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1

J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 264, 11641179 How to Derive a Protein Folding Potential? A New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fna 1mol 1stf 1gmp 1frd 1hsb 1ida 1plc 1aya 1onc 1sha 1fus 1psp 1fdd 256b 1acx 1bet 1fkb 1pal 2sic 1

Mirny, Leonid

2

J. Mol. Biol. (1990) 216, 239-241 Characterization and Preliminary Crystallographic Studies on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefying temperature (about a 100 K), and transferred at that temperature to the X-ray rotation camera. Throughout the entire period of data collection the crystals were surrounded by a stream of nitrogen gas

Yonath, Ada E.

3

J. Mol. Biol. (1969) 46, 269-279 Refinement of Protein Conformations using a Macromolecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'i-PLA-TRY-ILE-ALA-GLY4CIS-ALA-LEU CLY VAL LEU THR CIS LYS ASP GLU HIS TYR AL1 TRI ml NCAO X(C(C)C)AO NC(CC(C)C)AO NC(AOC

Levitt, Michael

4

J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 259, 819827 Selection of Chymotrypsin Inhibitors from a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were heated to 57.5°C for 10 min in a PTC200 thermocycler (MJ Re- search), rapidly cooled to 4°C and conformational studies of [Orn-10, Nle-13]-S-peptide. J Am Chem Soc 91:492­496. Ruettinger RT, Wen LP, Fulco AJ

Leatherbarrow, Robin J.

5

J. Mol. Biol. (1983) 171, 95-100 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

good candidates for such sites were noticed during initial inspection of the electron density map and processed as described by Winkler et al. (1979). Only relatively sparse data sets were collected: about 30, post-refinement calculations (Winkler et al., 1979) were successful even with Gd3+ and silicotungstate

Kirchhausen, Tomas

6

Clostridium thermocellum ATCC27405 transcriptomic, metabolomic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11. Lynd LR, Weimer PJ, van Zyl WH, Pretorius IS: Microbial cellulose utilization: Fundamentals and biotechnology. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 2002, 66:506. 577. 12. Rani KS,...

7

Information for a Letter of Recommendation to be written by Dr. Craig S. Hood, Biol. Sci.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information for a Letter of Recommendation to be written by Dr. Craig S. Hood, Biol. Sci. Dear for a Letter of Recommendation to be written by Dr. Craig S. Hood, Biol. Sci. By signing below, I am waiving

Hood, Craig

8

Mol. Biol. Evol. 18(6):10881102. 2001 2001 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine invertebrate taxa, including some well- studied and presumably cosmopolitan species, are actually-richness, overestimation of potential for long-dis- tance dispersal in putatively cosmopolitan species, failure of an ad- vanced conceptual framework of systematics methods, many invertebrates once supposed cosmopolitan

Foltz, David W.

9

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the transposable element (te) by a cut-and-paste mechanism 1, 18, usually generating a target site duplication (tsDs) at the site of insertion 1. Is elements also have many...

10

Biol. Cybernetics 32, 85--93 (1979) Transformation and Relational-Structure Schemes for Visual Pattern Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biol. Cybernetics 32, 85--93 (1979) Transformation and Relational-Structure Schemes for Visual patterns under visual inspection are judged to be the same, independent in this case of pattern position

Foster, David H.

11

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE April 16, 2013 NOTE: Change in BS CS Requirements beginning Fall 2013 the 1 unit BIOL 101 lab is no longer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013 ­ the 1 unit BIOL 101 lab is no longer required, but has been replaced with the 1-unit mandatory and an efficient path to graduation. We recognized that the required 1-unit BIOL 101 Lab had become impacted to improve their system and tools skills. To correct this, we dropped the 1-unit BIOL 101 Lab from our CS BS

12

Investigation of 5 MOL% YSZ Electrolyte for SOFC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation of 5 MOL% YSZ Electrolyte for SOFC. Author(s), Nilufer Evcimen, Ahmet Ekerim. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Nilufer Evcimen.

13

Histochem Cell Biol (2009) 132:199210 DOI 10.1007/s00418-009-0588-y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Histochem Cell Biol (2009) 132:199­210 DOI 10.1007/s00418-009-0588-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER Doxycycline whether the doxycycline-inducible synthesis of Timp-2, a natural inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinasesVectively examined by using a natural inhibitor. Surprisingly, already the application of doxycycline, which also

Witzgall, Ralph - Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III

14

Annu. Rev. Plant Biol.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Raschi A, Minnocci A. 2001. Responses of two olive tree (Olea europaea L.) culti- vars to elevated CO 2 concentration in the field. Photosynthetica 39:403-10 205. Wall GW,...

15

BIOL 448 DIRECTED STUDIES REGISTRATION FORM Completed form must be returned to Biology Program Office (Room 2521) prior to end of Drop/Add period.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science & Biology r Conservation r Ecology r Evolution r Marine r Plant r Oceanography & Biology r-mail: _________________________________ Year Standing: r 3rd r 4th r Unclassified r Other Academic Session: ______________________ BIOL 448: ____ Sec: ____ Number of Credits: r 3 credits r 6 credits Type of Elective: r General r Program Program

Vellend, Mark

16

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM TO THE EUROCHEMIC COMPANY, MOL, BELGIUM  

SciTech Connect

The United States Atomic Energy Commission program of assistance to the European Company for the Chemical Processing of Irradiated Fuels ("Eurochemic"), Mol, Belgium, is presented. Included are: background, formation, purpose, and structure of the Company; basic design considerations and a brief description of the proposed plant; present status of the and a list of participating organizations and members. (auth)

Shank, E.M.

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Stretching and twisting chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

core histones. NAP-1, and ACF. J. Mol. Biol. 351: 8999.core histones, NAP-1, and ACF. J. Mol. Biol. 351: 8999. 65.

Dobrovolskaia, Irina V.; Dobrovolskaia, Irina V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT BIOL-30200 Junior Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Eastern Chipmunk" 5:30 Fozia Khan (Peter Melcher) "A sweet study: Does tapping Acer saccharum for maple Following Myocardial Interaction in the Guinea Pig" 4:15 Ashley Hong (Andrew Smith) "A Histological Approach (Susan Swensen) "Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Genus Gurania Based on rps16-trnQ Chloroplast Intergenic

19

Name __________________________ BIOL 103 Fall 2008 Exam 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

baselines" OR the "tragedy of the commons." 2. (8 pts) What lesson can we draw from each the history of the Atlantic cod fishery? One sentence is sufficient. Then, in 1-3 sentences describe why the history) How are oil fields formed? 6. (8 pts) What is OPEC and why is it influential? #12;7. (8 pts) What

Kalinowski, Steven T

20

13 September 198 8 BIOL . SOC. WASH .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Effective Dispute Resolution ("CEDR") to appoint a Mediator. (b) The Parties shall within 14 days, the Parties may at any stage seek assistance from CEDR to provide guidance on a suitable procedure. (c) Unless

Prestwich, Ken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Name __________________________ BIOL 103 Fall 2007 Exam 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting; Energy futures analysis; PV-ANWR comparison Direct comparison of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) oil production and potential photovoltaics (PV) output (during the 70-year expected pumping lifetime of the ANWR deposit) has been neglected in the recent US policy debate. In part, this is because

Kalinowski, Steven T

22

Tanikawa C et al. Mol Cancer Res 8: 855-863, 2010. Tanikawa C et al. Cancer Res 69: 8761-9, 2009.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p53 p53 30000 p53 Tanikawa C et al. Mol Cancer Res 8: 855-863, 2010. Tanikawa C et al. Cancer Res 69: 8761-9, 2009. Tanikawa C et al.Oncogene 28: 3081-92, 2009. Morioka K et al. Cancer Science 100: 1227-1233, 2009. Kidokoro T et al. Oncogene 27: 1562-1571, 2008

Katsumoto, Shingo

23

Using Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount of isoprene in the gas phase (mols)1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure 101,000 (Pa)2. Volume of the liquid phase3. Things you need to know Math Amount of isoprene in gas = ideal gas constant 8.314 J mol-1 K-1 T = temperature of liquid phase units °K (which is 273.1 + °C) CUsing Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount

Last, Robert L.

24

DNA tethering characterization, enzyme-mediated DNA looping under tension, and nucleosome stability in the force measuring optical tweezers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kadonaga, J. T. (1997). ACF, an ISWI-containing and ATP-Core Histones, NAP-1, and ACF. J. Mol. Biol. 351: 89-99.core histones, NAP-1, and ACF. J. Mol. Biol. 351: 89-99.

Gemmen, Gregory John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

J59 Chem Biol Biohydrog 2011draft ($$$).pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biohydrogenation from Biomass Sugar Mediated by Biohydrogenation from Biomass Sugar Mediated by in vitro 1 Synthetic Enzymatic Pathways 2 3 Running title: Biohydrogenation by Enzyme Cocktail 4 5 6 Yiran Wang 1,4 , Weidong Huang 1 , Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh 1,2 , Zhiguang Zhu 1 , 7 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3, * 8 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, 210-A Seitz Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute 9 and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA 10 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 11 University, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA 12 3 DOE Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA 13 4 Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 115, Lane 572, 14 Bibo Road, Shanghai 201203, China 15 16 * Correspondence should be addressed to Y.P.Z. (ypzhang@vt.edu) 17

26

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2004) 65: 620626 DOI 10.1007/s00253-004-1684-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-forming industries require the use of greases to lubricate metal surfaces during manufacturing operations as a sole carbon and energy source (=0.05±0.01 h-1 at 0.5 vol% lubricant concentration). The active bacteria product has been shifted to pre- treatment, the cleaning process to remove lubricant greases and oils

Wood, Thomas K.

27

REGULATION OF CORTICAL ACTIN DYNAMICS DURING CENTROSOME SEPARATION AND CYTOKINESIS IN THE DROSOPHILA EMBRYO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drosophila nuclear fallout. Mol Biol Cell. 14:2908-20.endosomal components Nuclear-fallout and Rab11. J Cell Biol.Sullivan. 1998. Nuclear-fallout, a Drosophila protein that

Crest, Justin Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Study of the interactions of molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate 50 mol % mixture with water vapor and carbon dioxide in air. Final report, June 2, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interactions of aerial components such as water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen with the binary 50 mol % mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate have been studied in the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C using electrochemical methods. In addition, the behavior of nitrite ions in this melt was investigated electrochemically. By judicious choice of techniques, in situ electroanalysis was possible and the necessary relevant data to accomplish this is presented, as well as insight into the corresponding electrochemical mechanisms associated with the electroactive species. The influence of each atmospheric component was examined separately. At temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, nitrite ions are found to accumulate due to thermal decomposition of the nitrate. Water is highly soluble in the salt mixture, but no hydrolytic reactions were observed. Two methods of in situ analysis for water are described. Pure carbon dioxide is found to attack the melt at all temperatures above 250/sup 0/C producing carbonate. (LEW)

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chloroplast DNA insertions into the nuclear genome of rice: the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shahmuradov IA, Akbarova YY, Solovyev VV, Aliye JA (2003). Abundance of plastid DNA insertions in nuclear genomes of rice and Arabidopsis. Plant Mol Biol...

30

The genetic basis for adaptation of Escherichia coli to growth in minimal media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Genome Sequencing . . . . . . 3.3.2 Summary ofPalsson. Compara- tive genome sequencing of escherichia coliT. Feldblyum. Bacterial genome sequencing. Methods Mol Biol,

Conrad, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Geometry of the Ribosomal Polypeptide Exit , M. Gerstein1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membranes. J Mol Biol 348, 445-57. 43. Adams, P. L., Stahley, M. R., Kosek, A. B., Wang, J. & Strobel, S. A

Gerstein, Mark

32

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012 Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 12891298 1289 Cite this: Integr. Biol., 2012, 4, 12891298  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolution, which would help likely explain the complex biomechanical functions and force-sensing mechanisms resolution. This technique was based on a novel cell stretching device that allowed for quantitative control of cells and design better materials for cell and tissue engineering and other applications in vivo

Awtar, Shorya

33

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 38:873890 DOI 10.1007/s10295-011-0970-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dedicated to break- ing down the crystalline structure of cellulose to release the fermentable­substrate synergistic eVects. As a result, recombinant strains can simultaneously break down and ferment PASC to ethanol in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates is one of the major causes of elevated bioethanol produc- tion cost, making

Zhao, Huimin

34

57. S. A. Bastin-Shanower, S. J. Brill, J. Biol. Chem. 276, 36446 (2001).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA clone, M. Wold for the RPA expression plasmid, the staff of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source deposited in the RCSB Protein Data Bank (ac- cession codes 1MIU, 1IYJ, and 1MJE). Supporting Online Material

Morel, François M. M.

35

1 355 12107169 J Biol Chem 2002 Sep 13;277(37):34343-8. ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... B1, Cyclin B2, Cdc25B, Cdk1, and p55CDC mRNA as well as stimulating ... 22;277(47):44920-4. "Results suggest that nicotine stimulation of alpha7 ...

2003-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Tau protein binds to microtubules through a flexible array of distributed weak sites. Z Cell Biol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Tau protein plays a role in the extension and maintenance of neuronal processes through a direct association with microtubules. To characterize the nature of this association, we have synthesized a collection of tau protein fragments and studied their binding properties. The relatively weak affinity of tau protein for microtubules (ti10- ' M) is concentrated in a large region containing three or four 18 amino acid repeated binding elements. These are separated by apparently flexible but less conserved linker sequences of 13-14 amino acids that do not bind. Within the repeats, the binding energy for microtubules is delocalized and derives from a series of weak interactions contributed by small groups of amino acids. These unusual char acteristics suggest tau protein can assume multiple conformations and can pivot and perhaps migrate on the surface of the microtubule. The flexible structure of the tau protein binding interaction may allow it to be easily displaced from the microtubule lattice and may have important consequences for its function. TAU protein is a microtubule-associated protein present In brain and other neuronal tissues (Binder et al., 1985; Drubin et al., 1986; Weingarten et al., 1975). It is found in the axonal microtubules of mature neurons (Binder et al., 1985) and in the axonlike elongated neurite processes synthesized by differentiating neurons in culture

Karena Butner; Marc W. Kirschner

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Biol. Lett. (2007) 3, 280283 doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0053  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Miltenberger, H. & Querner, U. 1990 Genetic transmission of migratory behavior into a nonmigratory bird

38

J. Math. Biol. DOI 10.1007/s00285-009-0309-0 Mathematical Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In particular, it investigates their monotonicity and convergence under the assumption that the rates Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College, London, UK P. De Leenheer (B for instance Smith and Waltman (1995) and Angeli and Sontag (2003), and, for obvious historical rea- sons

Sontag, Eduardo

39

Mar Biol (2010) 157:6980 DOI 10.1007/s00227-009-1296-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Polychaeta: Amphinomidae), the `cosmopolitan' Wreworm, consists of at least three cryptic species Romulo complanata (Pallas 1766) has been considered a cosmopolitan species with a great morpholog- ical similarity cosmopolitan and indica- t

Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

40

Syst. Biol. 55(4):579594, 2006 Copyright c Society of Systematic Biologists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ 1076-836X online DOI: 10.1080/10635150600812551 Phylogeny and Biogeography of a Cosmopolitan Frog anuran group with a nearly cosmopolitan distribution. We investigated the phylogenetic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Int. J. Biol. Sci. 2010, 6 http://www.biolsci.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constituent of many fruits and vegetables. It is a five-carbon sugar polyol and has been used as a food. Introduction D-Xylitol is a five-carbon polyol (five-carbon sugar alcohol), which has the capacity to form com and vegetables is usually low, and thus it is uneconomical to extract large amounts of D-xylitol from

Qin, Wensheng

42

Original articleWildl. Biol. 17: 1-12 (2011) DOI: 10.2981/10-010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.wildlifebiology.com Browse biomass removal and nutritional condition of Alaska moose Alces alces C. Tom Seaton, Thomas F estimated the biomass of CAG and biomass removed by moose based on bite diameters and diameter for the maximum benefit to the public (Alaska Statutes 2009). //Xinet/production/w/wbio/live_jobs/wbio-17-01/wbio

Ruess, Roger W.

43

doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.0151 published online 12 May 2010Biol. Lett.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Harvard University, Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA 01366, USA. Corresponding author: Evan L. Preisser (e

Menke, Sean

44

Int. J. Biol. Sci. 2009, 5 http://www.biolsci.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cellulose fraction. For the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol to be economically feasible Of the sugars recovered from lignocellulose, D-glucose can be readily converted into ethanol by baker is presented, showing conversion of xylose to xylulose even when the immobilized enzyme pellets are suspended

Qin, Wensheng

45

Int. J. Biol. Sci. 2009, 5 http://www.biolsci.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showed that the transformed T. reesei strains released more reducing sugars compared to the parental be used for -glucosidase production as well as improving the biomass conversion using cellulases. Keywords such as bioethanol. Different microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria primarily initiate the biocon- version

Qin, Wensheng

46

The Rockefeller University Press $30.00 J. Cell Biol. Vol. 191 No. 5 915922  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Gly-Asn­enriched protein; mInsc, mouse Insc; SCD, symmetric cell division; TRE, tetracycline/doxycycline

Rockey, Don

47

Mar Biol (2007) 152:599609 DOI 10.1007/s00227-007-0714-0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using tagging, tracking, and genetic methods (reviewed by Hueter et al. 2005). DiVerences in patterns

Bohonak, Andrew J.

48

doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0524 published online 26 August 2009Biol. Lett.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(derek.briggs@yale.edu). Investigation of feathers from the famous Middle Eocene Messel Oil Shale near the fossil feathers of the Messel Oil Shale as lithified bac- teria. This interpretation was extrapolated

Prum, Richard O.

49

Biol. Lett. (2007) 3, 577580 doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0310  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the current wintering population abundance. This effort included a double plat- form aerial survey design mysticetus; West Greenland; satellite tracking; aerial survey; sea ice 1. INTRODUCTION Sequential depletion of the population (Zeh et al. 1993; Reeves & Heide-Jørgensen 1996). A dedicated aerial survey effort was conducted

Laidre, Kristin L.

50

BioCARS_J_Mol_Bio_327_1093.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using the BioCARS sector 14 beamline at the APS have determined how changes in a pair of proteins lead to the family of neurological disorders that includes Tay-Sachs dis- ease....

51

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (1995) 43:850-855 Springer-Verlag 1995 N. Padukone K. W. Evans J. D. McMillan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Springer, New York, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 210-280 Hahn-H~igerdal B, Hallborn J, Jeppson H, Olsson L, Skoog

California at Riverside, University of

52

XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protein BACH1 is a DNA helicase targeted by clinicallyby a superfamily-2 helicase. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 14,and Yang, W. (2006). UvrD helicase unwinds DNA one base pair

Fan, Li

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase p72, Mol Cell Biol. A.O.asp-glu-ala-asp/his) RNA helicase that may alter protein-RNA

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear cap binding complex regulates RNA synthesis and processing through interactions with RNA polymerase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nrd1, and the putative helicase Sen1." Mol Cell Biol 16(12):The putative nucleic acid helicase Sen1p is required forrequire a functional Sen1 helicase, a component of the Nrd1

Chung, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

THE RABIT: A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates in human populations--experiences from the Chernobyl catastrophe. Environ Mol Mutagen 30. Radio- biological evaluation of immigrants from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Int J Radiat Biol 72

Brenner, David Jonathan

56

Microtubule tethers at kinetochores and spindle poles : essential mitotic components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells. Mol Biol Cell 14, Lewandoski, M. , Wassarman, K. M. ,458. Meyers, E. N. , Lewandoski, M. , and Martin, G. R. (in the female germ line (Lewandoski et al. , 1997) produced

Silk, Alain Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analysis of the human HMG and H1 proteins in chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HMG-14 and HMG-17 on chromatin subunits. J. Mol. Biol.H1 and its location in chromatin. Nature. 288, 675-679. Anmay contribute to chromatin unfolding during transcriptional

Khuong, Mai Tu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

J. Math. Biol. (2008) 56:253278 DOI 10.1007/s00285-007-0082-x Mathematical Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and ranges for angles AOC and BOC, the possible positions of atom C lie on the sphere with radius |C| in a patch bounded by four planes that satisfy A · C = |A||C|cos( AOC), and B · C = |B||C|cos( BOC). Each equation defines a range of planes containing origin O with the constraints of AOC and BOC; the atom C lies

Richardson, David

59

J. Math. Biol. (2010) 61:581616 DOI 10.1007/s00285-009-0309-0 Mathematical Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and convergence under the assumption that the rates of the reactions are monotone functions of the concentrations-mail: angeli@dsi.unifi.it D. Angeli Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College and Sontag (2003), and, for obvious historical rea- sons, to a lesser extent in molecular and systems biology

Sontag, Eduardo

60

DOI 10.1515/hsz-2012-0254Biol. Chem. 2013; 394(2): 163188 Karin B. Buscha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-translocation of anionic meta- bolic products and Na+ ions out of the cell. As argued elsewhere (Mulkidjanian et al., 2008b, with the maximum of 15 in the case of Spirulina platensis (Krah et al., 2010; Pogoryelov et al., 2012). Hence production (Genova et al., 2008; Shoubridge, 2012), and it is striking that all super- complexes described so

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

int. j. radiat. biol 2002, vol. 78, no. 12, 1065 1067 Routine screening mammography: how important is the radiation-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- mended starting ages for routine mammography mightBrookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS

62

, 20130383, published 24 July 201392013Biol. Lett. John Wang, Joel Barkan, Shara Fisler, Carlos Godinez-Reyes and Yonat Swimmer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We examined the effectiveness of illuminating gillnets with ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes

63

22 Moore, S.C. et al. (2002) The elusive structural role of ubiquitinated histones. Biochem. Cell Biol. 80, 311319  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia Owner Garcia Farms Ed Hughs Research in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile

Campbell, Robert E.

64

Analysis of plasmid genes by phylogenetic profiling and visualization of homology relationships using Blast2Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sex: playing voyeurs 50 years later. Science 2003, 301:802-803. 6. Thomas CM, Nielsen KM: Mechanisms of, and barriers to, hori- zontal gene transfer between bacteria. Nat Rev Microbiol 2005, 3:711-721. 7. Burrus V, Waldor MK: Shaping bacterial... cells under nutritional stress. Can J Microbiol 2006, 52:24-30. 24. Escobar-Paramo P, Giudicelli C, Parsot C, Denamur E: The evolu- tionary history of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli revised. J Mol Evol 2003, 57:140-148. 25. Hartman AB...

Brilli, Matteo; Mengoni, Alessio; Fondi, Marco; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Lio, Pietro; Fani, Renato

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nucleic Acid Standards - Program List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Programs and References List of Programs and References CEHS M. A. El Hassan & C. R. Calladine (1995). ``The Assessment of the Geometry of Dinucleotide Steps in Double-Helical DNA: A New Local Calculation Scheme.'' J. Mol. Biol. 251, 648-664. X. J. Lu, M. A. El Hassan & C. A. Hunter (1997). ``Structure and Conformation of Helical Nucleic Acids: Analysis Program (SCHNAaP).''J. Mol. Biol. 273, 668-680. CompDNA (Please refer to Dr. Andrey A. Gorin: agor@sbnmr1.ski.mskcc.org OR Dr. Victor B. Zhurkin: zhurkin@lmmb.nci.nih.gov) A. A. Gorin, V. B. Zhurkin & W. K. Olson (1995). ``B-DNA Twisting Correlates with Base-pair Morphology.'' J. Mol. Biol. 247, 34-48. K. M. Kosikov, A. A. Gorin, V. B. Zhurkin & W. K. Olson (1999). ``DNA Stretching and Compression: Large-scale Simulations of Double Helical

66

transcripts from the L9 region is strongly regulated in response to xylan. R. flavefa-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the rumen species Streptococcus bo- vis. 1.Flint HJ, McPherson CA, Bisset J (1989) Appl Environ Microbiol 55, 1230-1233 2. Zhang J-X, Martin J, Flint HJ (1994) Mol Gen Genet 245, 260-264 3. Flint HJ, Martin J, Mc1 FV Nekrep1 HJ Flint2 ('University of Ljub jana, Biotechnical faculty, Grob je 3, 61230 Domzale

Recanati, Catherine

67

J. Mol. Model. 1999, 5, 252 262 Springer-Verlag 1999FULL PAPER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tang Institute of Physical Chemistry, Peking University, Beijing 100871, P.R.China. Tel: +86. In 1909, Paul Ehrlich demonstrated that drugs often induce physiological effects by binding to the highly

Luhua, Lai

68

B49: Typical Microstructures of Flash-Sintered 8 Mol % YSZ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A16: Analysis of Surface Physic-Chemical Properties of Titanium Heat Treated A17: Morphology Variations of GaN Nanowires and Devices ... A21: Synthesis and Characterization of ?-Tricalcium Phosphate / Glutamic acid ... B13: Ionic Conductivity of Doped Ceria Thin Films Using Different Electrode Configurations.

69

,J. Mol. Riol. (1983) 163. 1-26 Post-transcriptional Processing of Simian Virus 40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) : thr I !$S tra.nsc.rifd is ohstwwf f>>.t tw hwkgt~~~tit~. Thesr data are consistrnt with pubfishcci

Wickens, Marv

70

Performance of MolRec at TREC 2011 Overview and Analysis ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Solid triangle and bold line detection: Given our cleaned skeleton paths, we identify and orient solid triangles, and simultaneously detect bold lines ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

May 13, 1998 Gas Frac. Mol.Wt. Density Speci c Ht. Boil. Pt.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Argon 30 39.95 1.784 0.125 Butane 8 58.12 2.6 0.389 -0.5 HFC-134a 62 102.0 4.5 0.20 -26.3 Table 1-pressure for every 1 m height. Gas is non- ammable. Butane and HFC-134a must be heated during winter 1 #12;RPC drop across one layer less than 5 mmH2O at 10 cc=min ow rate. 2 #12;(Outside) Ar Butane Scale Thermal

Llope, William J.

72

J. theor. Biol. (2003) 220, 393406 doi:10.1006/jtbi.2003.3178, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the proposition that from a chemical perspective the replication reaction is an extreme expression of kinetic a chemical perspective, building on Eigen's (1971, 1992) kinetic approach in- itiated some 30 years ago chemical reactions, and, as such, are governed by the rules of kinetics and thermodynamics, just as for any

Pross, Addy

73

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY Phys. Med. Biol. 48 (2003) 34853504 PII: S0031-9155(03)62467-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is the conductivity, is the potential field, E is the electric field, J is the current density and B is the magnetic of the object, potential and electric field distributions are generated in the object. The current distribution in the object is given by J = E. The internal current distribution, J, sets up a magnetic flux density

Ider, Yusuf Ziya

74

eat-5 and unc-7 represent a multigene family in Caenorhabditis elegans involved in cell-cell coupling. J. Cell Biol. 134, 537548. Abstract Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The Drosophila melanogaster genes Passover and l(1)ogre and the Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-7 define a gene family whose function is not known. We have isolated and characterized the C. elegans gene eat-5, which is required for synchronized pharyngeal muscle contractions, and find that it is a new member of this family. Simultaneous electrical and video recordings reveal that in eat-5 mutants, action potentials of muscles in the anterior and posterior pharynx are unsynchronized. Injection of carboxyfluorescein into muscles of the posterior pharynx demonstrates that all pharyngeal muscles are dye-coupled in wild-type animals; in eat-5 mutants, however, muscles of the anterior pharynx are no longer dye-coupled to posterior pharyngeal muscles. We show that a gene fusion of eat-5 to the green fluo-

Todd A. Starich; Raymond Y. N. Lee; Cristin Panzareua; Leon Avery; Jocelyn E. Shaw

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY Phys. Med. Biol. 52 (2007) 65116524 doi:10.1088/0031-9155/52/21/012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the model-checker Spin to verify security properties of cryptography-based systems. Keywords model with a mod- est training effort. As an example for such requirements, we focus on se- curity aspects. Data for the development method and for the new tools has many advantages. Many software developers are trained in UML

Kaeli, David R.

