concuning the proposed action, as Nf:PA Compliance Officer (authorized undcr DOE Order 45 I. IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX ANI) NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

48

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 9, 2010 April 9, 2010 CX-001794: Categorical Exclusion Determination Commercial Renewable Energy Systems - Charlotte Mecklenburg School Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/09/2010 Location(s): Cornelius, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 8, 2010 CX-001635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar American Institute Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-Based Module Array CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 7, 2010 CX-001432: Categorical Exclusion Determination Commercial Renewable Energy Systems - Gaston County Solid Waste Biogas Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15, A9, A11, B5.1

49

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 28590 of 28,904 results. 81 - 28590 of 28,904 results. Download CX-001635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar American Institute Incubator - Semprius - Massively Parallel Microcell-Based Module Array CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001635-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001560: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydroelectric turbine at Water Treatment Plant American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Strategy Only CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/31/2010 Location(s): Greensboro, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001560-categorical-exclusion-determination

50

Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. This volume of the report contains the executive summary. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors: remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Waveguide electrooptic switch arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is presented of electrooptic waveguide switch arrays with strong emphasis on those based on titanium-diffused lithium niobate waveguides. Crosspoint and array design considerations and performance are discussed as are waveguide technology limits. ...

R. C. Alferness

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Automatic array privatization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter discusses techniques for automatic array privatization developed as part of the Polaris project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Array privatization is one of the most important transformations for effective program parallelization. ...

Peng Tu; David Padua

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

odd shaped array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. odd shaped array. (data structure). Definition: See ragged matrix. Author: PEB. Go to the Dictionary of Algorithms and ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

Automated array assembly. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three main sections are included which describe a general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis; a near-term (1982) factory design; and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon solar-cell arrays. The results of an extensive study and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing are presented. From this study, several manufacturing sequences emerge as candidates for satisfying the ERDA/JPL cost goal of $0.50/W selling price in 1986. A minimum manufacturing cost was found in a highly automated line of $0.30/W assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double-glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen-printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated antireflection (AR) layer. The least expensive junction-formation technology appears to be ion implantation;however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. An interim 1982 factory is described for the large-scale production of silicon solar-cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. A 6-month experimental production study of the elements of low-cost solar-cell manufacturing sequences is described as an outgrowth of the cost and manufacturing studies. This program consisted of three parts: an experimental production line study of the major variables associated with the fabrication of 3-in.-diameter silicon solar cells; a study of thick-film screen-printed silver metallization; and panel design and assembly development. (WHK)

D'Aiello, R.V.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Photovoltaic module mounting system  

SciTech Connect

A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

Miros, Robert H. J. (Fairfax, CA); Mittan, Margaret Birmingham (Oakland, CA); Seery, Martin N. (San Rafael, CA); Holland, Rodney H. (Novato, CA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Photovoltaic module mounting system  

SciTech Connect

A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Integrative Array User's Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Software location................................................................................................ 11 4.4 Loading datasets .................................................................................................... 12 5. Analysis Modules

Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

58

Module Configuration  

SciTech Connect

A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

Oweis, Salah (Ellicott City, MD); D' Ussel, Louis (Bordeaux, FR); Chagnon, Guy (Cockeysville, MD); Zuhowski, Michael (Annapolis, MD); Sack, Tim (Cockeysville, MD); Laucournet, Gaullume (Paris, FR); Jackson, Edward J. (Taneytown, MD)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

Koehler, Dale R. (1332 Wagontrain Dr., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CG-3 Detector Array  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tanks for the SANS instruments at HFIR. The Bio-SANS detector is on the left. CG-3 Detector Array For more information, contact Instrument Scientist: Volker Urban,...

62

Module Handbook Specialisation Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Specialisation Photovoltaics, University of Northumbria Module 1/Photovoltaics: PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL AND MODULE TECHNOLOGY Module name: PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL AND MODULE TECHNOLOGY Section EUREC · Chemistry · Physics Target learning outcomes The module Photovoltaic Cell and Module Technology teaches

Habel, Annegret

63

Micromachined electrode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Synthesis of Dense Arrays of Well ...  

Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Synthesis of Dense Arrays of Well-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Completely Filled with Titanium Carbide on Titanium Substrates

65

Characterization of Field Exposed Thin Film Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test arrays of thin film modules have been deployed at the Solar Energy Centre near New Delhi, India since 2002-2003. Performances of these arrays were reported by O.S. Sastry [1]. This paper reports on NREL efforts to support SEC by performing detailed characterization of selected modules from the array. Modules were selected to demonstrate both average and worst case power loss over the 8 years of outdoor exposure. The modules characterized included CdTe, CIS and three different types of a-Si. All but one of the a-Si types were glass-glass construction. None of the modules had edge seals. Detailed results of these tests are presented along with our conclusions about the causes of the power loss for each technology.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Sastry, O. S.; Stokes, A.; Singh, Y. K.; Kumar, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Definition: PV module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: PV module Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PV module A unit comprised of several PV cells, and the principal unit of a PV array; it is intended to generate direct current power under un-concentrated sunlight.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A solar panel is a set of solar photovoltaic modules electrically connected and mounted on a supporting structure. A photovoltaic module is a packaged, connected assembly of photovoltaic cells. The solar module can be used as a component of a larger photovoltaic system to generate and supply electricity in commercial and residential applications. Each module is rated by its DC output power under standard test conditions (STC), and

67

PV array simulator development and validation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple MPPT DC inputs. The flexibility of the PV simulator enables the validation of the inverter's capability to handle vastly different array configurations.

Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA); Deuel, Don (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Flexible retinal electrode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Random array grid collimator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

Fenimore, E.E.

1980-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Integrated residential photovoltaic array development. Quarterly report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Sixteen conceptual designs produced by eight teams are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that affect further array sub-system development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are the following: (1) an array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipperlocking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters; (2) an array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipperlocking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks; (3) an array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

Not Available

1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Design-For-Test in a Multiple Substrate Multichip Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the development and effectiveness of a multichip module (MCM) Design-For-Testability methodology for an application intended for use in a fully electronic active matrix LCD flight instrument. MCM test issues discussed include ... Keywords: Ball Grid Array (BGA), Built-In-Self-Test (BIST), Known-Good Die (KGD), Multichip Module (MCM) Test, boundary-scan

Joel A. Jorgenson; Russell J. Wagner

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Thermionic modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

King, Donald B. (Albuquerque, NM); Sadwick, Laurence P. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wernsman, Bernard R. (Clairton, PA)

2002-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

TES imaging array technology for CLOVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOVER is an experiment which aims to detect the signature of gravitational waves from inflation by measuring the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. CLOVER consists of three telescopes operating at 97, 150, and 220 GHz. The 97-GHz telescope has 160 horns in its focal plane while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 256 horns each. The horns are arranged in a hexagonal array and feed a polarimeter which uses finline-coupled TES bolometers as detectors. To detect the two polarizations the 97-GHz telescope has 320 detectors while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 512 detectors each. To achieve the required NEPs the detectors are cooled to 100 mK for the 97 and 150-GHz polarimeters and 230 mK for the 220-GHz polarimeter. Each detector is fabricated as a single chip to guarantee fully functioning focal planes. The detectors are contained in linear modules made of copper which form split-block waveguides. The detector modules contain 16 or 20 detectors each for compatibility with the hexagonal arrays of horns in the telescopes' focal planes. Each detector module contains a time-division SQUID multiplexer to read out the detectors. Further amplification of the multiplexed signals is provided by SQUID series arrays. The first prototype detectors for CLOVER operate with a bath temperature of 230 mK and are used to validate the detector design as well as the polarimeter technology. We describe the design of the CLOVER detectors, detector blocks, and readout, and give an update on the detector development.

Michael D. Audley; Robert W. Barker; Michael Crane; Roger Dace; Dorota Glowacka; David J. Goldie; Anthony N. Lasenby; Howard M. Stevenson; Vassilka Tsaneva; Stafford Withington; Paul Grimes; Bradley Johnson; Ghassan Yassin; Lucio Piccirillo; Giampaolo Pisano; William D. Duncan; Gene C. Hilton; Kent D. Irwin; Carl D. Reintsema; Mark Halpern

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) The Schlumberger array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

78

Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter ...  

Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter Electric Field Uniformity Ryan T. Kelly, Jason S. Page, Ioan Marginean, Keqi Tang, and Richard ...

79

Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

Kaun, T.D.; Smaga, J.A.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

80

Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells  

SciTech Connect

A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smaga, John A. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Striped tape arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing number of applications require high capacity, high throughput tertiary storage systems [1] [2]. We are investigating how data striping ideas apply to arrays of magnetic tape drives. Data striping increases throughput and reduces response time for large accesses to a storage system. Striped magnetic tape systems are particularly appealing because many inexpensive magnetic tape drives have low bandwidth; striping may offer dramatic performance improvements for these systems. There are several important issues in designing striped tape systems: the choice of tape drives and robots, whether to stripe within or between robots, and the choice of the best scheme for distributing data on cartridges. One of the most troublesome problems in striped tape arrays is the synchronization of transfers across tape drives. Another issue is how improved devices will affect the desirability of striping in the future. We present the results of simulations comparing the performance of striped tape systems to non-striped systems.

Ann L. Drapeau; Randy H. Katz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cellular array processing simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cellular array processing simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms. 4 references.

Lee, H.C.; Preston, E.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar array construction  

SciTech Connect

An interconnect tab on each cell of a first set of circular solar cells connects that cell in series with an adjacent cell in the set. This set of cells is arranged in alternate columns and rows of an array and a second set of similar cells is arranged in the remaining alternate columns and rows of the array. Three interconnect tabs on each solar cell of the said second set are employed to connect the cells of the second set to one another, in series and to connect the cells of the second set to those of the first set in parallel. Some tabs (making parallel connections) connect the same surface regions of adjacent cells to one another and others (making series connections) connect a surface region of one cell to the opposite surface region of an adjacent cell; however, the tabs are so positioned that the array may be easily assembled by depositing the cells in a certain sequence and in proper orientation.

Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

Pao, Hsueh-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Tran, Binh-Nien (San Ramon, CA)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Technical quarterly report No. 2. Motorola report No. 2258/2  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Both experimental, literature, and theoretical sources are being utilized to evaluate efficient solar cell design criteria and individual and synergistic process effects on the cost effective production and encapsulation of such efficient solar cells.

Coleman, M.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Unlikely Combination of Experiments With a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TOB Module Assembly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SiTracker Home Page Participating Institutions and Principal Contacts Useful Links Notes Images TOB Module Assembly and Testing Project TOB Integration Data Tracker Offline DQM LHC Fluence Calculator Total US Modules Tested Graph Total US Modules Tested Graph Total US Modules Tested Total US Modules Tested US Modules Tested Graph US Modules Tested Graph US Modules Tested US Modules Tested Rod Assembly TOB Modules on a Rod TOB Rod Insertion Installation of a TOB Rod Completed TOB Completed Tracker Outer Barrel TOB Module Assembly and Testing Project All 5208 modules of the CMS Tracker Outer Barrel were assembled and tested at two production sites in the US: the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The modules were delivered to CERN in the form of rods, with the last shipment taking

88

Investigation of the heat pipe arrays for convective electronic cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to evaluate a heat pipe convective cooling device consisting of sixteen small copper/water heat pipes mounted vertically in a 4x4 array 25.4 mm square. The analytical portion of the investigation focused on determination of the maximum heat transport capacity and the resistance of the individual heat pipes. The resistance of each beat pipe was found to be 2.51 K/Watt, or more than 3 times smaller than the resistance produced by a solid copper rod with the same dimensions. The maximum predicted heat rejection for the module was over 50 Watts, or a power density in excess of 7.75 Watts/CM2. In the experimental portion of the investigation, two different modules were tested. The first module utilized ten circular aluminum fins mounted on the condenser end of each heat pipe to enhance heat rejection, while the second contained only the sixteen copper/water heat pipes. The effects of flow velocity, input power, and base plate temperature on the overall thermal resistance and the heat rejection capacity were determined, as well as the pressure drop resulting from each module. The finned heat pipe array was found to have a lower overall thermal resistance and thus, a higher heat rejection capacity, but also resulted in a significantly larger pressure drop than the array without fins. The results of the heat pipe array experiments were also compared with experimental and empirical results obtained from flow over a flat plate 25.4 mm square.

Howard, Alicia Ann Harris

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electronically controllable transmission line design for traveling wave array antenna feed network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an electronically controllable transmission line (ECTL) is presented. By modulating the conductivity of a doped Si modulator in the ECTL, the wave propagation constant in the ECTL is controlled. Measured results show a phase change in the ECTL at a single frequency when non-zero bias voltage is applied. This ECTL is implemented in order to feed a traveling wave array antenna, which is composed of 8 aperture-coupled microstrip antenna elements. It is demonstrated that phase change in an ECTL feed line has applications as a traveling wave array antenna with beam steering. S-parameter measurements are presented which demonstrate phase change in an ECTL and main beam steering of an 8-element traveling wave array antenna. The design procedure for an aperture-coupled microstrip antenna with a specific input impedance at the resonant frequency and a matching circuit design for a traveling wave array antenna are discussed in detail.

Shin, Chang-Seok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

Yelton, William G. (Sandia Park, NM); Siegal, Michael P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A solar module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a fabrication process used to manufacture high power-to-weight-ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high-altitude-long-endurance (HALE) solar-electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). These modules have achieved power-to-weight ratios of 315 and 396 W/kg for 150{mu}m-thick monofacial and 110{mu}m-thick bifacial silicon solar cells, respectively. These calculations reflect average module efficiencies of 15.3% (150{mu}m) and 14.7% (110{mu}m) obtained from electrical tests performed by Spectrolab, Inc. under AMO global conditions at 25{degrees}C, and include weight contributions from all module components (solar cells, lamination material, bypass diodes, interconnect wires, and adhesive tape used to attach the modules to the wing). The fabrication, testing, and performance of 32 m{sup 2} of these modules will be described.

Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sinton, R.A. [Private Consultant, San Jose, CA (United States); Glenn, G.S. [Spectrolab, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Passive microfluidic array card and reader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

Dugan, Lawrence Christopher (Modesto, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

SciTech Connect

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

SciTech Connect

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

NERSC Modules Software Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment » Modules Environment Environment » Modules Environment Modules Software Environment NERSC uses the module utility to manage nearly all software. There are two huge advantages of the module approach: NERSC can provide many different versions and/or installations of a single software package on a given machine, including a default version as well as several older and newer versions; and Users can easily switch to different versions or installations without having to explicitly specify different paths. With modules, the MANPATH and related environment variables are automatically managed. Users simply ``load'' and ``unload'' modules to control their environment. The module utility consists of two parts: the module command itself and the modulefiles on which it operates. Module Command

97

Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Mitra, Robi D. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Diastolic arrays : throughput-driven reconfigurable computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we propose a new reconfigurable computer substrate: diastolic arrays. Diastolic arrays are arrays of processing elements that communicate exclusively through First-In First-Out (FIFO) queues, and provide ...

Cho, Myong Hyon, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Stability of CIS/CIGS Modules at the Outdoor Test Facility over Two Decades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses examining the status and question of long-term stability of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic (PV) module performance for numerous modules that are deployed in the array field, or on the roof of, the outdoor test facility (OTF) at NREL, acquired from two manufacturers.

del Cueto, J. A.; Rummel, S.; Kroposki, B.; Osterwald, C.; Anderberg, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

High-frequency pulse width modulation implementation using FPGA and CPLD ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulse width modulation (PWM) has been widely used in power converter control. Most high power level converters operate at switching frequencies up to 500 kHz, while operating frequencies in excess of 1 MHz at high power levels can be achieved using the ... Keywords: CPLD, counter, field programmable gate array, power converters, pulse width modulation

Eftichios Koutroulis; Apostolos Dollas; Kostas Kalaitzakis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Influence of parasitic resistances on the mismatch relative power loss of solar cell modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available from a photovoltaic module is reduced by the cell-to-cell variations in the photogenerated current of the integrated bypass diode in the unit cell structure. Previous studies on the performance of photovoltaic solar. [ 11 ] have pro- posed a sorting method of the photovoltaic cells and modules in a array into four bins

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Four-port gas separation membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-separation membrane assembly, and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly incorporates multiple gas-separation membranes in an array within a single vessel or housing, and is equipped with two permeate ports, enabling permeate gas to be withdrawn from both ends of the membrane module permeate pipes.

Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Fremont, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Campbell, CA)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Experience with CPV Module Failures at NREL (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The failures and performance issues associated with three years of on-sun testing of CPV modules are discussed. Pictures of various failure mechanisms and performance issues are presented. A wide array of CPV module failures and performance issues have been experienced at NREL. Many of the modules are prototypes and have not been through qualification testing. It is assumed that the qualification test would have captured many of the problems. Internal lens soiling due to condensation is not currently captured by the qualification test. Lens temperature dependence can be built into modeling if CPV is to operate in cold locations.