76

J. Math. Biol. DOI 10.1007/s00285-013-0672-8 Mathematical Biology Absolute stability and dynamical stabilisation in predator-prey systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Many ecological systems exhibit multi-year cycles. In such systems, invasions have a complicated spatiotemporal structure. In particular, it is common for unstable steady states to exist as long-term transients behind the invasion front, a phenomenon known as dynamical stabilisation. We combine absolute stability theory and computation to predict how the width of the stabilised region depends on parameter values. We develop our calculations in the context of a model for a cyclic predator-prey system, in which the invasion front and spatiotemporal oscillations of predators and prey are separated by a region in which the coexistence steady state is dynamically stabilised.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

10.1101/sqb.2009.74.040Access the most recent version at doi: published online April 7, 2010Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to urbanization and land use conversion of rural and natural areas is a major concern in Florida, has major potential to produce liquid fuels, biogass, and electricity. Bioethanol Ethanol can Sustainability Page 19 Gasification is a high-temperature thermochemical conversion of biomass into a combustible

78

INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 42:10091017 (2002) Experimental Hydrodynamics and Evolution: Function of Median Fins in Ray-finned Fishes1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of relevant fluid dynamic parameters such as circulation and vorticity. In previous papers we have described and represent energy lost as a consequence of thrust generation (Carling et al., 1998). Such lateral forces may, shares several characteristics at odds with recent com- putational fluid dynamic analyses (e.g., Cheng

Drucker, Eliot G.

79

J. Math. Biol. DOI 10.1007/s00285-006-0043-9 Mathematical Biology Mathematical and theoretical biology for systems biology, and then...vice versa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems Biology has two roots (1). The better known resides in Molecular Biology, grew to functional genomics and then became top-down, genomewide Systems Biology. The less-publicized root resides in theoretical and Mathematical Biology, with topics such as non-equilibrium thermodynamics, self-organization, kinetic modelling, metabolic control analysis, flux analysis and biochemical systems theory, culminating in genome-wide versions thereof. It is anticipated that from these roots a Biology of unprecedented strength and quality will emerge, which ends the deadlocks of functional genomics drowning in its oceans of data and of Mathematical Biology escaping reality. Much of the growth in Systems Biology has bypassed Mathematical and Theoretical Biology. Only at the 2005 ESMTB meeting in Dresden did the surge in Systems Biology activity seen in molecular cell biology, begin to be mirrored by a similar surge in Mathematical Biology. Until then, the more theoretical activities in Systems Biology involved engineers much more than mathematicians. Why has this been the case? Systems Biology is well-defined and broad at the same time, not unlike Mathematical Biology. It is the science that studies how functional biological properties arise in the interactions of components (2,

Hans V. Westerhoff; H. V. Westerhoff (b

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Streamlined determination of processive run length and mechanochemical coupling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RecBCD helicase determined from single turnover chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies. J. Mol. Biol, for both basic research and technological applications. Here, we present a streamlined analytical method of kinetic time courses of NTP hydrolysis that have not been addressed in previous analyses, and also

Derényi, Imre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Expression Vector Systems: New Weapons for Plant Research and Biotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and transformation-recalcitrant crops (e.g. Meyer et al., 2004; Coutu et al., 2007). Fur- thermore, vectors complementation in planta. J Mol Biol 362: 1120­1131 Coutu C, Brandle J, Brown D, Brown K, Miki B, Simmonds J

Citovsky, Vitaly

82

This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy is furnished to the author for non-commercial research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Guillen et al., 1998) (77% similar, 67% identical for LePAR1 and 84% simi- lar/69% identical for LePAR2 reductase from V. radiata was shown to reduce the fungal toxin eutypine (Guillen et al., 1998). Again dehydro- genase in higher plants: molecular cloning and expression. Plant Mol. Biol. 36, 755­765. Guillen

Klee, Harry J.

83

Maturation of single retinogeniculate projections visualized by in vivo electroporation of fluorescent proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mol Biol. 423: 259-278 McLaughlin T, Torborg CL, Feller MB,Neuron 40: 114760 McLaughlin T, O'Leary DD. 2005. Molecular32 Frisen J, Yates PA, McLaughlin T, Friedman GC, O'Leary

Hua, Ethan Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

PROGRAMS AND COURSES PROGRAMS AND COURSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Tel.: +45-45252488; fax: +45- 45931585. E-mail address: dave@cbs.dtu.dk (D. Ussery). 0097 also be involved in recombination (Majewski and Ott, 2000). Structural, physicochemical and theoretical. A quantitative study. J. Mol. Biol. 163, 129­146. Majewski, J., Ott, J., 2000. Gt repeats are associated

California at Davis, University of

85

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for Proposed Amendment 86 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Tel.: +45-45252488; fax: +45- 45931585. E-mail address: dave@cbs.dtu.dk (D. Ussery). 0097 also be involved in recombination (Majewski and Ott, 2000). Structural, physicochemical and theoretical. A quantitative study. J. Mol. Biol. 163, 129­146. Majewski, J., Ott, J., 2000. Gt repeats are associated

86

cole doctorale d'informatique, tlcommunications et lectronique de Paris Thse de doctorat de l'Universit Paris VI --Pierre-et-Marie-Curie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Tel.: +45-45252488; fax: +45- 45931585. E-mail address: dave@cbs.dtu.dk (D. Ussery). 0097 also be involved in recombination (Majewski and Ott, 2000). Structural, physicochemical and theoretical. A quantitative study. J. Mol. Biol. 163, 129­146. Majewski, J., Ott, J., 2000. Gt repeats are associated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Microsoft PowerPoint - MolWireH2-jM_JW_BNLworkshop.ppt [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Pulse Experiments on Fast Pulse Experiments on Molecular Processes in Organic Ions hν phase boundary e - 2-200 nm molecular wire Catalytic nanoparticle Energy Capture and Storage Using Nano Objects 10 8 6 4 2 0 x10 -3 3000nm 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 λ (nm) 0.14 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.00 Absorbance R R R R * n n=20 PolyFluorene 20 anion in THF LEAF (300ns) Na reduction 606 nm 2520 nm 80 60 40 20 0 ε (M -1 cm -1 ) x10 -3 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 λ (nm) T3-PPE-T3 and PPE Cations in DCE/Toluene T3PPET3 Cation PPE Cation < 10 ns S R S S R R OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR S R S S R R OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR * The spectrum of the T 3 end-capped polymer is red- shifted relative to that of the parent * The PPE cation radical is trapped by the T 3 end- groups in <10 ns !

88

JOl/mol of Food Pmftclian. Vv/. 64. No. J. 200/. P/1ges 401-41)4 Research Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurring car- cinogens known. and, thus, crop contamination with the toxins poses a serious health hazard of fungal pectinases and other hydro- lases (1-3) in plant cell wall degradation is well established

Cotty, Peter J.

89

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12, 9440-9462; doi:10.3390/ijms12129440 International Journal of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Zn2+ 3EW8 1.80 M344 D101L Zn2+ 3EWF 2.50 Substrate H143A Zn2+ 3EZP 2.65 M344 D101N Zn2+ 3EZT 2.85 M

Lee, Keun Woo

90

CNRS-IBPC, UMR7141 13, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris, France Bio-Logic SA 1, rue de l'Europe F-38640 Claix Tel: +33 476 98 96 79 www.biol-logic.info  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDV Light Duty Vehicle LED Light Emitting Diode LEL

Wollman, Francis-André

91

AE Kuznetsov and NB Gradova, scientific foundations of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

knowledge, uniting biology, chemistry, geochemistry, soil science, hydrobiology, biochemistry, microbiol- ogy, population genetics, and various fields of engi-.

92

A new deep branch of eurasian mtDNA macrohaplogroup M reveals additional complexity regarding the settlement of Madagascar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zones. In PhD thesis University of Otago; 2003. 18. Adelaar AK: "Asian roots of the Malagasy: a linguistic perspec- tive". Volume 151. Leiden: Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde; 1995:325-356. 19. Dahl OC: Malgache et Maanjan. Une... P, Macaulay V, et al.: Climate change and postglacial human dispersals in southeast Asia. Mol Biol Evol 2008, 25(6):1209-1218. 41. Lansing JS, Cox MP, Downey SS, Gabler BM, Hallmark B, Karafet TM, Norquest P, Schoenfelder JW, Sudoyo H, Watkins JC...

Ricaut, Francois-X; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Cox, Murray P; Dugoujon, Jean-M; Guitard, Evelyne; Sambo, Clement; Mormina, Maru; Mirazon-Lahr, Marta; Ludes, Bertrand; Crubezy, Eric

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Origins of chromosomal rearrangement hotspots in the human genome: evidence from the AZFadeletion hotspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Bromage, P. Tempst , T. Honjo, and L.D. Vales. 1994. The recombination signal sequence-binding protein RBP-2N functions as a transcriptional repressor. Mol. Cell. Biol. 14: 3310-3319. Frisse, L., R.R. Hudson, A. Batoszewicz, J.D. Wall, J. Donfack, and A... Tree: analyzing and visualizing evolutionary data. Bioinformatics 14: 68-73. Jeffreys, A.J. and C.A. May. 2004. Intense and highly localized gene conversion activity in human meiotic crossover hot spots. Nature Genet. 36: 152-256. Jobling, M.A. and C. Tyler...

Hurles, Matthew E; Willey, David; Matthews, Lucy; Hussain, Syed Sufyan

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 (1997) L541L549. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-4075(97)81352-1 LETTER TO THE EDITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a particular ground hyperfine substate by optical pumping. They are then deflected by resonant laser radiation the substate populations and the coherences formed between them; that is, both the amplitude and the phase, UK. 0953-4075/97/160541+09$19.50 c 1997 IOP Publishing Ltd L541 #12;L542 Letter to the Editor ground

Summy, Gil

95

SPECIATION AND RELEASE KINETICS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC IN PADDY SOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(III) reducers. Appl Environ Microbiol 58: 3205­3206. Manz W, Wendt-Potthoff K, Neu TR, Szewzyk U & Lawrence JR

Sparks, Donald L.

96

Evaluation and validation of the ABI 3700, ABI 3100, and the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1994, 107, 1320. [21] Boom, R., Sol, CJA, Salimans, MMM, Jansen, CL, Wertheim-van Dillen, PME, van der Noordaa, J., J. Clin. Microbiol. ...

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

State of the InstituteState of the Institute --Today,Today, October 16, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanotrophs. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2008, 74 (5), 1305-1315. (33) DeVaull, G.; McHugh, T. E.; Newberry, P

Li, Mo

98

Biochemistry and genetics of autotrophy in Methanococcus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project investigated fundamental aspects of carbon metabolism and genetics in the methane-producing archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. The project yielded 23 peer-reviewed publications and five reviews from 1997-2007. PDFs of the peer-reviewed publications are included in the next section. Some papers of special interest are listed below. The pathway of pyruvate biosynthesis was elucidated by a combination of biochemical and physiological studies. This work characterized the very oxygen sensitive pyruvate oxidoreductase and showed that the enzyme was irreversible under physiological conditions. Evidence for the flow of electrons from the energy coupling hydrogenase b (Ehb) was presented. These results were published in the following papers. Yang, Y.L., J.N. Gluska, and W.B. Whitman (2002) Intracellular pyruvate flux in the methane-producing archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Arch. Microbiol. 178: 493-498. Lin, W.C., Y.L. Yang, and W.B. Whitman (2003) The anabolic pyruvate oxidoreductase from Methanococcus maripaludis. Arch. Microbiol. 179: 444-456. Lin, W., and W.B. Whitman (2004) The importance of porE and porF in the anabolic pyruvate oxidoreductase of Methanococcus maripaludis. Arch. Microbiol. 181: 68-73. Porat, I., W. Kim, E.L. Hendrickson, Q. Xia, Y. Zhang, T. Wang, F. Taub, B.C. Moore, I.J. Anderson, M. Hackett, J.A. Leigh, and W.B. Whitman (2006) Disruption of the Ehb hydrogenase operon limits anabolic CO2 assimilation in the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. J. Bacteriol. 188: 1373-1380. The presence of a novel pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis was discovered and elucidated as part of these studies. These results were published in the following papers. Tumbula, D. L., Q. Teng, M. G. Bartlett, and W. B. Whitman (1997) Ribose biosynthesis and evidence for an alternative first step in the common aromatic amino acid pathway in Methanococcus maripaludis. J. Bacteriol. 179:6010-6013. Porat, I., B.W. Waters, Q. Teng, and W.B. Whitman (2004) Two biosynthetic pathways for the aromatic amino acids in the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. J. Bacteriol. 186: 4940-4950. Porat, I., M. Sieprawska-Lupa, Q. Teng, F.J. Bohanon, R.H. White, and W.B. Whitman. 2006. Biochemical and genetic characterization of an early step in a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids and p-aminobenzoic acid in the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Mol. Microbiol. 62: 1117-1132. A variety of computational, biochemical and genetic methods were used to elucidate the amino acyl-tRNA synthetases in methanococci. These were of special interest because genomic sequencing of a related archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii revealed that these organisms were lacking four of the enzymes thought to be universal in all living organisms. Many of these results were published in the following papers. Rother, M., A. Resch, W.L. Gardner, W.B. Whitman, and A. Bck (2001) Heterologous expression of archaeal selenoprotein genes directed by the SECIS element located in the 3' non-translated region. Mol. Microbiol. 40: 900-908. Stathopoulos, C., W. Kim, T. Li, I. Anderson, B. Deutsch, S. Palioura, W. Whitman, and D. Soll. (2001) Cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase is not essential for viability of the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98: 14292-14297. Farahi, K., G.D. Pusch, R. Overbeek, and W.B. Whitman (2004) Detection of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events in the prokaryotic tRNA synthetases by the Ratios of Evolutionary Distances method. J. Mol. Evol. 58: 615-631. Sauerwald, A., W. Zhu, T.A. Major, H. Roy, S. Palioura, D. Jahn, W.B. Whitman, J.R. Yates 3rd, M. Ibba, and D. Sll (2005) RNA-dependent cysteine biosynthesis in archaea. Science 307: 1969-1972. Yuan, J., S. Palioura, J.C. Salazar, D. Su, P. ODonoghue, M.J. Hohn, A.M. Cardoso, W.B. Whitman, and D. Sll (2006) RNA-dependent conversion of phosphoserine forms selenocysteine in eukaryotes and archaea. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103:18923-18927.

Whitman, William B.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Index of /files/ftp/NDB/coordinates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coordinates Parent Directory na-biol-mirror na-biol na-chiral-correct na-deposited na-mmcif na-nmr-mmcif na-nmr na-obsolete ndbidonly xml-extatom xml-noatom xml...

100

Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was funded by the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) through afuels: the joint bioenergy institute. ACS Chem Biol 9.

Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Synthetic gene oscillators and their applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scale. Genome Biol, 4(9), Grenier, F. , Timofeev, I. , andas in epileptic seizures (Grenier et al. , 2003). There is

Danino, Tal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The evolution of postpollination reproductive isolation in Costus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evol Biol 18:568 Maas PJM (1972) Costoideae (Zingiberaceae).New York, USA Maas PJM (1977) Renealmia (Zingiberaceae-

Yost, Jenn M.; Kay, Kathleen M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

CELL, MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Graduation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CELL, MOLECULAR AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Graduation Requirements: A minimum 2.0 average in all in Biology III: Cell Structure and Function (2 cr.; fall) 6. BIOL 24100 Biology IV: Genetics and Molecular Biology (3 cr.; spring) 7. BIOL 24200 Laboratory in Genetics and Molecular Biology (2 cr.; spring) 8. BIOL

Jiang, Wen

104

mental management, urban planning, waste disposal, and related fields in government and industry may choose from a variety of course offerings. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Castillo, Steven P.

105

Making Redescription Mining Well Posed A bias on the form of descriptor expressions helps violate the dichotomy law and ensure well posedness of redescription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Ramakrishnan, Naren

106

A simple simulation method for designing fibrous insulation materials R. Arambakam a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi

107

Microsoft Word - RPSEA Final Report RPSEA Format ns.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

halotolerant, sulfate---reducing bacterium isolated from exhaust water of a Tunisian oil refinery. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59: 1 059---63 12. Blum JS, Han S, Lanoil B,...

108

The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements in the common brown algae and in sea water, JournalBacterial tracking of motile algae, FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.brevis (Dinophyceae), Harmful Algae 1, 277-293. Mayali, X. ,

Amin, Shady A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of laccase and ...  

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 37:10911096 DOI 10.1007/s10295-010-0757-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of ...

110

A Monte Carlo-based framework enhances the discovery and interpretation of regulatory sequence motifs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000, 275:1293412940. 52. Nrc H, Res G, Microbiol M, Resprotein; and in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we discoverd subtleTfbG in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 One of the main mechanisms

Seitzer, Phillip; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G; Larsen, David J; Facciotti, Marc T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Real-time quantitative PCR for enteric adenovirus serotype 40 in environmental waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microbial source tracking study effort. 2005 NRC CanadaFebruary 2005. Published on the NRC Research Press Web siteWigand et al. 2005 NRC Canada Can. J. Microbiol. 51: 393

Jiang, Sunny C; Dezfulian, H; Chu, W P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Model-driven metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli : a systems biology approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellular and molecular biology. Washington, D.C. : ASMmodels in microbial systems biology. Curr Opin Microbiol 3.12 (iJR904 GSM/GPR). Genome Biology 2003;4:R54.1-R54.12. 14.

Feist, Adam Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Engineering of Bacterial Methyl Ketone Synthesis for Biofuels  

Published Ahead of Print 28 October 2011. 10.1128/AEM.06785-11. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.2012, 78(1):70. DOI: Harry R. Beller Ee-Been Goh, Edward E. K ...

114

INFRASTRUCTURE PRELIMINARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 300 rpm), centrifuged (2,000?g, 5 min), and supernatants collected and frozen. Differences from a rotating biological contactor treat- ing ammonium-rich leachate. Arch Microbiol 175: 198­207 8

115

Targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases from a switchgrass-adapted compost community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S2 Correspondence analysis of the compost bioreactor Author2004) Microbial Ecology of Compost. In: Lens P, Hamelers B,composting in a monitored compost bin. J Appl Microbiol 94:

Allgaier, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004) Microbial Ecology of Compost. In: Lens P, Hamelers B,composting in a monitored compost bin. J Appl Microbiol 94:a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community Martin Allgaier ,

Reddy, Amitha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Simulation of Natural and Social Process Interactions: An Example from Bronze Age Mesopotamia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relatedness groups are termed "divisions." For most of the history of microbiol- ogy, the primary focus that colonization of growth surfaces suspended in hotsprings (glass slides; glass wool; cotton fiber) tends

Kemner, Ken

118

Tik-borne rickettsial pathogens in ticks and small mammals in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mites and small mammals in Korea. J. Vet. Sci. 6:327334.Haemaphysalis longicornis in Korea. Microbiol. Immunol. 47:hemorrhagic disease patients in Korea, 1988. J. Korean Soc.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Real-time PCR quantification of human adenoviruses in urban rivers indicates genome prevalence but low infectivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated cell culture-nested PCR procedure, p. 547. Abstr.samples by real-time PCR. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:2250Real time quantitative PCR for enteric adenovirus serotype

Choi, S; Jiang, Sunny C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Real-time quantitative PCR for enteric adenovirus serotype 40 in environmental waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adenovirus detection by PCR as an index of human viruses.polluted waters by nested PCR amplification. Appl. Environ.real-time quantitative PCR. J. Clin. Microbiol. Wigand, R. ,

Jiang, Sunny C; Dezfulian, H; Chu, W P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Y. pestis sample collection from nonporous surfaces by quantitative real-time PCR. Lett. Appl. Microbiol. 50: 431-7. Hong-Geller, E. and Micheva-Viteva, S. (2010)...

122

Experimental factors affecting PCR-based estimates of microbial species richness and evenness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

template mismatch by real-time PCR using the 16S rRNA geneWelch DB (2009). Effect of PCR amplicon size on assessmentsof mixtures of 16S rRNA genes by PCR. Appl Environ Microbiol

Engelbrektson, Anna

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Flow cytometry sorting of freshwater phytoplankton Maria Cellamare & Anne Rolland & Stphan Jacquet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-activated cell sorter (FACS) tubes (Falcon #35-2058, BD Bioscience, Palo Alto, CA, USA). To 100 L of the main in soil. Appl Environ Microbiol 1998;64(7):2463­2472. Lagally ET, Medintz I, Mathies RA. Single

Jacquet, Stéphan

124

PubMed contains all of MEDLINE (1966-present), OLDMEDLINE (1946-1965), PubMed in-process records (new citations not yet fully indexed) and some additional non-MEDLINE citations. It is the primary database for researchers in the fields of biochemistry, mol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BASIC SEARCH TECHNIQUES PubMed searching is easy. Just enter your search terms in the search box to additional searching options. Keyword Searching Enter one or more keywords (e.g., molecular motors) in the search box and click Search. PubMed automatically combines (ANDs) significant terms together using

California at Berkeley, University of

125

BNL Biology Department - Publications 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STEM Home Page STEM Home Page About STEM Data Analysis Publications Users & Projects FAQs External Links Publication Categories DNA/RNA Protein Filaments Heavy Atom Instumentation Methods Nanoscience Proteins Lipoprotiens Viruses-Filamentous Viruses-Spherical Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Facility DNA/RNA/protein Makhov A.M., Sen A., Yu X., Simon M.N., Griffith J.D., and Egelman E.H. The Bipolar Filaments Formed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 SSB/Recombination Protein (ICP8) Suggest a Mechanism for DNA Annealing. J Mol Biol., 386(2):273-9 (2009). PubMed Ohi M.D., Ren L., Wall J.S., Gould K.L., and Walz T. Structural characterization of the fission yeast U5.U2/U6 spliceosome complex. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA., 104(9):3195-200 (2007). PubMed, Full Text Ohi M.D., Feoktistova A., Ren L., Yip C., Cheng Y., Chen J.S., Yoon

126

DNA folding: structural and mechanical properties of the two-angle model for chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical analysis of the structural and mechanical properties of the 30-nm chromatin fiber. Our study is based on the two-angle model introduced by Woodcock et al. (Woodcock, C. L., S. A. Grigoryev, R. A. Horowitz, and N. Whitaker. 1993. PNAS 90:9021-9025) that describes the chromatin fiber geometry in terms of the entry-exit angle of the nucleosomal DNA and the rotational setting of the neighboring nucleosomes with respect to each other. We explore analytically the different structures that arise from this building principle, and demonstrate that the geometry with the highest density is close to the one found in native chromatin fibers under physiological conditions. On the basis of this model we calculate mechanical properties of the fiber under stretching. We obtain expressions for the stress-strain characteristics which show good agreement with the results of recent stretching experiments (Cui, Y., and C. Bustamante. 2000. PNAS 97:127-132) and computer simulations (Katritch, V., C. Bustamante, and W. K. Olson. 2000. J. Mol. Biol. 295:29-40), and which provide simple physical insights into correlations between the structural and elastic properties of chromatin.

H. Schiessel; W. M. Gelbart; R. Bruinsma

2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ultramicroscopy 103 (2005) 261274 Use of surface affinity enrichment and cryo-embedding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dowall, J.M. Smith, J. Dubochet, EMBO J. 5 (1986) 1395. [6] R.M. Donev, L.P. Djondjurov, DNA Cell Biol. 18

Agard, David

128

103:2222-2233, 2010. First published Feb 24, 2010; doi:10.1152/jn.00903.2009J Neurophysiol Franois D. Roy, Jaynie F. Yang and Monica A. Gorassini  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the marine turbellarian Macrostomum sp.: These worms suck. Mar Biol 145:373­380. 45. Bedini C, Papi F (1970

Gorassini, Monica

129

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the marine turbellarian Macrostomum sp.: These worms suck. Mar Biol 145:373­380. 45. Bedini C, Papi F (1970

Thioulouse, Jean

130

Mechanisms of motor activity regulation in axonal transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emerging principles of kinesin motor utilization." Annu Revopposite-polarity microtubule motors." J Cell Biol 156( 4):Kinesin mutations cause motor neuron disease phenotypes by

Reis, Gerald Feliz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Functional genomic analysis of the let-7 regulatory network reveals novel targets with roles in growth and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recognition. PLoS Biol 3: e85. Brennecke J, Hipfner DR,elements. PLoS Genet 3: e85. Yu J, et al. 2007. Induced

Hunter, Shaun Edward

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The HslU ATPase acts as a molecular chaperone in prevention of aggregation of SulA, an inhibitor of cell division in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.V., Thi, M.H.D., Lecchi, P., Gottesman, S., Coutu- rier, M. and Maurizi, M.R. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271

Lee, Keun Woo

133

Serious limitations of the QTL/Microarray approach for QTL gene discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biol 2008, 9(12):R170. 69. Gorlov IP, Gallick GE, Gorlovaassociations. More recently, Gorlov et al. [69] found that

Verdugo, Ricardo A; Farber, Charles R; Warden, Craig H; Medrano, Juan F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Se in two marine fish.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xxi, 210 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis BIOL 2007 Zhang It is valuable to study the bioavailability of trace metal (more)

Zhang, Li

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Desert Hedgehog/Patched 1 signaling specifies fetal Leydig cell fate in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precursor. Dev. Biol. 240: 92­107. Ariyaratne, S.H.B., Mendis-Handagama, C.S., Hales, B.D., and Mason, I

Richardson, David

136

The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Functionally with the WRN Helicase Defective in Wernersynthesis via its helicase activity. J Biol Chem 2003; 27:Nairn RS. Depletion of Werner helicase results in mitotic

Trego, Kelly S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A heritability-adjusted GGE biplot for test environment evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooper et al. 1996; Guillen-Portal et al. 2004). AccordingBiol Environ Stat 2:269293 Guillen-Portal FR, Russell WK,

Yan, Weikai; Holland, James B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Palmitoylation is required for the production of a soluble multimeric Hedgehog protein complex and long-range signaling in vertebrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dev. Biol. 233: 122136. Lewandoski, M. , Meyers, E.N. , andex- pressing ?-actin?Cre (Lewandoski et al. 1997) to remove

Chen, M H; Li, Y J; Kawakami, T; Xu, S M; Chuang, Pao-Tien T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Bibliography and Literature Database, Ecology of the Southern California Bight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microplankton of the Monterey Formation and Modern Analogs.Biol. (Berl) the Monterey Formation, California / Curiale,matter in Miocene Monterey Formation, offshore California /

Allen, L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Travis Gallagher  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biol. 362, 114-122 (2006).?. "Structural analysis of ligand binding and catalysis in CL", Smith, NN, Roitberg, AE, Rivera, E, Howard, A, Holden, MJ ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Spinal glial regulation of nociceptive processing during inflammation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the induction and resolution of Lyme arthritis. J Biol Chem,joints of mice subjected to Lyme disease and it was found

Christianson, Christina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Host diversity begets parasite diversity: bird final hosts and trematodes in snail intermediate hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disease risk: the case of lyme disease. Conserv. Biol. 14,the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease decreases with2000). Ixodid ticks vector Lyme disease (a spirochaete

Hechinger, R F; Lafferty, K D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Demography, movement patterns, and mating system of leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) aggregating along the open coast of southern California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been hypothesized to use geomagnetic cues as referentialgroundwater discharge and geomagnetic anomalies in this areatemperature, bathymetry, and geomagnetic field. Mar Biol

Nosal, Andrew Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity in hot synthetic compost as revealed by PCR-isolated from mushroom compost. Soil Biol Biochem 2001, 33:thermophile, hot compost, Gram-negative actinomycete,

Pati, Amrita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Molecular mechanisms of B cell tolerance, proliferation and motility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERK signaling is a molecular switch integrating opposingsuperfamilies and their molecular evolution. Genome Biol,1378913794. Figure 3-1: Molecular domains of SHEP1. SHEP1

Browne, Cecille D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass feedstocks for biofuel production. Genome Biol 9:expensive steps in biofuel production from lignocellulosicenvisioned for future biofuel production (e.g. switchgrass,

Reddy, Amitha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases from a switchgrass-adapted compost community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass feedstocks for biofuel production. Genome Biol 9:expensive steps in biofuel production from lignocellulosicenvisioned for future biofuel production (e.g. switchgrass,

Allgaier, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Genetic and biotechnological approaches for biofuel crop improvement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering for biofuel production: towards affordablebiomass feedstocks for biofuel production. Genome Biol 2008,sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 2007,

Vega-Snchez, Miguel E; Ronald, Pamela C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Using a model filamentous fungus to unravel mechanisms of lignocellulose deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Glass Biotechnology for Biofuels 2013, 6:6 http://Somerville C: Cellulosic biofuels. Annu Rev Plant Biol 2009,plants and enzymes for biofuels production. Science 2007,

Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Glass, N Louise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gastric H,K-ATPase as a drug target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cations. J Biol Chem Fukushima Y, Nakao M: Changes inChem 1980;255(16):7813-9. Fukushima Y, Post RL: Binding of

Shin, Jai M; Sachs, G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated DNA-binding activity of AP-1 is attenuated in senescent human epidermal keratinocytes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of microtubes activated NF-kB. J Cell Biol 1995: 128: 1111regulation of wound healing? NF-kB activation in cultured

Shi, B; Isseroff, R R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

28 / AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 2006-2007 AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Castillo, Steven P.