Muller, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

Butler, B.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

Butler, Barry L. (Golden, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced silicon photonic modulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various electrical and optical schemes used in Mach-Zehnder (MZ) silicon plasma dispersion effect modulators are explored. A rib waveguide reverse biased silicon diode modulator is designed, tested and found to operate at ...

Sorace, Cheryl M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Motorola report No. 2258/1. Technical quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Design criteria for efficient solar cells are discussed, emphasis being given to front metal surface pattern and texture etched front surfaces. A generalized processing matrix, containing competing methods for solar cell manufacturing steps, is outlined. The steps in this processing matrix are discussed and characterized according to immediate and potential usefulness. Representative steps have been chosen for empirical evaluation.

Coleman, M.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

115

The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.  

SciTech Connect

Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

Brock, Billy C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Characterizing (rating) the performance of large photovoltaic arrays for all operating conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic arrays. The method provides both a ``rating`` at standard reporting conditions and a rigorous yet straightforward model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the performance model handles the influences of irradiance, module temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of-incidence, and temperature coefficients, in a practical way. Validity of the procedure was confirmed during field testing of a 25-kW array recently installed by Arizona Public Service Co. on Carol Spring Mountain (which powers microwave, ceullular phone, and TV communictions equipment). This paper describes the characterization procedure, measured array performance, and the predictive model.

King, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckert, P.E. [Arizona Public Service Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Scattering arrays for matrix computations  

SciTech Connect

Several new mesh connected multiprocessor architectures are adapted to execute highly parallel algorithms for matrix algebra and signal processing, such as triangular- and eigen-decomposition, inversion and low-rank updating of general matrices, as well as Toeplitz and Hankel related matrices. These algorithms are based on scattering theory concepts and information preserving transformations hence they exhibit local communication, and simple control and memory management, ideal for VLSI implementation. The architectures are based on two-dimensional scattering arrays that can be folded into linear arrays either through time-sharing or due to simple computation wavefronts, or due to special structures of the matrices involved, such as Toeplitz. 21 references.

Delosme, J.M.; Morf, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

120

Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cyber Security Module  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyber Security Module Cyber security training is required for all facility users and must be submitted before or upon arrival at the GUV Center. System Requirements and Information...

122

Detailed Course Module Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Course Module Description Course Module Description Module/Learning Objectives Level of Detail in Module by Audience Consumers Gen Ed/ Community College Trades 1. Energy Issues and Building Solutions High High High Learning Objectives: * Define terms of building science, ecological systems, economics of consumption * Relate building science perspective, ecology, social science * Explain historical energy and environmental issues related to buildings * Compare Site and source energy * Examine the health, safety and comfort issues in buildings * Examine the general context for building solutions (zero energy green home with durability as the goal) * Explain a basic overview of alternative energy (total solar flux) - do we have enough energy * Examine cash flow to homeowners

123

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

d022412A. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 18 Macroeconomic Activity Module To reflect uncertainty in the projection of...

124

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) took place in spring 2007 and is the third in the series of Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) experiments. The HATS experiments have been instrumental in testing and developing subfilterscale (...

Edward G. Patton; Thomas W. Horst; Peter P. Sullivan; Donald H. Lenschow; Steven P. Oncley; William O. J. Brown; Sean P. Burns; Alex B. Guenther; Andreas Held; Thomas Karl; Shane D. Mayor; Luciana V. Rizzo; Scott M. Spuler; Jielun Sun; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Eugene J. Allwine; Steven L. Edburg; Brian K. Lamb; Roni Avissar; Ronald J. Calhoun; Jan Kleissl; William J. Massman; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Jeffrey C. Weil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou. The trigger subsystem of the GRAD has been developed based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. The GRAD trigger subsystem makes prompt L1 trigger decisions to select valid events. These decisions are made by processing the hit signals from 1024 CsI scintillators of the GRAD. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates 12-bit trigger signals that are passed to the ETF global trigger system. In addition, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics and one FPGA of the trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in the other FPGA of the trigger module. The reliable and efficient performance in the Gamma-ray experiments demonstrates that the GRAD trigger subsystem is capable to satisfy the physical requirements.

Du Zhong-Wei; Su Hong; Qian Yi; Kong Jie

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Simulations of astronomical imaging phased arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a theoretical procedure for analyzing astronomical phased arrays with overlapping beams, and apply the procedure to simulate a simple example. We demonstrate the effect of overlapping beams on the number of degrees of freedom of the array, and on the ability of the array to recover a source. We show that the best images are obtained using overlapping beams, contrary to common practise, and show how the dynamic range of a phased array directly affects the image quality.

George Saklatvala; Stafford Withington; Michael P. Hobson

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Working with Modules within Python  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Modules within Perl and Python Working with Modules within Perl and Python Working with Modules within Perl and Python It can often be convenient to work with the modules system from within perl or python scripts. You can do this! Using Modules within Python The EnvironmentModules python package gives access to the module system from within python. The EnvironmentModules python package has a single function: module. Using this function you can provide the same arguments you would to "module" on the command line. The module() function accepts a list of arguments, like ['load','']; or ['unload','']. >>> import EnvironmentModules as EnvMod >>> EnvMod.module(['load','blast+']) It is important to understand that this is most effective for scripts

131

Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar  

SciTech Connect

The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

None

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2013 (AEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

134

Membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

Kaschemekat, J.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Unlikely Combination of Experiments with a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study are to: (1) parameterize current-voltage (I-V) performance over a wide range of illumination and temperatures: (a) 50-1150 W/m{sup 2} irradiance, 5-65 C; (b) obtain array temperature coefficients; and (c) quantify energy production; (2) investigate high-voltage leakage currents from the CIS modules in a high-voltage array: determine dependence on moisture, temperature, and voltage bias and ascertain corrosion problems if any; and (3) study long-term power and energy production stability.

del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

137

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

138

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

139

Means of manufacturing annular arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90/sup 0/. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

Day, R.A.

1985-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Array Based Java Source Code Obfuscation Using Classes with Restructured Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Array restructuring operations obscure arrays. Our work aims on java source code obfuscation containing arrays. Our main proposal is Classes with restructured array members and obscured member methods for setting, getting array elements and to get the length of arrays. The class method definition codes are obscured through index transformation and constant hiding. The instantiated objects of these classes are used for source code writing. A tool named JDATATRANS is developed for generating classes and to the best of our knowledge this is the first tool available for array restructuring, on java source codes.

Sivadasan, Praveen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Photovoltaic solar panel resistance to simulated hail. Low-Cost Solar Array Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Low-Cost Solar Array Project, test methods have been evaluated and procedures developed for testing photovoltaic flat-plate solar cell modules for resistance to impact by hailstones. Testing has included the use of simulated hailstones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity), steel balls, and other projectile types applied with three loading methods: pneumatic gun, gravity drop, and static loading. Results are presented that compare the advantages and disadvantages of the three test methods. Dropped-steel-ball tests are shown to exhibit little correlation with high-velocity ice-ball tests, whereas statically-loaded steel balls show a somewhat better correlation with ice-ball tests. Results are also presented on the hail impact strength of 16 flat-plate photovoltaic modules. The module designs tested have been shown to be capable of withstanding as large as 1-1/2-inch diameter and not capable of withstanding as small as 1/2-inch diameter simulated hail. The top surface material of the modules has a dominant influence on the hail impact resistance of the modules. In order of increasing impact strength for a given thickness, the top surface materials encountered in the modules tester were: clear silicone rubber, annealed glass, tempered glass, and acrylic sheet. The critical failure mechanism of each module type is explored and means for improving the hail resistance of future modules are described.

Moore, D.; Wilson, A.

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Photovoltaic solar panel resistance to simulated hail. Low-Cost Solar Array Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Low-Cost Solar Array Project, test methods have been evaluated and procedures developed for testing photovoltaic flat-plate solar cell modules for resistance to impact by hailstones. Testing has included the use of simulated hailstones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity), steel balls, and other projectile types applied with three loading methods: pneumatic gun, gravity drop, and static loading. Results are presented that compare the advantages and disadvantages of the three test methods. Dropped-steel-ball tests are shown to exhibit little correlation with high-velocity ice-ball tests, whereas statically-loaded steel balls show a somewhat better correlation with ice-ball tests. Results are also presented on the hail impact strength of 16 flat-plate photovoltaic modules. The module designs tested have been shown to be capable of withstanding as large as 1-1/2-inch diameter and not capable of withstanding as small as 1/2-inch diameter simulated hail. The top surface material of the modules has a dominant influence on the hail impact resistance of the modules. In order of increasing impact strength for a given thickness, the top surface materials encountered in the modules tester were: clear silicone rubber, annealed glass, tempered glass, and acrylic sheet. The critical failure mechanism of each module type is explored and means for improving the hail resistance of future modules are described.

Moore, D.; Wilson, A.

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable, which couples light from an M.times.N array of emitters onto N fibers, where the M wavelength may be distributed across two or more vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) chips, and combining emitters and multiplexer into a compact package that is compatible with placement on a printed circuit board. A key feature is bringing together two emitter arrays fabricated on different substrates--each array designed for a different wavelength--into close physical proximity. Another key feature is to compactly and efficiently combine the light from two or more clusters of optical emitters, each in a different wavelength band, into a fiber ribbon.

Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Larson, Michael C. (Goleta, CA); Garrett, Henry E. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from...

Armstrong, R P; Nicolson, G D; Ratcliffe, S; Linares, M; Horrell, J; Richter, L; Schurch, M P E; Coriat, M; Woudt, P; Jonas, J; Booth, R; Fanaroff, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Center punched solar cell module development effort. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of an advanced module development program with the objective of providing a low cost solar cell mechanical interconnect design are presented. The design approach, which avoids soldering or welding operations, lends itself to automated assembly techniques thus supporting the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project goals. During the course of the program, a total of twelve modules were delivered to JPL for qualification testing. The first group of six modules contained aluminum contact cells and the second group of six modules contained silver-titanium-palladium contact cells. Extensive component and environmental testing by Xerox Electro-Optical Systems at the module level has shown that reliable cell mechanical interconnection can be achieved when utilizing the proper electrical contact materials and pressures. Environmental testing of XEOS modules at JPL, in accordance with the same JPL specification used by XEOS, will be performed and the results will be separately published. The module design, manufacturing procedure, test program, significant problem areas and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations as formulated and conducted by XEOS are discussed.

Ross, R.E.; Mortensen, W.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Status of wake and array loss research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

149

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solar module having reflector between cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

Kardauskas, Michael J. (Billerica, MA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design of a photovoltaic central power station: flat-plate array  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a photovoltaic central power station using fixed flat-panel arrays has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes high-efficiency photovoltaic modules using dendritic web cells. The modules are arranged in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic output is connected to the existing 115 kV utility switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Considerations for a Standardized Test for Potential-Induced Degradation of Crystalline Silicon PV Modules (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past decade, there have been observations of module degradation and power loss because of the stress that system voltage bias exerts. This results in part from qualification tests and standards note adequately evaluating for the durability of modules to the long-term effects of high voltage bias that they experience in fielded arrays. This talk deals with factors for consideration, progress, and information still needed for a standardized test for degradation due to system voltage stress.

Hacke, P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

155

CIM - compact intensity modulation.  

SciTech Connect

Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

Bleuel, M.; Lang, E.; Gahler, G.; Lal, J.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Inst. Lau Langevin

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

157

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

158

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

159

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 18 cost KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft Hub (which limits surface speed)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

166

Renewable Fuels Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook forecasts.

Chris Namovicz

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Renewable Fuels Module This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Module Fuels Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 175 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve

168

Programmable synchronous communications module  

SciTech Connect

The functional characteristics of a programmable, synchronous serial communications CAMAC module with buffering in block format are described. Both bit and byte oriented protocols can be handled in full duplex depending on the program implemented. The main elements of the module are a Signetics 2652 Multi-Protocol Communications Controller, a Zilog Z-808 8 bit microprocessor with PROM and RAM, and FIFOs for buffering. (FS)

Horelick, D.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Double interconnection fuel cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Zymboly, Gregory E. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Photovoltaic module reliability workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

Mrig, L. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Superlattice-like stacking fault array in ion-irradiated GaN  

SciTech Connect

Controlling defects in crystalline solids is of technological importance for realizing desirable materials properties. Irradiation with energetic particles is useful for designing the spatial distribution and concentration of defects in materials. Here, we performed ion irradiation into hexagonal GaN with the wurtzite structure and demonstrated the spontaneous formation of superlattice-like stacking fault arrays. It was found that the modulation period can be controlled by irradiation conditions and post-irradiation heat treatments.

Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu [Osaka University; Usov, Igor Olegovich [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Weber, William J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Test-to-Failure of Crystalline Silicon Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerated lifetime testing of five crystalline silicon module designs was carried out according to the Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-to-Failure Protocol. This protocol compares the reliability of various module constructions on a quantitative basis. The modules under test are subdivided into three accelerated lifetime testing paths: 85..deg..C/85% relative humidity with system bias, thermal cycling between ?40..deg..C and 85..deg..C, and a path that alternates between damp heat and thermal cycling. The most severe stressor is damp heat with system bias applied to simulate the voltages that modules experience when connected in an array. Positive 600 V applied to the active layer with respect to the grounded module frame accelerates corrosion of the silver grid fingers and degrades the silicon nitride antireflective coating on the cells. Dark I-V curve fitting indicates increased series resistance and saturation current around the maximum power point; however, an improvement in junction recombination characteristics is obtained. Shunt paths and cell-metallization interface failures are seen developing in the silicon cells as determined by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves in the case of negative 600 V bias applied to the active layer. Ability to withstand electrolytic corrosion, moisture ingress, and ion drift under system voltage bias are differentiated.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Trudell, D.; Bosco, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S. R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gradient Combinatorial Libraries via Modulated Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Libraries via Modulated Light Exposure. Bookmark and Share Gradient Combinatorial Libraries via Modulated Light Exposure. ...

175

Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, fourth quarter 1977. Texas Instruments report No. 03-77-56  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array (LSSA) Project, is a process development task. This contract includes solar cell module process development activities in the areas of Surface Preparation, Plasma Processing, Diffusion, Cell Processing and Module Fabrication. In addition, a High Efficiency Cell Development Activity is included. During this quarter, effort was concentrated on wafer etching for saw damage removal, establishing a standard phosphorous diffusion process and a baseline solar cell process as a test bed, designing a large area square cell including test sites, analyzing module layouts for optimum packing efficiency and fabricating the first Tandem Junction Cells (TJC) for this contract. A TJC with backside contacts gave 15.1% efficiency at AM1.

Carbajal, B.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Alignment method for solar collector arrays - Energy ...  

The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising ...

177

Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...  

ORNL 2010-G00642/jcn UT-B IDs PFTT-200100978, PFTT-200201199, PFTT-200401482, PFTT-200401483 Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...

178

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet overview of the Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array project implemented by the Department of Energy Golden Office and National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Primary Dendrite Array Morphology: Observations from Ground ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array ... Solidification and Microstructure Evaluation of the Ni-Ga and Co-Ni-Ga Alloys.

180

Carbon Nanotube Nano-Electrode Arrays - Available ...  

Computers & Electronics; Publication(s) Nanoelectrode Arrays Based on Low Site Density Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. (pdf) - Tu, Y., Lin, Y., Ren, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Array Technologies Inc aka Wattsun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc aka Wattsun Technologies Inc aka Wattsun Jump to: navigation, search Name Array Technologies Inc (aka Wattsun) Place Albuquerque,, New Mexico Zip 87107 Sector Solar Product Manufactures the Wattsun Solar Tracker, a sun-tracking mounting system for PV modules. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

183

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

184

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 19 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook2011 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module.

185

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

186

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

187

1 Modules and exactness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppose that R is an associative ring with 1. In most commutative cases, R is either the integers Z or some field k. Example: Suppose that k is a field and G is a group. The group-algebra k(G) over k is the direct sum k(G) = ? k, g?G with elements written as finite sums ? g?G ?g g, with ?g ? k and all but finitely many ?g = 0. The rule (?g g)(?h h) = (?g?h) (gh) defines the algebra structure on k(G), with multiplicative identity 1 = 1 e, where e is the identity element of G. A k(G)-module M is a k-vector space M, with bilinear map ? : k(G) M ? M with (r, m) ? ? r?m, such that r?(s?m) = (rs)? m and 1 ? m = m, or equivalently M is a k-vector 1 space equipped with a group homomorphism G ? Autk(M). k(G)-modules are often called G-modules for that reason. Not even that is the most enlightened way to describe a k(G)-module. A group G can be thought of as a category (actually a groupoid) with one object ? and a morphism ? g ? ? ? for every g ? G. Then a k(G)-module is a functor M: G ? k ? Mod which takes values in the category of k-vector spaces. NB: Ive only based these notions on fields k and their vector spaces to make them seem real. The object k could be a ring; then k(G) is a k-algebra still and a k(G)-module is a k-module M equipped with a group homomorphism G ? Autk(M). Now we recall some basic definitions and facts about R-modules. Suppose that f: M ? N is an R-module homomorphism. Then the kernel ker(f) of f is defined by ker(f) = {all x ? M such that f(x) = 0}. ker(f) is plainly a submodule of M. The image 2 im(f) of f is the submodule of N consisting of all y ? N such that y = f(x) for some x ? M. The cokernel of f cok(f) is defined to be the quotient A sequence cok(f) = N / im(f). M f ? ? M ? g ? ? M of R-module homomorphisms is said to be exact if ker(g) = im(f). Equivalently, the sequence is exact if g f = 0 and for all y ? M ? with g(y) = 0 there is an x ? M such that f(x) = y. A sequence M1 ? M2 ? ? Mn of R-module homomorphisms is said to be exact if ker = im everywhere. Example 1.1. The sequence 0 ? ker(f) ? M f ? ? N ? cok(f) ? 0 is exact for all R-module homomorphisms f. Note that 0 ? M f ? ? N is exact if and only if f is a monomorphism (injective), and that

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Power module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

Campbell, Jeremy B. (Torrance, CA); Newson, Steve (Redondo Beach, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Array Converter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter Converter Jump to: navigation, search Name Array Converter Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Product US manufacturer of micro-inverters. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

REMARC: Reconfigurable Multimedia Array Coprocessor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a new reconfigurable processor architecture called REMARC (Reconfigurable Multimedia Array Coprocessor). REMARC is a reconfigurable coprocessor that is tightly coupled to a main RISC processor and consists of a global control unit and 64 programmable logic blocks called nano processors. REMARC is designed to accelerate multimedia applications, such as video compression, decompression, and image processing. These applications typically use 8bit or 16-bit data therefore, each nano processor has a 16-bit datapath that is much wider than those of other reconfigurable coprocessors. We have developed a programming environment for REMARC and several realistic application programs, DES encryption, MPEG-2 decoding, and MPEG-2 encoding. REMARC achieves speedups ranging from a factor of 2.3 to 21.2 on these applications. 1 Introduction As the demand for multimedia applications, such as video compression, decompression, and image processing, increasing the performance of thes...

Takashi Miyamori; Kunle Olukotun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

Wares, Brian S.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Shared Memory Programming in Metacomputing Environments: The Global Array Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Global Array shared-memory nonuniform memory-access programming model is explored in a wide-area-network (WAN) distributed supercomputer environment. The Global Array model is extended by introducing a concept of mirrored arrays ... Keywords: Metacomputing, NUMA memory architecture, distributed arrays, global arrays, shared-memory programming

Jarek Nieplocha; Robert Harrison

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DPAD2A Field Programmable Analog Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DPAD2 is a Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) based on CMOS switched capacitor technology. This paper describes the major design decisions that went into creating DPAD2 with respect to the ultimate goal of the work, being a mixed signal field programmable ... Keywords: CMOS, analog field array

Adrian Bratt; Ian Macbeth

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Solar Array Ventures Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Array Ventures Inc Place Austin, Texas Product Texas-based start-up thin film PV panel maker, which plans to develop five production plants over the next five years, with four of those facilities located at a site in New Mexico. References Solar Array Ventures Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Array Ventures Inc is a company located in Austin, Texas . References ↑ "Solar Array Ventures Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Array_Ventures_Inc&oldid=351246" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

195

Method of monolithic module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for "monolithic module assembly" which translate many of the advantages of monolithic module construction of thin-film PV modules to wafered c-Si PV modules. Methods employ using back-contact solar cells positioned atop electrically conductive circuit elements affixed to a planar support so that a circuit capable of generating electric power is created. The modules are encapsulated using encapsulant materials such as EVA which are commonly used in photovoltaic module manufacture. The methods of the invention allow multiple cells to be electrically connected in a single encapsulation step rather than by sequential soldering which characterizes the currently used commercial practices.

Gee, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Garrett, Stephen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Morgan, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Worobey, Walter (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Coal Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

Michael Mellish

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LSA Automated Array Assembly Task has as its goal the manufacture of photovoltaic modules at a capacity of 500 MW per year at a cost of $0.50 per peak watt. Divided between ten solar cell manufacturers, each installation should produce 50 MW per year. This implies that automated machinery would continuously produce 120 solar cells per minute. The purpose of this report is to detail the processes and techniques which are believed to have great promise of accomplishing this task. The initial stages of the program were involved in studying the possibility of automated assembly. Phase 1 reviewed a large cross section of processes, conceptual designs, and innovative technologies in preparation for 1986. Through this documentation, a large amount of comprehensive data has been collected. It is these reports upon which the next phase of the program is based. The purpose of Phase 2 is to propose an automated sequence, verify it and present future cost projections. Utilizing the large amount of information available from Phase 1 and drawing from its own experience Solarex has proposed a process sequence which it is believed has great potential of achieving the LSA goals. This report describes the processes, details, the verification tests performed, and estimates the cost of such an automated array assembly.

Wihl, M.; Toro, J.; Scheinine, A.; Anderson, J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Photovoltaic-module encapsulation design and materials selection: Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Encapsulation-material system requirements, material-selection criteria, and the status and properties of encapsulation materials and processes available to the module manufacturer are presented in detail. Technical and economic goals established for photovoltaic modules and encapsulation systems and their status are described for material suppliers to assist them in assessing the suitability of materials in their product lines and the potential of new-material products. A comprehensive discussion of available encapsulation technology and data is presented to facilitate design and material selection for silicon flat-plate photovoltaic modules, using the best materials available and processes optimized for specific power applications and geographic sites. A basis is provided for specifying the operational and environmental loads that encapsulation material systems must resist. Potential deployment sites for which cost effectiveness may be achieved at a module price much greater than $0.70/W/sub p/, are also considered; data on higher-cost encapsulant materials and processes that may be in use and other material candidates that may be justified for special application are discussed. Described are encapsulation-system functional requirements and candidate design concepts and materials that have been identified and analyzed as having the best potential to meet the cost and performance goals for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project. The available data on encapsulant material properties, fabrication processing, and module life and durability characteristics are presented.

Cuddihy, E.; Carroll, W.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from converted phases stack coherently. Combining data from all arrays we process the data set as an array of mini-arrays and stack the data into CCP bins. Processing the data in...

202

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) The Wenner array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC resistivity survey and...

203

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) The Pole-Dipole array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

204

Module Utilization Committee. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the US Department of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules. The final report of that committee accounts for that disposition. The membership and activities of the committee are set forth and the results of its activities are reported.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays ...  

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ...

206

Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays sandwiched between...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays sandwiched between graphene layers for high-capacity lithium storage Title Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays...

207

High power semiconductor laser diode arrays  

SciTech Connect

The cw optical power obtainable from semiconductor laser diodes has been extended to unprecedented levels in recent years through the use of multistripe arrays. By spreading out the optical power with more than 100 stripes, single-facet, cw output in exces of 5 Watts has been demonstrated, and 500 mW cw is now commercially available. Recent improvements to array performance include: arrays up to 1 cm wide that generates quasi-cw (150 usec pulse) output in excesss of 11 Watts, and a novel device structure which produces up to 215 mW cw in a single diffraction limited lobe.

Cross, P.S.

1986-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

209

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

210

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

211

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 137 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

212

Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 167 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the

213

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 135 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

214

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh/100 kW kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 1/8 cost / KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft / Hub (which limits surface speed) * Flexible Motor Magnets on Rim ID * Develop Touch-down System for Earthquake Flying Rim Eliminate Shaft and Hub Levitate on Passive Magnetic Bearings Increase Rim Tip Speed Larger Diameter Thinner Rim Stores More Energy 4 X increase in Stored Energy with only 60% Increase in Weight Development of a 100 kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module High Speed, Low Cost, Composite Ring with Bore-Mounted Magnetics Current State of the Art Flywheel Limitations of Existing Flywheel * 15 Minutes of storage * Limited to Frequency Regulation Application * Rim Speed (Stored Energy) Limited by Hub Strain and Shaft Dynamics

215

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 3, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of the quality of the various possible forms of the starting silicon material leads to the conclusion that wafers from Czochralski-pulled ingots are the only form of silicon which will be available for automated array processing for the next several years. A new calculational procedure has been developed and tested for the optimization of performance of both the front and back contact metallizations. The survey of present-day contact and interconnect metallization technology for silicon devices has been completed. A semi-automated parallel gap welding procedure is defined in detail, and a further analysis of panel material costs is presented. Glass panels of three configurations are considered the best choice and these are described. A complete description of the cost analysis procedure for one particular solar array module manufacturing sequence is given. The basic materials costs of the process sequences developed and studied are beginning to approach interesting values. The lowest cost projected to date for material and expense items for array module manufacturing is $0.30/W. (WDM)

Williams, B.F.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding...

220

Low-cost laser diode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Low-cost laser diode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

Freitas, Barry L. (Livermore, CA); Skidmore, Jay A. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sampling Errors in Rawinsonde-Array Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data used for sounding-array budget computations have random errors, both instrumental errors and errors of representativeness (here called sampling errors). The latter are associated with the fact that radiosondes do not measure large-...

Brian E. Mapes; Paul E. Ciesielski; Richard H. Johnson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Randomized post-optimization of covering arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of covering arrays with the fewest rows remains a challenging problem. Most computational and recursive constructions result in extensive repetition of coverage. While some is necessary, some is not. By reducing the repeated coverage, ...

Peyman Nayeri; Charles J. Colbourn; Goran Konjevod

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Array with Hs 7.58 m, Tp 2.22 s and DSPR 4. WEC Farm Modeling: WEC Energy Sink Definition WEC Energy Sink Definition * Currently WECs modeled in SWAN as constant...

225

Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

Cuddihy, E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

Sabanayagam, Chandran R. (Allston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Needham, MA); Misasi, John (Syracuse, NY); Hatch, Anson (Seattle, WA); Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Quasi-random array imaging collimator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes-touching imaging collimator. The quasi-random array imaging collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasing throughput by elimination of a substrate. The present invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

Fenimore, E.E.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Performance and Reliability of Multijunction III-V Modules for Concentrator Dish and Central Receiver Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 15 years, Solar Systems have developed a dense array receiver PV technology for 500X concentrator reflective dish applications. This concentrator PV technology has been successfully deployed at six different locations in Australia, counting for more than 1 MWp of installed peak power. A new Multijunction III-V receiver to replace the current silicon Point-Contact solar cells has recently been developed. The new receiver technology is based on high-efficiency (>32%) Concentrator Ultra Triple Junction (CUTJ) solar cells from Spectrolab, resulting in system power and energy performance improvement of more than 50% compared to the silicon cells. The 0.235 m{sup 2} concentrator PV receiver, designed for continuous 500X operation, is composed of 64 dense array modules, and made of series and parallel-connected solar cells, totaling approximately 1,500 cells. The individual dense array modules have been tested under high intensity pulsed light, as well as with concentrated sunlight at the Solar Systems research facility and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's High Flux Solar Furnace. The efficiency of the dense array modules ranges from 30% to 36% at 500X (50 W/cm{sup 2}, AM1.5D low AOD, 21C). The temperature coefficients for power, voltage and current, as well as the influence of Air Mass on the cell responsivity, were measured. The reliability of the dense array multijunction III-V modules has been studied with accelerated aging tests, such as thermal cycling, damp heat and high-temperature soak, and with real-life high-intensity exposure. The first 33 kWp multijunction III-V receiver was recently installed in a Solar Systems dish and tested in real-life 500X concentrated sunlight conditions. Receiver efficiencies of 30.3% and 29.0% were measured at Standard Operating Conditions and Normal Operating Conditions respectively.

Verlinden, P. J.; Lewandowski, A.; Bingham, C.; Kinsey, G. S.; Sherif, R. A.; Laisch, J. B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Frequency multiplexed flux locked loop architecture providing an array of DC SQUIDS having both shared and unshared components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Architecture for frequency multiplexing multiple flux locked loops in a system comprising an array of DC SQUID sensors. The architecture involves dividing the traditional flux locked loop into multiple unshared components and a single shared component which, in operation, form a complete flux locked loop relative to each DC SQUID sensor. Each unshared flux locked loop component operates on a different flux modulation frequency. The architecture of the present invention allows a reduction from 2N to N+1 in the number of connections between the cryogenic DC SQUID sensors and their associated room temperature flux locked loops. Furthermore, the 1.times.N architecture of the present invention can be paralleled to form an M.times.N array architecture without increasing the required number of flux modulation frequencies.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates has conducted a study to identify and estimate costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays were investigated - General (Normal) Maintenance, Cleaning, Panel Replacement, Gasket Repair/Replacement, Wiring Repair/Replacement, and Termination Repair/Replacement. The effects of the mounting types - Rack Mount, Stand-Off Mount, Direct Mount, and Integral Mount - and the installation/replacement type - Sequential, Partial Interruption, and Independent - have been identified and described. Recommendation on methods of reducing maintenance costs are made.

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Systolic Arrays for Integer Chinese Remaindering Getin K. Koc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Coeentino, #Fault Tolerance in a Systolic Residue Arithmetic Processor Array," IEEE Trona. on Computers, Vol

California at Davis, University of

233

Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

Edenburn, M.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

HEMI AL FREE WATER ANALYSIS WITH NANOELE TRODE ARRAYS  

hemi al free water analysis with nanoele trode arrays te hnology summary te hnology readiness level:

235

Characterization of Multicrystalline Silicon Modules with System Bias Voltage Applied in Damp Heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As it is considered economically favorable to serially connect modules to build arrays with high system voltage, it is necessary to explore potential long-term degradation mechanisms the modules may incur under such electrical potential. We performed accelerated lifetime testing of multicrystalline silicon PV modules in 85 degrees C/ 85% relative humidity and 45 degrees C/ 30% relative humidity while placing the active layer in either positive or negative 600 V bias with respect to the grounded module frame. Negative bias applied to the active layer in some cases leads to more rapid and catastrophic module power degradation. This is associated with significant shunting of individual cells as indicated by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves. Mass spectroscopy results support ion migration as one of the causes. Electrolytic corrosion is seen occurring with the silicon nitride antireflective coating and silver gridlines, and there is ionic transport of metallization at the encapsulant interface observed with damp heat and applied bias. Leakage current and module degradation is found to be highly dependent upon the module construction, with factors such as encapsulant and front glass resistivity affecting performance. Measured leakage currents range from about the same seen in published reports of modules deployed in Florida (USA) and is accelerated to up to 100 times higher in the environmental chamber testing.

Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Call, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

Tewari, Param H. (Milpitas, CA); Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Silicon ball grid array chip carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Gassman, Richard A. (Greensboro, NC); Chu, Dahwey (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules are made of several components, including the front surface materials, encapsulant, rear surface, and frame.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

242

Adjustable extender for instrument module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Integration of diffractive lenses with addressable vertical-cavity laser arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optical interconnection system is being developed to provide vertical, digital data channels for stacked multichip modules. A key component of the system is an array of individually addressable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with diffractive lenses integrated into the substrate to control beam divergence and direction. The lenses were fabricated by direct-write e-beam lithography and reactive ion beam etching into the GaAs substrate. Preliminary device performance data and the design and fabrication issues are discussed.

Warren, M.E.; Du, T.C.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.; Lear, K.L.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Schneider, R.P.; Zolper, J.C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Early expansion in exploding multiple wire arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is developed for the initial stage (blow-off and the onset of pinching) of a multiple exploded wire array. With obvious modifications the model can also be applied to single wires or other self-pinched plasma columns. Each wire in the array is modeled as a plasma cylinder undergoing self-similar radial motion, and the whole array is coupled self-consistently to an external circuit. The plasma expands initially; the onset of self-pinch is shown to be coincident with the plasma conductivity reaching a value large enough for skin effect to occur. The model is run for a variety of system parameters, and the choice of machine and wire parameters to attain particular objectives (e.g., rapid current rise, limited wire expansion, etc.) is discussed.

Bloomberg, H.W.; Lampe, M.; Colombant, D.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multisource Self-calibration for Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of a sensor array is more involved if the antennas have direction dependent gains and multiple calibrator sources are simultaneously present. We study this case for a sensor array with arbitrary geometry but identical elements, i.e. elements with the same direction dependent gain pattern. A weighted alternating least squares (WALS) algorithm is derived that iteratively solves for the direction independent complex gains of the array elements, their noise powers and their gains in the direction of the calibrator sources. An extension of the problem is the case where the apparent calibrator source locations are unknown, e.g., due to refractive propagation paths. For this case, the WALS method is supplemented with weighted subspace fitting (WSF) direction finding techniques. Using Monte Carlo simulations we demonstrate that both methods are asymptotically statistically efficient and converge within two iterations even in cases of low SNR.

Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/TSP.2009.2022894

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Terabyte IDE RAID-5 Disk Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy physics experiments are currently recording large amounts of data and in a few years will be recording prodigious quantities of data. New methods must be developed to handle this data and make analysis at universities possible. We examine some techniques that exploit recent developments in commodity hardware. We report on tests of redundant arrays of integrated drive electronics (IDE) disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. IDE redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) prices now are less than the cost per terabyte of million-dollar tape robots! The arrays can be scaled to sizes affordable to institutions without robots and used when fast random access at low cost is important.

David A. Sanders et al.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automated Array Assembly. Quarterly report No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the existing technologies applicable to solar module fabrication is nearing completion. One basic module whose manufacturing costs were derived from first principles is described. In this case, four basic cost analyses were made using a computerized cost analysis procedure. Excluding raw wafer cost, the estimated module processing cost per watt for the Ti/Ag evaporation metallization base case is about $2.40. An experimental thick-film Al screen-printing technique could reduce the cost to about $1.55/W. These estimates use a derived overall process yield of about 65 percent. (WDM)

Williams, B.F.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9). The model is created by aggregating individual refineries into one linear programmming representation for each PADD. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of conventional and new petroleum products. In order to interact with other NEMS modules with different regional representations, certain PMM inputs and outputs are converted from PADD regions to other regional structures and vice versa. The linear programming results are used to determine

250

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, DOE/EIA- 6, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

251

Light modulating device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method of fabricating a solar cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

Lazzery, Angelo G. (Oaklyn, NJ); Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of the ORRUBA Silicon Detector Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new high solid-angular coverage array, composed of two rings of silicon detectors, optimized for measuring (d,p) reactions. A partial implementation has been used to measure (d,p) reactions on nuclei around the N = 82 shell closure.

Pain, S. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chae, K. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Moazen, B. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Chipps, K. A. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80403 (United States); Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; O'Malley, P.; Thomas, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Johnson, M. S.; Matei, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Kozub, R. L. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Models of Photovoltaic Module Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of data collected over a three-year period at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Photovoltaic Test Facility has enabled the prediction of photovoltaic (PV) module performance under conditions different from the test environment. The equations developed by PG&E provide a basis for rating photovoltaic modules and systems more accurately than in the past.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Water-equivalent dosimeter array for small-field external beam radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing complexity of dose patterns external beam radiotherapy, there is a great need for new types of dosimeters. We studied the first prototype of a new dosimeter array consisting of water-equivalent plastic scintillating fibers for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. We found that this array allows precise, rapid dose evaluation of small photon fields. Starting with a dosimeter system constructed with a single scintillating fiber coupled to a clear optical fiber and read using a charge coupled device camera, we looked at the dosimeter's spatial resolution under small radiation fields and angular dependence. Afterward, we analyzed the camera's light collection to determine the maximum array size that could be built. Finally, we developed a prototype made of ten scintillating fiber detectors to study the behavior and precision of this system in simple dosimetric situations. The scintillation detector showed no measurable angular dependence. Comparison of the scintillation detector and a small-volume ion chamber showed agreement except for 1x1 and 0.5x5.0 cm{sup 2} fields where the output factor measured by the scintillator was higher. The actual field of view of the camera could accept more than 4000 scintillating fiber detectors simultaneously. Evaluation of the dose profile and depth dose curve using a prototype with ten scintillating fiber detectors showed precise, rapid dose evaluation even with placement of more than 75 optical fibers in the field to simulate what would happen in a larger array. We concluded that this scintillating fiber dosimeter array is a valuable tool for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. It possesses the qualities necessary to evaluate small and irregular fields with various incident angles such as those encountered in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy.

Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec City (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

258

Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO.sub.2 laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart.

Strauss, Charlie E. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO{sub 2} laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart. 4 figs.

Strauss, C.E.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

260

System Voltage Potential-Induced Degradation Mechanisms in PV Modules and Methods for Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past decade, degradation and power loss have been observed in PV modules resulting from the stress exerted by system voltage bias. This is due in part to qualification tests and standards that do not adequately evaluate for the durability of modules to the long-term effects of high voltage bias experienced in fielded arrays. High voltage can lead to module degradation by multiple mechanisms. The extent of the voltage bias degradation is linked to the leakage current or coulombs passed from the silicon active layer through the encapsulant and glass to the grounded module frame, which can be experimentally determined; however, competing processes make the effect non-linear and history-dependent. Appropriate testing methods and stress levels are described that demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. This information, along with outdoor testing that is in progress, is used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. Na-rich precipitates are observed on the cell surface after stressing the module to induce PID in damp heat with negative bias applied to the active layer.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Smith, R.; Glick, S.; Pankow, J.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.; Bennett, I.; Kloos, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Force Modulator System  

SciTech Connect

Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better marry the die-specific Force Modulator technology with stamping presses in the form of a press cushion. This system would be designed to operate the binder ring for multiple parts, thus cutting the per-die cost of the technology. This study reports the results of technology field application. This project produced the following conclusions: (1) The Force Modulator system is capable of operating at very high tempos in the stamping environment; (2) The company can generate substantial, controlled holding tonnage (binder ring pressure) necessary to hold high strength steel parts for proper formation during draw operations; (3) A single system can be designed to operate with a family of parts, thus significantly reducing the per-die cost of a FM system; (4) High strength steel parts made with these systems appear to show significant quality improvements; (5) The amounts of steel required to make these parts is typically less than the amounts required with traditional blank-holding technologies; and (6) This technology will aid in the use of higher strength steels in auto and truck production, thus reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency.

Redmond Clark

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Efficient tiling patterns for reconfigurable gate arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a few potentially efficient tiling patterns for gate-array realizations. We start with a brief recapitulation of tiling patterns, and fundamental limits of placement/routing in a two-dimensional plane. We state the first principles ... Keywords: FPGA, hexagonal, octagonal, tiling

Sumanta Chaudhuri; Sylvain Guilley; Philippe Hoogvorst; Jean-Luc Danger

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Accelerating Haskell array codes with multicore GPUs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current GPUs are massively parallel multicore processors optimised for workloads with a large degree of SIMD parallelism. Good performance requires highly idiomatic programs, whose development is work intensive and requires expert knowledge. To raise ... Keywords: arrays, data parallelism, dynamic compilation, gpgpu, haskell, skeletons

Manuel M.T. Chakravarty; Gabriele Keller; Sean Lee; Trevor L. McDonell; Vinod Grover

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

FAWN: a fast array of wimpy nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fast array of wimpy nodes---FAWN---an approach for achieving low-power data-intensive data-center computing. FAWN couples low-power processors to small amounts of local flash storage, balancing computation and I/O capabilities. ...

David G. Andersen; Jason Franklin; Michael Kaminsky; Amar Phanishayee; Lawrence Tan; Vijay Vasudevan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ROBOTIC DEVICE FOR CLEANING PHOTOVOLTAIC PANEL ARRAYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

output from a photovoltaic cell installed at Northeastern University., Boston, MA, USA. The graph shows to human crews and current hardware alternatives. A photovoltaic cell is an electronic device that converts1 ROBOTIC DEVICE FOR CLEANING PHOTOVOLTAIC PANEL ARRAYS MARK ANDERSON, ASHTON GRANDY, JEREMY HASTIE

Mavroidis, Constantinos

266

Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report we demonstrate that consistent highquality quantitative results can be achieved by array CGH after random prime amplification (RPA) and labeling. Further, we show that careful attention to quantitation of the starting DNA from manually microdissected paraffin material is necessary for optimum results

Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Breast; Y Devries; Sarah Nyante; Jim Korkola; Richard Segraves; Kentaro Nakao; Dan Moore; Hanik Bae; Monica Wilhelm; Shelley Hwang; Frederic Waldman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hybrid algorithms for adaptive array systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, mobile communications have caused an explosive growth to the number of wireless users. This growth has triggered an enormous demand not only for capacity but also for better coverage and quality of services with priority on interference ... Keywords: adaptive arrays, beamforming, least mean squares algorithm, mobile communications, sample matrix inversion algorithm, smart antennas

D. Papadimitriou; I. O. Vardiambasis

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Compute Node MD3000 Storage Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compute Node MD3000 Storage Array Dell 2950 Head Node 24-Port Switch Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node 24-Port Switch Dell 2950

Weber, David J.

269

Phase I of the automated array assembly task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Annual technical report. Motorola report No. 2258/4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed to analyze, both technically and economically, the state of technology readiness for the automated production of solar cells and modules is compiled and reviewed critically. The long-term objective solar module characteristics include a selling price of less than $.50/peak watt and a mean-time-before-failure (MTBF) of 20 years in any terrestrial environment. While efficiency is important to attaining the cost goal, it is a most significant factor in array economics; accordingly, this program has stressed high efficiency, with a suggested cell goal of 15 percent. The analysis emphasized technical evaluation of individual process steps first, and then concentrated upon process sequences for making solar cells and modules. Further analysis was performed to yield a detailed cost study of individual process steps; this was applied to the cost analysis of potential process sequences. Potentially economical process sequences formed from process steps deemed to have high technical merit were then identified. Potentially promising technologies needing further development to achieve satisfactory maturity were then identified. It is concluded that, while specific areas of technology need advanced development and the source of silicon needs definition, no fundamentally new technology needs to be developed to permit manufacture of solar cells which will meet the 1985 LSSA Program cost goals.

Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Grenon, L.A.; Lesk, I.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, C.J.

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Living Systems Energy Module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Objective Array Design: Application to the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple, versatile, computationally efficient ensemble-based method for objectively designing an observation array is described. The method seeks to compute the observation array that minimizes the analysis error variance, according to Kalman ...

Pavel Sakov; Peter R. Oke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Photovoltaic Cz Silicon Module Improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work focused on reducing the cost per watt of Cz silicon photovoltaic modules under Phase II of Siemens Solar Industries' DOE/NREL PVMaT 4A subcontract is described in this report. New module designs were deployed in this phase of the contract, improvements in yield of over 10% were realized, and further implementation of Statistical Process Control was achieved during this phase. Module configurations representing a 12% cost reduction per watt were implemented in small scale production under Phase II of this contract. Yield improvements are described in detail, yield sensitivity to wafer thickness is quantified, and the deployment of SPC in critical process steps is reported here.

Jester, T. L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Residential Sector Demand Module 1995, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This updated version of the NEMS Residential Module Documentation includes changesmade to the residential module for the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1995.

John H. Cymbalsky

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biomass Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Energy Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy...

277

Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of PV module encapsulation materials, processing, and testing shows that overall module reliability is determined by all component materials and processing factors.

Pern, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Photovoltaic-module bypass-diode encapsulation. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented in this annual report. A comprehensive survey of available pad-mounted PN junction and Schottky diodes led to the selection of Semicon PN junction diode cells for this application. Diode junction-to-heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1/sup 0/C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150/sup 0/C. Based on the results of a detailed thermal analysis, which covered the range of bypass currents from 2 to 20 amperes, three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed and fabricated. Thermal testing of these modules has enabled the formation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally-mounted packaged diodes. An assessment of bypass diode reliability, which relies heavily on rectifying diode failure rate data, leads to the general conclusion that, when proper designed and installed, these devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

Not Available

1983-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Photovoltaic module soiling studies, May 1978-October 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retention of particulate contamination on the surface of flat-plate photovoltaic devices is adversely affecting electrical performance of outdoor-exposed modules. The results of an experimental study being performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Low-Cost Solar Array Project to characterize and understand the effects of outdoor contaminants on sensitive optical surfaces of flat-plate photovoltaic modules and cover materials are described. Comparative electrical and optical performance data from photovoltaic modules and materials subjected to outdoor exposure at field test sites throughout the United States have been collected and examined. The results show significant time- and site-dependence. During periods when natural removal processes do not dominate, the rate of particulate contamination accumulation appears to be largely material-independent. The effectiveness of natural removal processes, especially rain, is strongly material-dependent. Glass and acrylic top-cover materials retain fewer particles than silicone rubber does. Side-by-side outdoor exposure testing for long duration is presently the most effective means of evaluating soiling differences between materials. Changes in spectral transmission as a function of time and location and limited scattering data are presented.

Hoffman, A.R.; Maag, C.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of an accelerated test design for predicting the service life of the solar array at Mead, Nebraska. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic viability requires that photovoltaic arrays should have a service life of 20 years or longer. Qualification and performance tests indicate that presently available photovoltaic modules provide acceptable performance at the time of installation. This study is being conducted as part of a program to develop and validate an accelerated test plan that can be used to predict the useful service life of present and future solar arrays. Previously a methodology was developed for designing an accelerated test program incorporating trade-offs between the cost of each test and its value in reducing the variance in the life prediction for that array. The objective of the present study is to apply this methodology to develop an accelerated test plan to predict the service life of the 25-kW photovoltaic array installed near Mead, Nebraska. Potential long-term degradation modes for the two types of modules in the Mead array have been determined and judgments have been made as to those environmental stresses and combinations of stresses which accelerate the degradation of the power output. Hierarchical trees representing the severity of effects of stresses (test conditions) on eleven individual degradation modes have been constructed and have been pruned of tests judged to be nonessential. Composites of those trees have been developed so that there is now one pruned tree covering eight degradation modes, another covering two degradation modes, and a third covering one degradation mode. These three composite trees form the basis for selection of test conditions in the final test plan which is now being prepared.

Gaines, G.B.; Thomas, R.E.; Noel, G.T.; Shilliday, T.S.; Wood, V.E.; Carmichael, D.C.

1979-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Laser Array Synchronization - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

Laser Array Synchronization Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

282

Au nanoslit arrays as plasmonic substrates for solar water ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au nanoslit arrays as plasmonic substrates for solar water splitting with ?-Fe 2 O 3. Bohn, Christopher; Agrawal, Amit; Lee ...

283

The european FAZIA initiative: a high-performance digital telescope array for heavy-ion studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The european Fazia collaboration aims at building a new modular array for charged product identification to be employed for heavy-ion studies. The elementary module of the array is a Silicon-Silicon-CsI telescope, optimized for ion identification also via pulse shape analysis. The achievement of top performances imposes specific electronics which has been developed by FAZIA and features high quality charge and current preamplifiers, coupled to fully digital front-end. During the initial R&D phase, original and novel solutions have been tested in prototypes, obtaining unprecedented ion identification capabilities. FAZIA is now constructing a demonstrator array consisting of about two hundreds telescopes arranged in a compact and transportable configuration. In this contribution, we mainly summarize some aspects studied by FAZIA to improve the ion identification. Then we will briefly discuss the FAZIA program centered on experiments to be done with the demonstrator. First results on the isospin dynamics obtained with a reduced set-up demonstrate well the performance of the telescope and represent a good starting point towards future investigations with both stable and exotic beams.

G. Casini; S. Barlini; G. Pasquali; G. Pastore; M. Bini; S. Carboni; A. Olmi; S. Piantelli; G. Poggi; A. Stefanini; S. Valdre'; E. Bonnet; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; M. Bruno; A. Chbihi; M. Cinausero; M. Degerlier; P. Edelbruck; J. D. Frankland; F. Gramegna; D. Gruyer; M. Guerzoni; A. Kordjasz; T. Kozik; N. Le Neindre; O. Lopez; T. Marchi; P. Marini; L. Morelli; A. Ordine; M. Parlog; M. F. Rivet; E. Rosato; F. Salomon; G. Spadaccini; T. Twarog; E. Vient; M. Vigilante

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Proceedings of the Third EPRI Phased Array Ultrasound Seminar  

SciTech Connect

Phased array technology for ultrasonic examination is providing innovative solutions for nuclear in-service examination applications. EPRI has been a prime mover in the development and deployment of phased array ultrasound applications in the domestic nuclear market over the past decade. As part of this strategic effort, EPRI has hosted a series of seminars on phased array technology and its applications.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Przetakiewicz, Marek (Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

289

Module Handbook Specialisation Biomass Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target learning outcomes The module of Introduction and Basic concepts establishes the fundamental) Efficiency determination (I) Biofuels Management: prevention and protection against explosions Efficiency thermochemistry processes · Mass and energy balances · Efficiency calculation Target learning outcomes

Damm, Werner

290

Multiple Layer Graphene Optical Modulator  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a tiny optical modulator based on graphene, potentially leading to significantly improved data transmission speeds in digital communications. The extremely strong interaction between light and relativistic ...