153

Upcoming Events Dr bike sessions: Free 30 minute health check for your bike, carried  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Evans, Paul

154

MINOR: Livestock Production A minor in Livestock Production consists of at least 19 credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation....................................... 4 ANSC 304 and Wool Production; ANSC 415, Horse Production; ANSC 416, Beef Production; ANSC 417, Dairy Production BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life, and BIOL 211G, Cellular and Organismal Biology

Castillo, Steven P.

155

HARRY R. BELLER 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 70A-3317  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Excellence in Refereeing, Water Resources Research (AGU). 1997. · American Chemical Society award Union PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS Müller, J., D. MacEachran, H. Burd, N. Sathitsuksanoh, C. Bi, Y-C. Yeh. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 79:63-73. Yeh, Y.-C., J. Müller, C. Bi, N. J. Hillson, H. R. Beller, S. R

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

156

xylosidase activities were found in the crude membrane fraction. Less than 30%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Wallace RJ, Flint HJ (1997) Int JSyst Bacteriol 47, 284-2888 2. Gasparic A, Marinek Logar R, Martin J, Wallace RJ, Nekrep, FV, Flint, HJ (1995) FEMSMicrobiol Lett 125, 135-142 3. Gasparic A, Martin J, Daniel A, Flint HJ (1995) Appl Environ Microbiol 61, 2958-2964 4. Flint HJ, Whitehead TR, Martin

Recanati, Catherine

157

THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The exposure of military personnel and civilians to the alpha emitter and heavy metal depleted uranium (DU particle radiation in depleted uranium-induced cellular effects 1.0 152 B. Ponnaiya, H. Lieberman CRR Biol

158

Tracking animals in freshwater with electronic tags: past, present and future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013:819860. Eiler JH: Tracking aquatic animals with radioRamm DC: Electromagnetic tracking of rock lobsters (Jasuswith a new estuarine fish tracking system. J Fish Biol 1988,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Autoinhibition regulates the motility of the C-elegans intraflagellar transport motor OSM-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processive actin-based motor. Nature. Ou, G. , O.E. Blacque,of intraflagellar transport motors. Nature. 436:583587.subunit and the Kinesin-2 motor protein, KIF17. Curr. Biol.

Imanishi, M; Endres, N F; Gennerich, A; Vale, Ronald D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

BACTERIOCHLOROPHYLL PROTEIN STRUCTURE - - STUDIES WITH POLARIZED LIGHT AND TRIPLET STATE ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W.W. and Monger, T.G. , Brookhaven Symp. Biol. Singleton,Vredenberg and J. Amesz in Brookhaven Symp. in Biology No.Fenna and B.W. Mathews in Brookhaven Symposia in Biology No.

Bolt, John Davis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Canopy Herbivory and Insect Herbivore Diversity in a Dry ForestSavanna Transition Frederico S. Neves1,2,5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros, Montes Claros-Minas Gerais, Campus Darcy Ribeiro, CEP 39401-089, Brazil^ncias Biol´ogicas/Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 30161-970, Brazil 3

Quesada Avendaño, Mauricio

162

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K. Fredrickson, "c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis," PLoS Biol. 4 (8), 1324-1333 (2006). DOI: 10.1371journal.pbio.0040268...

163

One Fish, Two Fish, Small Fish, Huge Fish: Utilizing Zebrafish as a Model for Studying Mitochondrial Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

353-367 Laelle, H. (1977) J Fish Biol 10, 121-174 Koerber,arrow). (I) The heart rates of MitoBloCK-6 treated fish andmorpholino-injected fish were markedly reduced compared with

Johnson, Meghan Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Using Zinc Finger Nucleases for Targeted Genome Modification in the Zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yeast ortholog of BLM RecQ helicase. Genes Dev. 19, 339350.M, Proytcheva M. (1999) The DNA helicase activity of BLM isinteraction of p53 and BLM DNA helicase in apoptosis. J Biol

McCammon, Jasmine Mali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A mechanistic model for understanding pH effect on phosphorus availability in rhizosphere and bulk soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil with low P availability. Biol. Fertil. Soils. , 44:143-to the use of the P availability obtained for bulk soilcan indeed alter P availability in the rhizosphere (e.g.

DEVAU, Nicolas; Le Cadre, Edith; Hinsinger, Philippe; Grard, Frdric

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Biochemistry 1994, 33, 9327-9332 9327 Thermodynamics of Unfolding of the All ,&Sheet Protein Interleukin-1@  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequence using the sequencebuilder of QUANTA (Molecular Simulations,Inc.). In most prior studies, the ASA. L., & Plotnikov, V. V. (1989) Thermochim. Acta L. (1993) Protein Sci. 2, 2028-2036. Biol. 196, 641

Clore, G. Marius

167

Dynamics of genetic adaptation in Escherichia coli K12 MG1655  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLoS Comput Biol 2:e72. Herring, C. D. , A. Raghunathan, C.Agents Chemother 46:3035-8. Herring, C. D. , J. D. Glasner,in Escherichia coli. Gene Herring, C. D. , A. Raghunathan,

Applebee, Margaret Kenyon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Current Perspectives on the Physical and Biological Processes of Humboldt Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production from herring spawning in the Strait ofStomach analysis of anchovy, herring and smelt in HumboldtSouthwest) - Pacific herring. U.S. Fish Wildl. Serv. , Biol.

Schlosser, S. C.; Rasmussen, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Engineering supported membranes for cell biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membranes in structural biology. J Struct Biol 168:12 50.supported membranes for cell biology Cheng-han Yu Jay T.range problems in cell biology. Because lateral mobility of

Yu, Cheng-han; Groves, Jay T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

2006 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Biol. Chem. 281, 22312 (2006) Y. Arai, M. McBeath, J. R. Bargar, J. Joye and J. A. Davis, "Uranyl Adsorption and Surface Speciation at the Imogolite-Water Interface:...

171

Genetic structure of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in the Bannu district of Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adjoining with NWFP, Pakistan: district Zhob. Pak J Biol Sciof malaria in Pakistan [http:// 202.83.164.26/wps/portal/a malaria-endemic area of Pakistan. Am J Trop Med Hyg 9.

Khatoon, Lubna; Baliraine, Frederick N; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Malik, Salman A; Yan, Guiyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

PHS 398 (Rev. 11/07), Biographical Sketch Format Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disulfide bridges at atomic resolution. .Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr. 1075-91. Nguyen N, Birktoft JJ, Sha R, Wang T, Zheng J, Constantinou PE, Ginell SL, Chen Y, Mao C,...

173

Identication of a Coordinate Regulator of Interleukins 4, 13 ...  

P. M. Webb, D. E. Crocker, S. B. Blackwell, D. P. Costa, B. J. Le Boeuf, J. Exp. Biol. 201, 2349 (1998). 27. S. H. Ridgway, B. L. Scronce, J. Kanwisher, Science

174

A Functional Study of Arabidopsis Argonaute10 in Floral Determinacy and Small RNA Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shoots by class III HD-ZIP and KANADI genes. Curr Biol 13:of the class III HD-Zip gene family in land plants. Evol Devand its targets, the HD-Zip genes, are crucial players in

Ji, Lijuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assemblathon 2: evaluating de novo methods of genome assembly in three vertebrate species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly. Genome BiolJ: Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indianambitious multi-species genome sequencing projects such as

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Scanning multiple samples simultaneously in tube-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2008. Bone. Stock et al. J Struct Biol 161, 144-150. 2008. Carbon. ... 2012. Al/SiC. Stock, Almer, J Appl Cryst 47, 1077-83. 2012. Review. ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Badre, D., and Wagner, A.D. (2007). Neuropsycho-logia 45, 28832901.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Badre, D., and Wagner, A.D. (2007). Neuropsycho- logia 45, 2883­2901. Beauregard, M., Levesque, J., Mensour, B., Beaudoin, G., Leroux, J.M., Bourgouin, P., and Beauregard, M. (2003). Biol. Psychiatry 53

Fiete, Ila

178

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 26(2):J Somerville C. 2007. Biofuels. Curr Biol 17(4):R1159.biomass characteristics for biofuels. Curr Opin Biotechnol

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sphingosine-1-phosphate effects on cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liss, New York (2005). 31. Fukushima,N. , Ishii,I. , Contos,Liss, New York (2005). 41. Fukushima,N. , Ishii,I. , Contos,Biol. 6, R5 (2005). 7. Fukushima,N. , Ishii,I. , Contos,

Landeen, Lee K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling in the heart and its role in cardioprotection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

309: 155-160, 2003. 18. Fukushima N, Kimura Y and Chun J. AJ Biol Chem 276: 37. Ishii I, Fukushima N, Ye X and Chun J.G, Contos JJ, Weiner JA, Fukushima N and Chun J. Comparative

Means, Christopher Kable

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Molecular Foundry - Our Accomplishments  

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H. Jensen, M. TerAvest, N. Beedle, Y. Appling, M. Hepler, G. Cambray, V. Mutalik, L. Angenent, C. Ajo-Franklin. ACS Synth. Biol., 2013, 2 (3), pp 150-159. DOI: 10.1021sb300119v...

182

Dynamics of lettuce drop incidence and Sclerotinia minor inoculum under varied crop rotations  

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Koike, S. T. 1998. Effects of crop rotation and irrigationImplications for yield and crop rotation. Asp. Appl. Biol.minor Inoculum Under Varied Crop Rotations J. J. Hao and K.

Hao, J J; Subbarao, K V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nutrient use efficiency in bioenergy cropping systems: Critical research questions  

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and one panic grass grown as biofuel. Aspects Appl. Biol.giganteus grown as a biofuel for 14 successive harvests.2 O release from agro- biofuel production negates the global

Brouder, Sylvie; Volenec, Jeffrey J; Turco, Ronald; Smith, Douglas R; Ejeta, Gebisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene NAME________________________________________ OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY UIN__________________________________________  

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the following courses with a C or better) CHP 318 Science of Nutrition _____3___________________ BIOL 103 Basic. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure

185

References and Notes 1. G. R. Hasle, C. B. Lange, Diatom Res. 7, 37 (1992).  

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, and dried. Inspection for valves in different stages of morpho- genesis was done by SEM screening. 21. H, New York, 1993). 23. J. D. Pickett-Heaps, D. H. Tippit, J. A. Andreozzi, Biol. Cell. 35, 199 (1979

Howe, James M.

186

Botany firewall policy Prepared by Sean Shang  

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-GENERAL, BOTA-SERVER and BOTA-DMZ. Each VRF is linked to an interface of the virtual firewall provided by UBC be applied to each interface/VRF to control or filter the network traffic that go in or out of the interface them, BIOL01-BOTANY2 and GRID2-BOTA-SERVERS VLAN are under BOTA-SERVERs VRF; BIOL01-BOTANY3 VLAN

Vellend, Mark

187

Low Pressure, Vacuum, and Leak Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 140 kPa Oil UIM: 3 Pa gas-flow instruments are calibrated in the ... 8 to 10 -3 ) mol/s with inert gases and other ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermophysical Properties of Fluid Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Density, mol/l mol/m3 g/ml kg/m3 lb-mole/ft3 lbm/ft3. Energy, kJ/mol kJ/kg kcal/mol Btu/lb-mole kcal/g Btu/lbm. Velocity, m/s ft/s mph. ... All rights reserved ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bioreactors Modeling and Control  

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., Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Wastes to improve ethanol and biogas production: A review. Int. J. Mol. Sci

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

190

Auf einen Blick 2009 ETH Zrich 3  

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PHYS ­ Physik cHAB ­ Chemie und Angewandte Biowissenschaften BiOL ­ Biologie Systemorientierte Bewegungswissenschaften und Sport Chemie Chemieingenieurwissenschaften Chemie- und Bioingenieurwissenschaften Rechnergestützte Wissenschaften 12 15 1 5 - Physik 158 103 29 64 19 Chemie 69 47 20 71 11

191

Obtaining enzymes in pure form was an essential prerequisite for understanding the  

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Applications of chemical approaches to biol- ogy in the twentieth century led to the birth The far reaches, is in the chemical language of thermodynamics and kinetics. It is now clear, as it as been for decades17 of chemical biology may aid in the kinetic and thermodynamic dissection of pathways and may prove particularly

Herschlag, Dan

192

Forcing Versus Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India  

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Forcing Versus Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India Karina Laneri1 the monsoonal rains. Consideration of a more complex model with clinical immunity demonstrates the robustness Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India. PLoS Comput Biol 6(9): e1000898. doi:10

Pascual, Mercedes

193

COMMENTARY nature photonics | VOL 1 | JANUARY 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 3  

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. ITO is indium tin oxide, PEDOT is poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), NPB is (N,N'-bis(naphthalene-1-yl organic or inorganic materials. Furthermore, natural biomaterials are a renewable resourceV (­)(+) 1 2 LUMO HOMO Figure 1 BioLEDs, which use DNA to help boost light emission15 . Shown are the energy

Cincinnati, University of

194

761 Literaturverzeichnis  

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biologyofwoodyplantsinthetropics.In:TOMLINSON, P. B. & M. H. ZIMMERMAN [Hrsg.]: Tropical trees as living systems. Cambridge Univ terrestrial orchids. In: WIL- LIAMS G. & al. [Hrsg.]: Pollination 1982. Proc. Symp. Plant Cell Biol. Res vorkommen- den Samenpflanzen. Wien. BENKERT, D., F. FUKAREK & H. KORSCH [Hrsg.] (1996): Verbreitungsatlas

Paulus, Hannes F.

195

BioMed Central Page 1 of 10  

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counterpart. Nature 1994, 367:453-455. 25. Grenier S, Pintureau B, Heddi A, Lassabliere F, Jager C, Louis C Biol 1994, 4(6):537-540. 45. Sinkins SP, Curtis CF, O'Neill SL: The potential application of inherited bipunctata). Journal of Bacteriology 1994, 176:388-394. 49. Hurst GDD, Jiggins FM, Schulenberg JHG, Bertrand

Tinsley, Matt

196

BNL | John Shanklin  

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Ole1p exists as a dimer in vivo. J. Biol. Chem., 285(25):19384-19390 (2010). PubMed Nguyen H.T., Mishra G., Whittle E., Bevan S.A., Merlo A.O., Walsh T.A., and Shanklin J....

197

Regulation of apical-basal patterning during Arabidopsis thaliana embryo development  

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J. L. (2004). "Class III HD-Zip gene regulation, the goldenthe role of class III HD-ZIP genes." PLoS Genet 2(6): e89.shoots by class III HD-ZIP and KANADI genes." Curr Biol 13(

Smith, Zachery Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A M a g a z i n e f o r A l u m n i a n d F r i e n d s FALL 2012 Olympic Glory  

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in reproduction and de- velopment. Biol. Bull. 208: 81­91. Byrne, M. 2006. Life history diversity and evolution. 1997. Molecular phyloge- netic analysis of life history evolution in asterinid starfish. Evolution 51. The impact of the "Sea Empress" oil spill. Aquat. Living Resour. 17: 389­394. Li, Y. C., A. B. Korol, T

199

The Case for Young People and Nature: A Path to a Healthy, Natural, Prosperous Future James Hansen1  

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the risk of contracting Lyme disease in a mixed suburban landscape was shown to be a strong function of woodlot size. Lyme disease risk could not be adequately predicted by knowing the amount of forest cover. Effect of forest fragmentation on Lyme disease risk. ­ Conserv. Biol. 17: 267­272. Buchan, L. A. J

Hansen, James E.

200

Directed enzyme evolution: beyond the low-hanging fruit Moshe Goldsmith and Dan S Tawfik  

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to the ratio of conversion rates at all substrate concentrations, and therefore comprises the stan- dard the nucleotide and sugar 1-phosphate promiscuity of nucleotidyltransferase RmlA via directed evolution. J Biol: Directed evolution of a thermophilic beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl Biochem

Tawfik, Dan S.

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201

Imaginative solutions by marine organisms for drag reduction Frank E. Fish  

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at an angle to the water flow (i.e., angle of attack), a lift is generated due to deflection of the fluid at the water surface. J. Exp. Biol., 198:1567-1574. 19. Hoerner, S. F. 1965. Fluid-Dynamic Drag. Published for engineers the possibility that animals can be used as solutions to design problems for reduction in energy

Fish, Frank

202

Biosciences Division  

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Antibody Availability NCI 01 MRSL216 SERF1A AF073518.1 10.44 7336.37 0.28 Novus Biol. cat H00008293-A01 MRSL30 ENSG00000130487 AA953200 9.26 53294.98 0.47 MRSL60 CCNG2...

203

Breast cancer risk in relation to urinary and serum biomarkers of phytoestrogen exposure in the EPIC-Norfolk study  

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isoflavone daidzein: exploring the relevance to human health. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2005, 230:155-170. 8. Adlercreutz H, Bannwart C, Wahala K, Makela T, Brunow G, Hase T, Arosemena PJ, Kellis JT Jr, Vickery LE: Inhibition of human aro- matase by mammalian...

Ward, Heather A; Chapelais, Gaelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Improved application of the oscillating method for the isoelectric point determination of protein: Potential connection with protein data banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oscillating method (OM) for the theoretical determination of the pI values, one by one, of proteins and other macromolecules has been previously published [Sillero and Maldonado, Comput. Biol. Med 36 (2006) 157-166]. An improved application of the ... Keywords: Acid-base residues, Electric charge, PH, PI theoretical determination, PICAL, Proteins, Visual basic

Andrs Maldonado; Francisco Vara; Antonio Sillero

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

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Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

206

Zoe Vanessa Finkel ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  

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. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 233 (1999) 181­211 183 abundance of intermediate-sized particles ranging from 2) Experimental set-up to measure particle removal in static and flow-through experiments. The peristaltic pump and Thompson, 1995). 2.4. Static experiments Using a peristaltic pump, the water in the jars was periodically

207

Liver and brain abscess caused by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus in association with a large patent foramen ovale: a case report  

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of the liver measuring 49 mm and 40 mm in diameter. Metastatic tumor was suspected. The fever of our patient continued, and on the third day, he developed a severe headache with persistent vomiting. Fundoscopy was normal. Computer tomogra- phy (CT) scanning... , Hartley JC: Development of broad range 16S rDNA PCR for use in the routine clinical microbiology service. J Med Microbiol 2003, 52:685-691. 5. Haight DO, Toney JF, Greene JN, Sandin RL, Vincent AL: Liver abscess following blunt trauma: a case report...

Ariyaratnam, Shaumya; Gajendragadkar, Parag R; Dickinson, Richard J; Roberts, Phil; Harris, Kathryn; Carmichael, Andrew; Karas, Johannis A

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Application of the comprehensive set of heterozygous yeast deletion mutants to elucidate the molecular basis of cellular chromium toxicity  

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individually in YEPD or YNB media [45,46]. Where specified, organisms were cultured in 300 ?l volumes in 48-well plates (Greiner Bio-One, Stone- house, Gloucestershire, UK) with shaking at 30C in a BioTek Powerwave microplate reader (BioTek, Vinooski, VT, USA... . Nature Biotechnol 1998, 16:572-575. 5. Avery SV: Metal toxicity in yeasts and the role of oxidative stress. Adv Appl Microbiol 2001, 49:111-142.Genome Biology 2007, 8:R268 ml of cells were pelleted by centrifugation and resuspended in 60 ?l of Passive...

Holland, Sara; Lodwig, Emma; Sideri, Theodora; Reader, Tom; Clarke, Ian; Gkargkas, Konstantinos; Hoyle, David C; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Avery, Simon V

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low Grade Alumina Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Increasing amount of research institutes and industrial companies in the .... with an activation energy of 23.7kJ/mol and 18.0kJ/mol respectively;...

210

Improvement of La0.65Sr0.3MnO3-gamma-YSZ cathodes by infiltrating nanoSm0.6Sr0.4CoO3-gamma particles  

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solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) use 8mol% yttria stabilizedthe degradation of SOFC components, and consequently extend

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CHEMICAL ENERGETICS The contents of this module were developed under grant award # P116B-001338 from the Fund for the Improve-  

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CHEMICAL ENERGETICS The contents of this module were developed under grant award # P116B-001338 STALEY ENERGY SCALE OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS ­6000 kJ mol­1 6000 kJ mol­10 kJ mol­1 #12;CHEMICAL ENERGETICS CONTENTS 2 Some Experiments 3 System And Surroundings 4 System

Hardy, Darel

212

5 DYNAMIC SIMULATION 5.1 DYNAMIC SIMULATION CASE  

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.64 12.27 12.00 Propane (mol%) 86.86 87.28 87.65 87.92 i-Butane (mol%) 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.07 n-Butane (mol

Hong, Deog Ki

213

2009 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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09 Publications 09 Publications Journal Papers J. Abendroth, A. C. Kreger and W. G. J. Hol, "The Dimer Formed by the Periplasmic Domain of EpsL from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio parahaemolyticus", J. Struct. Biol. 168, 313 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.07.022 J. Abendroth, D. D. Mitchell, K. V. Korotkov, T. L. Johnson, A. Kreger, M. Sandkvist and W. G. J. Hol, "The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cytoplasmic Domains of EpsF from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio cholerae", J. Struct. Biol. 166, 303 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.03.009 V. Aguilar-Guerrero, R. J. Lobo-Lapidus and B. C. Gates, "Genesis of a Cerium Oxide Supported Gold Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Transformation of Mononuclear Gold Complexes into Clusters as Characterized by X-ray

214

Parallel evolution of conserved non-coding elements that target a common set of developmental regulatory genes from worms to humans  

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PHA- 4. Dev Biol 2004, 266(2):388-398. 4. Wenick AS, Hobert O: Genomic cis-regulatory architecture and trans-acting regulators of a single interneuron-specific gene battery in C. elegans. Dev Cell 2004, 6(6):757-770. 5. Hwang SB, Lee J: Neuron cell... Genefinder coding_exon * Genefinder exon * history CDS history coding_exon * history exon * history Transcript history Pseudogene Pseudogene exon * Pseudogene Pseudogene inverted inverted_repeat RepeatMasker repeat...

Vavouri, Tanya; Walter, Klaudia; Gilks, Walter R; Lehner, Ben; Elgar, Greg

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microfluidics-integrated time-lapse imaging for analysis of cellular Dirk R. Albrecht,yza  

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. Cole and G. Sluder, J. Cell Biol., 1994, 127, 1301­1310. 29 Z. Yang, A. E. Kenny, D. A. Brito and C. L, B. Piqani, T. M. Eisenhaure, B. Luo, J. K. Grenier, A. E. Carpenter, S. Y. Foo, S. A. Stewart, B. R. Grenier, A. B. Castoreno, U. S. Eggert, D. E. Root, P. Golland and D. M. Sabatini, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci

Bhatia, Sangeeta

216

Highlights from the Fourth International Society for Computational Biology Student Council Symposium at the Sixteenth Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council (SC) of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) is a student-led, world- wide network of young researchers in computational biol- ogy and bioinformatics. The ISCB Board of Directors officially approved the SC in July 2004... eight abstracts chosen from oral presentations and a set of six best- ranked abstracts from the posters presented at the sympo- sium during the poster session. Rigorous peer review was carried out by members of the program committee, which comprised...

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Poultry Litter as an Energy Source and as a Means of Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is nearing completion on an assessment of the opportunity for poultry-litter-to-energy processes to help solve both local and global environmental problems. The problems addressed are those of water pollution and solid waste disposal at the local level, and global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. The processes assessed by TVA are combustion or gasification of poultry litter in thermal reactors or boilers for energy production, and also biol...

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

Enhanced neuronal response induced by fast inhibition Ramana Dodla1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington, DC, 2003 . 23 W. J. Wilbur and J. Rinzel, J. Theor. Biol. 105, 345 1983 . 24 W. K. Luk and K for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2005 . 36 Cm =1 F/cm2 is the membrane capacitance. GNa=120.0 mS/cm2 , GK=36.0 m if their arrival times fall within a window tw whose width depends on the strength of the input. For an input

Dodla, Ramana

219

Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs  

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Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2 Morris E. (2009) Active-site inhibitors of mTOR target rapamycin-resistant outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2. PLoS Biol and activated by growth factor stimulation via the canonical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)!Akt!mTOR pathway

Halazonetis, Thanos

220

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

871; 871; NO. OF PAGES 5 Please cite this article in press as: Wilson DB. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis, Curr Opin Microbiol (2011), doi:10.1016/j.mib.2011.04.004 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis David B Wilson Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still

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221

8441.full.pdf  

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28 September 2012. 28 September 2012. 10.1128/AEM.02130-12. 2012, 78(23):8441. DOI: Appl. Environ. Microbiol. David A. Hogsett and Lee R. Lynd Kara K. Podkaminer, Adam M. Guss, Heather L. Trajano, through Targeted Gene Deletions Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum Discovery of a New Endoxylanase in Characterization of Xylan Utilization and http://aem.asm.org/content/78/23/8441 Updated information and services can be found at: These include: SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL Supplemental material REFERENCES http://aem.asm.org/content/78/23/8441#ref-list-1 at: This article cites 29 articles, 13 of which can be accessed free CONTENT ALERTS more» articles cite this article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new http://journals.asm.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml Information about commercial reprint orders:

222

Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

733; 733; NO OF PAGES 7 Please cite this article in press as: Wuichet K, et al. Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems, Curr Opin Microbiol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.mib.2009.12.011 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems Kristin Wuichet 1 , Brian J Cantwell 1 and Igor B Zhulin 1,2 Two-component signal transduction systems are abundant in prokaryotes. They enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. These systems are also found, although in much smaller numbers, in lower eukaryotes and plants, where they appear to control a few very specific functions. Two-component systems have evolved in Bacteria from much simpler one-component systems bringing about the benefit of extracellular versus

223

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Base, supplementary, and derived SI units...steradian sr Magnetic flux density tesla T Molar energy joule per mole J/mol Molar entropy joule per mole kelvin J/mol · K Derived units Molar heat capacity joule per mole kelvin J/mol · K Absorbed does gray Gy Moment of force newton meter N · m Acceleration meter per second squared m/s 2 Permeability...

224

Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ Mass transfer and separation technology 424302 / 2011 Hemuppgift / Homework exercise H1+H2 17.3 24 hexan (C6H14) vid 25°C. Molbråket y för pentan i ångfas som är i jämvikt med vätskan är y = 0.01?(c+d+e) (mol/mol). Beräkna molbråken för pentan och hexan (mol/mol) i vätskan, och beräkna totala (ång

Zevenhoven, Ron

225

Enrico Lucon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1998-2010 SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium) Structural Materials Expertise Group Institute of Nuclear Material Science. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

proteinsSTRUCTURE O FUNCTION O BIOINFORMATICS Role of conformational sampling in computing  

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, Lunde BM, Eletr ZM, Isern NG, Roseman T, Lipfert J, Doniach S, Tompa M, Kuhlman B, et al. (2006) J Mol

Baker, David

227

NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Tables. I. Ten Organic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... J. Chem. 13, 10 1995. 7 BP van Eijck, J. van Opheusden, MMM van Schaik, and E. van Zoeren, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 86, 465 1981. ...

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pysico-chemical properties of hydrophobic ionic liquids containing 1-octylpyridinium, 1-octyl-2-methylpyridinium or 1-octyl-4-methylpyridinium cations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organometallic catalysis. Chemical Reviews 2002, 102, 3667-catalysis. J. Mol. Cat. A: Chemical 2004, (12) Dai, S. ; Ju,synthesis and catalysis. Chemical Reviews 1999, 99, 2071-

Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Lee, Jong-Min; Prausnitz, John M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Li corrosion resistant glasses for headers in ambient temperature Li batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing 10 to 50 mol% CaO, 10 to 50 mol% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 30 to 60 mol% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0 to 30 mol% MgO are provided. These compositions are capable of forming a stable glass-to-metal seal possessing electrical insulating properties for use in a lithium battery. Also provided are lithium cells containing a stainless steel body and molybdenum center pin electrically insulated by means of a seal produced according to the invention.

Hellstrom, E.E.; Watkins, R.D.