291

Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wind energy External costs Future price trends 3. Environmental Issues Environmental benefits of WT and Externalities Clculation methods Current plant costs Wind energy prices The value Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme

Habel, Annegret

292

Solar cell module lamination process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Tracy, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Physical and electrical degradation of photovoltaic modules after exposure in terrestrial environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between March 1977 and March 1979, MIT/Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, placed 75 kW of photovoltaic modules at various experimental test sites in the United States. The largest of these include a 25 kW array field in Mead, Nebraska, used to power corn irrigation and crop drying equipment; a ground level 25 kW array field in Lexington, used as a residential system test bed; a 15 kW rooftop test bed in Lexington, used to evaluate components of photovoltaic systems prior to field installation. To date only 44 modules (amounting to 600 watts) out of 6,000 have experienced electrical failures. This report summarizes the performance of the photovoltaic modules at the Mead test site and describes the physical and electrical changes which have occurred due to weathering and soil accumulation since start-up in July 1977. Where relevant, comparisons will be made with modules at the other test sites.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array, NREL (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array System Specifications System size: 720 kilowatts (kW) DC Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaic, ground mounted Annual output: 1.2 gigawatt hours (GWh) Location: Top of South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado Start of operation: December 2008 Financial Terms System ownership: SunEdison financed, built, owns, operates and maintains the system Solar Power and Services Agreement (SPSA): SunEdison and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) entered into a 20-year SPSA to provide Solar Energy Services to the Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Cost to DOE/NREL: There are no up-front costs to DOE or NREL * The price per kilowatt hour (kWh) for the power purchased from the

297

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array, NREL (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array System Specifications System size: 720 kilowatts (kW) DC Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaic, ground mounted Annual output: 1.2 gigawatt hours (GWh) Location: Top of South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado Start of operation: December 2008 Financial Terms System ownership: SunEdison financed, built, owns, operates and maintains the system Solar Power and Services Agreement (SPSA): SunEdison and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) entered into a 20-year SPSA to provide Solar Energy Services to the Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Cost to DOE/NREL: There are no up-front costs to DOE or NREL * The price per kilowatt hour (kWh) for the power purchased from the

298

Annular array and method of manufacturing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90.degree.. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings, hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Economic analysis of the unified heliostat array  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Unified Heliostat Array (UHA) is comprised of conventional two-axis heliostats mounted on a terraced south-facing wall of a single structure. The arrangement of heliostats on the array is chosen to eliminate or control the degree of inter-heliostat shading and blocking. The UHA was investifated as to cost and optical performance. Two heliostats, the Veda Industrial Heliostat (VIH) and the Repowering Heliostat were investigated in conjunction with the UHA. The UHA was found to be a viable candidate for solar thermal central receiver applications. The UHA-VIH combination was shown to provide very high flux densities and to be suitable for high temperature applications in the 1000/sup 0/K to 2000/sup 0/K range. These temperatures were shown to be achievable even with very small (1 MWt) collector fields.

Not Available

1980-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Measuring Solar Spectral and Angle-ofIncidence Effects on Photovoltaic Modules and Solar Irradiance Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation. INTRODUCTION It is common knowledge to people familiar with photovoltaic technology that the electrical current generated by photovoltaic devices is influenced by the spectral distribution (spectrum) of sunlight. It is also commonly understood that the spectral distribution of sunlight vari...

David L. King; Jay A. Kratochvil; William E. Boyson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The ASTRI Mini-Array Science Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASTRI is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size Telescope in a dual-mirror configuration (SST-2M) for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), scheduled to start data acquisition in 2014. Although the ASTRI SST-2M prototype is mainly a technological demonstrator, it will perform scientific observations of the Crab Nebula, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 at E>1 TeV. A remarkable improvement in terms of performance could come from the operation, in 2016, of a SST-2M mini-array, composed of a few SST-2M telescopes to be placed at final CTA Southern Site. The SST mini-array will be able to study in great detail relatively bright sources (a few x 10E-12 erg/cm2/s at 10 TeV) with angular resolution of a few arcmin and energy resolution of about 10-15%. Thanks to the stereo approach, it will be possible to verify the wide field of view (FoV) performance through the detections of very high-energy showers with core located at a distance up to 500 m, to compare the mini-array performance with the Monte Carlo expectations by means of deep observations of selected targets, and to perform the first CTA science at the beginning of the mini-array operations. Prominent sources such as extreme blazars, nearby well-known BL Lac objects and radio-galaxies, galactic pulsar wind nebulae, supernovae remnants, micro-quasars, and the Galactic Center can be observed in a previously unexplored energy range, in order to investigate the electron acceleration and cooling, relativistic and non relativistic shocks, the search for cosmic-ray (CR) Pevatrons, the study of the CR propagation, and the impact of the extragalactic background light on the spectra of the sources.

S. Vercellone; G. Agnetta; L. A. Antonelli; D. Bastieri; G. Bellassai; M. Belluso; C. Bigongiari; S. Billotta; B. Biondo; G. Bonanno; G. Bonnoli; P. Bruno; A. Bulgarelli; R. Canestrari; M. Capalbi; P. Caraveo; A. Carosi; E. Cascone; O. Catalano; M. Cereda; P. Conconi; V. Conforti; G. Cusumano; V. De Caprio; A. De Luca; A. Di Paola; F. Di Pierro; D. Fantinel; M. Fiorini; D. Fugazza; D. Gardiol; M. Ghigo; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; E. Giro; A. Grillo; D. Impiombato; S. Incorvaia; A. La Barbera; N. La Palombara; V. La Parola; G. La Rosa; L. Lessio; G. Leto; S. Lombardi; F. Lucarelli; M. C. Maccarone; G. Malaguti; G. Malaspina; V. Mangano; D. Marano; E. Martinetti; R. Millul; T. Mineo; A. Misto'; C. Morello; G. Morlino; M. R. Panzera; G. Pareschi; G. Rodeghiero; P. Romano; F. Russo; B. Sacco; N. Sartore; J. Schwarz; A. Segreto; G. Sironi; G. Sottile; A. Stamerra; E. Strazzeri; L. Stringhetti; G. Tagliaferri; V. Testa; M. C. Timpanaro; G. Toso; G. Tosti; M. Trifoglio; P. Vallania; V. Zitelli; F. Tavecchio

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Apparatus for encapsulating a photovoltaic module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject inventions concern various photovoltaic module designs to protect the module from horizontal and vertical impacts and degradation of solar cell efficiency caused by moisture. In one design, a plurality of panel supports that are positioned adjacent to the upper panel in a photovoltaic module absorb vertical forces exerted along an axis perpendicular to the upper panel. Other designs employ layers of glass and tempered glass, respectively, to protect the module from vertical impacts. A plurality of button-shaped channels is used around the edges of the photovoltaic module to absorb forces applied to the module along an axis parallel to the module and direct moisture away from the module that could otherwise penetrate the module and adversely affect the cells within the module. A spacer is employed between the upper and lower panels that has a coefficient of thermal expansion substantially equivalent to the coefficient of thermal expansion of at least one of the panels.

Albright, Scot P. (El Paso, TX); Dugan, Larry M. (Boulder, CO)

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

Commissioning of modulator-based IMRT with XiO treatment planning system  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the procedures for correction of the modulator thickness and commissioning of the XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for modulator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (M-IMRT). This modulator manufacturing system adopts a method in which the modulator is milled using a floor-type computer-aided numerical control milling machine (CNC-mill) with modulator data calculated by XiO TPS. XiO TPS uses only effective attenuation coefficients (EAC) for modulator thickness calculation. This article describes a modified method for assessing modulator thickness. A two-dimensional linear attenuation array was used to correct the modulator thickness calculated by XiO. Narrow-beam geometry was used for measuring the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) at off-axis positions (OAP) for varying brass thicknesses. An equation for the two-dimensional LAC ratio (2D-LACR) can be used to calculate the corrected modulator thickness. It is assumed that the broad beam EAC of a small field varies with the brass thickness and the OAP distance in the same way as that of LACR, so the two-dimensional EAC (2D-EAC) is equal to the EAC corrected using the LACR. The dose distribution was evaluated for three geometric patterns and one clinical case on low energy x ray (4 MV) with a large field size (20x20 cm{sup 2}). The results using the proposed correction method of modulator thickness showed a good agreement between the measured dose distributions and the dose distributions calculated by TPS with the correction. Hence, the method is effective to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT in XiO TPS. An important problem for the brass modulator is the milling condition, such as the drill diameter and the cutting pitch size. It is necessary to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT for the ''softening'' and ''hardening'' effects of the beam to be considered in dose calculation in patients and the modulator profile design.

Oguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasunori [Program in Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan) and Shinshu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, 1-1-20 Daiko Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Education of Risk Professionals Module 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides documentation for Module 1 in the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI) Education of Risk Professionals Probabilistic Risk Assessment PRA) training program. Module 1 is the first of six training modules in the Education of Risk Professionals series. Each module is one week in length, and the entire training program is typically scheduled over 10 months. Accompanying this report are the Microsoft PowerPoint slide presentations for Module 1, which contain speaker notes that offer de...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Education of Risk Professionals Module 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides documentation for Module 2 in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Education of Risk Professionals Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) training program. Module 2 is comprised of PRA 102, Systems Analysis and PRA 102A, Basic PRA Software. Module 2 is the second of six training modules in the Education of Risk Professionals series. Each module is typically one week in length. The entire training program is typically scheduled over the course of 10 months. The PowerPoint slide ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system that produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the US energy markets. The model achieves a supply and demand balance in the end-use demand regions, defined as the nine Census Divisions, by solving for the prices of each energy type such that the quantities producers are willing to supply equal the quantities consumers wish to consume. The system reflects market economics, industry structure, and energy policies and regulations that influence market behavior. The NEMS Integrating Module is the central integrating component of a complex modeling system. As such, a thorough understanding of its role in the modeling process can only be achieved by placing it in the proper context with respect to the other modules. To that end, this document provides an overview of the complete NEMS model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

Not Available

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Large scale production task: low cost silicon solar array project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several design concepts were evaluated and compared with respect to potential for low cost and automation, protection against weathering, potential for array efficiency as a function of weight and area, potential for design flexibility and exposure to electrical breakdown or leakage to ground. This evaluation program narrowed attention to design concepts involving glass as the primary structural and weather resistant component of the module. The leading specific design structure consisted of the solar cell circuit embedded in polyvinyl butyrate by lamination between a glass front surface and a polyester film rear surface. Preliminary evaluation of this structure in high humidity and thermal cycle was promising, and extensive field experience with similar structures in architectural and automotive applications was favorable. The specific design proposed was comprised of 120 two-inch diameter cells in a series-parallel configuration. The laminate was mounted in an aluminum frame with a neoprene gasket providing the requisite mechanical strength with flexibility. The resulting module size of 15 by 46 inches permits three modules to be neatly fitted into the 46 inch square subarray specified by JPL. The design as modified to accommodate subsequent experience is shown. Performance and environmental test results are presented and discussed.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effect of the nonlinear saturation of the gain on the peak modulation frequency in lasers based on self-assembled quantum dots  

SciTech Connect

Peak modulation frequency of lasers based on self-organized quantum dots is calculated taking into account the effect of nonlinear gain saturation. Because of a large nonlinear gain coefficient and a reduction in the differential gain with increasing optical losses, the peak modulation frequency is attained for an optimum loss level that is significantly lower than the saturated optical gain in the active region. For lasers based on multiply stacked arrays of quantum dots, the peak modulation frequency first increases with increasing number of quantum-dot layers before leveling off, with the limiting value being inversely proportional to the nonlinear gain coefficient.

Zhukov, A. E., E-mail: zhukov@beam.ioffe.ru; Arakcheeva, E. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Gordeev, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zubov, F. I.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Savelyev, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Hendricks, Troy R. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a $^{153}$Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices (SQUID) and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than $10^3$ elements and spectral resolving powers $R=\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda > 10^3$.

Omid Noroozian; John A. B. Mates; Douglas A. Bennett; Justus A. Brevik; Joseph W. Fowler; Jiansong Gao; Gene C. Hilton; Robert D. Horansky; Kent D. Irwin; Zhao Kang; Daniel R. Schmidt; Leila R. Vale; Joel N. Ullom

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Programmable Multi-Chip Module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

Kautz, David (Lenexa, KS); Morgenstern, Howard (Lee' s Summit, MO); Blazek, Roy J. (Overland Park, KS)

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Programmable Multi-Chip Module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

Kautz, David (Lenexa, KS); Morgenstern, Howard (Lee' s Summit, MO); Blazek, Roy J. (Overland Park, KS)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

315

Acoustic Array Development for Wind Turbine Noise Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the design and use of a multi-arm, logarithmic spiral acoustic array by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for measurement and characterization of wind turbine-generated noise. The array was developed in collaboration with a team from the University of Colorado Boulder. This design process is a continuation of the elliptical array design work done by Simley. A description of the array system design process is presented, including array shape design, mechanical design, design of electronics and the data acquisition system, and development of post-processing software. System testing and calibration methods are detailed. Results from the initial data acquisition campaign are offered and discussed. Issues faced during this initial deployment of the array are presented and potential remedies discussed.

Buck, S.; Roadman, J.; Moriarty, P.; Palo, S.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) The Dipole-Dipole array is a type of electrode configuration for a Direct-Current Resistivity Survey and is defined by its electrode array geometry.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://appliedgeophysics.berkeley.edu/dc/EM46.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Dipole-Dipole_Array)&oldid=596974" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

317

Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

Horowitz, Seymour M. (6525 Swainland Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Nesbitt, Dale D. (1712 Marin Ave., Berkeley, CA 94707)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Halbach array DC motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An "inside-out" design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then "switched" or "commutated" to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives.

Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA); Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Halbach array DC motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An ``inside-out`` design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then ``switched`` or ``commutated`` to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives. 17 figs.

Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.; Post, R.F.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Critical infrastructure security curriculum modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructures have succumbed to the demands of greater connectivity. Although the scheme of connecting these critical equipment and devices to cyberspace has brought us tremendous convenience, it also enabled certain unimaginable risks and ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, course modules, critical infrastructures, cybersecurity, programmable logic controllers, security, vulnerability

Guillermo A. Francia, III

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shift register neutron coincidence module  

SciTech Connect

A neutron coincidence module was designed using multistage shift registers to produce the coincidence gates and a crystal controlled oscillator with variable clock outputs to change the gate lengths. The advantage of this system over the conventional, thermal-neutron coincidence gates is a decrease in deadtime by more than an order of magnitude. (auth)

Stephens, M.M.; Swansen, J.E.; East, L.V.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Modulation Optimization under Energy Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider radio applications where the nodes operate on batteries so that energy consumption must be minimized while satisfying given throughput and delay requirements. In this context, we analyze the best modulation strategy to minimize the total energy consumption required to send a given number of bits. The total energy consumption includes both the transmission energy and the circuit energy consumption. We show that for both MQAM and MFSK the transmission energy decreases with the product while the circuit energy consumption increases with , where is the modulation bandwidth and the transmission time. Thus, in short-range applications where the circuit energy consumption is nonnegligible compared with the transmission energy, the total energy consumption is minimized by using the maximum system bandwidth along with an optimized transmission time . We derive this optimal for MQAM and MFSK modulation in both AWGN channels and Rayleigh fading channels. Our optimization considers both delay and peak-power constraints. Numerical examples are given, where we exhibit up to 2 energy savings over modulation strategies that minimize the transmission energy alone.

Shuguang Cui Andrea; Andrea J. Goldsmith; Ahmad Bahai

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Methods for validating the presence of and characterizing proteins deposited onto an array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining if proteins have been transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array comprising staining the array with a total protein stain and imaging the array, optionally comparing the staining with a standard curve generated by staining known amounts of a known protein on the same or a similar array; a method of characterizing proteins transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array including staining the array with a post-translational modification-specific (PTM-specific) stain and imaging the array and, optionally, after staining the array with a PTM-specific stain and imaging the array, washing the array, re-staining the array with a total protein stain, imaging the array, and comparing the imaging with the PTM-specific stain with the imaging with the total protein stain; stained arrays; and images of stained arrays.

Schabacker, Daniel S. (Naperville, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays ...  

Each laser in the array outputs only a few watts and could be pumped by solar energy. ... For directed energy laser communication in space and underwater ...

325

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal...

326

DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

327

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1975) Jump...

328

Implementation of a Performance Instrumentation Framework for Global Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit implements a shared-memory programming model for distributed memory machines where data locality is managed by the programmer. GA uses an (more)

Kawsar, Golam H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nanopost Arrays Anchor Molecules, Improve Ion Yields for Laser ...  

ORNL 2011-G00228/jcn UT-B ID 200902284 09.2011 Nanopost Arrays Anchor Molecules, Improve Ion Yields for Laser Mass Spectrometry Technology Summary

330

HEMI AL FREE WATER ANALYSIS WITH NANOELE TRODE ARRAYS  

hemi al free water analysis with nanoele trode arrays te hnology summary te hnology readiness level: proof of on ept has een demonstrated.

331

Quantum manipulation and simulation using Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the prospect of using quantum properties of large scale Josephson junction arrays for quantum manipulation and simulation. We study the collective vibrational quantum modes of a Josephson junction array and show that they provide a natural and practical method for realizing a high quality cavity for superconducting qubit based QED. We further demonstrate that by using Josephson junction arrays we can simulate a family of problems concerning spinless electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions. These protocols require no or few controls over the Josephson junction array and are thus relatively easy to realize given currently available technology.

Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Materials Issues in Area-Array Microelectronic Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher power devices require more signal and ground lines and, to limit point .... on BGA interconnects using column grid arrays10 rather than standard balls.

333

Development of Automated Production Line Processes for Solar Brightfield Modules: Annual Technical Progress Report, 1 January 2003 -- 30 June 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes how Spire Corporation is addressing the PV Manufacturing R&D project goals of improving photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing processes and products while reducing costs and providing a technology foundation that supports significant manufacturing scale-up. To accomplish this, we are focusing our efforts on the design of a large-area utility-scale module and the development of the necessary manufacturing techniques and equipment to manufacture such a module in a high-volume production environment. A three-phase program is under way for developing and demonstrating new automated systems for fabricating very large PV modules ideal for use in multi-megawatt grid-connected applications. We designed a large-area 800 W module and we are developing associated module production equipment that will minimize the total installed system cost for utility-scale PV arrays. Unique features of the module design include a cantilevered glass superstrate to reduce the glass thickness a nd internally laminated bypass diodes that simplify internal busing and junction-box designs. Other program activities include the development of automation for solar cell string inspections, string busing, materials lay-up, and lamination; enhancements to the lamination process; and performance testing of large-area modules.

Nowlan, M. J.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Miller, D. C.; Moore, S. B.; Hogan, S. J.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Emerging photovoltaic module technologies at PVUSA: A five-year assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) project tests two types of photovoltaic systems: new modules fielded as 20-kW Emerging Module Technology (EMT) arrays, and more mature technologies fielded as 20- to 500-kW turnkey Utility Scale (US) systems. This report summarizes experiences of the PVUSA project in operating the first six 20-kW EMT photovoltaic systems. Five systems are installed at Davis, California, and one at Kihei, Hawaii. Products selected for testing and demonstration were judged to have potential for significant technical advancement or reduction in manufacturing cost. Features leading to selection of each system and findings over the average 5 years of operation are compared in the report. Factory product qualification test experiences along with field acceptance test results are documented. Evaluation includes a broad range of performance parameters, including long-term efficiency, seasonal generation patterns, and maintenance. While some of the arrays have operated as well as any commercial system, others have fared poorly. Throughout the procurement and operation of these precommercial PV modules, PVUSA has provided feedback to vendors, critical for product improvement. The data and evaluations in this report will be of further benefit to manufacturers and provide general comparative information on a variety of technologies to researchers in utilities, government, and industry alike.

Townsend, T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of Pseudorandom Binary Arrays for Calibration of Surface Profile Metrology Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical metrology tools, especially for short wavelengths (extreme ultraviolet and x-ray), must cover a wide range of spatial frequencies from the very low, which affects figure, to the important mid-spatial frequencies and the high spatial frequency range, which produces undesirable scattering. A major difficulty in using surface profilometers arises due to the unknown point-spread function (PSF) of the instruments [G. D. Boreman, Modulation Transfer Function in Optical and Electro-Optical Systems (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 2001)] that is responsible for distortion of the measured surface profile. Generally, the distortion due to the PSF is difficult to account for because the PSF is a complex function that comes to the measurement via the convolution operation, while the measured profile is described with a real function. Accounting for instrumental PSF becomes significantly simpler if the result of measurement of a profile is presented in the spatial frequency domain as a power spectral density (PSD) distribution [J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics, 3rd ed. (Roberts and Company, Englewood, CO, 2005)]. For example, measured PSD distributions provide a closed set of data necessary for three-dimensional calculations of scattering of light by the optical surfaces [E. L. Church et al., Opt. Eng. (Bellingham) 18, 125 (1979); J. C. Stover, Optical Scattering, 2nd ed. (SPIE Optical Engineering Press, Bellingham, WA, 1995)]. The distortion of the surface PSD distribution due to the PSF can be modeled with the modulation transfer function (MTF), which is defined over the spatial frequency bandwidth of the instrument. The measured PSD distribution can be presented as a product of the squared MTF and the ideal PSD distribution inherent for the system under test. Therefore, the instrumental MTF can be evaluated by comparing a measured PSD distribution of a known test surface with the corresponding ideal numerically simulated PSD. The square root of the ratio of the measured and simulated PSD distributions gives the MTF of the instrument. The applicability of the MTF concept to phase map measurements with optical interferometric microscopes needs to be experimentally verified as the optical tool and algorithms may introduce nonlinear artifacts into the process. In previous work [V. V. Yashchuk et al., Proc. SPIE 6704, 670408 (2007); Valeriy V. Yashchuk et al., Opt. Eng. (Bellingham) 47, 073602 (2008)] the instrumental MTF of a surface profiler was precisely measured using reference test surfaces based on binary pseudorandom (BPR) gratings. Here, the authors present results of fabricating and using two-dimensional (2D) BPR arrays that allow for a direct 2D calibration of the instrumental MTF. BPR sequences are widely used in engineering and communication applications such as global position systems and wireless communication protocols. The ideal BPR pattern has a flat 'white noise' response over the entire range of spatial frequencies of interest. The BPR array used here is based on the uniformly redundant array (URA) prescription [E. E. Fenimore and T. M. Cannon, Appl. Opt. 17, 337 (1978)] initially used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy applications. The URA's superior imaging capability originates from the fact that its cyclical autocorrelation function very closely approximates a delta function, which produces a flat PSD. Three different size BPR array patterns were fabricated by electron beam lithography and induction coupled plasma etching of silicon. The basic size units were 200, 400, and 600 nm. Two different etch processes were used, CF{sub 4}/Ar and HBr, which resulted in undercut and vertical sidewall profiles, respectively. The 2D BPR arrays were used as standard test surfaces for MTF calibration of the MicroMap{trademark}-570 interferometric microscope using all available objectives. The MicroMap{trademark}-570 interferometric microscope uses incoherent illumination from a tungsten filament source and common path modulated phase shifting interference to produce a set of interferograms detected on a change couple

Barber, S.K.; Takacs, P.; Soldate, P.; Anderson, E.H.; Cambie, R.; McKinney, W.R.; Voronov, D.L.; Yashchuk, V.V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Overview of the PV Module Model in PVWatts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Overview of the PV module model. PVWatts module power estimates were compared with those using the Sandia model for three modules and data sets.

Marion, B.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mounting support for a photovoltaic module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Reliability Issues for Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Si modules good in field; new designs need reliability testing. CdTe & CIGS modules sensitive to moisture; carefully seal. CPV in product development stage; benefits from expertise in other industries.

Kurtz, S.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy Basics: Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PV module must have a high transmission in the wavelengths that can be used by the solar cells in the module. For example, for silicon solar cells, the top surface must have...

340

Reconfigurable photonic switch based on a binary system using the White cell and micromirror arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractWe describe an optical switch for use in crossconnects. It is a free-space device, based on multiple bounces in a pair of White cells sharing a spatial light modulator at one end. In a companion paper, we described various polynomial cells, in which the number of outputs was proportional to the number of bounces raised to some power. In the binary device described here, the number of possible outputs is proportional to the number two raised to the power of the number of bounces. It allows a 1024 1024 switch using a single digital two-state tip/tilt micromirror array, four spherical mirrors, and a spot displacement device. It is highly scalable and insensitive to micromirror pointing accuracy. Index TermsMicroelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optical communication, optical interconnects, White cell.

Victor Argueta-diaz; Betty Lise Anderson; Senior Member

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System April 2013 Independent Statistics & ...

342

High Frequency Power Modulation - TRIMET Smelters Provide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High Frequency Power Modulation - TRIMET Smelters Provide Primary Control Power for Stabilizing the Frequency in the Electricity Grid.

343

The NREL Outdoor Accelerated-weathering Tracking System and Photovoltaic Module Exposure Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the Outdoor Accelerated-weathering Tracking System (OATS) and interim results for the first OATS study on photovoltaic (PV) modules. With two test planes measuring 1.52 x 1.83 m, OATS provides a unique solar-concentrating exposure capability. Test sample temperatures are moderated by air blowers. Water spray capability exists for wetting samples. The OATS two-axis tracker points to the sun using software calculations. Non-imaging aluminum reflectors give a nominal clear-sky optical concentration ratio of three. Field-qualification measurements in the test plane under reflector conditions showed its relative irradiance non-uniformity was '' 15% for a clear-sky summer day with '' 75 mm as the smallest distance for that non-uniformity. Exposure studies began in November 1997 on seven pairs of commercially available ribbon silicon, crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon PV modules kept at constant resistive load. The modules were periodically removed from OATS for visual inspection and solar simulator performance measurements. There were no module failures. This PV module study is ongoing and later results will be compared to other testing techniques. Through July 1998, the modules under reflector conditions received 392 MJ/m2 of total ultraviolet (TUV) exposure. That was 2.07 times the TUV exposure compared to a south-facing fixed array tilted 40{sup o} up from horizontal at NREL. Similarly, the modules in the test plane under the covered reflectors received 1.04 times the fixed array TUV exposure. For the test plane under the covered reflectors there was a loss of 13% TUV exposure attributed to the reflectors blocking some of the diffuse-sky UV light. Also through July 1998, the OATS sunlight availability measured 95% compared to the cumulative global normal exposure at the NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The OATS sunlight availability losses included downtime when the PV modules were removed, and when there were OAT S tracking problems, maintenance, and repair. For December 1997 through July 1998, the SRRL cumulative exposure was 99% compared to the respective monthly averages from years 1961 through 1990 at Boulder, Colorado.

Basso, T. S.

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advanced photovoltaic concentrator system low-cost prototype module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the continued development of an extruded lens and the development of a PV receiver, both of which will be used in the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation (SEA) 10X concentrator. These efforts were pare of a pre-Concentrator Initiative Program. The 10X concentrator consists of an inexpensive, extruded linear Fresnel lens which focuses on one-sun cells which are adhesive-bonded to an anodized aluminum heat sink. Module sides are planned to be molded along with the lens and are internally reflective for improved on- and off-track performance. End caps with molded-in bearings complete the module. Ten modules are mounted in a stationary frame for simple, single-axis tracking in the east-west direction. This configuration an array, is shipped completely assembled and requires only setting on a reasonably flat surface, installing 4 fasteners, and hooking up the wires. Development of the 10-inch wide extruded lens involved one new extrusion die and a series of modifications to this die. Over 76% lens transmission was measured which surpassed the program goal of 75%. One-foot long receiver sections were assembled and subjected to evaluation tests at Sandia National Laboratories. A first group had some problem with cell delamination and voids but a second group performed very well, indicating that a full size receiver would pass the full qualification test. Cost information was updated and presented in the report. The cost study indicated that the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation concentrator system can exceed the DOE electricity cost goals of less than 6cents per KW-hr. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Kaminar, N.R.; McEntee, J.; Curchod, D. (Solar Engineering Applications Corp., San Jose, CA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Mirror Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.

Frster, A; Baba, H; Bhr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; De Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; MANDAT, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Micha?owski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pareschi, G; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Phlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; Van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wi?niewski, ?; Wrnlein, A; Yoshida, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Receiver control for the Submillimeter Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient operation of a submillimeter interferometer requires remote (preferably automated) control of mechanically tuned local oscillators, phase-lock loops, mixers, optics, calibration vanes and cryostats. The present control system for these aspects of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) will be described. Distributed processing forms the underlying architecture. In each antenna cabin, a serial network of up to ten independent 80C196 microcontroller boards attaches to the real-time PowerPC computer (running LynxOS). A multi-threaded, gcc-compiled program on the PowerPC accepts top-level requests via remote procedure calls (RPC), subsequently dispatches tuning commands to the relevant microcontrollers, and regularly reports the system status to optical-fiber-based reflective memory for common access by the telescope monitor and error reporting system. All serial communication occurs asynchronously via encoded, variable-length packets. The microcontrollers respond to the requested commands and queries by accessin...

Hunter, T R; Kimberk, R; Leiker, P S; Christensen, R D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

Keolian, Robert M. (Monterey, CA); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sensor array for toxic gas detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Penrose, William R. (Naperville, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Multisensor fusion-based gas detection module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article develops a gas detection module for the intelligent home. The module uses eight gas sensors to detect the environment of the home and building. The gas sensors of the module have an NH3 sensor, an air pollution sensor, an alcohol ... Keywords: Intelligent home, Logical filter method, Multisensor fusion algorithms

Jr-Hung Guo; I. -Chao Chien; Kuo-Lan Su; Chia-Ju Wu

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Emittance growth from electron beam modulation  

SciTech Connect

In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Automatic Layout Design for Power Module  

SciTech Connect

The layout of power modules is one of the key points in power module design, especially for high power densities, where couplings are increased. In this paper, along with the design example, an automatic design processes by using a genetic algorithm are presented. Some practical considerations and implementations are introduced in the optimization of module layout design.

Ning, Puqi [ORNL; Wang, Fei [ORNL; Ngo, Khai [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

SiC Power Module  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 100 Entry R&D 100 Entry SiC Power Module 2 R&D 100 Entry SiC Power Module Submitting OrganizatiOn Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1033 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1033 USA Stanley Atcitty Phone: 505-284-2701 Fax: 505-844-2890 satcitt@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. _____________________________________ Stanley Atcitty JOint Entry Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc.; University of Arkansas; Rohm Co., LTD.; and the Department of Energy/ Energy Storage Program. 1. 1. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. 535 W. Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA Alexander B. Lostetter, President & CEO Phone: 479-443-5759

356

Module Encapsulant Diagnostic and Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Encapsulant materials are used in photovoltaic devices for mechanical support, electrical isolation, and protection against corrosion. The ability of an encapsulant to protect against surface corrosion is related to its adhesional strength. The adhesion of candidate encapsulants under accelerated environmental stress was examined to determine what materials have the best hydrolytic stability and are more likely to reduce corrosion rates. Under environmental exposure, the ingress of water has been correlated with increased corrosion rates. The diffusivity of different encapsulants has been measured to determine how long it takes for water to enter a module. The high diffusivity of ethylene vinyl acetate indicates that, even with the use of an impermeable back-sheet, moisture from the sides will diffuse throughout the entire module. To significantly reduce moisture ingress requires a true hermetic seal, the use of an encapsulant loaded with desiccant, or the use of a very low diffusivity encapsulant.

Kempe, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Parallel numerical algorithms based on tensor notation and Co-Array Fortran syntax  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-Array Fortran represents a correspondence between tensor notation and an extended Fortran array syntax. It uses normal Fortran array indices to point to data in local memory and adds co-array indices to point to data in remote memory. By writing algorithms ... Keywords: Co-Array Fortran, Numerical linear algebra, Tensor algebra

Robert W. Numrich

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Rationale for co-arrays in Fortran 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains some of the technical decisions made during the incorporation of co-arrays in Fortran 2008. Familiarity with John Reid's summary of co-arrays [R07] is assumed. This document is by no means exhaustive: It is a selection of issues from ...

Aleksandar Donev

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Subband adaptive array for DS-CDMA mobile radio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel scheme of subband adaptive array (SBAA) for direct-sequence code divisionmultiple access (DS-CDMA). The scheme exploits the spreading code and pilot signal as the reference signal to estimate the propagation channel. Moreover, instead ... Keywords: CDMA, RAKE, multipath fading, subband adaptive array

Xuan Nam Tran; Takanori Omata; Tetsuki Taniguchi; Yoshio Karasawa

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Co-arrays in the next Fortran Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WG5 committee, at its meeting in Delft, May 2005, decided to include co-arrays in the next Fortran Standard. A Fortran program containing co-arrays is interpreted as if it were replicated a fixed number of times and all copies were executed asynchronously. ...

John Reid; Robert W. Numrich

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Polymorphic Systems with Arrays, 2-Counter Machines and Multiset Rewriting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymorphic systems with arrays (PSAs) is a general class of nondeterministic reactive systems. A PSA is polymorphic in the sense that it depends on a signature, which consists of a number of type variables, and a number of symbols whose types can be ... Keywords: array, infinite-state, model checking, parameterised

Ranko Lazi?; Tom Newcomb; Bill Roscoe

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

SciQL: array data processing inside an RDBMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific discoveries increasingly rely on the ability to efficiently grind massive amounts of experimental data using database technologies. To bridge the gap between the needs of the Data-Intensive Research fields and the current DBMS technologies, ... Keywords: array database, array query language, scientific databases, sciql

Ying Zhang; Martin Kersten; Stefan Manegold

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films A dissertation presented Advisor Author Joost J. Vlassak Patrick J. McCluskey Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis analysis of the thermophysical properties of thin films. The continuous growth of integrated circuits

365

Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Cooper, Gregory A. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ancestor worship in CS1: on the primacy of arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

History has given us the array as the fundamental data structure to present to students within the CS1 curriculum. However, with the recent growth in popularity of object-oriented languages for CS1 (C++, Java, C#), and with that, the acceptance of the ... Keywords: CS1, arrays, curriculum, data structures, object oriented-design, object-oriented programming, objects-first

Phil Ventura; Christopher Egert; Adrienne Decker

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydraulic Performance of a Multistage Array of Advanced Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulic characteristics of an advanced design centrifugal contactor array have been determined at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The advanced design utilizes couette mixing (Taylor vortices) in the annulus between the rotating and stationary bowls. Excellent phase separation over a wide range of flow conditions was obtained. Interfaces within an entire eight-stage array were controlled with a single weir air pressure.