1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF IRON-BASE TERNARY ALLOYS THAT DEVELOP Cr2O3 AND/OR Al2O3 BARRIER SCALES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resistant Alloy for Coal Gasification Service, LockheedI.M. , Table H Coal gasification atmosphere (mol fraction).development of "coal gasification" processes. large number

Nagarajan, V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Computational biology and high performance computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper in Computational Biology The First Step Beyond theM . Glaeser, Mol. & Cell Biology, UCB and Life SciencesLBNL-44460 Computational Biology and High Performance

Shoichet, Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Melatonin and the aging brain  

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mitochondrial decay of aging. Mol. Aspects Med. 26, Ames,the degenerative diseases of aging. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.2004. Retardation of brain aging by chronic treatment with

BONDY, S; SHARMAN, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

New NIST SRMs/RMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mol/mol, and will primarily support power plants aiming to ... This is a list of our most recent ... SRM 2684b Bituminous Coal (Sulfur and Mercury) New ...

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Role for Id-1 in the Aggressive Phenotype and Steroid ...  

Desprez, P. Y., Hara E., Bissell, M. J., and Campisi, J. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1. Mol. Cell.

235

Whole-genome resequencing of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 undergoing short-term laboratory evolution in lactate minimal media reveals flexible selection of adaptive mutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feldblyum T: Bacterial genome sequencing. Methods Mol Biolstudy, we describe the genome sequencing of 11 endpoints ofand discussion Comparative genome sequencing Five parallel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

New and Renewal NIST SRMs/RMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SRM 1666b Propane in Air (Nominal Amount-of-Substance Fraction 10 mol/mol) Lot # 84-K-XX SRM 1668b Propane ...

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

Experimental biogeography: the role of environmental gradients in high geographic diversity in Cape Proteaceae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a year (Calf et al. 2003; Hockey et al. 2005). ThisMol Ecol Notes 2:618620 Hockey P, Dean WRJ, Ryan PG (2005)

Latimer, Andrew M.; Silander, J. A.; Rebelo, A. G.; Midgley, G. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effects of Gaseous Impurities in Hydrogen on the Long Term Cycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hydrogen Storage in Materials: Theory and Experiment ... the Gibbs energies of formation of Li3N (?Go=-100.16 kJ/mol)...

239

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

> 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

240

Teor'ia de Grupos y Mec'anica Qu'antica Luis A. Seco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

armonicos desacoplados. 7. El ' atomo de hidr'ogeno. 8. El helio y los otros 'atomos. 9. Mol'eculas. 10

Seco, Luis A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electrode Materials with the Na0.44MnO2 Structure: Effect of Titanium Substitution on Physical and Electrochemical Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heating them in a molten salt mixture of 68 mol % LiNOion-exchanged in molten nitrate salts to yield materials

Saint, Juliette A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work in Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the regulation of chromatin organization and function.Imbalzano, A. N. (2006). Chromatin remodelling in mammaliandistinct patterns of local chromatin modification. Mol Cell

Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expression profiles. Mol. Genet. Genomics 279:Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus2006. Aspergillusnigergenomics:past,presentandinto

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Polynomial interior point algorithms for general LCPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 10, 2007... and Marianna Nagy acknowledge the Research Fellowship of MOL, the Hungarian Oil .... For further use we recall some well-known results.

245

An EP theorem for dual linear complementarity problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Marianna Nagy acknowledge the Research Fellowship of MOL, the Hungarian Oil .... (DLCP) are not only nonnegative, but they are complementary as well.

246

A structural role for the PHP domain in E. coli DNA polymerase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with DNA polymerases of diverse origins. Nucleic Acids Res 1998, 26:37463752. macromolecular crystal structures. Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 2011, 67:355367. 37. Afonine PV, Grosse-Kunstleve RW, Echols N, Headd JJ, Moriarty NW... available for redistributiondomains and protein three-dimensional structure. Nucleic Acids Res 2013, 41(Database issue):D34852. 32. Price MN, Dehal PS, Arkin AP: FastTree 2approximately maximum- likelihood trees for large alignments. PLoS One 2010, 5:e9490...

Barros, Tiago; Guenther, Joel; Kelch, Brian; Anaya, Jordan; Prabhakar, Arjun; ODonnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John; Lamers, Meindert H

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mechanism of G1 arrest in the Drosophilaeye imaginal disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drosophila PCNA gene function. Curr Biol 2003, 13:53-58. 22. Jarman AP, Grau Y, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is a proneural gene that directs chordotonal organ formation in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. Cell 1993, 73:1307-1321. 23. Jarman AP, Grell EH... , Ackerman L, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is the proneural gene for Drosophila photoreceptors. Nature 1994, 369:398-400. 24. Gibson MC, Schubiger G: Drosophila peripodial cells, more than meets the eye? Bioessays 2001, 23:691-697. 25. Knoblich JA, Sauer K, Jones...

Escudero, Luis M; Freeman, Matthew

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Diet (TWD). Neurobiol Dis 2007, 28:16-29. 9. Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L: Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease. J Biol Chem... Diets, Inc, so as to avoid diets associated with predictable organ toxicity. Mice were supplied with food and water ad libi- tum and were weighed weekly. At the age of 18 weeks, mice were sacrificed via isoflurane inhalation, and the brains were removed...

Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Dickstein, Dara L; Hof, Patrick R; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Gandy, Sam

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

The conserved protein kinase-A target motif in synapsin of Drosophilais effectively modified by pre-mRNA editing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genet 2000, 34:499-531. 4. Maas S, Rich A, Nishikura K: A-to-I RNA editing: Recent news and residual mysteries. J Biol Chem 2003, 278:1391-1394. 5. Eisenberg E, Nemzer S, Kinar Y, Sorek R, Rechavi G, Levanon EY: Is abundant A-toI RNA editing primate... nervous system function and integrity. Cell 2000, 102:437-449. 8. Hoopengardner B, Bhalla T, Staber C, Reenan R: Nervous system targets of RNA editing identified by comparative genomics. Science 2003, 301:832-836. 9. Xia S, Yang J, Su Y, Qian J, Ma E...

Diegelmann, Soren; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Werner, Ursula; Hoppe, Jurgen; Zars, Troy; Buchner, Erich

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Targets downstream of Cdk8 in Dictyostelium development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Targets downstream of Cdk8 in Dictyostelium development David M Greene1, Gareth Bloomfield2,3, Jason Skelton3, Alasdair Ivens3,4, Catherine J Pears1* Abstract Background: Cdk8 is a component of the mediator complex which... in Dictyostelium discoideum. Developmental biology 2005, 284:25-36. 14. Bloomfield G, Tanaka Y, Skelton J, Ivens A, Kay RR: Widespread duplications in the genomes of laboratory stocks of Dictyostelium discoideum. Genome Biol 2008, 9:R75. 15. Glockner G, Eichinger L...

Greene, David M; Bloomfield, Gareth; Skelton, Jason; Ivens, Alasdair; Pears, Catherine J

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electron and Hydrogen-Atom Self-Exchange Reactions of Iron and Cobalt Coordination Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are faster at lower temperatures, showing small negative enthalpies of activation: Hq(e-) ) -2.1 ( 0.5 kcal mol-1 (288- 320 K) and Hq (H· ) ) -1.5 ( 0.5 kcal mol-1 (260-300 K). This behavior is concluded for a range of hydrogen-atom transfer reactions (eq 2) follow the cross relation.8 Organic hydrogen

Roth, Justine P.

252

American Mineralogist, Volume 89, pages 15331539, 2004 0003-004X/04/00101533$05.00 1533  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

escape peaks complicate collection of both U and Pb peak and background counts. Due to the larger energy for Pb peak and background collection. #12;CHERNIAK ET AL.: SYNTHESIS AND USAGE OF PB-FREE REE PHOSPHATES mol% Ce, and 20 mol% Nd. This molar ratio approximates a La-Ce-Nd ratio typical of metamorphic

Spear, Frank S.

253

CARBON DIOXIDE HYDRATES CRYSTALLISATION IN EMULSION Aurlie Galfr, Amara Fezoua, Yamina Ouabbas, Ana Cameirao, Jean Michel Herri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy, like in power generation plant. One possible way to reduce these emissions is to install. As the flue gases are at low concentration in CO2 (typically 5%-15 % in power plant) and at high flow rates ] r5hours Growth rate in five hours [mol.h-1 ] rmoy Average growth rate [mol.h-1 ] t Time [h] tind

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

FOCUS: NOVEL APPROACHES TO PEPTIDE AND PROTEIN STRUCTURE Evaluation of Ion Mobility Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over a small (e.g., 3 kcal/mol) range obscures any weak trend with energy as is the case in this study, 10271­10279. 56. Price, W. D.; Jockusch, R. A.; Williams, E. R. Binding Energies of Protonated Betaine span an 8-kcal/mol range. These cross sections are compared with those determined from candidate low-energy

Clemmer, David E.

256

Artificial Cellulosomes and Arsenic Cleanup: From Single Cell Programming to Synthetic Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations. BY4742 AtPCS PCs PCs (?mol/g DCW) As (?mol/g DCW) Time (hr) Figure 5.3. PC production andBY4742 expressing AtPCS. DCW = dry cell weight. As (umol/g

Tsai, Shen-Long

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.L. ; Hevesi, J.A. ; and Flint, L.E. 1996, pp. 60 to 63.ACC: MOL.19970409.0087. Flint, L.E. 1998. CharacterizationSurvey. ACC: MOL.19980429.0512. Flint, A.L. , Flint, L.E. ,

Karasaki, Kenzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas f in out in n n n = - 100 n contraction (%) #12;Syngas ratio (H2:CO): sr H in CO in n n = 2 _ _ n: (mols per hour) sr: Syngas ratio Rates active metal (g) r: Rate (mols / hr / g metal) #12;Rate Syngas: syngas H COr r r= +2 r syngas: Syngas

Kentucky, University of

259

Dynamics of Y H2CO reactions Hans U. Stauffer, Ryan Z. Hinrichs, Jonathan J. Schroden, and H. Floyd Davisa)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy (Ecoll). The potential energy barrier for C­H insertion is found to lie below 12 kcal in the previous studies. For ex- ample, the C­H bond dissociation energy in formaldehyde is 89 kcal/mol, substantially smaller than that in saturated hy- drocarbons like ethane 105 kcal/mol or unsaturated hydro

Davis, H. Floyd

260

Ozone effects on inhibitors of human neutrophil proteinases  

SciTech Connect

The effects of ozone on human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A-1-PI), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (A-1-Achy), bronchial leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (BLPI), and Eglin C were studied using in vitro exposures in phosphate-buffered solutions. Following ozone exposure, inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and/or cathepsin G (Cat G) were measured. Exposure of A-1-PI to 50 mol O3/mol protein resulted in a complete loss of HNE inhibitory activity, whereas A-1-Achy lost only 50% of its Cat G inhibitory activity and remained half active even after exposure to 250 mol of O3. At 40 mol O3/mol protein, BLPI lost 79% of its activity against HNE and 87% of its Cat G inhibitory activity. Eglin C, a leech-derived inhibitor, lost 81% of its HNE inhibitory activity and 92% of its ability to inhibit Cat G when exposed to 40 mol O3/mol. Amino acid analyses of ozone-exposed inhibitors showed destruction of Trp, Met, Tyr, and His with as little as 10 mol O3/mol protein, and higher levels of O3 resulted in more extensive oxidation of susceptible residues. The variable ozone susceptibility of the different amino acid residues in the four proteins indicated that oxidation was a function of protein structure, as well as the inherent susceptibility of particular amino acids. Exposure of A-1-PI and BLPI in the presence of the antioxidants, Trolox C (water soluble vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C), showed that antioxidant vitamins may protect proteins from oxidative inactivation by ozone. Methionine-specific modification of BLPI reduced its HNE and Cat G inhibitory activities. Two moles of N-chlorosuccinimide per mole of BLPI methionine caused an 80% reduction in activity against Cat G, but only a 40% reduction in HNE inhibitory activity.

Smith, C.E.; Stack, M.S.; Johnson, D.A.

1987-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nitrates/Nitrites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of iron-base alloys in eutectic molten salt mixtures...Stainless steel μm/yr mils/yr μm/yr mils/yr NaNO 3 -NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 (86.3,8.4,5.3 mol%, respectively) 15 0.6 1 0.03 KNO 3 -KCl (94.6 mol%, respectively) 23 0.9 7.5 0.3 LiCl-KCl (58.42 mol%, respectively) 63 2.5 20 0.8...

262

LPG--a direct source of C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ olefins  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the selective production of olefins by the catalytic dehydrogenation of the corresponding paraffins by means of UOP's Oleflex process. In this process, propylene can be obtained at about 85 mol % selectivity by the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane. Isobutylene can be obtained at selectivities in excess of 90 mol % from isobutane, and n-butenes (1-butene plus 2-butene) at about 80 mol % from n-butane. The availability of this technology, coupled with an abundant supply of LPG (C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ paraffins), opens new avenues for the selective production of propylene and butylenes.

Pujado, P.R.; Berg, R.C.; Vora, B.V.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

264

availability in two different treatment implementations: (1) from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

availability in two different treatment implementations: (1) from availability in two different treatment implementations: (1) from seedlings exposed to 360, 550, and 700 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 in a glasshouse; and (2) from intact adults exposed to 360 and 550 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) Facility. FACE and glasshouse wed-watered Larrea significantly down- regulated photosynthesis at elevated CO2, reducing maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)), carboxylation efficiency (CE), and Rubisco catalytic sites, whereas droughted Larrea showed a differing response depending on treatment technique. A(max) and CE were lower in droughted Larrea compared with well-watered plants, and CO2 had no effect on these reduced photosynthetic parameters. However, Rubisco catalytic sites decreased in droughted Larrea at elevated CO2. Operating

265

California, General Catalog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ltd., pp287-315, 1999. 5. Levenson AS, Tonetti DA and Jordan VC: The oestrogen-like effect of 4 induced by high linear energy transfer radiation in breast epithelial cells. Mol Carcinog 31: 192

California at Santa Cruz, University of

266

Volume change and cracking in internally cured mixtures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... where R is the universal gas constant (8.314 J/mol K), T (K) is the ... of LWA were used (LWA-K and LWA-H). The LWA-K expanded shale was used ...

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha upregulate angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors on cardiac fibroblasts and are associated with increased AT(1) density in the post-MI heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

broblasts and the infarcted heart. Am J Physiol 1998;274:matrix remodeling in heart failure: a role for de novoin right and left heart after myocardial infarction. Mol

Gurantz, D; Cowling, R T; Varki, N; Frikovsky, E; Moore, C D; Greenberg, Barry H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effect of co-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on photoluminescence of cu-doped potassium lithium borate glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SnO{sub 2} co-doped lithium potassium borate glasses doped with 0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mol% of Cu were synthesized by the melt quenching technique. The SnO{sub 2} co-dope was added to the compounds in the amounts of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 mol%. The photoluminescent spectrum for different concentrations of copper was studied. It was observed that the intensity of blue emission (450, 490 nm) varies with concentration mol%. In addition, with different concentration of SnO{sub 2} to 0.10 mol% Cu, the influence of the luminescence has been observed to enhance intensity and shifted to blue and red (490, 535 nm) emissions.

Namma, Haydar Aboud; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Ariwahjoedi, B. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Malaysia and Baghdad College of Economic Sciences University (Iraq); Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Silica-polystyrene nanocomposite particles synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization and their encapsulation through miniemulsion polymerization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polystyrene (PS) chains with molecular weights comprised between 8000 and 64000 g?mol-1and narrow polydispersities were grown from the surface of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil A200 fumed silica and Stber silica, resp.) through nitroxide-mediated ...

Brangre Bailly; Anne-Carole Donnenwirth; Christle Bartholome; Emmanuel Beyou; Elodie Bourgeat-Lami

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evidence for a contribution of ALA synthesis to plastid-to-nucleus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all genomes and data types. Mol. Cell 28, 337-350. Gentleman, R. C., Carey, V. J., Bates, D. M., Bolstad, B., Dettling, M., Dudoit, S., et al. (2004). Bioconductor: open...

271

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jersey, 19SZ), p. 306. of catechol (0.06 mol) was added tosolution. To the alkaline catechol solution was added a fil-ligands j,ncorporating catechol moieties. Little is Im011il

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An overview of Cdk1-controlled targets and processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loading of the Mcm2-7 helicase. Mol Cell 2006, Cvetic CA,EY, Lee SE, Ira G: Sgs1 helicase and two nucleases Dna2 andM, Foiani M: Srs2 DNA helicase is involved in checkpoint

Enserink, Jorrit M; Kolodner, Richard D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mechanisms of amphipathic helical peptide denaturation by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 10, 2010 ... Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 123. J Comput Aided Mol Des (2010) 24:829841. DOI 10.1007/s10822-010-9377-x...

274

Microsoft PowerPoint - Low Dose Update Metting 6 Dec 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the dermis von Neubeck, CH, et al., Environ. Mol. Mut. 53 245-59 (2012) The mammary gland of host mice is cleared of endogenous epithelium; host is irradiated and Radiation...

275

Structural Materials II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Materials Corrosion in Liquid Fluoride Salt for NGNP Applications: Kumar ... Liquid fluoride salt FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) is...

276

Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray ...  

tions at 300 nL/min and comparing results ... Liu, T.; Camp, D. G.; Smith, R. D. Mol ... Valaskovic, G. A.; Kelleher, N. L.; Mclafferty, F. W. Science ...

277

Met and Mat Trans Abstracts B: August 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The apparent activation energy is about 100 kJ/mol. ..... to investigate the effect of gravity in a reaction system that produced a light, solid ceramic particle (TiB2)...

278

P-type ATPase analysis in cyanobacteria and six miscellaneous bacterial phyla with fully sequenced genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal gene transfer of PIB-type ATPases among bacteriaenergy transduction of P-type ATPases. Biochim Biophys Actastructure and mechanism of P-type ATPases. Nat Rev Mol Cell

Babayan, Vardan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

P-type ATPases in the proteobacterial, bacteroidetes and fusobacterial phyla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specificities in the P-type ATPase Superfamily. J Mol Evol.and unique features of P-type ATPases: a comparative view onand M.H. Saier Jr. 1994. P-type ATPases of eukaryotes and

Kumar, Kris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

theAgronomyGuide C O L L E G E O F A G R I C U LT U R A L S C I E N C E S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Loyttyniemi 1980). In contrast, a large variety of beetles, especially ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera-256. MOlOhiro A. 1991. Attraction of beetles (in particular ambrosia beetles) to freshly felled logs

Guiltinan, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Comparison of cracking kinetics for Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} residuum and Midway Sunset crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} residuum and Midway Sunset crude oil were examined by micropyrolysis at several constant-heating rates to determine pyrolysis cracking kinetics. Determined by the discrete distribution method, both feeds exhibited principal activation energies of 50 kcal/mol and frequency factors {approximately} 10{sup 13} sec{sup -1}. Energy distributions were similar ranging from 45 to 57 kcal/mol. Determined by the shift-in-T{sub max} method, E{sub approx}, A{sub approx} for Kern River 650{degrees}F{sup +} and Midway Sunset were 48 kcal/mol, 1.3 X 10{sup 12} sec{sup -1}, and 46 kcal/mol, 4.6 X 10{sup 11} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results are similar, but not identical to other kinetic parameters for heavy oils from type II source rocks.

Reynolds, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I MOlE) o II! . o o o PUMPED STORAGE (I 000 GEOTHERMAL POWERhydroelectric plants, pumped storage The electricity supplyLWR) Hydroelectric Pumped storage Geothermal IV. Annual

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7272 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Molekulare Elektronik Modulbezeichnung (en.): Molecular Electronics Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Mol #12;EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Modulbeschreibung Beschreibung: Inhalt: 1) Introduction, history

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

284

A Mechanistically Based Model for High Temperature LCF of Ni ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5. Oxidation was well-represented by parabolic kinetics and an activation energy of 9.6 k-cal/mol. 6. Based on metallographic observations and LCF test results.

285

Characterization of CDGSH family members : a new and unique class of 2Fe-2S proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Genomics (JCSG, SSRL) that runs XDS (37). Modelby Chris Rife at the JCSG (SSRL) implementing MolProbity (and sent frozen (77 K) to SSRL in an SSRL-supplied cassette

Conlan, Andrea R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Temperature-Dependent Electron Transport in Quantum Dot Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a 150 nm layer of 10 mol. % tin oxide in indium oxide (indium tin oxide, or ITO). The pattern allows for six 1 mmof transparent conducting oxides: indium tin oxide (ITO) and

Padilla, Derek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heating them in a molten salt- mixture of 68-mol% LiNOtakes place during the molten salt exchange. Because the850 C. c) prepared by molten salt exchange of Na x Ti y Mn

Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Analysis - The relationship betwwen the formation factor and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The handbook values are from the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Salt, conc. molL -1, D HB 10 -9 m 2 s -1, D CP 10 -9 m 2 s -1. ...

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Catalytic properties, densification and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline yttria-zirconia-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alumina, titania, ceria and manganese oxide were either coated onto or doped in cubic 7 mol% Y203-ZrO2 (7YZ) nanocrystals to form nanocomposites for methane combustion. These novel catalysts were very active and thermally ...

Cui, Jianyi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

doi:10.1006/jcht.2002.0977 Available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan Pei-Chao Cheng, and Lawrence Scott.4 ± 2.2) kJ · mol-1, and coronene (307.5 ± 9.8) kJ · mol-1. c 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights, corannulene, a bowl-shaped C20H10 hydrocarbon, and of coronene, a planar aTo whom correspondence should

Chickos, James S.

292

Nucleic Acid Softwars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nucleic Acid Software Nucleic Acid Software FR3D, a software for finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. Sarver, M., Zirbel, C.L., Stombaugh, J., Mokdad, A. and Leontis, N.B. (2008) FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. J Math Biol, 56, 215-252. RNAView, a program for quickly generating a display of RNA/DNA secondary structures with tertiary interactions. Yang, H., Jossinet, F., Leontis, N., Chen, L., Westbrook, J., Berman, H.M. and Westhof, E. (2003) Tools for the automatic identification and classification of RNA base pairs. Nucleic Acids Res, 31, 3450-3460. RNAMLview, a program to display and/or edit RNAView 2-dimensional diagrams. 3DNA, a software package for the analysis, rebuilding and visualization of three-dimensional nucleic acid structures.

293

Plant Nucleotide Sugar Formation, Interconversion, and Salvage by Sugar Recycling*  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Plant Nucleotide Sugar Formation, Interconversion, and Salvage by Sugar Recycling ∗ Maor Bar-Peled 1,2 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 2 1 Department of Plant Biology and 2 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602; email: peled@ccrc.uga.edu, mao@ccrc.uga.edu Annu. Rev. Plant Biol. 2011. 62:127-55 First published online as a Review in Advance on March 1, 2011 The Annual Review of Plant Biology is online at plant.annualreviews.org This article's doi: 10.1146/annurev-arplant-042110-103918 Copyright c 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 1543-5008/11/0602-0127$20.00 ∗ Dedicated to Peter Albersheim for his inspiration and his pioneering studies in determining the structure and biological functions of complex carbohydrates. Keywords nucleotide sugar biosynthesis, nucleotide sugar interconversion, nucleotide sugar

294

FY11 Approved LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved LDRD Projects Approved LDRD Projects 2011 Projects Page 1 LDRD Proj. No. Project Title P.I. Dept./Bldg. Directorate 08-002 Strongly Correlated Systems: From Graphene to Quark-Gluon Plasma Kharzeev, D. & Tsvelik, A. PHYS/CMP NPP/BES 08-028 Genomic DNA Methylation: The Epigenetic Response of Arabidopsis Thaliana Genome to Long-term Elevated Atmospheric Temperature and CO 2 in Global Warming Liu, Q. MED/490 & BIO/463 ELS 09-001 Nanoscale Anode Materials for Lithium Batteries Graetz, J. ES&T/ERD GARS 09-002 Bioconversion of Lignocellulose to Ethanol and Butanol Facilitated by Ionic Liquid Preprocessing Francis, A. J./Wishart, J.F./Dunn, J. ES/Chem./Biol ogy ELS 09-003 Organic Photovoltaics: Nanostructure, Solvent Annealing and Performance Ocko, B. PM/510B BES 09-004 Surface Chemisty and

295

2012 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Publications 2 Publications Journal Papers L. A. Abriata, D. Alvarez-Paggi, G. N. Ledesma, N. J. Blackburn, A. J. Vila and D. H. Murgida, "Alternative Ground States Enable Pathway Switching in Biological Electron Transfer", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17348 (2012) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1204251109 H. B. Akkerman, A. C. Chang, E. Verploegen, C. J. Bettinger, M. F. Toney and Z. Bao, "Fabrication of Organic Semiconductor Crystalline Thin Films and Crystals from Solution by Confined Crystallization", Org. Electron. 13, 235 (2012) doi: 10.1016/j.orgel.2011.11.005 A. E. Aleshin, R. G. DiScipio, B. Stec and R. C. Liddington, "Crystal Structure of C5b-6 Suggests Structural Basis for Priming Assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex", J. Biol. Chem. 287, 19642 (2012) doi:

296

BNL | Stefan Tafrov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stefan Tafrov Stefan Tafrov Research Interests Understanding the molecular organization of the chromatin and the changes in it during replication, transcription, silencing, repair etc. Development of models for examining the effects of the radiation over human skin cells. Molecular biology of the yeast Saccharamyces. Recent News Thanks Again, to BNL's Mentors Selected Publications Sampath V., Liu B., Tafrov S., Srinivasan M., Rieger R., Chen E.I., and Sternglanz R. Biochemical characterization of Hpa2 and Hpa3-two small closely related acetyltransferases from S. cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem., [Epub ahead of print] (2013 Jun 17). PubMed Lebel E.A., Rusek A., Sivertz M.B., Yip K., Thompson K.H., and Tafrov S.T. Analyses of the secondary particle radiation and the DNA damage it causes

297

NDB Download  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Download Data from FTP Server Download Data from FTP Server Dowload NDB ID to PDB ID mapping (tsv format) Coordinate Files na-biol. Coordinate files (PDB format) for one biological assembly of nucleic acid-containing structures determined by x-ray crystallography. na-deposited. Coordinate files (PDB format) for the asymmetric unit of nucleic acid-containing structures determined by x-ray crystallography. The chirality has been corrected for these structures. na-mmcif. Coordinate files (mmCIF format) for the asymmetric unit of nucleic acid-containing structures determined by x-ray crystallography in mmCIF format. na-nmr. Copies of the coordinate files released by the PDB for nucleic acid-containing structures determined by NMR. na-nmr-mmcif. Coordinate files (mmCIF format) for nucleic

298

Swarming, Schooling, Milling: Phase diagram of a data-driven fish school model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the basic phase diagram of the fish school model derived from data by Gautrais etal (PLoS Comp. Biol. 8, e1002678 (2012)), exploring its parameter space beyond the parameter values determined experimentally on groups of barred flagtails (Kuhlia mugil}) swimming in a shallow tank. A modified model is studied alongside the original one, in which an additional frontal preference is introduced in the stimulus/response function to account for the angular weighting of interactions. Our study, mostly limited to groups of moderate size (in the order of 100 individuals), focused not only on the transition to schooling induced by increasing the swimming speed, but also on the conditions under which a school can exhibit milling dynamics and the corresponding behavioral transitions. We show the existence of a transition region between milling and schooling, in which the school exhibits multistability and intermittency between schooling and milling for the same combination of individuals parameters. We also s...