Hodges, M.E.

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

PUMA for homemade arrays Maitreya Dunham September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the database, select Spotted as array type, Genepix as analysis software, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae from on loader. SFTP them onto the PC. Gridding Open Genepix 5.1 in Analysis Only mode. Emulate scanner 4000B sure pixel size is set to 5 µm. Click the little disk icon on the right and "load array list." Select

Dunham, Maitreya

369

A Mirnov loop array for field-reversed configurations  

SciTech Connect

An array of 64 magnetic pick-up loops has been used for stability studies of large field-reversed configurations in the FRX-C/LSM device. This array proved reliable, could resolve signals of a few Gauss, and allowed the detection of several plasma instabilities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Tuszewski, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array November 21, 2011 - 12:16pm Addthis An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm Project will produce enough

371

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array November 21, 2011 - 12:16pm Addthis An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm Project will produce enough

372

Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning, the projection resolution along the scanning direction increased from 4.0 cycles/mm [at 10% modulation-transfer-function (MTF)] in DBT to 5.1 cycles/mm in s-DBT at magnification factor of 1.08. The improvement is more pronounced for faster scanning speeds, wider angular coverage, and smaller detector pixel sizes. The scanning speed depends on the detector, the number of views, and the imaging dose. With 240 ms detector readout time, the s-DBT system scanning time is 6.3 s for a 15-view, 100 mAs scan regardless of the angular coverage. The scanning speed can be reduced to less than 4 s when detectors become faster. Initial phantom studies showed good quality reconstructed images. Conclusions: A prototype s-DBT scanner has been developed and evaluated by retrofitting the Selenia rotating gantry DBT scanner with a spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array. Preliminary results show that it improves system spatial resolution substantially by eliminating image blur due to x-ray focal spot motion. The scanner speed of s-DBT system is independent of angular coverage and can be increased with faster detector without image degration. The accelerated lifetime measurement demonstrated the long term stability of CNT x-ray source array with typical clinical operation lifetime over 3 years.

Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); XinRay Systems, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Hologic, Inc., Bedford, Massachusetts 01730 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Multi-standard programmable baseband modulator for next generation wireless communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable research has taken place in recent times in the area of parameterization of software defined radio (SDR) architecture. Parameterization decreases the size of the software to be downloaded and also limits the hardware reconfiguration time. The present paper is based on the design and development of a programmable baseband modulator that perform the QPSK modulation schemes and as well as its other three commonly used variants to satisfy the requirement of several established 2G and 3G wireless communication standards. The proposed design has been shown to be capable of operating at a maximum data rate of 77 Mbps on Xilinx Virtex 2-Pro University field programmable gate array (FPGA) board. The pulse shaping root raised cosine (RRC) filter has been implemented using distributed arithmetic (DA) technique in the present work in order to reduce the computational complexity, and to achieve appropriate power reduction and enhanced throughput. The designed multiplier-less programmable 32-tap FIR-based RRC ...

Hatai, Indranil; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2406

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

3D self-supported nanoarchitectured arrays electrodes for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional self-supported nanoarchitectured arrays electrodes (3DSNAEs) consisting of a direct growth of nanoarchitectured arrays on the conductive current collector, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nanoarchitectured arrays structures, ...

Xin Chen, Ying Du, Nai Qing Zhang, Ke Ning Sun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SiC APDs and arrays for UV and solar blind detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report advancements in APDs and arrays using 4H SiC. Novel structures, array designs and specialized read out integrated circuits have been developed towards the realization of UV and solar-blind detector arrays exhibiting ...

Shaw, Gary A.

377

Receiver control for the Submillimeter Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient operation of a submillimeter interferometer requires remote (preferably automated) control of mechanically tuned local oscillators, phase-lock loops, mixers, optics, calibration vanes and cryostats. The present control system for these aspects of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) will be described. Distributed processing forms the underlying architecture. In each antenna cabin, a serial network of up to ten independent 80C196 microcontroller boards attaches to the real-time PowerPC computer (running LynxOS). A multi-threaded, gcc-compiled program on the PowerPC accepts top-level requests via remote procedure calls (RPC), subsequently dispatches tuning commands to the relevant microcontrollers, and regularly reports the system status to optical-fiber-based reflective memory for common access by the telescope monitor and error reporting system. All serial communication occurs asynchronously via encoded, variable-length packets. The microcontrollers respond to the requested commands and queries by accessing non-volatile, rewriteable lookup-tables (when appropriate) and executing embedded software that operates additional electronic devices (DACs, ADCs, etc.). Since various receiver hardware components require linear or rotary motion, each microcontroller also implements a position servo via a one-millisecond interrupt service routine which drives a DC-motor/encoder combination that remains standard across each subsystem.

T. R. Hunter; R. W. Wilson; R. Kimberk; P. S. Leiker; R. D. Christensen

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Analysis and Design of Smart PV Module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the design of a smart photovoltaic (PV) module- a PV module in which PV cells in close proximity are electrically grouped to form a pixel and are connected to dc-dc converter blocks which reside embedded in the back pane of the module. An auto-connected flyback converter topology processing less than full power is used to provide high gain and perform maximum power point tracking (MPPT). These dc-dc converters interface with cascaded H-bridge inverter modules operating on feed forward control for dc-link voltage ripple rejection. By means of feed forward control, a significant reduction in dc link capacitance is achieved by enduring higher dc link ripple voltages. The dc link electrolytic capacitors are replaced with film capacitors thus offering an improvement in the reliability of the smart PV module. The proposed configuration is capable of producing 120V/ 240V AC voltage. The PV module now becomes a smart AC module by virtue of embedded intelligence to selectively actuate the individual dc-dc converters and control the output AC voltages directly, thus becoming a true plug and power energy system. Such a concept is ideal for curved surfaces such as building integrated PV (BIPV) system applications where gradients of insolation and temperature cause not only variations from PV module-to-PV module but from group-to-group of cells within the module itself. A detailed analysis along with simulation and experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed system.

Mazumdar, Poornima

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

380

The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or ``soft`` array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

Thornton, J.P.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

382

DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

383

DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

384

The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or soft'' array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

Thornton, J P

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely-connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays.

Andr Xuereb; Claudiu Genes; Guido Pupillo; Mauro Paternostro; Aurlien Dantan

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fabrication of stable large-area thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 10 May 1992--9 May 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights the progress made by Solar Cells, Inc. (SCI), in its program to produce 60-cm {times} 120-cm solar modules based on CdTe films. During the past year, confirmed efficiency has increased to 10.4% (active area) on a 1 cm{sup 2} cell, 9.8% (aperture area) on a 64-cm{sup 2} 8-cell submodule, and 6.6% (total area) on a 7200-cm{sup 2} module. A module measured in-house had a power output of 53 W, for a total-area efficiency of 7.4%. Average efficiency of modules produced is steadily increasing and standard deviation is decreasing; in a limited run of 12 modules, results were 6.3% ({plus_minus} 0.2%). Field testing has begun; a nominal 1-kW array of 24 modules was set up adjacent to SCI`s facilities. Analysis indicates that present modules are limited in efficiency by shunt resistance and optical absorption losses in the glass superstrate. Loss analysis of present devices allows us to project a module efficiency of 11.8%. A third generation deposition method -- atmospheric pressure elemental vapor deposition (APEVD) has been brought on-line and has produced good quality CdTe. In addition, SCI is expanding its proactive safety, health, environmental, and disposal program dealing with issues surrounding cadmium.

Nolan, J.F.; Meyers, P.V. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Development of Automated Production Line Processes for Solar Brightfield Modules: Final Annual Technical Progress Report, 1 July 2004 -- 15 October 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spire Corporation is addressing the Photovoltaic Manufacturing R&D project goals of improving photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing processes and products while reducing costs and providing a technology foundation that supports significant manufacturing scale-up. To accomplish this, we are focusing our efforts on the design of a large-area utility-scale module and the development of the necessary manufacturing techniques and equipment to manufacture such a module in a high-volume production environment. A three-phase program is under way for developing and demonstrating new automated systems for fabricating very large PV modules ideal for use in multi-megawatt grid-connected applications. We designed a large-area (1.57 m x 3.68 m) 800-W module, and we are developing associated module production equipment that will minimize the total installed system cost for utility-scale PV arrays. Activities in Phase 2 focused on the development of automation for module materials lay-up, cell string busing, and module lamination; enhancements to the cell stringing and lamination processes; and performance testing of large-area modules.

Nowlan, M. J.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Miller, D. C.; Moore S. B.; Hogan, S. J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development of flame retardant PV module encapsulants: Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase 1 final report covers the work performed by Springborn Testing and Research, Inc., for the period October 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 under the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC36-97GO10255, entitled Development of Flame Retardant PV Module Encapsulants. While use of roof-mounted arrays has always been an attractive means of deploying PV, only within recent years have such building integrated concepts (BIPV) found renewed interest among module makers and end-users. Prior to building integrated and rooftop applications, flammability requirements for modules have not been a great industry concern. However, with growing interest in BIPV and the requirement for building code requirements for commercial and industrial structures, flammability issues have become a barrier to entry for many module constructions into this potentially huge domestic market for PV. The overall goal of the 3 phase PV BONUS two project is to develop and commercialize a line of fire retardant encapsulation materials to serve the emerging building integrated and building mounted PV market. The objectives of the Phase 1 effort are limited to concept development and business planning activities.

Galica, J.P.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Performance Characterization and Remedy of Experimental CuInGaSe2 Mini-Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We employed current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), photoluminescence (PL), electroluminescence (EL), lock-in thermography (LIT), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) to complementarily characterize the performance and remedy for two pairs of experimental CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) mini-modules. One pair had the three scribe-lines (P1/P2/P3) done by a single pulse-programmable laser, and the other had the P2/P3 lines by mechanical scribe. Localized QE measurements for each cell strip on all four mini-modules showed non-uniform distributions that correlated well with the presence of performance-degrading strips or spots revealed by PL, EL, and LIT imaging. Performance of the all-laser-scribed mini-modules improved significantly by adding a thicker Al-doped ZnO layer and reworking the P3 line. The efficiency on one of the all-laser-scribed mini-modules increased notably from 7.80% to 8.56% after the performance-degrading spots on the side regions along the cell array were isolated by manual scribes.

Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Mansfield, L.; Glynn, S.; Rekow, M.; Murion, R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Binary module test. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to design and test a binary loop module representative of and scaleable to commercial size units. The design was based on state-of-the-art heat exchanger technology, and the purpose of the tests was to confirm performance of a supercritical boiling cycle using isobutane and a mixture of isobutane and isopentane as the secondary working fluid. The module was designed as one percent of a 50 MW unit. It was installed at Magma Power's East Mesa geothermal field and tested over a period of approximately 4 months. Most of the test runs were with isobutane but some data were collected for hydrocarbon mixtures. The results of the field tests are reported. In general these results indicate reasonably good heat balances and agreement with overall heat transfer coefficients calculated by current stream analysis methods and available fluid property data; however, measured pressure drops across the heat exchangers were 20 percent higher than estimated. System operation was stable under all conditions tested.

Schilling, J.R.; Colley, T.C.; Pundyk, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Smart Fan Modules And System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fan module including: two or more individual fans, each fan having an air movement means and a motor engaged with the air movement means for accelerating air entering each of the two or more individual fans; a temperature sensor for sensing a temperature associated with the two or more fans and for outputting a first signal corresponding to the temperature; rotational speed sensor for outputting a second signal corresponding to a rotational speed of each of the two or more fans; and a processor for receiving the first and second signals and controlling the two or more individual fans based on the first and second signals. A fan module including: two or more individual fans, each fan having an air movement means and a motor engaged with the air movement means for accelerating air entering each of the two or more individual fans; a temperature sensor for sensing a temperature associated with the two or more fans and for outputting a first signal corresponding to the temperature; rotational speed sensor for outputting a second signal corresponding to a rotational speed of each of the two or more fans; and a processor for receiving the first and second signals and controlling the two or more individual fans based on the first and second signals.

Cipolla, Thomas M. (Katonah, NY); Kaufman, Richard I. (Somers, NY); Mok, Lawrence S. (Brewster, NY)

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

In-Line Thermoelectric Module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an-in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions maybe perpendicular to the direction-of current flow through the module.

Pento, Robert; Marks, James E.; Staffanson, Clifford D.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

In-line thermoelectric module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions may be perpendicular to the direction of current flow through the module.

Pento, Robert (Algonquin, IL); Marks, James E. (Glenville, NY); Staffanson, Clifford D. (S. Glens Falls, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Enhancing the Electrooptic Effect Using Modulation Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As electronic operating frequencies increase toward the terahertz regime, new electrooptic modulators capable of low-voltage high-frequency operation must be developed to provide the necessary optical interconnects. This letter presents a new concept that exploits modulation instability to enhance the intrinsically weak electrooptic effect, \\chi^(2). Simulations demonstrate more than 50 times enhancement of electrooptic effect at millimeter wave frequencies leading to a substantial reduction in the required modulation voltage.

DeVore, Peter T S; Jalali, Bahram

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Residential Sector Demand Module 1998, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fourth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. Since last year, severalnew end-use services were added to the module, including: Clothes washers,dishwashers, furnace fans, color televisions, and personal computers. Also, as with allNEMS modules, the forecast horizon has been extended to the year 2020.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Optimum matching of ohmic loads to the photovoltaic array  

SciTech Connect

Optimum matching of loads to the photovoltaic (PV) generator is most desirable for more accurate sizing, higher system performance and maximum utilization of the costly solar array generator. The quality of load matching depends on the PV array characteristics, the load characteristics, and the insolation profile. A matching factor is defined as the ratio of the load energy to the array maximum energy over a one day period. Optimum matching is achieved by determining the optimal array parameters with respect to the load parameters. Optimization is done using direct-search techniques. Results show that the theoretical optimum matching factor for an ohmic load is 94.34%. For an electrolytic load the matching factor could reach 99.83%. A maximum power tracker can be eliminated if optimum matching is achieved.

Khouzam, K.; Khouzam, L.; Groumpos, P. (Cleveland State Univ., OH (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Abstract A new generation MT array measurement system was applied in a contiguous bipole deployment at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey area are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single range front fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2) delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as

399

TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

P. Bauleo; C. Bonifazi; A. Filevich; A. Reguera

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ordered arrays of nanocrystals : synthesis, properties and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoscale materials, including nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes, exhibit an appealing array of physical properties, and provide an interesting prospect for research both from a fundamental as well as a technological ...

Bhaviripudi, Sreekar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Potential technologies based on stamped periodic nanoparticle array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stamped nanoparticle array patterning technology integrating interference lithography, self assembly and soft lithography is assessed. This technology is capable of parallel patterning of nanoparticles at a large scale. ...

Wang, Zongbin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Measurement of plasma flows using Mach probe arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A rectangular array of three-dimensional Mach probes is constructed and installed in the plasma vessel of the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT in order to measure ion flow velocity on the cross section of the VTF. ...

Kardon, Brian (Brian Michael)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

KK8, Aligned Assembly of Nanowire Arrays with Intrinsic Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective conjugation of 1-D nanostructures only onto the lines within the array. 3 . ... CC1, In Situ High-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Graphene ... Electroluminescent Devices with a Low Turn-on Voltage and High...

404

Halbach array DC motor/generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are ...

405

LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased Array Transceivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased ArrayFall 2011 LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz PhasedAbstract LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased

Marcu, Cristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State ...  

... in which collection cycles begin on all disks in the array at a scheduled time, or it can query the disks to determine the best time to start a global ...

407

GaN Nanopore Arrays: Fabrication and Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GaN nanopore arrays with pore diameters of approximately 75 nm were fabricated by inductively coupled plasma etching (ICP) using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films as etch masks. Nanoporous AAO films were formed on the GaN ...

Wang, Yadong

408

Trading capacity for performance in a disk array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of performance-enhancing techniques, such as striping, mirroring, and rotational data replication, exist in the disk array literature. Given a fixed budget of disks, one must intelligently choose what combination of these techniques to employ. ...

Xiang Yu; Benjamin Gum; Yuqun Chen; Randolph Y. Wang; Kai Li; Arvind Krishnamurthy; Thomas E. Anderson

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Beam Multiplexing Using the Phased-Array Weather Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently installed S-band phased-array radar (PAR) at the National Weather Radar Testbed (NWRT) offers fast and flexible beam steering through electronic beam forming. This capability allows the implementation of a novel scanning strategy ...