Calovi, Daniel S; Ngo, Sandrine; Sire, Clment; Chat, Hugues; Theraulaz, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Proposal Review Panels (Areas Other Than Crystallography)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panels Proposal Review Panels High Pressure Instrumentation Imaging/ Microbeam Macromolecular Crystallography Scattering Applied Materials Stanislav Sinogeikin, Chair Tim Graber, Chair Patrick LaRiviere, Chair John Rose, Chair Robert Suter, Chair Ercan Alp Maria Baldini Bin Chen Przemyslaw Dera Lars Ehm Ravi Kumar Barbara Lavina Sang-Heon (Dan) Shim Heather Watson Keith Brister Wenjun Liu Darren Dale Matthew Ginder-Vogel Xiaojing Huang (guest) Tony Lanzirotti Lisa Miller Mark Pfeifer Martina Ralle Xianghui Xiao Hanfei Yan Arnon Lavie Anne Mulichak Armand Beaudoin Dillon Fong Dileep Singh Mike Toney Bob Von Dreele Scattering Condensed Matter Scattering Chem/Biol/Environ Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) Spectroscopy Structural Science Roy Clarke, Chair Lynda Soderholm, Chair Peter Jemian, Chair Mali Balasubramanian, Chair

300

Pyrolysis and ignition behavior of coal, cattle biomass, and coal/cattle biomass blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in demand, lower emission standards, and reduced fuel supplies have fueled the recent effort to find new and better fuels to power the necessary equipment for societys needs. Often, the fuels chosen for research are renewable fuels derived from biomass. Current research at Texas A&M University is focused on the effectiveness of using cattle manure biomass as a fuel source in conjunction with coal burning utilities. The scope of this project includes fuel property analysis, pyrolysis and ignition behavior characteristics, combustion modeling, emissions modeling, small scale combustion experiments, pilot scale commercial combustion experiments, and cost analysis of the fuel usage for both feedlot biomass and dairy biomass. This paper focuses on fuel property analysis and pyrolysis and ignition characteristics of feedlot biomass. Deliverables include a proximate and ultimate analysis, pyrolysis kinetics values, and ignition temperatures of four types of feedlot biomass (low ash raw manure [LARM], low ash partially composted manure [LAPC], high ash raw manure [HARM], and high ash partially composted manure [HAPC]) as well as blends of each biomass with Texas lignite coal (TXL). Activation energy results for pure samples of each fuel using the single reaction model rigorous solution were as follows: 45 kJ/mol (LARM), 43 kJ/mol (LAPC), 38 kJ/mol (HARM), 36 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 22 kJ/mol (TXL). Using the distributed activation energy model the activation energies were 169 kJ/mol (LARM), 175 kJ/mol (LAPC), 172 kJ/mol (HARM), 173 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 225 kJ/mol (TXL). Ignition temperature results for pure samples of each of the fuels were as follows: 734 K (LARM), 745 K (LAPC), 727 (HARM), 744 K (HAPC), and 592 K (TXL). There was little difference observed between the ignition temperatures of the 50% blends of coal with biomass and the pure samples of coal as observed by the following results: 606 K (LARM), 571 K (LAPC), 595 K (HARM), and 582 K (HAPC).

Martin, Brandon Ray

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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301

Activation of the S-H Group in Fe(2-SH)Fe Clusters: S-H Bond Strengths and Free Radical Reactivity of the Fe(2-SH)Fe Cluster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants were determined for the abstraction of hydrogen atom from (OC)3Fe(?-SH)2Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2H2) and (OC)3Fe(?-SCH3)(?-SH)Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2MeH) by benzyl radical in benzene. From the temperature dependent rate data for Fe2S2H2, ?H and ?S were determined to be 2.03 ? 0.56 kcal/mol and 19.3 ? 1.7 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 1.2 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. For Fe2S2MeH, ?H and ?S were determined to be 1.97 ? 0.46 kcal/mol and 18.1 ? 1.5 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 2.3 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. Temperature dependent rate data are also reported for hydrogen atom abstraction by benzyl radical from thiophenol (?H = 3.62 ? 0.43 kcal/mol, ?S = 21.7 ? 1.3 cal/mol K) and H2S (?H = 5.13 ? 0.99 kcal/mol, ?S = 24.8 ? 3.2 cal/mol K), giving kabs at 25?C of 2.5 ? 105 and 4.2 ? 103 M 1 s 1, respectively. DFT calculations predict S-H bond strengths of 73.1 and 73.2 kcal/mol for Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH, respectively. Free energy and NMR chemical shift calculations confirm the NMR assignments and populations of Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH isomers. Derived radicals Fe2S2H and Fe2S2Me exhibit singly occupied HOMOs with unpaired spin density distributed between the two Fe atoms, a bridging sulfur, and d?-bonding between Fe centers. The S-H solution bond dissociation free energy (SBDFE) of Fe2S2MeH was found to be 69.4 1.7 kcal/mol by determination of its pKa (16.0 0.4) and the potential for the oxidation of the anion, Fe2S2Me- of 0.26 0.05 V vs. ferrocene in acetonitrile (corrected for dimerization of Fe2S2Me). This SBDFE for Fe2S2MeH corresponds to a gas phase bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of 74.2 kcal/mol, in satisfactory agreement with the DFT value of 73.2 kcal/mol. Replacement of the Fe-Fe bond in Fe2S2MeH with bridging ?-S (Fe2S3MeH) or ?-CO (Fe2S2(CO)MeH) groups leads to (DFT) BDEs of 72.8 and 66.2 kcal/mol, the latter indicating dramatic effects of choice of bridge structure on S-H bond strengths. These results provide a model for the reactivity of hydrosulfido sites of low-valent heterogeneous FeS catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Franz, James A.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Bowden, Thomas A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Appel, Aaron M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Bitterwolf, Thomas E.; Dupuis, Michel

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples  

SciTech Connect

Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metal Interactions at the Biochar-Water Interface: Energetics and Structure-Sorption Relationships Elucidated by Flow Adsorption Microcalorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in biochars and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of metals have increased in recent years. However, a systematic understanding of the mechanisms involved in biochar-metal interactions and conditions under which a given mechanism is predominant is still needed. We used flow adsorption micro-calorimetry to study structure-sorption relationships between twelve plant-derived biochars and two metals of different ionization potential (Ip). Biochar structure influenced the amount of K+ (Ip = 419 kJ mol-1) or Cd(II) (Ip = 868 kJ mol-17 ) sorption but had no effect on the mechanism of sorption. Irrespective of the biochar, K+ sorption was exothermic, surface-controlled and occurred via an ion-exchange mechanism on negatively- charged sites with molar heats of adsorption (_Hads) of -4 kJ mol-1 on wood versus -8 kJ mol-1 on grass biochars. In contrast, Cd(II) sorption was endothermic and favored surface complexation on uncharged biochar surfaces with _Hads of around +17 kJ mol-1. Cadmium sorption transitioned from surface- to diffusion-controlled on biochars formed at ? 350 oC and _Hads for Cd(II) sorption was the same on grass and wood biochars. We concluded that, in general, metals with lower Ip favor electrostatic interactions with biochars, while metals of higher Ip favor more covalent-like interactions.

Harvey, Omar R.; Herbert, Bruce; Rhue, Roy D.; Kuo, Li-Jung

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil using Thenoyltrifluoroacetone and Tributylphosphate Complexation  

SciTech Connect

Samples of clean soil from the source used to backfill pits at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex were spiked with Pu-239 and Am-241 to evaluate ligand-assistedsupercritical fluid extraction as a decontamination method. The actual soil in the pits has been subject to approximately three decades of weatheringsince it was originally contaminated. No surrogate soil can perfectly simulate the real event, but actual contaminated soil was not available for research purposes. However, fractionation of Am and Pu in the surrogate soil was found to be similar to that previously measured in the real soil using asequential aqueous extraction procedure. This suggests that Pu and Am behavior are similar in the two soils. The surrogate was subjected to supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, in the presence of the fluorinated beta diketone thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA), and tributylphosphate (TBP). As much as 69% of the Pu and 88% of the Am were removed from the soil using 3.2mol% TTA and 2.7 mol % TBP, in a single 45 minute extraction. Extraction conditions employing a 5 mol % ethanol modifier with 0.33 mol % TTA and 0.27 mol %TBP resulted in 66% Pu and 68% Am extracted. To our knowledge, this is thefirst report of the use of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the removal of actinides from soil.

Mincher, Bruce Jay; Fox, Robert Vincent; Holmes, R.; Robbins, R; Boardman, C.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Details Activities (18) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: Noncondensible gases from hot springs, fumaroles, and deep wells within the Valles caldera geothermal system (210-300°C) consist of roughly 98.5 mol% CO2, 0.5 mol% H2S, and 1 mol% other components. 3He/4He ratios

307

Ab initio and density functional studies of hydrocarbon adsorption in zeolites.  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption energies of methane and ethane in zeolites are investigated with ab initio molecular orbital theory and density functional theory. In this work we have used zeolite cluster models containing two, three, and five tetrahedral (Si, Al) atoms and have found equilibrium structures for complexes of methane, ethane, and propane with an acid site. If a large enough cluster is used and correlation effects are included via perturbation theory, the calculated adsorption energy for ethane is about 5 kcal/mol compared with the experimental value of 7.5 kcal/mol. The B3LYP density functional method gives a much smaller binding of {approximately}1 kcal/mol for ethane. The reason for the failure of density fictional theory is unclear.

Curtiss, L. A.

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chemistry and stoichiometry of wood liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approximate stoichiometry of liquefaction, from data of two PDU runs and a laboratory run is Wood (100 g) + CO (0.1 - 0.4 Mol) ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ (0.5 - 1.0 Mol) + H/sub 2/O (0.4 - 0.8 Mol) + Product (55 - 64 g). Product includes wood oil, water soluble organics and residues. Water is formed by decomposition, carbon dioxide by decomposition and reduction of wood oxygen by CO. Aqueous products include many carboxylic acids plus a roughly equal percentage of non-acids. The wood oil is divided into a neutral fraction and three phenolic fractions of varying molecular weight. Some specific compounds found in water and oil phases are listed.

Davis, H.G.; Kloden, D.J.; Schaleger, L.L.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Enthalpies of Reaction of Pentaammineruthenium(II) Complexes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enthalpies of Reaction of Pentaammineruthenium(II) Complexes Enthalpies of Reaction of Pentaammineruthenium(II) Complexes James F. Wishart, Henry Taube, Kenneth J. Breslauer and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 23, 2997-3001 (1984) Abstract: Enthalpies have been obtained for substitution in aquopentaammineruthenium(II) by acetonitrile, imidazole, pyridine, thiodiethanol, pentaammine(pyrazine)ruthenium(II) ion, isonicotinamide, pyrazine, N-methylpyrazinium ion, dimethyl sulfoxide, and carbon monoxide, by using a batch microcalorimeter. The values are -9.2, -9.3, -12.7, -13.7, -13.8, -15.3, -16.8, -18.0, -19.2, and -38.3 kcal mol-1, respectively. Enthalpies were also obtained for the protonation of pentaammine(pyrazine)ruthenium(II) ion (-4.9 kcal mol-1) and for the comproportionation of [((NH3)5Ru)2pyr]5+ (-3.9 kcal mol-1). The enthalpies

310

Temperature programmed desorption from LiAlO sub 2 treated with H sub 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements have been made of H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} desorption from LiAlO{sup 2} treated at 923 K with He-H{sub 2} mixtures containing 990, 495, and 227 vppm H{sub 2}. Desorptions were into sweep gases of pure He and into He-H{sub 2} mixtures. The H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} desorption peaks were shown to be the sums of first order subpeaks which had reproducible desorption activation energy and pre-exponential terms. For H{sub 2}O desorption, the activation energies were 96, 117, 134 kJ/mol (23, 28, and 32 kcal/mol). (Earlier work had identified an additional peak with an activation energy of 75 kJ/mol (18 kcal/mol).) Enhancement of desorption of H{sub 2}O by H{sub 2} in the sweep gas was confirmed. The enhancement results not from modifying the activation energies and pre-exponential terms for the various sites but from changes in the populations of sites participating in the desorption process so that sites with lower activation energies are increasingly involved. For those runs with He as the sweep gas, desorption of H{sub 2} could be observed. The subpeaks involved had activation energies within approximately 4 kJ/mol (1 kcal/mol) higher than the analogous peaks for H{sub 2}O desorption. 2 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Fischer, A.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne in response to three years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pure stands of Ryegrass were in their third year of growth in the field, exposed to either ambient (355 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}), or elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. A Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system was used to maintain the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration whilst limiting experimental constraints on the field conditions. The theoretically predicted increase in the net rates of CO{sub 2} uptake per unit leaf area (A {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) as a consequence, primarily, of the suppression of photorespiration by CO{sub 2} a competitive inhibitor of RubP oxygenation by Rubisco, was observed for the Lolium perenne studied. Also observed was a general decline in leaf evapotranspiration (E) consistent with observations of increased water use efficiency of crops grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. Enhancement of leaf A in the FACE grown L. perenne ranged from 26.5 1 % to 44.95% over the course of a diurnal set of measurements. Whilst reductions in leaf E reached a maximum of 16.61% over the same diurnal course of-measurements. The increase in A was reconciled with an absence of the commonly observed decline in V{sub c}{sub max} as a measure of the maximum in vivo carboxylation capacity of the primary carboxylasing enzyme Rubisco and J{sub max} a measure of the maximum rate of electron transport. The manipulation of the source sink balance of the crop, stage of canopy regrowth or height in the canopy had no effect on the observation of a lack of response. The findings of this study will be interpreted with respect to the long term implications of C{sub 3} crops being able to adapt physiologically to maximize the potential benefits conferred by growth in elevated CO{sub 2}.

Hymus, G.J. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Writtle College (United Kingdom)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nanoindentation Under Dynamic Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of H2 atmosphere P mN Load Q kJ mol-1 Activation energy R J mol-1 K-1 Molar gas constant - 8.31451 7.0e-05 S mN nm-1 Stiffness dp/dh at peak load and depth T C Temperature Tc C Critical temperature above which hydrogen has no miscibility... to the plasticity index H/Er. Finally, the issue of local and average strain rate is addressed. 2.3.1 Indenter Geometry There are several different indenter geometries in common usage. Some of these, such as the Brinell sphere, Rockwell conospheroids, and Vickers...

Wheeler, Jeffrey M

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma  

SciTech Connect

The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10/sup 9.4/. This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein.

Dyke, B.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.; Laurs, R.M.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Organic Rankine-Cycle Power Systems Working Fluids Study: Topical report No. 3, 2-methylpyridine/water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mixture of 35 mole percent (mol %) 2-methylpyridine and 65 mol % water was tested at 575, 625, and 675/degree/F in a dynamic loop. Samples of the degraded fluid were chemically analyzed to determine the identities of major degradation products and the quantity of degradation. Computed degradation rates were found to be higher than those for Fluorinol 85 or toluene. For this reason (and other reasons, related to fluid handling), other fluids are recommended as the first choice for service in organic Rankine-cycle systems in preference to 2-methylpyridine/water. 7 refs., 39 figs., 39 tabs.

Cole, R.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Irreversibility analysis of hydrogen separation schemes in thermochemical cycles. [Condensation, physical absorption, diffusion, physical adsorption, thermal adsorption, and electrochemical separation  

SciTech Connect

Six processes have been evaluated as regards irreversibility generation for hydrogen separation from binary gas mixtures. The results are presented as a series of plots of separation efficiency against the mol fraction hydrogen in the feed gas. Three processes, condensation, physical absorption and electrochemical separation indicate increasing efficiency with hydrogen content. The other processes, physical and thermal adsorption, and diffusion show maxima in efficiency at a hydrogen content of 50 mol percent. Choice of separation process will also depend on such parameters as condition of feed, impurity content and capital investment. For thermochemical cycles, schemes based on low temperature heat availability are preferable to those requiring a work input.

Cox, K.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cinfony - combining Open Source cheminformatics toolkits behind a common interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.update(cdk.Molecule(mol).calcdesc(cd kdescs)) d.update(rdkit.Molecule(mol).calcdesc( )) descs.append(d) # Write a file suitable for 'read.table' in R outputfile = open("inputforR.txt", "w") print >> outputfile, "\\t".join(["Prop erty"] + descnames) for smile, propval, desc in zip... -website of the Cinfony API documentation. Click here for file [http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/supplementary/1752- 153X-2-24-S1.zip] Additional file 2 Timing Code. A zip file containing Python, Java and C++ code used for run time comparisons for two test cases...

O'Boyle, Noel M; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 0.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.2 E / eV (E pump +E probe ) / eV /(cm/GW) 0 1 2 3 4 /(104.(Mol/l)-1.cm.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.0 4.2 E / eV (E pump +E probe ) / eV /(cm/GW) 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 /(104.(Mol

319

High CO2 Solubility, Permeability and Selectivity in Ionic Liquids with the Tetracyanoborate Anion  

SciTech Connect

Five different ionic liquids containing the tetracyanoborate anion were synthesized and evaluated for CO2 separation performance. Measured CO2 solubility values were exceptionally high compared to analogous ionic liquids with different anions and ranged from 0.128 mol L-1 atm-1 to 0.148 mol L-1 atm-1. In addition, CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 selectivity values were measured using a supported ionic liquid membrane architecture and the separations performance of the ionic liquid membranes exceeded the Robeson upper bound. These results establish the distinct potential of the tetracyanoborate, [B(CN)4], anion for the separation of CO2.

Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Hillesheim, Patrick C [ORNL; Yeary, Joshua S [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

M.Sc.Info-Veranstaltung, 21. Juni 2011 M.Sc. Chemie und Molecular Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.Sc.Info-Veranstaltung, 21. Juni 2011 M.Sc. Chemie und Molecular Science an der FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Rainer Fink - Studiendekan Chemie / Mol.Sci. - #12;M.Sc.Info-Veranstaltung, 21. Juni 2011 Grundzüge der Masterstudiengänge Chemie und Molecular Science Qualifikation zu den Masterstudiengängen Modulwahl (Chemie

Stummer, Wolfgang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The optimal size of a globular protein domain: A simple sphere-packing model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Biochemistry 24 (1985) 1501. [18] A. Donev, F.H. Stillinger, P.M. Chaikin, S. Torquato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92.M. Visscher, M. Bolsterl, Nature 239 (1972) 504. [21] A. Donev, I. Cisse, D. Sachs, E. Variano, F/BiochemMols/RasFrames/PSTABLE.HTM. [25] A. Bairoch, B. Boeckmann, S. Ferro, E. Gasteiger, Brief Bioin- form. 5 (2004) 39. [26] A. Donev

Eddy, Sean

322

DNA Binding and Photocleavage in Vitro by New Dirhodium(II) dppz Complexes: Correlation to Cytotoxicity and Photocytotoxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ther. 2002, 1, 1327. (b) Sodet, O.; Khan, Q. A.; Kohn, K. W.; Pommier, Y. Curr. Med. Chem: Anti) Kanzaki, A.; Takebayashi, Y.; Ren, X.-Q.; Miyashita, H.; Mori, S.; Akiyama, S.-I.; Pommier, Y. Mol. CancerVersity, Columbus, Ohio 43210, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M UniVersity, College Station, Texas 77843, and Food

Turro, Claudia

323

Composition dependence of lithium diffusivity in lithium niobate at high temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition dependence of lithium diffusivity in lithium niobate at high temperature D. H. Jundt on the diffusivity of lithium in lithium niobate at 1100 "C in the crystallographic z direction over the composition range from 48.38 to 49.85 mol % L&O. A vapor transport technique was applied to produce a lithium

Fejer, Martin M.

324

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C 4, supplment au no 8-9, Tome 28, Aot-Septembre 1967, page'c 3-34 LE CENTRE INTERSTITIEL LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-34 LE CENTRE INTERSTITIEL LITHIUM DANS LE FLUORURE DE LITHIUM IRRADI? par Y. FARGE(l) Laboratoire de A apparaît dans des cristaux de fluorurede lithium fortement irradiés aux électrons ou aux neutrons'irradiation;ce centre, effet primaire de l'irradiation, serait l'interstitiel lithium qui formerait un ion moléculaire

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

10.1101/gr.6584707Access the most recent version at doi: 2007 17: 1723-1730; originally published online Nov 30, 2007;Genome Res.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-phase boundary in the hamster (Miltenberger et al. 1995) and is known as the G-box binding motif for plant basic of the central nervous system and periphery. Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 86: 101­114. Miltenberger, R.J., Sukow, K

Hartemink, Alexander

326

From Routes 100 and 33X to Carnegie Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-phase boundary in the hamster (Miltenberger et al. 1995) and is known as the G-box binding motif for plant basic of the central nervous system and periphery. Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 86: 101­114. Miltenberger, R.J., Sukow, K

Modi, Jay

327

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride. I = 2.2 molp.w. present work. Reaction Pu 4+ + HF PuF 3+ + H + t oI = 0) Ref. p.w. p.w. p.w. Pu 4+ + 2HF 2H + PuF 22+ + dis

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland, OR Syracuse, NY Albany, NY New York, NY Salt LakeRI Syracuse, NY New York, NY Albany, NY Tacoma, WA Salt LakeTN/A~S Tulsa, OK Albany-Schene~Y MO~L St. New York-Nort~J

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Numerical Procedure to Extract Physical Properties from Raman Scattering Data in a Flow Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispersion experiments were carried out at three different gas velocities: 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5 cm/s, and. In the ammonia dispersion experiments, 4.0 and 8.0 mol % NH3 in N2 were used, and the gas velocities in nitrogen were determined from gas dispersion experi- ments at room temperature. Results of the dispersion

Anderson, Timothy J.

330

Energetics of Adsorbed CH3 and CH on Pt(111) by Calorimetry: Dissociative Adsorption of CH3I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidation of methane, steam reforming, combustion and selective oxidations of methane and various other of formation, the enthalpy for the dissociation of adsorbed methane to adsorbed methyl coadsorbed + 2 Had was found to be uphill by between +4 and +23 kJ/mol. Measured methane yields (which require

Campbell, Charles T.

331

Efficient Evaluation of Binding Free Energy Using Continuum Electrostatics Danzhi Huang and Amedeo Caflisch*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Evaluation of Binding Free Energy Using Continuum Electrostatics Solvation Danzhi Huang of the absolute free energy of binding. A predictive accuracy of about 1.0 kcal/mol is obtained for 13 and 29 into proteins of known structure require fast and accurate methods for the evaluation of binding free energies.1

Caflisch, Amedeo

332

Amperometric biosensor for the determination of phenols using a crude extract of sweet potato  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An amperometric biosensor for the determination of phenols is proposed using a crude extract of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) as an enzymatic source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO; tyrosinase; catechol oxidase; EC 1.14.18.1). The biosensor is constructed by the immobilization of sweet potato crude extract with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin onto an oxygen membrane. This biosensor provides a linear response for catechol, pyrogallol, phenol and p-cresol in the concentration ranges of 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.5 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} and 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.5 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. The response time was about 3-5 min for the useful response range, and the lifetime of this electrode was excellent for fifteen days (over 220 determinations for each enzymatic membrane). Application of this biosensor for the determination of phenols in industrial wastewaters is presented.

Cruz Vieira, I. da; Fatibello-Filho, O. [Universidade Federal de Sa Carlos (Brazil)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Article original Inventaire molculaire d'un cosystme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, France Abstract - Molecular inventory of an anaerobic digestion microbial ecosystem. The bacterial/Elsevier, Paris anaerobic digestion / biodiversity / microbial ecology / phylogeny / 16S rRNA Résumé - LArticle original Inventaire moléculaire d'un écosystème microbien de digestion anaérobie Jean

Recanati, Catherine

334

Microsoft PowerPoint - Kickoff Meeting 2-24-11 UC.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atm HX3 9 12 10 From FGD (LP) steam T 52 C CO 2 Stripper HX1 HX2 3 4 6 From FGD T 52 C Steam condensate Rich Mg slurry x CO2 (M) 0.01, CO 3 T p 1 8 7 0.66 molL Lean Mg...

335

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: PLANETS, VOL. 118, 938951, doi:10.1002/jgre.20077, 2013 Magnetodynamo lifetimes for rocky, Earth-mass exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe at center 5391 K NT Effective dissipation temperature 3500 K S Entropy of fusion 118(e) J mol­1 K] examined the effect of surface temperatures and plate tectonics. They found that higher surface tempera numerical simulations. [6] Furthermore, numerical models can adequately treat the effects of a nonuniform

Conrad, Clint

336

sp2 Carbon-Hydrogen Bond (C-H) Functionalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 (p-NMe 2 )PhPMe 2 [IrCl(cod)] 2 PCy 3 a 5 mol % ligand (1:RhCl(coe) 2 ] 2 and [RhCl(cod)] 2 precatalysts gave goodwe elected to use [RhCl(cod)] 2 for all subsequent studies

Yotphan, Sirilata

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development of C2U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- CO 2 flow: 18.4 slpm (1.26 x 10 -2 g-mols or 5.53x10 -4 kgs) - Equivalent to 5.0 kW (thermal) power plant. 1.75 kW with 35% efficiency Design basis - Centerpoint of operation...

338

The influence of subglacial hydrology on the flow of West Antarctic ice streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure in a conduit (Pa) Q Activation energy for creep ( J mol?1) q? Darcy water flux (m s?1) qa Water flux in the till, to/from above (m s?1) qb Water flux in the till, to/from below (m s?1) Qc Volumetric water flux in a conduit (m3 s?1) qc Water flux...

Baker, Narelle Paula Marie

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB): Data Bank and Website Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Janes, Bob

340

Visit the National Academies Press online and register for... Instant access to free PDF downloads of titles from the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table of Contents FOREWORD: WILLIAM H. DANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

342

DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Krivobokova, Tatyana

343

AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2008-1039 History of Space-Based Infrared Astronomy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Sloan, Gregory C.

344

Solid-State Lasers: A Graduate Text  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Richardson, Martin C.

345

Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

346

Student Union Bldg. Moscow, ID 83843  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Vcph with an ASI-V autosampler. The geochemical speciation model WHAM(VI) (Windermere Humic Aqueous Model, version fraction of alka- line metals (mol L?1 ). WHAM(VI) includes consideration of binding to colloidal fulvic for their trout fishing data. WHAM speciation modelling was carried out by Scott Young. We thank Sarah Forbes

O'Laughlin, Jay

347

Copyright 1983 by the American Psychological Association, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Br Hammastein, P. (1995) 7'knds Ed. Ewf. la, MaynardSmith, J. &Szathmbry,E(1995) ThcMqjor Zhsizions,P.(1995)L Mol. Ewf. 41,127-73l. Law, R.& Lewis, D.H.(1983) Bioi. J. hn.Soc 20, 2.49-276, Douglaq A E. (199

Timberlake, William D.

348

~ .. -~' -. I-.' : -,'<- " 1 . 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Br Hammastein, P. (1995) 7'knds Ed. Ewf. la, MaynardSmith, J. &Szathmbry,E(1995) ThcMqjor Zhsizions,P.(1995)L Mol. Ewf. 41,127-73l. Law, R.& Lewis, D.H.(1983) Bioi. J. hn.Soc 20, 2.49-276, Douglaq A E. (199

Washington at Seattle, University of

349

ORIGINAL PAPER Automated determination of uranium(VI) at ultra trace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and phosphogypsum) approximately 10 g dry sample was dissolved in 150 mL 8 mol L-1 HNO3 with constant boiling), phosphogypsum, and vegetable ash certified by CIEMAT (Spain). Results of analyses for three replicates (n=3 cases. The phosphogypsum sample was obtained from ponds of a phosphate fertilizer plant located

Sánchez, David

350

and allows a deeper insight into structural rearrangements during the first isomerization step.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Confined Acoustic Vibrations Tzu-Ming Liu, Hung-Pin Chen, Shih-Chia Yeh, Chih-Yu Wu, Chung-Hsiung Wang time of hydrogen bonding of water mol- ecules. If the surface to volume ratio of macromolecules is large, surrounding water molecules will overdamp the vibrations and smear the resonant absorp- tion

Oldenburg, Amy

351

Vertebrate Membrane Proteins: Structure, Function, and Insights from Biophysical Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produce multiple products used in signaling such as inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate, diacylglycerol and cardiovascular diseases are proinflammatory products of arachidonic acid de- rived from oxidation by 5 bond (4­5 kcal/mol), but these minor fluctuations can lead to productive catalytic events (Vendruscolo

Palczewski, Krzysztof

352

Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking  

SciTech Connect

1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

THE DIFFUSION OF LITHIUM IN ALUMINUM  

SciTech Connect

The diffusion of lithium in aluminum was measured at various temperatures with diffusion couples of aluminum-LiAl. The activation energy, E, is 33.3 kcal/mol, and the diffusion factor, Do, is 4.5 cm{sup2}/sec. (auth)

Costas, L. P.

1963-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Increased Hydrogen Production by Genetic Engineering of Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escherichia coli is capable of producing hydrogen under anaerobic growth conditions. Formate is converted to hydrogen in the fermenting cell by the formate hydrogenlyase enzyme system. The specific hydrogen yield from glucose was improved by the modification of transcriptional regulators and metabolic enzymes involved in the dissimilation of pyruvate and formate. The engineered E. coli strains ZF1 (DfocA; disrupted in a formate transporter gene) and ZF3 (DnarL; disrupted in a global transcriptional regulator gene) produced 14.9, and 14.4 mmols of hydrogen/mg of dry cell weight, respectively, compared to 9.8 mmols of hydrogen/mg of dry cell weight generated by wild-type E. coli strain W3110. The molar yield of hydrogen for strain ZF3 was 0.96 mols of hydrogen/mol of glucose, compared to 0.54 mols of hydrogen/mol of glucose for the wild-type E. coli strain. The expression of the global transcriptional regulator protein FNR at levels above natural abundance had a synergistic effect on increasing the hydrogen yield in the DfocA genetic background. The modification of global transcriptional regulators to modulate the expression of multiple operons required for the biosynthesis of formate

Zhanmin Fan; Ling Yuan; Ranjini Chatterjee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Cerenkov third-harmonic generation in ,,2... nonlinear photonic crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerenkov third-harmonic generation in ,,2... nonlinear photonic crystal Yan Sheng,1,a Wenjie Wang,1 of Cerenkov emission of a third-harmonic frequency in a two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal, where coherent light called Cerenkov radiation.1 In this process, the mol- ecules of the medium are polarized

Arie, Ady

356

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, May 2008, p. 29242927 Vol. 74, No. 9 0099-2240/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.02871-07  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weight [DCW]) is three times higher than levels re- cently reported for other engineered E. coli strainsMT and the arsenite transporter GlpF Metala Final concn ( M) Arsenic content ( mol/g DCW ) SDb in: Control cellsc with growing cell cultures unless otherwise indicated. b Based on DCW and three independent experiments. c E

Chen, Wilfred

357

Machinable dissolved metal oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powders of a metal oxide superconductor are mixed with sufficient amount (10--80 mol%) of In, Sn, and/or Al, to become nonbrittle, machinable. Preferred superconductors are YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O compounds.

Chen, Chung-Hsuan.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile Escuela de Ingeniera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moléculas de hidrogeno (H2), las que junto al oxigeno presente en la atmosfera se encargan de alimentar una tecnología es el almacenamiento de hidrogeno, la infraestructura para su distribución y las pérdidas durante hidrogeno en forma de gas, vincularlo a metales o producirlo a bordo a partir de gas natural, metanol

Rudnick, Hugh

359

Main Title 32pt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tf 2 Zn(EA) 4 101 8.9 Tf 3 Fe(dEA) 6 207 13.1 Tf 2 Zn(EA) 6 341 14.6 E a of aqueous (and molten) metal salt 3-5 kcal mol -1 conductivity is low: suggests significant ion pairing...

360

Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 93 (2005) 285292 Inhibition of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases by phytoestrogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

progesterone production. 7.3. 17-HSD 1 and 17-HSD 2 Makela et al. [49,50] studied the effects of several. Gynecol. 87 (1996) 897­904. [8] L. Strauss, R. Santti, N. Saarinen, T. Streng, S. Joshi, S. Makela, Di. Makela, T. Hase, T. Fotsis, Lignan and isoflavonoid conjugates in human urine, J. Steroid Biochem. Mol

Breitling, Rainer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

No Job Name  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leachant solution ID pH type concentration, molL sulfuric acid H 2 SO 4 1.2 H + 0.05 acetic acid HAc 2.9 H + 0.099 deionized water H 2 O 5.7 HOH sodium carbonate Na 2 CO 3...

362

Journal of Molecular Structure (Theochem), 163 (1988) 207-237 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam -Printed in The Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy is 56 kcal mol-*, which is 16 kcal mole1 weaker than the Si-Si single bond in disilane! The origin to that of disilane, 3, H&Si-SiHJ (iv) and the correct description of planar 1;i.e., should the bonding be viewed

Goddard III, William A.

363

Determination of the arrhenius parameters for Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} {l_reversible} SiH{sub 4} + SiH{sub 2} and {Delta}H{degrees} {sub f}(SiH{sub 2}) by RRKM analysis of forward and reverse reaction rate data  

SciTech Connect

RRKM theory is used to generate good estimates of the high-pressure Arrhenius parameters for the thermal decomposition of disilane. The heat of formation of SiH{sub 2} is determined by this process to be 64.4 +- 1.0 kcal/mol.

Moffat, H.K.; Jensen, K.F.; Carr, R.W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1992-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

366

BASIC GEOPHYSICAL FLUID Lecture 1: Introduction -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conservation, equations of state. · Rotating frame of reference, Centrifugal and Coriolis forces. · Local a perfect gas: pV = RT for 1 mole where R = molar gas const = 8.3 J mol-1 K-1. If M = mass of 1 mole, = M/

Read, Peter L.

367

DuraLith Geopolymer Low Temperature Waste Forms  

Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW), mol/L Minor constituents: 129I, 99Tc (HSW), 99Tc, 137Cs (LAW) heavy and other metals Na OH NO 3 Al TOC Si K CO 3 Cl NO 2 PO 4 SO 4

368

Machinable dissolved metal oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powders of a metal oxide superconductor are mixed with sufficient amount (10--80 mol%) of In, Sn, and/or Al, to become nonbrittle, machinable. Preferred superconductors are YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O compounds.

Chen, Chung-Hsuan

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

Biological effects of Mississippi River nitrogen on the northern gulf of Mexico--a review and synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological effects of Mississippi River nitrogen on the northern gulf of Mexico--a review.3 ? 1011 mol N year? 1 ) to the northern Gulf of Mexico. This large input dominates the biological of Mexico 1. Introduction The continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico is physically

Breed, Greg A.

372

Impact of local recharge on arsenic concentrations in shallow aquifers inferred from the electromagnetic conductivity of soils in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an intermediate size between cluster 1 and 3, also displays an intermediate I­V curve between curve 1 and 3 studied using temperature programmed desorption, ion scattering spectroscopy, scanning tunneling temperature programmed desorption, compared to the adhesive energy of 90 kcal/mol for the bulk Au metal

van Geen, Alexander

373

Evaporative Evolution of a Na-Cl-NO3-K-Ca-SO4-Mg-Si Brine at 95(degree)C: Experiments and Modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA) was evaporated at 95 C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to validate geochemical calculations of evaporating water chemistry using a high temperature Pitzer thermodynamic database. The water evolved towards a complex ''sulfate type'' brine that contained about 45 mol% Na, 40 mol% Cl, 9 mol% NO{sub 3}, 5 mol% K, and less than 1 mol% each of SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), F, and Si. All measured ions in the condensed vapor phase were below detection limits. The mineral precipitates identified were halite, anhydrite, bassanite, niter and nitratine. Trends in the solution composition and identification of CaSO{sub 4} solids suggest that fluorite, carbonate, sulfate, and magnesium-silicate precipitation control the aqueous solution composition of sulfate type waters by removing fluoride, calcium, and magnesium during the early stages of evaporation. In most cases, the high temperature Pitzer database, used by EQ3/6 geochemical code, sufficiently predicts water composition and mineral precipitation during evaporation. Predicted solution compositions are generally within a factor of two of the experimental values. The model predicts that sepiolite, bassanite, amorphous silica, calcite, halite and brucite are the solubility controlling mineral phases.

Alai, M; Sutton, M; Carroll, S A

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

What's New in the Computational Biology Section  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New? What's New? Kane, SR, Chakicherla, AY, Chain, PSG, Schmidt, R, Shin, MW, Legler, TC, Scow, KM, Larimer, FW, Lucas, SM, Richardson, PM, and Hristova, KR. (2007). Whole-Genome Analysis of the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1. J. Bacteriol. 189(5): 1931-1945. PubMed Scott KM, Sievert SM, Abril FN, Ball LA, Barrett CJ, Blake RA, Boller AJ, Chain PS, Clark JA, Davis CR, Detter C, Do KF, Dobrinski KP, Faza BI, Fitzpatrick KA, Freyermuth SK, Harmer TL, Hauser LJ, Hugler M, Kerfeld CA, Klotz MG, Kong WW, Land M, Lapidus A, Larimer FW, Longo DL, Lucas S, Malfatti SA, Massey SE, Martin DD, McCuddin Z, Meyer F, Moore JL, Ocampo LH, Paul JH, Paulsen IT, Reep DK, Ren Q, Ross RL, Sato PY, Thomas P, Tinkham LE, Zeruth GT. (2006). The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2. PLoS Biol. 4(12): e383. PubMed

375

Discrete- versus continuous-state descriptions of the F1-ATPase molecular motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A discrete-state model of the F1-ATPase molecular motor is developed which describes not only the dependences of the rotation and ATP consumption rates on the chemical concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, but also on mechanical control parameters such as the friction coefficient and the external torque. The dependence on these mechanical parameters is given to the discrete-state model by fitting its transition rates to the continuous-angle model of P. Gaspard and E. Gerritsma [J. Theor. Biol. 247 (2007) 672-686]. This discrete-state model describes the behavior of the F1 motor in the regime of tight coupling between mechanical motion and chemical reaction. In this way, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the F1 motor are obtained such as the Michaelis-Menten dependence of the rotation and ATP consumption rates on ATP concentration and its extension in the presence of ADP and Pi, their dependences on friction and external torque, as well as the chemical and mechanical thermodynamic efficiencies.

E. Gerritsma; P. Gaspard

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Diogenes S. Alves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 a 23. 1 a 23. 1 Taxas de Mudança e Padrões de Desmatamento e Uso da Terra na Amazônia Brasileira Diogenes S. Alves, 1 Douglas C. Morton, 2 Mateus Batistella, 3 Dar A. Roberts, 4 e Carlos Souza Jr. 5 A investigação das taxas e padrões de mudanças no uso e cobertura da terra (LCLUC) na Amazônia é uma questão central para a pesquisa do Experimento de Grande Escala da Biosfera-Atmosfera na Amazônia (LBA). LCLUC, juntamente com mudanças climáticas, afetam as funções biológicas, químicas e físicas da Amazônia e por isso a ligação com a mudança ambiental em escalas local, regional e global. Um número considerável de pesquisas tem focalizado a estimativa de taxas de conversão da floresta na Amazônia, principalmente com o uso de sensoriamento remoto e a avaliação de

377

NREL: Investigación de Biomasa Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of a woman looking into a glass cylindrical tank filled with liquid. The tank is illuminated and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Photo of a woman looking into a glass cylindrical tank filled with liquid. The tank is illuminated and green algae and gas bubbles can be seen floating in the liquid. Gracias a la investigación de la biomasa, el NREL se encuentra en proceso de desarrollo de tecnologías para convertir la biomasa-materia vegetal como árboles, césped, residuos agrícolas, algas y otros materiales biológicos-en combustible. Estos biocombustibles reducirán la dependencia de nuestro país al petróleo de origen extranjero, mejorarán la calidad del aire y apoyarán las economías rurales. Los proyectos y las capacidades de la biomasa en el NREL se concentran en: caracterización de biomasas; conversión bioquímica; conversión termoquímica; ciencia química y catalítica;

378

Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purified Proteins Purified Proteins BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Cancer Protein Biomarkers Production Purified Proteins PLATE ANL_ID Title Accession MW / PI Purification Yield (Mg) Antibody Availability NCI 01 MRSL_216 SERF1A AF073518.1 10.44 / 7336.37 0.28 Novus Biol. cat# H00008293-A01 MRSL_30 ENSG00000130487 AA953200 9.26 / 53294.98 0.47 MRSL_60 CCNG2 BF061444 6.23 / 39042.21 1.54 Mouse Anti-Human CCNG2 Monoclonal Antibody, Unconjugated, Clone 1F9-C11 -- Abnova Corporation H00000901-M01 MRSL_189 PDLIM1/CLIM1 BC000915.1 6.56 / 36071.71 3.59 Novus Biologicals, Inc.cat# NB 100-1367; EVEREST BIOTECH LTD. Cat# EB06229 MRSL_58 BHMT AV659897 6.58 / 44998.49 5.09

379

Towards Scalable Optimal Sequence Homology Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AbstractThe field of bioinformatics and computational biol- ogy is experiencing a data revolution experimental techniques to procure data have increased in throughput, improved in accuracy and reduced in costs. This has spurred an array of high profile sequencing and data generation projects. While the data repositories represent untapped reservoirs of rich information critical for scientific breakthroughs, the analytical software tools that are needed to analyze large volumes of such sequence data have significantly lagged behind in their capacity to scale. In this paper, we address homology detection, which is a funda- mental problem in large-scale sequence analysis with numerous applications. We present a scalable framework to conduct large- scale optimal homology detection on massively parallel super- computing platforms. Our approach employs distributed memory work stealing to effectively parallelize optimal pairwise alignment computation tasks. Results on 120,000 cores of the Hopper Cray XE6 supercomputer demonstrate strong scaling and up to 2.42 107 optimal pairwise sequence alignments computed per second (PSAPS), the highest reported in the literature.

Daily, Jeffrey A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Going beyond 2D: following membrane diffusion and topography in the IgE-Fc[epsilon]RI system using 3-dimensional tracking microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to follow and observe single molecules as they function in live cells would represent a major milestone for molecular-cellular biology. Here we present a tracking microscope that is able to track quantum dots in 3 dimensions and simultaneously record time-resolved emission statistics from a single dot. This innovative microscopy approach is based on four spatial filters and closed loop feedback to constantly keep a single quantum dot in the focal spot. Using this microscope, we demonstrate the ability to follow quantum dot-labeled IgE antibodies bound to Fc{epsilon}Rl membrane receptors in live RBL-2H3 cells. The results are consistent with prior studies of 2 dimensional membrane diffusion (Andrews et al., Nat. Cell Biol., 10, 955, 2008). In addition, the microscope captures motion in the axial (Z) direction, which permits tracking of diffusing receptors relative the 'hills and valley' of the dynamically changing membrane landscape. Our novel approach is uniquely capable of following single-molecule dynamics on live cells with 3 dimensional spatial resolution.

Wells, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lessard, Guillaume A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phipps, Marry E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lidke, Diane S [UNM; Wilson, Bridget S [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nutrient Requirements Of Swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no. 119, Midwestern Section meeting of the American Society of Animal Science, Des Moines, IA. Trotter, M., and C. L. Allee. 1979a. Availability of phosphorus in corn, soybean meal and wheat. J. Anim. Sci. 49(Suppl. 1):255 (Abstr.). Trotter, M., and G. L. Allee. 1979b. Availability of phosphorus in dry and high-moisture grain for pigs and chicks. J. Anim. Sci. 49(Suppl. 1):98 (Abstr.). Trotter, M., and G. L. Allee. 1979c. Effects of steam pelleting and extruding sorghum grain-soybean meal diets on phosphorus availability for swine. J. Anim. Sci. 49(Suppl. 1):255 (Abstr.). Tucker, H. F., and W. D. Salmon. 1955. Parakeratosis or zinc deficiency disease in the pig. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 88:613--616. Tunmire, D. L., D. E. Orr, Jr., and L. F. Tribble. 1983. Ammonium polyphosphate vs. dicalcium phosphate as a phosphorus supplement for growing-finishing swine. J. Anim. Sci. 57:632--637. Ullrey, D. E. 1992. Basis for regulation of selenium supplements in animal diets. J. Anim. Sci. ...

Tenth Revised Edition; Board On Agriculture

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

PRIORITY COMMUNICATION Maternal Stress Beginning in Infancy May Sensitize Children to Later Stress Exposure: Effects on Cortisol and Behavior*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neonatal environment can permanently alter an individuals responses to stress. To demonstrate a similar phenomenon in humans, we prospectively examined the relationships of maternal stress beginning in infancy and concurrent stress on preschoolers hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity and later mental health symptoms. Methods: Salivary cortisol levels were assessed in 282 4.5-year-old children and 154 of their siblings. Maternal reports of stress were obtained when the children were ages 1, 4, and 12 months, and again at 4.5 years. Childrens mental health symptoms were assessed in first grade. Results: A cross-sectional analysis revealed that preschoolers exposed to high levels of concurrent maternal stress had elevated cortisol levels; however, a longitudinal analysis revealed that concurrently stressed children with elevated cortisol also had a history of high maternal stress exposure in infancy. Importantly, children exposed only to high levels of concurrent or early stress had cortisol levels that did not significantly differ from those never exposed to stress. Further analysis of the components of stress indicated that maternal depression beginning in infancy was the most potent predictor of childrens cortisol. We also found that preschoolers with high cortisol levels exhibited greater mental health symptoms in first grade. Conclusions: These results link the findings of preclinical studies to humans by showing that exposure to early maternal stress may sensitize childrens pituitary-adrenal responses to subsequent stress exposure. Biol Psychiatry 2002;52:776784 2002 Society of Biological Psychiatry

Marilyn J. Essex; Marjorie H. Klein; Eunsuk Cho; Ned H. Kalin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NF45/ILF2 tissue expression, promoter analysis, and interleukin-2 transactivating function  

SciTech Connect

NF45/ILF2 associates with NF90/ILF3 in the nucleus and regulates IL-2 gene transcription at the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)/NF-AT DNA target sequence (P.N. Kao, L. Chen, G. Brock, J. Ng, A.J. Smith, B. Corthesy, J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 20691-20699). NF45 is widely expressed in normal tissues, especially testis, brain, and kidney, with a predominantly nuclear distribution. NF45 mRNA expression is increased in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. The human and murine NF45 proteins differ only by substitution of valine by isoleucine at amino acid 142. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human NF45 gene to chromosome 1q21.3, and mouse NF45 gene to chromosome 3F1. Promoter analysis of 2.5 kB of the murine NF45 gene reveals that significant activation is conferred by factors, possible including NF-Y, that bind to the CCAAT-box sequence. The function of human NF45 in regulating IL-2 gene expression was characterized in Jurkat T-cells stably transfected with plasmids directing expression of NF45 cDNA in sense or antisense orientations. NF45 sense expression increased IL-2 luciferase reporter gene activity 120-fold, and IL-2 protein expression 2-fold compared to control cells. NF45 is a highly conserved, regulated transcriptional activator, and one target gene is IL-2.

Zhao Guohua [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Shi Lingfang [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Qiu Daoming [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Hu Hong [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Kao, Peter N. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States)]. E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) HSCoE Final Report Executive Summary September 30, 2010 Lin Simpson Director, HSCoE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, Colorado NREL is a national laboratory operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. HSCoE Final Report, Executive Summary Acronyms and Abbreviations ANL APCI B Be BET C CA Ca Caltech COF Cr Cu DOE DRIFTS Duke EERE F Fe FY g g/mol H H 2 K kJ kW L Li LLNL 2 m Met-Cars Mg Michigan Missouri mL Mn Mo MOF mol N Na Ni NIST nm Argonne National Laboratory Air Products and Chemicals Inc. boron

385

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 660 fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature (Th) and 44 freezing temperature (Tm) measurements, mainly on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368°C range). Tm (-0.3 to -12.7°C range) and crushing stage observations indicate that early trapped fluids contained up to (approximate)2 mol% CO2 (now measured at <0.4 mol%). reservoir temperatures have decreased by

386

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Photorefractive effect at 775 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals  

SciTech Connect

The photorefractive effect induced by 775-nm laser light on doped lithium niobate crystals is investigated by the direct observation in the far field of the transmitted-beam distortion as a function of time. Measurements performed at various Zr-doping concentrations and different light intensities show that the 775-nm light beam induces a steady-state photorefractive effect comparable to that of 532-nm light, but the observed build-up time of the photovoltaic field is longer by three-orders of magnitude. The 775-nm photorefractivity of lithium niobate crystals doped with 3 mol. % ZrO{sub 2} or with 5.5 mol. % MgO is found to be negligible.

Nava, G.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Degiorgio, V. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, and CNISM, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M. V.; Pozza, G.; Sada, C. [Physics and Astronomy Departement, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ligand Discrimination in Myoglobin from Linear-Scaling DFT+U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Myoglobin modulates the binding of diatomic molecules to its heme group via hydrogen-bonding and steric interactions with neighboring residues, and is an important benchmark for computational studies of biomolecules. We have performed calculations on the heme binding site and a significant proportion of the protein environment (more than 1000 atoms) using linear-scaling density functional theory and the DFT+U method to correct for self-interaction errors associated with localized 3d states. We confirm both the hydrogen-bonding nature of the discrimination effect (3.6 kcal/mol) and assumptions that the relative strain energy stored in the protein is low (less than 1 kcal/mol). Our calculations significantly widen the scope for tackling problems in drug design and enzymology, especially in cases where electron localization, allostery or long-ranged polarization influence ligand binding and reaction.

Cole, Daniel J; Payne, Mike C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design of gasifiers to optimize fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase 1 of Task 4.2 began this quarter with TGA testing of limestone, taconite and K[sub 2]CO[sub 3] as a gasification catalysts with Illinois No. 6 coal. These tests are designed to compare the reactivities of these catalysts using Illinois No 6 coal. In all cases the molar equivalent ratio of catalyst to fixed carbon was 0.12, so that for K[sup +] the molar ratio was K/FC = 0.12, for Ca[sup ++] = 0.06, and for Fe[sup +++] = 0.04 mols/mol. In this way the active sites on the coal structure (-COO[sup [minus

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Calculation of activities and solubilities of alkali metal perchlorates at high ionic strengths in multicomponent aqueous systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equations of Nyvlt, of Bromley, and of Pitzer for the representation of activity coefficients of electrolytes in multicomponent ionic systems have been used to fit solubility data for some alkali metal perchlorates and ammonium perchlorate in mixture with other electrolytes at ionic strengths varying from 0.08 mol-kg/sup -1/ to as high as 24 mol-kg/sup -1/. Only the Pitzer equations can be used reliably to fit the solubility data over the whole range of ionic strengths encountered for ternary systems but there are certain limitations and certain assumptions which have to be made concerning the Pitzer ionic interaction parameters. A method is also proposed for the calculation of the Pitzer single electrolyte parameters, ..beta../sup 0/, ..beta../sup 1/, and C/sup phi/, for the less soluble perchlorates from fitting their solubility data over a wide range of high ionic strengths.

Chan, C.; Khoo, K.H.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comparative Calculations of Solubility Equilibria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in calculated solubilities in the Na-F-PO{sub 4}-HPO{sub 4}-OH system. at 25 C for NaOH concentrations up to 5 mol/kg were assessed. These uncertainties were based on an evaluation of the range of values for the Gibbs energies of the solids. Comparative calculations using the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) and SOLGASMIX indicated that the variation in activity coefficients with NaOH concentration is much greater in the ESP code than in SOLGASMIX. This resulted in ESP calculating a higher solubility in water and a lower solubility in NaOH concentrations above 1 mol/kg: There was a marked discrepancy in the solubilities of the pure components sodium fluoride and trisodium phosphate predicted by ESP and SOLGASMIX. In addition, different solubilities for these components were obtained using different options in ESP. Because of these observations, a Best Practices Guide for ESP will be assembled.

Beahm, E.C.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

Everett, Susan M [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mull, Derek L [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measurement of genotoxic air pollutant exposures in street vendors and school children in and near Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

The effects of air pollution on human health are a great concern, particularly in big cities with severe traffic problems such as Bangkok, Thailand. In this study, exposure to genotoxic compounds in ambient air was studied by analysis of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene through direct measurement of concentrations in air as well as through the use of different biomarkers of exposure: urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) for PAHs and urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) for benzene. The study was conducted in various susceptible groups of the population with different occupations in 5 traffic-congested areas of Bangkok, as well as in primary school children. The level of total PAHs on the main roads at various sites ranged from 7.10 to 83.04 ng/m{sup 3}, while benzene levels ranged from 16.35 to 49.25 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels in nearby temples, the control sites, ranged from 1.67 to 3.04 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 10.16 to 16.25 ppb benzene. Street vendors selling clothes were exposed to 16.07 {+-} 1.64 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 21.97 {+-} 1.50 ppb benzene, levels higher than in monks and nuns residing in nearby temples (5.34 {+-} 0.65 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 13.69 {+-} 0.77 ppb benzene). Grilled-meat vendors in the same area were exposed to both total PAHs and benzene at even higher levels, possibly due to additional formation of PAHs during the grilling of meat (34.27 {+-} 7.02 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 27.49 {+-} 2.72 ppb benzene). At the end of the workday, urinary 1-OHP levels in street vendors (0.12 and 0.15 {mu}mol/mol creatinine in clothes and grilled-meat vendors, respectively) were significantly higher than in controls (0.04 {mu}mol/mol creatinine; P < 0.01). Afternoon urinary t,t-MA levels in both groups of street vendors (0.12 mg/g creatinine) were also significantly higher than in controls (0.08 mg/g creatinine; P < 0.05). School children from two schools in Bangkok were exposed to total PAHs and benzene at levels of 6.70 {+-} 0.47 ng/m{sup 3} and 4.71 {+-} 0.25 ppb, respectively, higher than those to which children living outside the city were exposed (1.25 {+-} 0.24 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 2.10 {+-} 0.16 ppb benzene). At the end of the school day, levels of urinary 1-OHP and t,t-MA were significantly higher (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) in Bangkok school children (0.23 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.27 mg/g creatinine, respectively) than in school children from outside Bangkok (0.10 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.08 mg/g creatinine, respectively)

Ruchirawat, Mathuros [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand) and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)]. E-mail: mathuros@tubtim.cri.or.th; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Settachan, Daam [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Tuntaviroon, Jantamas [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Buthbumrung, Nantaporn [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Sharma, Suman [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand)

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of a Primary Amine-Functionalized Ion-Exchange Resin for CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

A primary amine-functionalized polymeric ion-exchange resin (Lewatit VP OC 1065, Lanxess) was evaluated for use in CO{sub 2} capture applications. The polymeric resin was characterized by SEM, DRIFTS-IR, N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms, and packed bed sorption measurements to determine some of the characteristic properties of the resin. Capture capacities ranging from 1.85 to 1.15 mol CO{sub 2}/kg sorbent were obtained in a packed bed reactor exposed to 10 vol % CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at adsorption temperatures ranging from 30 to 70 C. The capture capacity of the resin was stable over 18 adsorption/regeneration cycles. The resin was evaluated through thermogravimetric analysis to have a low moisture adsorption (1.5 mol H{sub 2}O/kg sorbent). It is possible to completely regenerate the resin under 1 atm of CO{sub 2} at 200 C.

Alesi, W. Richard; Kitchin, John R.

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Transformation of Acetone and Isopropanol to Hydrocarbons using HZSM-5 Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research describes the production of hydrocarbons from acetone and isopropanol produced by the MixAlco process. The MixAlco process has two types of products: acetone and isopropanol. The effect of the temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), type of catalyst, feed composition, and pressure are studied. For the isopropanol reaction, the following conditions were used: HZSM-5 (280), 1 atm, 300410C, and 0.511.5 h1, respectively. The temperature and WHSV affect the average carbon number of the reaction products. A product similar to commercial gasoline was obtained at T = 320 C and WHSV= 1.3 to 2.7 h1. Also, at these conditions, the amount of light hydrocarbons (C1C4) is low. For the acetone reaction, the following conditions were used: HZSM-5 with silica alumina ratio (Si/Al) 80 and 280 mol silica/mol alumina, 17.8 atm, 305415C, 1.311.8 h1, and hydrogen acetone ratio 01 mol H2 /mol acetone. The conversion on HZSM-5 (80) was higher than HZSM-5 (280); however, for HZM5 (80) the production of light hydrocarbons (C1C4) was more abundant than (280), and it formed less coke. For acetone, the effect of high pressure (P = 7.8 atm) was evaluated. At high pressure, the conversion was lower than at atmospheric pressure. HZSM-5 (280) rapidly deactivated, and the amount of light hydrocarbons (C1C4) increased. For acetone, co-feeding hydrogen inhibited coke formation and decreased the amount of light hydrocarbons (C1C4).

Taco Vasquez, Sebastian

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Direct DNA Photocleavage by a New Intercalating Dirhodium(II/II) Complex: Comparison to Rh2(-O2CCH3)4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.; Akiyama, S.-I.; Pommier, Y. Mol. Cancer Ther. 2002, 1, 1327- 1334. (b) Sodet, O.; Khan, Q. A.; Kohn, K. W-Cancer Agents 2002, 2, 387-401. (3) (a) Kanzaki, A.; Takebayashi, Y.; Ren, X.-Q.; Miyashita, H.; Mori, S of Chemistry, The Ohio State UniVersity, Columbus, Ohio 43210, and Texas A&M UniVersity, College Station, Texas

Turro, Claudia

397

Supporting R&D of industrial fuel cell developers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is supporting the industrial developers of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) and tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results suggest that a lithium concentration level of 65-75 mol% in the LiNa electrolyte will improve cell performance. They have made inroads in understanding the interfacial resistance of bipolar plate materials, and they have reduced the air electrode overpotential in OSFCs by adding dopants.

Krumpelt, M.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, 44:4, 1011-1015 (August, 1999). PREDICTING EFFECTIVENESS FACTOR FOR M-TH ORDER AND LANGMUIR RATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

throughout the interior of the particle, i.e., no reactant concentration gradient within the particle catalytic pellet or a solid fuel particle) may be expressed as: d2 C dr2 + 2 r dC dr - r De = 0 (1) where r is the intrinsic reaction rate per unit particle volume in mol/cm3 /sec (as a function of C), De is the effective

Fletcher, Thomas H.