Tian-You Yu; Marko B. Orescanin; Christopher D. Curtis; Dusan S. Zrni?; Douglas E. Forsyth

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low cost modular designs for photovoltaic array fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Described are the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Design criteria and performance requirements have been defined and evaluated for specific array subsystems. These subsystems include support structures, foundations, intermodule connection, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control. Fully integrated flat-panel array-field designs, optimized for lowest life-cycle costs, have been developed for systems ranging in size from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. These designs are applicable for near-term implementation (1982 to 1983) and reduce the array-field balance-of-system (BOS) costs to a fraction of previous costs. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Prezetakiewiczr, Marek (East Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Waltham, MA)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes 18 USGS Schlumberger soundings and 6 Schlumberger soundings by Furgerson (1973) were plotted and automatically processed and interpreted References Jackson, D.B. ODonnell, J.E.; Gregory, D. I. (1 January 1977) Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Schlumberger_Array)_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=591389

413

Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module[1] Resources Portable Solar Photovoltaic Lanterns: Performance and Certification Specification, and Type Approval, ESMAP TECHNICAL PAPER 078 Testing of Storage Batteries used in Stand Alone Photovoltaic Power Systems, Test procedures and examples of test results Technical Specifications for Solar Home Systems (SHS), Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Development (PV Component) Project

414

Optical sensing based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques, apparatus and systems for using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy measurements to optically monitor gas media such as gases in gas combustion chambers.

Buckley, Steven G. (Redmond, WA); Gharavi, Mohammadreza (Tehran, IR); Borchers; Marco (Berlin, DE)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Stably free modules over smooth affine threefolds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the stably free modules over a smooth affine threefold over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from 2 are free.

Jean Fasel.; no 1; 33--49

416

Stably free modules over smooth affine threefolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the stably free modules over a smooth affine threefold over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from 2 are free.

Fasel, Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Solid State Marx Modulators for Emerging Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging linear accelerator applications increasingly push the boundaries of RF system performance and economics. The power modulator is an integral part of RF systems whose characteristics play a key role in the determining parameters such as efficiency, footprint, cost, stability, and availability. Particularly within the past decade, solid-state switch based modulators have become the standard in high-performance, high power modulators. One topology, the Marx modulator, has characteristics which make it particularly attractive for several emerging applications. This paper is an overview of the Marx topology, some recent developments, and a case study of how this architecture can be applied to a few proposed linear accelerators.

Kemp, M.A.; /SLAC

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Petroleum Market Module - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 137 Petroleum Market Module Table 11.2. Year-round gasoline ...

419

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM)  

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM) Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

420

Figure F2. Electricity market module regions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 227 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stably Free Modules Over the Klein Bottle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is concerned with constructing countably many, non-free stably free modules for the Klein bottle group. The work is based on the papers Stably (more)

Misseldine, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE EFFECT OF ACOUSTIC MODULATION ON SPRAY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... that at full load in liquid injection systems, extra energy or perturbation is ... The acoustic modulation is generated by a piezoelectric crystal driven by a ...

423

Village Hydro Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Hydro Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITE...

424

PRA Fundamentals Computer Based Training Module 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product is a computer based training (CBT) module on Probabilistic Risk Assessment (Module 2 PRA Fundamentals). This product is a computer based training module on Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA CBT Module 2 - PRA Fundamentals). The PRA CBT is the second module and it titled PRA Fundamentals. This module is designed to provide a high level intriduction to the fundamentals of PRAs for nuclear power plants. It is the second module in the series. WindowsXP/Vista/Windows 7.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

Moore, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Fisher, Karl A. (Brentwood, CA)

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

A New Air Cerenkov Array at the South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Air­ Ÿ Cerenkov Array at the South Pole J.E. Dickinson a J.R. Gill a S.P. Hart b;a G.C. Hill@sun.leeds.ac.uk) PACS codes: 96.40 (cosmic rays) 29.40.K ( Ÿ Cerenkov detectors) Abstract VULCAN comprises a 9 element array of air­ Ÿ Cerenkov radiation detectors estab­ lished at the South Pole. VULCAN operates

Delaware, University of

427

Nondestructive Evaluation: Procedure for Manual Phased Array UT of Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available in a handheld, portable configuration. This technology could increase the speed of the examinations, save costs, reduce radiation exposure, and decrease the cost and difficulty of qualifying personnel to perform the examination. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed ultrasonic phased array inspection methodo...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Dielectrophoresis device and method having nonuniform arrays for manipulating particles  

SciTech Connect

Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake A.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optical manipulation of intrinsic localized vibrational energy in cantilever arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optically-induced real-time impurity modes are used to shepherd intrinsic localized vibrational modes (discrete breathers) along micromechanical arrays via either attractive or replulsive interactions. Adding an electrode to the cantilever array provides control of the sign of lattice anharmonicity, hence allowing both hard and soft nonlinearities to be studied. A number of dynamical effects are demonstrated and explained, including the optical tweezing of localized vibrational energy in a nonlinear lattice.

M. Sato; B. E. Hubbard; A. J. Sievers; B. Ilic; H. G. Craighead

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

Jaing, C

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Optical Physics of Imaging and Interferometric Phased Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave, submillimetre-wave, and far-infrared phased arrays are of considerable importance for astronomy. We consider the behaviour imaging phased arrays and interferometric phased arrays from a functional perspective. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging or interferometric phased array can be found once the synthesised reception patterns are known. The reception patterns do not have to be orthogonal or even linearly independent. It is shown that the operation of phased arrays is intimately related to the mathematical theory of frames, and that the theory of frames can be used to determine the degree to which any class of intensity or field distribution can be reconstructed unambiguously from the complex amplitudes of the travelling waves at the output ports. The theory can be used to set up a likelihood function that can, through Fisher information, be used to determine the degree to which a phased array can be used to recover the parameters of a parameterised source. For example, it would be possible to explore the way in which a system, perhaps interferometric, might observe two widely separated regions of the sky simultaneously.

Stafford Withington; George Saklatvala; Michael P. Hobson

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays  

SciTech Connect

All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array`s input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

Pinsker, R.I.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reproducible, high performance patch antenna array apparatus and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reproducible, high-performance patch antenna array apparatus includes a patch antenna array provided on a unitary dielectric substrate, and a feed network provided on the same unitary substrate and proximity coupled to the patch antenna array. The reproducibility is enhanced by using photolithographic patterning and etching to produce both the patch antenna array and the feed network.

Strassner, II, Bernd H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Development Status of The ILC Marx Modulator  

SciTech Connect

The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-}0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

Nguyen, M; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Testing Protocol for Module Encapsulant Creep (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently there has been an interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; or use materials with better corrosion characteristics. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85C, yet modules may experience temperatures above 100C in operation. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass mock modules using different encapsulation materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state at some of the highest outdoor temperatures achievable, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and in the case of the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet. These findings have very important implications for the development of IEC and UL qualification and safety standards, and in regards to the necessary level of cure during the processing of crosslinking encapsulants.

Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, DMS (strain gauge?) Test bridge, Fatigue Extrapolation · Wind Diesel Systeme in kleinen Inselnetzen/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

Habel, Annegret

437

Modulation instability in RF MEMS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modulation instability generated by mechanical frequencies in RF MEMS switches is predicted and its potential contribution to the RF signal degradation is discussed. In particular, evaluations have been performed for double clamped configurations in ... Keywords: Modulation instability, Nonlinear Schrodinger equation, Power handling, RF MEMS

Romolo Marcelli; Giancarlo Bartolucci; Giorgio Angelis; Andrea Lucibello; Emanuela Proietti

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development Status of the ILC Marx Modulator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-} 0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

Nguyen, M.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

A type system for recursive modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much work in recent years on extending ML with recursive modules. One of the most difficult problems in the development of such an extension is the double vision problem, which concerns the interaction of recursion and data abstraction. ... Keywords: abstract data types, modules, recursion, type systems

Derek Dreyer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Platts, David (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM)

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microcell-based module array" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Transportation Sector Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model,incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules.

John Maples

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Analysis of FPGA/FPIC switch modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Switch modules are the most important component of the routing resources in FPGAs/FPICs. Previous works have shown that switch modules with higher routability result in better area performance for practical applications. We consider in this paper an ... Keywords: Computer-aided design of VLSI, FPGA, FPIC, layout, synthesis

Yao-Wen Chang; Kai Zhu; Guang-Ming Wu; D. F. Wong; C. K. Wong

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Semidualizing modules Sean Sather-Wagstaff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, (R, m) is a Cohen-Macaulay local ring with canonical module = R. Definition. A finitely generated R-module C is semidualizing if (a) The natural homothety homomorphism R C : R HomR(C, C) is an isomorphism, and (b) Exti R(C, C) = 0 for each i = 0. Notation. S0(R) is the set of isomorphism classes

Sather-Wagstaff, Sean

444

Research on high-efficiency, large-area CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film modules. Final subcontract report, 16 August 1993--30 June 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final subcontract report, describing work to fabricate a large-area, stable, 12.5% (aperture)-efficient encapsulated CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module by scalable, low-cost techniques on inexpensive substrates. Demonstrated encapsulated module efficiencies (encapsulated 12.8%-efficient mini-module on 68.9cm{sup 2} and an NREL-verified 12.7%-efficient unencapsulated circuit on 69 CM{sup 2} with a prismatic cover) are the highest reported mini-module demonstrated (and verified by NREL). This is the first thin-film module of its size to exceed the 10% efficiency level. SSI also supplied NREL with a 1-kW array of large-area ({approximately}3890 CM{sup 2}) approximately 30-W modules. The NREL-verified performance of this array is a significant step toward meeting the efficiency target of the USDOE Five-Year Plan goals of 8%--10%-efficient commercial thin-film, flat-plate modules. Long-term outdoor stability of CIS and CIS-based absorbers was demonstrated by testing at NREL. Excellent stability was demonstrated for 6 years of outdoor exposure. The stability of the 1-kW Siemens CIS array, installed and tested at NREL, was also demonstrated for an exposure of about 1 year. The foundations have been laid to meet the thin-film milestones of the DOE Five-Year Plan. Outdoor testing has demonstrated excellent intrinsic module stability. Future plans include scaling these results to larger areas and emphasizing the reduction of variation methodology to lay the foundation for demonstrating the potential of CIS as a future commercial product.

Tarrant, D.E.; Gay, R.R. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of an automated solar cell layup and interconnect system is now complete. This system incorporates a Unimate 2000 B industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a vacuum pick up and induction heating coil. The robot interfaces with a smart cell preparation station which correctly orients the cell, applies solder paste and forms and positions the correct lengths of interconnect lead. The system is controlled and monitored by a TRS-80 micro computer. The first operational tests of the fully integrated station have been run. These tests proved the soundness of the basic design concept but also pointed to areas in which modifications are necessary. These modifications are nearly complete and the improved parts are being integrated. Development of the controlling computer program is progressing to both reflect these changes and reduce operating time.

Hagerty, J.J.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the components of an automated solar cell layup and interconnect system is now complete. This system incorporates a Unimate 2000 B industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a vacuum pick up and induction heating coil. The robot interfaces with a smart cell preparation station which correctly orients the cell, applies solder paste and forms and positions the correct lengths of interconnect lead. The system is controlled and monitored by a TRS-80 micro computer. The entire system is presently undergoing integration prior to formal testing. A survey of elastomer manufacturers has shown transfer molded EPDM to be a strong candidate for the edge sealing material.

Hagerty, J.J.

1979-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installation of the cell preparation station into its new enclosure is now complete and operation verification tests have been performed. The detailed layout drawings of the Automated Lamination Station have been produced and construction has begun. All major and most minor components have been delivered by vendors. The station framework has been built and assembly of components is underway. The final drawings for the Automated Vacuum Chamber are being completed and the first in-house components are being fabricated.

Hagerty, J. J.

1981-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Process development for automated solar-cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Automated Lamination Station is mechanically complete and is currently undergoing final wiring. The high current driver and isolator boards have been completed and installed, and the main interface board is under construction. The automated vacuum chamber has had a minor redesign to increase stiffness and improve the cover open/close mechanism. Design of the Final Assembly Station has been completed and construction is underway.

Hagerty, J. J.; Gifford, M.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Advanced Indoor Module Light-Soaking Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the accelerated, indoor light-soaking test station is presented in this paper, along with data obtained for six modules that underwent exposure. The station comprises a climate-controlled chamber equipped with a solar simulator that allows 1-sun light intensity exposure. Concurrently, we monitor the electrical characteristics of multiple PV modules and exercise active control over their electrical bias using programmable electronic loads, interfaced to a data acquisition system that acquires power-tracking and current-voltage data. This capability allows us to the test different bias conditions and to cyclically alternate between them. Additionally, we can vary the light intensity and module temperatures to garner realistic temperature coefficients of module performance. Data obtained on cadmium telluride (CdTe) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules are presented.

del Cueto, J. A.; Osterwald, C.; Pruett, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

McGregor, Douglas S. (Riley, KS); Shultis, John K. (Manhattan, KS); Rice, Blake B. (Manhattan, KS); McNeil, Walter J. (Winnfield, KS); Solomon, Clell J. (Wichita, KS); Patterson, Eric L. (Manhattan, KS); Bellinger, Steven L. (Manhattan, KS)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

Cerrina, Francesco (Madison, WI); Sussman, Michael R. (Madison, WI); Blattner, Frederick R. (Madison, WI); Singh-Gasson, Sangeet (Madison, WI); Green, Roland (Madison, WI)

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Testability of AND-EXOR Based Iterative Logic Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iterative Logic Arrays (ILAs) are ideal as VLSI sub-systems because of their regular structure and its close resemblance with FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays). AND-EXOR based circuits are of interest in the design of very low power circuits where energy loss implied by high frequency switching is of much consideration. This paper examines the testability of AND-EXOR based Iterative Logic Arrays (ILAs). For certain ILAs it is possible to find a test set whose size remains constant irrespective of the size of the ILA, while for others it varies with array size. Former type of ILAs is known as Constant-Testable (C-Testable). It has been shown that AND-EXOR based Logic Arrays are C-Testable and size of test set is equal to number of entries in cell truth table. The test generation problem has been shown to be related to certain properties of cycles in a set of graphs derived from cell truth table. By careful analysis of these cycles an efficient test generation technique that can be easily converted to an A...

Chakraborty, Avik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Central Laser Facility for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Central Laser Facility is a system often used in astroparticle experiments based on arrays of fluorescence or Cherenkov light detectors. The instrument is based on a laser source positioned at a certain distance from the array, emitting fast light pulses in the vertical direction with the aim of calibrating the array and/or measuring the atmospheric transmission. In view of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a similar device could provide a calibration of the whole installation, both relative, i.e. each individual telescope with respect to the rest of the array, and absolute, with a precision better than 10%, if certain design requirements are met. Additionally, a precise monitoring of the sensitivity of each telescope can be made on time-scales of days to years. During calibration runs of the central laser facility, all detectors will be pointed towards the same portion of the laser beam at a given altitude. Simulations of the possible configurations of a Central Laser Facility for CTA (varying la...

Gaug, Markus; Cilmo, Marco; Di Pierro, Federico; Tonachini, Aurelio; Vallania, Piero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modules Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules August 20, 2013 - 4:25pm Addthis Flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules are made of several components, including the front surface materials,...

459

Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

Chiang, C.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, Clement J. (New Brunswick, NJ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Image-Based Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking of Moving Targets During Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) enables efficient and highly conformal dose delivery. However, intrafraction motion may compromise the delivered target dose distribution. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking can potentially mitigate the impact of target motion on the dose. The purpose of this study was to use a single kV imager for DMLC tracking during IMAT and to investigate the ability of this tracking to maintain the dose distribution. Methods: A motion phantom carrying a two-dimensional (2D) ion chamber array and buildup material with an embedded gold marker reproduced eight representative tumor trajectories (four lung tumors, four prostate). For each trajectory, a low and high IMAT plan were delivered with and without DMLC tracking. The three-dimensional (3D) real-time target position signal for tracking was provided by fluoroscopic kV images acquired immediately before and during treatment. For each image, the 3D position of the embedded marker was estimated from the imaged 2D position by a probability-based method. The MLC leaves were continuously refitted to the estimated 3D position. For lung, prediction was used to compensate for the tracking latency. The delivered 2D dose distributions were measured with the ion chamber array and compared with a reference dose distribution delivered without target motion using a 3%/3 mm {gamma}-test. Results: For lung tumor motion, tracking reduced the mean {gamma}-failure rate from 38% to 0.7% for low-modulation IMAT plans and from 44% to 2.8% for high-modulation plans. For prostate, the {gamma}-failure rate reduction was from 19% to 0% (low modulation) and from 20% to 2.7% (high modulation). The dominant contributor to the residual {gamma}-failures during tracking was target localization errors for most lung cases and leaf fitting errors for most prostate cases. Conclusion: Image-based tracking for IMAT was demonstrated for the first time. The tracking greatly improved the dose distributions to moving targets.

Poulsen, Per Rugaard, E-mail: perpolse@rm.dk [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Fledelius, Walther [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cho, Byungchul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keall, Paul [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier`s Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor arra