399

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Reversible Electrocatalytic Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen at Low Overpotentials by a Functional Hydrogenase Mimic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new bis(diphosphine) nickel(II) complex, [Ni(PPh2NR2)2](BF4)2, 1, (R = CH2CH2OCH3) is described. A {Delta}G{sup o} of 0.84 kcal/mol{sup -1} for hydrogen addition for this complex was calculated from the experimentally determined equilibrium constant. This complex displays reversible electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production and oxidation at low overpotentials, a characteristic most commonly associated with hydrogenase enzymes.

Smith, Stuart E.; Yang, Jenny Y.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, Morris

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO{sub 2} ON CANOPY TRANSPIRATION IN SENESCENT SPRING WHEAT  

SciTech Connect

The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s} the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to 20% and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by 10%. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about 5%.

GROSSMAN,S.; KIMBALL,B.A.; HUNSAKER,D.J.; LONG,S.P.; GARCIA,R.L.; KARTSCHALL,TH.; WALL,G.W.; PINTER,P.J,JR.; WECHSUNG,F.; LAMORTE,R.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Interim report FY 1994, Ferrocyanide Safety Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}CS uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}CS exchanged materials to form tank ``hot-spots.`` This research, performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), stems from concerns of possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. If radioactive cesium is exchanged and concentrated by the remaining nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, this heating could cause temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide tanks. For the purposes of this study, two simulants, In-Farm-2 and U-Plant-2, were chosen to represent the wastes generated by the scavenging processes. These simulants were formulated using protocols from the original cesium scavenging campaign. Later additions of cesium-rich wastes from various processes also were considered. The simulants were prepared and centrifuged to obtain a moist ferrocyanide sludge. The centrifuged sludges were treated with the original supernate spiked with a known amount of cesium nitrate. After analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were calculated. The capacity of solid waste simulants to exchange radioactive cesium from solution was examined. Initial results showed that the greater the molar ratio of cesium to cesium nickel ferrocyanide, the less effective the exchange of cesium from solution. The theoretical capacity of 2 mol cesium per mol of nickel ferrocyanide was not observed. The maximum capacity under experimental conditions was 0.35 mol cesium per mol nickel ferrocyanide. Future work on this project will examine the layering tendency of the cesium nickel ferrocyanide species.

Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.; Burger, L.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dpartement Mention Spcialits Etablissements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulaire (R) Sciences des matériaux et nanoobjets (R) Systèmes dynamiques et statistiques de la matière-radioprotection (R/P) Observatoire de Paris, Paris 11, Ecole Centrale Physique fondamentale et Sciences pour l Protéines (R) Biophysique moléculaire et cellulaire (R) Paris 7 Sciences du Végétal Sciences du Végétal (R

Gutkin, Boris

405

Molecular dynamics simulation of electron transfer in proteins. Theory and application to Q sub A yields Q sub B transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron transfer (ET) from the primary menaquinone Q{sub A} to the secondary ubiquinone Q{sub B}, i.e., Q{sub A}{sup {minus}}Q{sub B} {yields} Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup {minus}}, in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis has been simulated by using the method of molecular dynamics accounting for the classical motion of a protein's nuclear degrees of freedom, the redistribution of charge accompanying electron transfer being described quantum chemically. We outline the role of classical nuclear degrees of freedom in electron transfer, identifying the essential dynamic properties that should be determined from molecular dynamics simulations in order to characterize electron transfer. These quantities, all related to the energy difference {Delta}E(t) = E{sub p}(t) - E{sub R}O(t) of virtual forward (electron tries to jump forward before ET) and backward (electron tries to jump backward after ET) electron transfer, R and P denoting the states Q{sub A}{sup {minus}}Q{sub B} and Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup {minus}}, respectively, are as follows: the variance of {Delta}E(t) and the average value of {Delta}E(t) before and after transfer, i.e., {Sigma}{sub R} (6.9 kcal/mol), {sub R} (22 kcal/mol) and {Sigma}{sub p} (8.8 kcal/mol), {sub p} ({minus}25 kcal/mol), respectively; the relaxation time of the energy-energy correlation function {sub R})({Delta}E(0) - {sub R})>{sub R} (120 fs); the time describing the relaxation of {Delta}E(t) from an average value {sub R} to an average value {sub p} immediately after electron transfer (200 fs). The quantities in brackets are the respective simulation results.

Nonella, M.; Schulten, K. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1991-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Widmansta?tten Ferrite and Bainite in Ultra High Strength Steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to transformation, mm Martensite start temperature, in QC Steady state nucleation rate Negligible partitioning local equilibrium Partitioning local equilibrium Volume fraction of ferrite transformed Austenite Isothermal reaustenitisation... temperature in QC Interfacial energy per unit area Temperature at which stress-free austenite and ferrite of the same composition have identical free energies, QC Same as To except taking stored energy 400 J mol-1 of bainite, QC Radius of spherical nucleus...

Ali, Ashraf

1991-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

THE ABUNDANCE OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MIDPLANE PRESSURE IN GALAXIES: NON-EQUILIBRIUM, TURBULENT, CHEMICAL MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of spiral galaxies show a strong linear correlation between the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen surface density R{sub mol} and midplane pressure. To explain this, we simulate three-dimensional, magnetized turbulence, including simplified treatments of non-equilibrium chemistry and the propagation of dissociating radiation, to follow the formation of H{sub 2} from cold atomic gas. The formation timescale for H{sub 2} is sufficiently long that equilibrium is not reached within the 20-30 Myr lifetimes of molecular clouds. The equilibrium balance between radiative dissociation and H{sub 2} formation on dust grains fails to predict the time-dependent molecular fractions we find. A simple, time-dependent model of H{sub 2} formation can reproduce the gross behavior, although turbulent density perturbations increase molecular fractions by a factor of few above it. In contradiction to equilibrium models, radiative dissociation of molecules plays little role in our model for diffuse radiation fields with strengths less than 10 times that of the solar neighborhood, because of the effective self-shielding of H{sub 2}. The observed correlation of R{sub mol} with pressure corresponds to a correlation with local gas density if the effective temperature in the cold neutral medium of galactic disks is roughly constant. We indeed find such a correlation of R{sub mol} with density. If we examine the value of R{sub mol} in our local models after a free-fall time at their average density, as expected for models of molecular cloud formation by large-scale gravitational instability, our models reproduce the observed correlation over more than an order-of-magnitude range in density.

Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Glover, Simon C. O., E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: glover@uni-heidelberg.de [Zentrum der Astrophysik der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Correlation of the Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters with the thermodynamic properties of low albite and potash feldspar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters provides a better estimate of the relative stability of low albite and potash feldspar than do predictions from calorimetry and high temperature phase equilibria. The calculated saturation indices from field data for low albite, potash feldspar suggest that [Delta]G[sub f,298][sup o] for the latter should be revised to [minus]3748.6[plus minus]3.7 kJ.mol[sup [minus]1].

Apps, J.A.; Chang, G.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Generalized Hypertree Decompositions: NP-Hardness and Tractable Variants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) as initiator and Solkane 365mfc (1,1,1,3,3-pentafluo- robutane) as solvent at 50 °C. The pentafluorobutane with 47.0 g (0.245 mol) of 1a, 30 mL of Solkane 365 mfc and 2.23 g of Perkadox 16 N initiator. The vessel. (Caution! Guard against static electricity dis- charges by appropriate grounding during this process

Schwentick, Thomas

410

Interleaving Symbolic Execution and Partial Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) as initiator and Solkane 365mfc (1,1,1,3,3-pentafluo- robutane) as solvent at 50 °C. The pentafluorobutane with 47.0 g (0.245 mol) of 1a, 30 mL of Solkane 365 mfc and 2.23 g of Perkadox 16 N initiator. The vessel. (Caution! Guard against static electricity dis- charges by appropriate grounding during this process

Hähnle, Reiner

411

A Structured Approach to Develop Concurrent Programs in UML ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) as initiator and Solkane 365mfc (1,1,1,3,3-pentafluo- robutane) as solvent at 50 °C. The pentafluorobutane with 47.0 g (0.245 mol) of 1a, 30 mL of Solkane 365 mfc and 2.23 g of Perkadox 16 N initiator. The vessel. (Caution! Guard against static electricity dis- charges by appropriate grounding during this process

Singh, Gurdip

412

Ultrafast Carbon-Carbon Single-Bond Rotational Isomerization in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the barrier heights of 1, n-butane, and ethane, the time constants for n-butane and ethane internal rotation is not completely free. (2) The trans-gauche isomerization of 1,2- disubstituted ethane derivatives, such as n-butane energy barrier of the n-butane (?3.4 kcal/mol) and of other simple 1,2-disubstituted ethane derivatives

Fayer, Michael D.

413

Al2O3 incorporation in MgSiO3 perovskite and ilmenite Wendy R. Panero a,, Sofia Akber-Knutson b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Al2O3 incorporation in MgSiO3 perovskite and ilmenite Wendy R. Panero a,, Sofia Akber-Knutson b in the MgSiO3­Al2O3 system predict that MgSiO3­perovskite dissolves about 15 mol% Al2O3 at the top of the lower mantle, limited by coexistence with Al-rich ilmenite (corundum). The solubility increases

Stixrude, Lars

414

Hoja 7 Calculo I Primero de Ingenieria Informatica Curso 20122013 Calculo de primitivas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a nivel del mar? Responde a la misma pregunta para el hidr´ogeno, para el que C = 0.006. c) Teniendo en cuenta que a nivel del mar hay unas 400 000 mol´eculas de ox´igeno por cada una de hidr´ogeno, ¿a qu´e altura habr´a m´as hidr´ogeno que ox´igeno? 3 #12;

Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

415

Hoja 8 Calculo I Primero de Ingenieria Informatica Curso 20112012 Calculo de areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hidr´ogeno, para el que C = 0.006. c) Teniendo en cuenta que a nivel del mar hay unas 400 000 mol´eculas de ox´igeno por cada una de hidr´ogeno, ¿a qu´e altura habr´a m´as hidr´ogeno que ox´igeno? 18

Fernández Gallardo, Pablo

416

Dehydrated Prussian Blues for CO2 Storage and Separation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adsorption isotherms of pure gases present in flue and natural gas including CO2, N2, CH4 and water were studied using prussian blues of chemical formula M3[Co(CN)6]2 (M = Cu, Ni, Mn). These materials adsorbed 8-12 wt % of CO2 at room temperature and 1 bar of pressure with heats of adsorption ranging from 6 to 16 kcal/mol.

Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Ghorishi, Behrooz S.

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

Composition and decomposition of soybean and sorghum tissues grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that changes in both quantity and quality of plant residue inputs to soils as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration increases may alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover rates and pool sizes. We determined the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant tissue quality, and how modifications in tissue quality affect C and N mineralization. Soybean and sorghum were grown under elevated (704.96 {plus_minus} 0.33 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) and ambient (357.44 {plus_minus} 0.12 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} in open-top chambers. Leaf and stem tissues were separated form harvested plants and analyzed for C,N, lignin, and cellulose. Tissues were applied to Norfolk loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Kandiudult) and aerobically incubated for 70-d to determine C and N mineralization, C turnover, relative N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no effect on plant residue C concentration, but N concentration of soybean leaves and stems and sorghum stems was reduced; however, CO{sub 2} enrichment increased C/N ratio and lignin concentration for only sorghum stems and soybean leaves, respectively. Source of plant residue (i.e., produced under either elevated or ambient CO{sub 2}) had no impact on soil C turnover, relative N mineralization, cumulative C and N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. These data suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} will have little effect on composition or decomposition of field crop residues. Thus, since CO{sub 2} enrichment results in increased photosynthetic C fixation, the possibility exists for increased soil C storage under field crops in an elevated CO{sub 2} world. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Henning, F.P. [Cooperative Ext. Serv., Dunwoody, GA (United States); Wood, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Rogers, H.H.; Runion, G.B.; Prior, S.A. [National Soil Dynamics Lab., Auburn, AL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Decomposition of tritiated water with solid oxide electrolysis cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept for decomposing tritiated water with a solid oxide electrolysis cell is proposed. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Preliminary experiments with the cell using stabilized zirconia with 8 mol% CaO were performed. Water vapor was decomposed electrically and cell voltage agreed well with the theoretical value.

Konishi, S.; Naruse, Y.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

passage.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 1. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised January 2012 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 1.1. Notation Table 1.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4πǫ 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident part. energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4πǫ 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "microbiol mol biol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Application of a nonisothermal thermogravimetric method to the kinetic study of the reduction of metallic oxides; Part 1. A general treatment and its application to the reduction of the oxides of molybdenum by hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a theoretical treatment to evaluate activation energies of reactions by means of nonisothermal experiments is developed. The treatment considers the case where either the surface reaction or the intraparticle diffusion could be rate-controlling. Complementary to the theoretical treatment, thermogravimetric experiments have been carried out under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The reduction of MoO{sub 3} to Mo was found to pass through an intermediate MoO{sub 2} phase. The rate of reduction to MoO{sub 2} seems to be controlled by surface reaction, and the activation energy obtained from isothermal studies is 205.7 kJ/mol. This is comparable to the value of 211.6 kJ/mol obtained from nonisothermal reduction studies using the present theoretical treatment. The rate of reduction to Mo appears to be influenced by gas diffusion through voids. The activation energy from isothermal studies is 85.2 kJ/mol.

Sichen, D.; Seetharaman, S. (Dept. of Theoretical Metallurgy, Royal Inst. of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (SE))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SOLID SOLUTION EFFECTS ON THE THERMAL PROPERTIES IN THE MgAl2O4-MgGa2O4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid solution eects on thermal conductivity within the MgO-Al2O3-Ga2O3 system were studied. Samples with systematically varied additions of MgGa2O4 to MgAl2O4 were prepared and the laser ash technique was used to determine thermal diusivity at temperatures between 200C and 1300C. Heat capacity as a function of temperature from room temperature to 800C was also determined using dierential scanning calorimetry. Solid solution in the MgAl2O4-MgGa2O4 system decreases the thermal conductivity up to 1000C. At 200C thermal conductivity decreased 24% with a 5 mol% addition of MgGa2O4 to the system. At 1000C the thermal conductivity decreased 13% with a 5 mol% addition. Steady state calculations showed a 12.5% decrease in heat ux with 5 mol% MgGa2O4 considered across a 12 inch thickness.

O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Sander, Todd P. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu{sub 2}O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu{sub 2}O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu{sub 2}O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu{sub 2}O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

Jernigan, G.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials and Chemical Sciences Div.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution, prepared without sonication, was studied by adiabatic scanning calorimetry. Measurements revealed four phase transitions with the temperatures 35.2, 39.6, 44.6, and 52.4 Degree-Sign C at heating and one transition at the temperature 40.4 Degree-Sign C at cooling. The first three transitions at heating occur in unilamellar vesicles. The first and third transitions correspond to the subgel-gel and gelliquid phase transitions, corresponding enthalpy jumps are equal to 33 and 49 kJ/mol. The second transition appears after some aging and is similar to gel-ripple phase transition in a DPPC solution, with the enthalpy jump under the transition exceeding 7.4 kJ/mol. The transition occurs in unilamellar vesicles. The transition at the temperature 52.4 Degree-Sign C occurs in another subsystem of the solution, which we believe to be multilamellar vesicles. The enthalpy jump at this transition is equal to 97 kJ/mol, and data analysis suggests that this is a subgel-liquid transition. The phase transition at cooling is the liquid-gel transition in unilamellar vesicles. During the measurements, a slow evolution of the solution occurs, consisting in a change of concentrations of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles. This transformation mainly occurs at low temperatures.

Voronov, V. P.; Kuryakov, V. N.; Muratov, A. R., E-mail: muratov@ogri.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Molecular structure of H/sub 2/S/sub 2/ and barriers to internal rotation  

SciTech Connect

The molecular structure of H/sub 2/S/sub 2/ has been determined by ab initio molecular theory at the SCF and CI-SD levels. The SCF and CI-SD results are in good agreement with each other for all parameters and are in agreement with experiment except for the value of theta(HSS). The calculated value for theta is 98.4/sup 0/ as compared to an experimental value of 91.3/sup 0/. It is suggested that the experimental value is too low. The vibrational frequencies for the optimum skew structure and the cis (tau = 0/sup 0/) and trans (tau = 180/sup 0/) structures have been calculated at the SCF level. The cis and trans structures have one imaginary frequency and are true transition states on the internal rotation energy surface. The barriers to internal rotation were calculated at the SCF and CI-SD levels and were corrected for the difference in zero-point energies; this correction is 0.6-0.7 kcal/mol. The trans barrier is 5.0 +/- 0.15 kcal/mol and the cis barrier is 7.5 +/- 0.15 kcal/mol. 22 references, 3 tables.

Dixon, D.A.; Zeroka, D.; Wendoloski, J.J.; Wasserman, Z.R.

1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ligand binding involves breakage of hydrogen bonds with water molecules and formation of new hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand. In this work, the change of hydrogen bonding energy in the binding process, namely hydrogen bonding penalty, is evaluated with a new method. The hydrogen bonding penalty can not only be used to filter unrealistic poses in docking, but also improve the accuracy of binding energy calculation. A new model integrated with hydrogen bonding penalty for free energy calculation gives a root mean square error of 0.7 kcal/mol on 74 inhibitors in the training set and of 1.1 kcal/mol on 64 inhibitors in the test set. Moreover, an application of hydrogen bonding penalty into a high throughput docking campaign for EphB4 inhibitors is presented, and remarkably, three novel scaffolds are discovered out of seven tested. The binding affinity and ligand efficiency of the most potent compound is about 300 nM and 0.35 kcal/mol per non-hydrogen atom, respectively.

Hongtao Zhao; Danzhi Huang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Computational evaluation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 metabolism for chemical production  

SciTech Connect

Cyanobacteria are ideal metabolic engineering platforms for carbon-neutral biotechnology because they directly convert CO2 to a range of valuable products. In this study, we present a computational assessment of biochemical production in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 (Synechococcus 7002), a fast growing cyanobacterium whose genome has been sequenced, and for which genetic modification methods have been developed. We evaluated the maximum theoretical yields (mol product per mol CO2 or mol photon) of producing various chemicals under photoautotrophic and dark conditions using a genome-scale metabolic model of Synechococcus 7002. We found that the yields were lower under dark conditions, compared to photoautotrophic conditions, due to the limited amount of energy and reductant generated from glycogen. We also examined the effects of photon and CO2 limitations on chemical production under photoautotrophic conditions. In addition, using various computational methods such as MOMA, RELATCH, and OptORF, we identified gene-knockout mutants that are predicted to improve chemical production under photoautotrophic and/or dark anoxic conditions. These computational results are useful for metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria to synthesize valueadded products.

Vu, Trang; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Reed, Jennifer L.

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

First calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M21SW050201, 'Complete the first calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system'. This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. To complement previous work undertaken under this work package we have extended out heat of extraction studies by di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphoric acid to curium. This report also details the heat of extraction of samarium in the same system. This work was performed to not only test the methodology but also to check for consistency with the heats of extraction obtained with those in the prior literature. The heat of extraction for samarium that was obtained in this study was -9.6 kJ mol-1, which is in reasonable agreement with the previously obtained value of -10.9 kJ mol-1. The curium heat of extraction was performed under two sets of conditions and the obtained heats of extraction were in reasonable agreement with each other at -16.0 {+-} 1.1 and -16.8 {+-} 1.5 kJ mol-1.

Leigh R. Martin; Peter R. Zalupski

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cyclopentacorannulene: {pi}-facial stereoselective deuterogenation and determination of the bowl-to-bowl inversion barrier for a constrained buckybowl  

SciTech Connect

Attachment of an ethane or ethylene unit to the rim of corannulene produced relatively rigid bowls of dihydrocyclopenta- and cyclopentacorannulene, respectively. In contrast to the parent corannulenes, their inversion barriers are too high to be determined by the NMR coalescence methods. Due to the significant curvature of cyclopentacorannulene, deuterogenation is {pi}-facial specific; both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis lead exclusively to exo-dideuteriocyclopentacorannulene 2a. Equilibration of the endo- and exo-isotopomers allowed the determination of {Delta}G{sup {dagger}} at 27.61-27.67 kcal/mol over the temperature range 52.1-99.3{degree}C and the estimation of {Delta}H{sup {dagger}} (27.3{+-}0.7 kcal/mol) and {Delta}S{sup {dagger}} (-1.1{+-}0.2 eu) for the bowl-to-bowl inversion. The inversion barrier calculated at the HF/6-31G{sup *}//3-21G level (25.9 kcal/mol) compares well with the experimental result. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Sygula, A.; Abdourazak, A.H.; Rabideau, P.W. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS OF PRECURSORS OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE REACTIONS OF ACETIC ACID WITH HYDROXYLAMINE AND ITS IONIZED AND PROTONATED DERIVATIVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational study of the reactions of hydroxylamine and its ionized and protonated derivatives with acetic acid is provided. The reaction of neutral hydroxylamine with acetic acid, despite being clearly exothermic, involves a very large energy barrier. The reaction of ionized hydroxylamine with acetic acid is also clearly exothermic, but again a significant energy barrier is found (around 24 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). The reaction of the most stable protonated isomer of hydroxylamine, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, with acetic acid also involves a high barrier (more than 27 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Only the higher energy isomer, NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}{sub 2}, leads to a sensibly lower energy barrier (about 2.3 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Nevertheless, an estimate of the reaction coefficient at low temperatures such as those reigning in the interstellar medium gives very low values. Therefore, it seems that precursors of interstellar glycine could not be efficiently produced from the reactions of hydroxylamine-derived ions with acetic acid.

Barrientos, Carmen; Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Laura; Rayon, Victor M.; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theoretical prediction of high-pressure arrhenius parameters by nonlinear regression: application to silane and disilane decomposition  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius parameters are estimated for silane and disilane thermal decomposition reactions by direct regression of RRKM predictions on published static and shock-tube data. For silane decomposition, they find E/sub infinity/ = 57.4-61.1 kcal/mol and log A/sub infinity/ = 14.9-16.3, while for disilane they find E/sub infinity/ = 51.1-52.5 kcal/mol and log A/sub infinity/ = 15.2-16.2. The lower limiting values correspond to inclusion of negative temperature dependence in the collision efficiency, while the higher values correspond to inclusion of weak or negligible temperature dependence. The Arrhenium parameters for both silane and disilane decomposition differ substantially from previously published values. For silane, they predict preexponentials approximately an order of magnitude greater than the previous values for the same activation energy. For disilane, they find A/sub infinity/ is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the literature values and E/sub infinity/ is greater by more than 2 kcal/mol. Falloff curves for both silane and disilane decomposition are given. Implications of these results for the activation energy of SiH/sub 2/ insertion into H/sub 2/ and SiH/sub 4/ and for ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 2/) are discussed.

Roenigk, K.F.; Jensen, K.F.; Carr, R.W.

1987-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Solid PETN  

SciTech Connect

The thermal decomposition of PETN below its melting point has been investigated. Separate monitoring of six product gases allowed individual initial rates of reaction and activation energies to be calculated. The activation energies for the production of both N2O and H2O area between 50 and 56 kcal*mol-1, pointing to a single process operant over the entire temperature range 363 - 408 K. The other four observed products have activation energies that are significantly higher. The activation energies for CO2 and N2 formation are 65-66 kcal*mol-1 while those for the production of CO and [NO+NO2] are 71-75 kcal*mol-1. Whether these values represent two or only one additional mechanism is not clear; however, for the 2s width uncertainty limits overlap. The processes or process involved in the formation of CO2, N2, CO, and [NO + NO2] appear(s) to change at 373K, as a dramatic drop in activation energies is observed at lower temperatures.

Miller, G. D.; Haws, L. D.; Dinegar, R. H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 27. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised April 2006 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 27.1. Notation Table 27.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4π 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident particle energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4π 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization

434

Nanoscale Strontium Titanate Photocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting  

SciTech Connect

SrTiO3 (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 5 nm STO, and 6.5 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H2 and O2, but the activity is decreasing from 28 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (bulk STO), to 19.4 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (30 nm STO), and 3.0 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Conceptual Design of a CERMET NTR Fission Core Using Multiphysics Modeling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

An initial pre-conceptual CERMET Nuclear Thermal Propulsion reactor system is investigated within this paper. Reactor configurations are investigated where the fuel consists of 60 vol.% UO2 and 40 vol.% W where the UO2 consists of Gd2O3 concentrations of 5 and 10 mol.%.Gd2O3. The fuel configuration consisting of 5 mol.% UO2 was found to have a total mass of 2761 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 4.10 and required a coolant channel surface area to fueled volume ratio of approximately 15.0 in order to keep the centerline temperature below 3000 K. The configuration consisting of 10 mol.% Gd2O3 required a surface area to volume ratio of approximately 12.2 to cool the reactor to a peak temperature of 3000 K and had a total mass of 3200 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 3.54. It is not known yet what concentration of Gd2O3 is required to maintain fuel stability at 3000 K; however, both reactors offer the potential for operations at 25,000 lb, and at a specific impulse which may range from 900 to 950 seconds.

Jonathan A. Webb; Brian J. Gross; William T. Taitano

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

CO{sub 2}-gasification reactivity of different carbonaceous materials at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

At the atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures between 1,223 and 1,673 K, the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of seven different carbonaceous materials comprising coal tar pitch coke, petroleum coke, natural graphite, carbon black and three coal chars was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis. Their crystalline structures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the reactivity of the chars, pitch coke and petroleum coke produced from liquid phase carbonization, is several times poorer than that of the coal chars produced from solid phase carbonization and even lower than that of natural graphite. At the same time, it is obtained that under the condition of the chemical reaction control, the apparent activation energies of the former are in the range of 135.82-174.92 kJ/mol, while those of the latter are between 89.95 kJ/mol and 110.05 kJ/mol. Besides, the reactivity of the sample has a certain correlation with the crystalline structure of the sample, i.e., the larger the fraction of the relatively better crystalline structure is, the poorer the reactivity of the sample is.

Gu, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, Y.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radioprotectors and Tumors: Molecular Studies in Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal investigated effects of radiation using a set of archival tissues. Main interests of this proposal were to investigate effects of irradiation alone or in the presence or radioprotectors; to investigate these effects on different tissues; and to use/develop molecular biology techniques that would be suitable for work with archived tissues. This work resulted in several manuscripts published or in preparation. Approach for evaluation of gene copy numbers by quantitative real time PCR has been developed and we are striving to establish methods to utilize Q-RT-PCR data to evaluate genomic instability caused by irradiation(s) and accompanying treatments. References: 1. Paunesku D, Paunesku T, Wahl A, Kataoka Y, Murley J, Grdina DJ, Woloschak GE. Incidence of tissue toxicities in gamma ray and fission neutron-exposed mice treated with Amifostine. Int J Radiat Biol. 2008, 84(8):623-34. PMID: 18661379, http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09553000802241762?cookieSet=1 2. Wang Q, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Tissue and data archives from irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of four decades, in press in Radiation and Environmental Biophysics. 3. Alcantara M, Paunesku D, Rademaker A, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF TISSUE TOXICITIES IN B6CF1 MICE IRRADIATED WITH FISSION NEUTRONS OR COBALT 60 GAMMA RAYS: Gender modulates accumulation of tissue toxicities caused by low dose rate fractionated irradiation; in preparation; this document has been uploaded as STI product 4. Wang Q, Paunesku T Wanzer B and Woloschak GE. Mitochondrial gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice with lymphoid cancers; in preparation 5. Wang Q, Raha, S, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Evaluation of gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice; in preparation

Gayle Woloschak, David Grdina

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Accuracy of EGSnrc calculations at {sup 60}Co energies for the response of ion chambers configured with various wall materials and cavity dimensions  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, five experimental data sets are used to evaluate the ability of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to calculate the change in chamber response associated with changes in wall material and cavity dimension at {sup 60}Co energies. Calculations of the ratios of response per unit mass of air as a function of cavity volume for walls ranging from polystyrene to lead are generally within 1%-3% of experiments. A few exceptions, which are discussed, include 20%-30% discrepancies with experiments involving lead-walled chambers used by Attix et al. [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 60, 235-243 (1958)] and Cormack and Johns [Radiat. Res. 1, 133-157 (1954)], and 5% discrepancies for the graphite chamber of Attix et al. (relative to data for other wall materials). Simulations of the experiment by Whyte [Radiat. Res. 6, 371-379 (1957)], which varied cavity air pressure in a large cylindrical chamber, are generally within 0.5% (wall/electrode materials ranging from beryllium to copper). In all cases, the agreement between measurements and EGSnrc calculations is much better when the response as a function of cavity height or air pressure is considered for each wall material individually. High-precision measurements [Burns et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 7125-7135 (2007)] of the response per unit mass as a function of cavity height for a graphite chamber are also accurately reproduced, and validate previous tests of the transport mechanics of EGSnrc. Based on the general agreement found in this work between corresponding experimental results and EGSnrc calculations it can be concluded that EGSnrc can reliably be used to calculate changes in response with changes in various wall materials and cavity dimensions at {sup 60}Co energies within a accuracy of a few percent or less.

La Russa, Daniel J.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Ottawa Carleton Institute of Physics, Carleton University Campus, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Constructive episodic simulation: temporal distance and detail of past and future events modulate hippocampal engagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Behavioral, lesion and neuroimaging evidence show striking commonalities between remembering past events and imagining future events. In a recent event-related fMRI study, we instructed participants to construct a past or future event in response to a cue. Once an event was in mind, participants made a button press, then generated details (elaboration) and rated them. The elaboration of past and future events recruited a common neural network. However, regions within this network may respond differentially to event characteristics, such as the amount of detail generated and temporal distance, depending on whether the event is in the past or future. To investigate this further, we conducted parametric modulation analyses, with temporal distance and detail as covariates, and focused on the medial temporal lobes and frontopolar cortex. The analysis of detail (independent of temporal distance) showed that the left posterior hippocampus was responsive to the amount of detail comprising both past and future events. In contrast, the left anterior hippocampus responded differentially to the amount of detail comprising future events, possibly reflecting the recombination of details into a novel future event. The analysis of temporal distance revealed that the increasing recency of past events correlated with activity in the right parahippocampus gyrus (Brodmann area (BA) 35/36), while activity in the bilateral hippocampus was significantly correlated with the increasing remoteness of future events. We propose that the hippocampal response to the distance of future events reflects the increasing disparateness of details likely included in remote future events, and the intensive relational processing required for integrating such details into a coherent episodic simulation of the future. These findings provide further support for the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis (Schacter and Addis (2007) Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:773786) and highlight the involvement of the hippocampus in relational processing during elaboration of future events. VC 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. KEY WORDS: episodic; autobiographical memory; future; fMRI; parametric modulation

Donna Rose Addis; Daniel L. Schacter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

Korreman, Stine, E-mail: korreman@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States); Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Juhler-Nottrup, Trine [Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Turbulence Considerations for Comparing Ecosystem Exchange over Old-Growth and Clear-Cut Stands For Limited Fetch and Complex Canopy Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) methodology over three adjacent forests in southern Washington State to identify stand-level age-effects on ecosystem exchange. The sites represent Douglas-fir forest ecosystems at two contrasting successional stages: old-growth (OG) and early seral (ES). Here we present eddy flux and meteorological data from two early seral stands and the Wind River AmeriFlux old-growth forest during the growing season (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. We show an alternative approach to the usual friction velocity (u*) method for determining periods of adequate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) mixing based on the ratio of mean horizontal ({bar u}) and vertical ({bar w}) wind flow to a modified turbulent kinetic energy scale (uTKE). This new parameter in addition to footprint modeling showed that daytime CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE}) in small clear-cuts (< 10 hectares) can be measured accurately with EC if micrometeorological conditions are carefully evaluated. Peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -14.0 to -12.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) at OG were measured in April in both 2006 and 2007 before bud break when air and soil temperatures and vapor pressure deficit were relatively low, and soil moisture and light levels were favorable for photosynthesis. At the early seral stands, peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -11.0 to -8.7 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were measured in June and July while spring-time CO{sub 2} fluxes were much smaller (F{sub NEE} = -3.8 to -3.6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). Overall, we measured lower evapotranspiration (OG = 230 mm; ES = 297 mm) higher midday F{sub NEE} (OG F{sub NEE} = -9.0 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}; ES F{sub NEE} = -7.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and higher Bowen ratios (OG {beta} = 2.0. ES {beta} = 1.2) at the old-growth forest than at the ES sites during the summer months (May-August). Eddy covariance studies such as ours add critical land-atmosphere exchange data for an abundant, but rarely studied Douglas-fir age class.

Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Paw U, K T; Falk, M; Bible, K

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

443

Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of gobs'' of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events.

Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Use of Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Volatile Organic Compound Sources at the La Porte Super Site During the Texas Air Quality Study 2000  

SciTech Connect

Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was deployed for continuous real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a site near the Houston Ship Channel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000. Overall, 28 ions dominated the PTR-MS mass spectra and were assigned as anthropogenic aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, xylenes) and hydrocarbons (propene, isoprene), oxygenated compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, C7 carbonyls), and three nitrogencontaining compounds (e.g., HCN, acetonitrile and acrylonitrile). Biogenic VOCs were minor components at this site. Propene was the most abundant lightweight hydrocarbon detected by this technique with concentrations up to 100+ nmol mol-1, and was highly correlated with its oxidation products, formaldehyde (up to ~40 nmol mol-1) and acetaldehyde (up to ~80 nmol/mol), with typical ratios close to 1 in propene-dominated plumes. In the case of aromatic species the high time resolution of the obtained data set helped in identifying different anthropogenic sources (e.g., industrial from urban emissions) and testing current emission inventories. A comparison with results from complimentary techniques (gas chromatography, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) was used to assess the selectivity of this on-line technique in a complex urban and industrial VOC matrix and give an interpretation of mass scans obtained by soft chemical ionization using proton-transfer via H3O+. The method was especially valuable in monitoring rapidly changing VOC plumes which passed over the site, and when coupled with meteorological data it was possible to identify likely sources.

Karl, Thomas G.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, Eric; Stutz, Jochen P.; Shetter, Rick; Hall, Samual R.; Goldan, P. D.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Lindinger, Werner

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program. FY-1992 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of ``gobs`` of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events.

Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing ones by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers were given for future experimental verifications. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated based upon the thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of the blue-shifting hydrogen bonds in all the six most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen, blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form. Computing resources were available through a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant from the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both the canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing values by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers remain for future experimental verification. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated according to thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of blueshifting hydrogen bonds in all six of the most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen and blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming the high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas-phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

448

Materials for Hydrogen Storage: Structure and Dynamics of Borane Ammonia Complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activation energies for rotations in low temperature orthorhombic ammonia borane were analyzed and characterized in terms of electronic structure theory. The perdeuterated, 11B- enriched ammonia borane 11BD3ND3 sample was synthesized and the structure was refined from neutron powder diffraction data at 175 K. This temperature has been chosen as median of the range of previously reported NMR measurements of these rotations. A representative molecular cluster model was assembled from the refined geometry and the activation energies were calculated and characterized by analysis of the environmental factors that control the rotational dynamics. The barrier for independent NH3 rotation, Ea = 12.7 kJ/mol, largely depends on the molecular conformational torsion in the solid state geometry. The barrier for independent BH3 rotation, Ea = 38.3 kJ/mol, results from the summation of the effect of molecular torsion and large repulsive intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen interactions. However, a barrier of Ea = 31.1 kJ/mol was calculated for rotation with preserved molecular conformation. Analysis of the barrier heights and the corresponding rotational pathways shows that rotation of the BH3 group involves strongly correlated rotation of the NH3 end of the molecule. This observation suggests that the barrier from previously reported measurement of BH3 rotation, corresponds to H3BNH3 correlated rotation. Support for this work by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division is gratefully acknowledged. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Parvanov, Venci M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Hess, Nancy J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika A.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

Comparison of sugar molecule decomposition through glucose and fructose: a high-level quantum chemical study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient chemical conversion of biomass is essential to produce sustainable energy and industrial chemicals. Industrial level conversion of glucose to useful chemicals, such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, and levulinic acid, is a major step in the biomass conversion but is difficult because of the formation of undesired products and side reactions. To understand the molecular level reaction mechanisms involved in the decomposition of glucose and fructose, we have carried out high-level quantum chemical calculations [Gaussian-4 (G4) theory]. Selective 1,2-dehydration, keto-enol tautomerization, isomerization, retro-aldol condensation, and hydride shifts of glucose and fructose molecules were investigated. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses indicate that, for acyclic glucose and fructose molecules, the dehydration and isomerization require larger activation barriers compared to the retro-aldol reaction at 298 K in neutral medium. The retro-aldol reaction results in the formation of C2 and C4 species from glucose and C3 species from fructose. The formation of the most stable C3 species, dihydroxyacetone from fructose, is thermodynamically downhill. The 1,3-hydride shift leads to the cleavage of the C-C bond in the acyclic species; however, the enthalpy of activation is significantly higher (50-55 kcal/mol) than that of the retro-aldol reaction (38 kcal/mol) mainly because of the sterically hindered distorted four-membered transition state compared to the hexa-membered transition state in the retro-aldol reaction. Both tautomerization and dehydration are catalyzed by a water molecule in aqueous medium; however, water has little effect on the retro-aldol reaction. Isomerization of glucose to fructose and glyceraldehyde to dihydroxyacetone proceeds through hydride shifts that require an activation enthalpy of about 40 kcal/mol at 298 K in water medium. This investigation maps out accurate energetics of the decomposition of glucose and fructose molecules that is needed to help find more efficient catalysts for the conversion of hexose to useful chemicals.

Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Direct Determination of the Ionization Energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUVRadiation  

SciTech Connect

Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements providethe first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O)= 4.30 +- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules Delta H0 f,0(PtC(g)) = 701 +- 7 kJ/mol, Delta H0f,0(PtO(g)) = 396 +- 12 kJ/mol, and Delta H0f,0(PtO2(g)) = 218 +- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B.; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

Article Removal of Mercury by Foam Fractionation Using Surfactin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The separation of mercury ions from artificially contaminated water by the foam fractionation process using a biosurfactant (surfactin) and chemical surfactants (SDS and Tween-80) was investigated in this study. Parameters such as surfactant and mercury concentration, pH, foam volume, and digestion time were varied and their effects on the efficiency of mercury removal were investigated. The recovery efficiency of mercury ionsInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12 8246 was highly sensitive to the concentration of the surfactant. The highest mercury ion recovery by surfactin was obtained using a surfactin concentration of 10 CMC, while recovery using SDS required 10 CMC. However, the enrichment of mercury

A Biosurfactant; Hau-ren Chen; Chien-cheng Chen; A. Satyanarayana Reddy; Chien-yen Chen; Wun Rong Li; Min-jen Tseng; Hung-tsan Liu; Wei Pan; Jyoti Prakash Maity; Shashi B. Atla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Empirically corrected HEAT method for calculating atomization energies  

SciTech Connect

We describe how to increase the accuracy ofthe most recent variants ofthe HEAT method for calculating atomization energies of molecules by means ofextremely simple empirical corrections that depend on stoichiometry and the number ofunpaired electrons in the molecule. Our corrections reduce the deviation from experiment for all the HEAT variants. In particular, our corrections reduce the average absolute deviation and the root-mean-square deviation ofthe 456-QP variant to 0.18 and 0.23 kJoule/mol (i.e., 0.04 and 0.05 kcallmol), respectively.

Brand, Holmann V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Microreactor for fast chemical kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical reaction process in a T-shaped microchannel is studied experimentally through the reaction of Ca++ with a fluorescent tracer, Calcium-green. For thin channels (10 um), diffusion of species is found to behave in a way independent of the thickness direction. In such a situation, simulations of a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion model agree remarkably well with the experimental measurements. The comparison of experiments and simulations is used to measure the chemical kinetic constant, which we find to be k=3.2 x 10^5 dm^3/(mol s). Applications of the analysis to faster reactions and to micro-titration are also discussed.

Baroud, C N; Menetrier, L; Tabeling, P; Baroud, Charles N.; Okkels, Fridolin; Menetrier, Laure; Tabeling, Patrick

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Heat Capacity of MgB2: Evidence for Moderately Strong Coupling Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the superconducting state of a phase pure polycrystalline sample of the new layered high-temperature superconductor MgB2 by specific heat measurements in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla. The characteristic jump at the superconducting transition is observed and compared with the predictions of weak coupling BCS-theory and the ?-model. Our analysis shows excellent agreement with the predictions for ? = ?/kBTC = 2.1(1) with a Sommerfeld term ? of 1.1(1) mJ/mol K indicating that MgB2 is a superconductor in the moderately strong electron-phonon coupling regime.

R. K. Kremer; B. J. Gibson; K. Ahn

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Nitrog. Bases Table 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 1: References for Nitrogenous Base Structures Table 1: References for Nitrogenous Base Structures used in Lester Clowney, Shri C. Jain, A. R. Srinivasan, John Westbrook, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Nitrogenous Bases. (1996) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 519-529. Cytosine -------------------------------------------------------------------------- CSD ID Compound Reference -------------------------------------------------------------------------- acytid alpha-cytidine Post, M.L., et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1977, 479, 133 bivvil 2',3'-O-(tetraisopropyl-1,3-disiloxanediyl)-cytidine Hoogendorp J.D and Romers, C Acta Cryst., 1982, B38, 2738 bofwoi 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorocytidine dihydrate Marck, C., et al. J. Mol. Struct., 1982, 82, 77

456

Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Chemistry Data This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Analytical Data for Deleted Contaminants of Concern ............................................................. C1.O Mol~tezuma Creek Hardness Dat Surface Water Copper Data Summa ................ CI-9 Surface Water Radium-228 Dat Surface Water Radon-222 Data Summary ....................... ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . C l - I 2 Alluvial Ground Water Aln~noniuu~ as Nitrogen Data Summary ....................... . . . ................................ Cl-15 Alluvial Ground Water Cobalt Data Summary ........... Alluvial Ground Water Copper Data Sumrl Alluvial Ground Water Lead Data Su~nmary ................................. C1-19 Alluvial Ground Water Lead-210 Data Sutl~rnary

457

Enhanced Polymer Hydrogen Getters for Use in the TRUPACTT-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Addressing the needs to safely and more efficiently ship Transuranic (TRU) wastes that may generate flammable levels of hydrogen, polymer getters were previously evaluated for deployment in the TRUPACT-II. Subsequently, enhanced polymer getters, collectively known as ''TRUGETTER,'' were formulated and pelletized, then tested against the challenging conditions defined for transport of TRU wastes. Reaction rate, reversibility, compatibility, structure/shape, passivity and capacity were evaluated. The effects of temperature extremes, radiation exposure, poisons, pressure, and free liquids were quantified. The manufacturing parameters for production of getter powder and pellets were determined. The TRUGETTER hazards have been characterized and flammability studies completed demonstrating it is not regulated as a hazardous material by DOT. TRUGETTER is commercially available on a multikilogram scale. The precious metal content of the getters is easily recycled. The optimum formulation of TRUGETTER pellets has a hydrogen capacity of 6.3 mol kg{sup -1}. The hydrogenation rate at 5% hydrogen, ambient temperature and 50% getter loading is 1.2 x 10{sup -3} mol s{sup -1} kg{sup -1}, and the rate is proportional to the hydrogen concentration (i.e., partial pressure). Therefore, the amount of getter required to meet the performance specification of 1.2 x 10{sup -5} mol s{sup -1} for 60 days at ambient temperature is determined by the getter capacity rather than rate. About 20 kg of getter will provide 2X the required hydrogen capacity. Reducing the temperature to -20 F reduces the hydrogenation rate at 5% hydrogen and 50% getter loading to 1.4 x 10{sup -5} mol s{sup -1} kg{sup -1}. The rate of hydrogen removal from air at -20 F is about 10 times faster. Therefore, based on initial results 20 kg of getter should be sufficient to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the ICV below 0.4% by volume even at the low temperature extreme. Codeployment of the getter with zeolite and Hopcalite' catalyst mitigates the effects of all getter poisons evaluated. The gettering reaction is not reversible under transport conditions, and increasing the total pressure from 0 psig to 50 psig has minimal impact on absorption rate. Exposure to 2.5 x 10{sup 4} rad gamma radiation has minimal impact on hydrogen absorption rate and capacity. Based on the tests conducted during Phase 2 TRUGETTER will be able to maintain a safe environment within the TRUPACT-II under the defined conditions of transport. The TRUGETTER is now ready for Phase 3 of this project, which will involve evaluation of the engineered getter assembly in its deployed form.

Tim Shepodd

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Phase transformation of Mg-Fe alloys  

SciTech Connect

An Mg-Fe alloy system prepared through mechanical alloying (MA) was structurally analyzed. MA can produce single-phase bcc alloys using Mg concentrations up to about 15 mol %. Use of conventional average structure analysis and x-ray pair-distribution function method enabled the long-range and short-range order structures of the Mg-Fe alloys to be bridged. The substituted Mg atoms were randomly arranged in the low-Mg composition but started to have an order structure. The partially ordered Mg-Fe alloy undergoes an austenitic (cubic) to martensitic (orthorhombic) phase change, as increasing Mg composition.

Yoneda, Yasuhiro [Synchrotron Radiation Research Unit, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Abe, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Department of Material development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Uchida, Hirohisa [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate and Undergraduate Schools of Engineering, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on canopy transpiration in senescent spring wheat  

SciTech Connect

The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s}, the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to twenty percent and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by ten percent. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about five percent.

Grossman, S.; Kimball, B.A.; Hunsaker, D.J.; Long, S.P. et al

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reduction potential of the sulfhydryl radical: Pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis studies of the formation and reactions of {sm_bullet}SH and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

H{sub 2}S, which is a very toxic gas, has a large number of natural and anthropogenic sources, and the safe removal of this substance has been a matter of ongoing industrial concern. Formation and reactions of the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} radicals in aqueous solutions have been studied by excimer laser flash photolysis and by pulse radiolysis. Acidic H{sub 2}S solutions can be photolyzed with 193 nm laser pulses and produce a transient species with {lambda}{sub max} at 240 nm, ascribed to the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} radical. Solutions of SH{sup {minus}} can be photolyzed also with 248 nm laser pulses to produce the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} reacts with SH{sup {minus}} ({kappa}{sub f} = 4 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s, {kappa}{sub r} = 5 {times} 10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}) to form HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}, with {lambda}{sub max} at 380 nm. Both {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} react rapidly with O{sub 2}; the former produces SO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} ({kappa} = 5 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s), and the latter produces O{sub 2}{sm_bullet} ({kappa} = 4 {times} 10{sup 8} L/mol s). Both radicals react with olefinic compounds. The monomeric radical oxidizes Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and chlorpromazine. The dimeric radical is a weaker oxidant toward ferrocyanide but reduces N-methylpyridinium compounds. The reduction potential for the dimeric radical at pH 7 was determined from one-electron transfer equilibria with Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 3{minus}} and with the 4-methoxyaniline radical cation and found to be 0.69 V vs NHE. From the equilibrium constant K = [HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}]/[SH{sup {minus}}][{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}}] = 8 {times} 10{sup 3} L/mol, the reduction potential for ({sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}},H{sup +}/SH{sup {minus}}) is calculated to be 0.92 V.

Das, T.N.; Huie, R.E.; Neta, P.; Padmaja, S. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite I. Effects of Al content and precipitation rate on the structure of 2-line ferrihydrite  

SciTech Connect

The association of Al with ferrihydrite (Fh) may have a considerable effect on the composition, structure, and surface properties of Fh nanoparticles, and thus impact its reactivity and interaction with pollutant species. Aluminous Fh is abundant in natural environments, but the mode of association of Al with this nanomineral is not yet fully understood. Al{sup 3+} speciation may vary from true chemical substitution for Fe{sup 3+}, to adsorption or surface precipitation, and/or to formation of a mixture of two (or more) individual nanoscale phases. The conditions of formation (i.e. slow vs. rapid precipitation) may also affect the nature of Fh nanoparticles in terms of their crystallinity, phase purity, and Al speciation. In this study we used a variety of laboratory (TEM, NMR, ICP-AES) and synchrotron-based techniques (X-ray total scattering and PDF analysis, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, Al K-edge XANES spectroscopy) to characterize two synthetic Al-bearing Fh series formed at different precipitation rates in the presence of 5-40 mol% Al. We find that Al is dominantly octahedrally coordinated in the synthetic Fh samples and that up to 20-30 mol% Al substitutes for Fe in the Fh structure, regardless of the synthesis method we used. Formation of separate aluminous phases (e.g., gibbsite) was most significant at Al concentrations above 30 mol% Al in slowly precipitated samples. However, small amounts (<6% of total Al) of Al-hydroxide phases were also detected by NMR spectroscopy in samples with lower Al content (as low as 15 mol% Al), particularly in the Fh series that was precipitated slowly. Furthermore, it appears that the amount of Al incorporated in Fh is not affected by the synthesis methods we used and is more likely controlled by the accumulated strain caused by Al substitution in the Fh lattice. Given the prevalence of naturally occurring aluminous ferrihydrite, assumptions about ferrihydrite reactivity in natural environments should consider the impact of Al substitution on reduction potential, Fe bioavailability, as well as sorption reactions.

Cismasu, A. Cristina; Michel, F. Marc; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Levard, Clment; Brown, Jr., Gordon E. (Stanford)

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Whittaker J, Meeks J, Powell RJ, Isenberg DA, Walport MJ, Vyse TJ: Polymorphism at the C-reactive protein locus influences gene expression and predisposes to systemic lupus ery- thematosus. Hum Mol Genet 2004, 13:137-147. 15. Szalai AJ, McCrory MA, Cooper... , Chow C, Cohen A, Lan- gelier D, Lapointe G, Gaudet D, Faith J, Branco N, Bull SB, McLeod RS, Griffiths AM, Bitton A, Greenberg GR, Lander ES, Siminovitch KA, Hudson TJ: Genetic variation in the 5q31 cytokine gene clus- ter confers susceptibility...

Smyth, Deborah J; Howson, Joanna M M; Payne, Felicity; Maier, Lisa M; Bailey, Rebecca; Holland, Kieran; Lowe, Christopher E; Cooper, Jason D; Hulme, John S; Vella, Adrian; Dalhman, Ingrid; Lam, Alex C; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Twells, Rebecca C J; Todd, John A

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

SEARCHING FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULE BUTATRIENYLIDENE IN REACTION C{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the reaction C{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} {sub g}/a {sup 3}{Pi} {sub u}) + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} at collision energy 5.0 kcal mol{sup -1} in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using selective photoionization. Time-of-flight and photoionization spectra of products C{sub 4}H{sub 3} and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} were measured. From the best simulation of product time-of-flight spectra, a low-energy-biased translational-energy distribution and an isotropic angular distribution are derived for product channels C{sub 4}H{sub 3} + H and C{sub 4}H{sub 2} + H{sub 2} that have average translational-energy releases of 11 and 20 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. Product C{sub 4}H{sub 3} is identified as H{sub 2}CCCCH because its ionization threshold 8.0 {+-} 0.2 eV and maximal translational-energy release 42 kcal mol{sup -1} coincide with that of product channel H{sub 2}CCCCH + H. H{sub 2}CCCC (butatrienylidene) and HCCCCH (diacetylene) might have contributions to product C{sub 4}H{sub 2}; both isomers have ionization energies near the measured ionization threshold 10.0 {+-} 0.2 eV and the maximal translational-energy release 62 kcal mol{sup -1} is within the energetic limits of both isomeric product channels. Nonetheless, channel H{sub 2}CCCC + H{sub 2} is suggested to be more dominant than channel HCCCCH + H{sub 2} because the maximal translational-energy release is in good agreement with the available energy of the former channel and the former channel is 3.8 times the branching ratio of the later channel predicted by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations. C{sub 4}H{sub 2} is identified for the first time in the barrierless reaction C{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} which has never been considered in any astronomical chemical networks. This work sheds new light on the formation of butatrienylidene/diacetylene in cold interstellar media where C{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} are abundant.

Lee, Shih-Huang; Huang, Wen-Jian; Lin, Yi-Cheng; Chin, Chih-Hao, E-mail: shlee@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation potential using 16S rRNA gene-targeted real-time PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Edwards, 2003), and a dry cell weight (dcw) of 1.33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985) [i.e. X = (Y ¥ DS/dcw of benzene consumed and assuming Y = 9.4 g cells mol benzene-1 (Ulrich and Edwards, 2003), dcw = 1. 33 ¥ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985), and a soil bulk density (rb) of 1.6 kg l-1 [i.e. X = (Y ¥ DS/rb ¥ dcw

Alvarez, Pedro J.

466

This document must be cited in the following way: " Alejandro A. Franco,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mol´ecula, la adenina de una cadena s´olo puede unirse, por medio de dos enlaces de hidr´ogeno (las, la guanina s´olo puede unirse a una citosina, pero lo hace por medio de tres enlaces de hidr´ogeno en primer tipo de par es m´as inestable, al tener s´olo dos puen- tes de hidr´ogeno, por lo que es m´as f

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III DE MADRID DEPARTAMENTO DE MATEMATICAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mol´ecula, la adenina de una cadena s´olo puede unirse, por medio de dos enlaces de hidr´ogeno (las, la guanina s´olo puede unirse a una citosina, pero lo hace por medio de tres enlaces de hidr´ogeno en primer tipo de par es m´as inestable, al tener s´olo dos puen- tes de hidr´ogeno, por lo que es m´as f

Ares, Saúl

468

A Calcium Coordination Framework Having Permanent Porosity and High CO2/N2 Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

A thermally stable, microporous calcium coordination network shows a reversible 5.75 wt % CO{sub 2} uptake at 273 K and 1 atm pressure, with an enthalpy of interaction of {approx}31 kJ/mol and a CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity over 45 under ideal flue gas conditions. The absence of open metal sites in the activated material suggests a different mechanism for selectivity and high interaction energy compared to those for frameworks with open metal sites.

Banerjee D.; Parise J.; Zhang, Z.; Plonka, A.M.; Li, J.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Comparison of silver sorbents for application to radioiodine control at the PUREX process facility modification. [Iodine 129  

SciTech Connect

In continued support of the design of the gaseous radioiodine control system for the PUREX Process Facility Modification (PFM), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted laboratory-scale measurements of the performance of four state-of-the-art sorbents for radioiodine in the dissolver offgas (DOG) of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The PFM is a new head-end treatment plant being designed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. The experiments performed measured the iodine effluent concentration from Norton silver mordenite (NAgZ), Linde silver mordenite (LAgZ), Linde silver faujasite (AgX), and silver nitrate-impregnated silicic acid (AgNO/sub 3/Si) during simulated normal operating conditions in the PFM after three shutdown/startup cycles, and during standby. At normal operating conditions the input gas is expected to have a dew point of 35/degree/C to 40/degree/C and contain 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L, 1 vol% NO, and 1 vol% NO /sub 2/. The sorbent bed would be at 150/degree/C. A shutdown/startup cycle consisted of eliminating iodine and NO/sub x/ from the input gas, cooling the bed to room temperature, stopping gas flow, and restarting the system. During standby conditions the input gas contained no iodine or NO/sub x/, the dew point was at 30/degree/C to 35/degree/C, and the bed temperature remained at 150/degree/C. This experimental study showed that 20 cm beds of NAgZ, LAgZ, and 18 wt% silver AgX could load up to 0.25 mmol I/g sorbent and routinely reduce the iodine concentration in a simulated PFM DOG from 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L to less than the target level of 10/sup /minus/5/ ..mu..mol I/L. In contrast, the AgNO/sub 3/Si unexpectedly failed to achieve this required level of performance, reducing the concentration on a routine basis only to 10/sup /minus/4/ to 10/sup /minus/2/ ..mu..mol I/L. 5 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Halko, B.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Mitochondrial genomes reveal an explosive radiation of extinct and extant bears near the Miocene-Pliocene boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:863-874. 20. Shields GF, Adams D, Garner G, Labelle M, Pietsch J, Ramsay M, Schwartz C, Titus K, Williamson S: Phylogeography of mitochon- drial DNA variation in brown bears and polar bears. Mol Phy- Additional File 1 Supplementary materials. Click here... , Lalueza-Fox C, Anderson S, Rambaut A, Austin J, Ward R: Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of two extinct moas clarify ratite evolution. Nature 2001, 409:704-707. 24. Stiller M, Green RE, Ronan M, Simons JF, Du L, He W, Egholm M, Rothberg JM, Keates...

Krause, Johannes; Unger, Tina; Nocon, Aline; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Stiller, Mathias; Soibelzon, Leopoldo; Spriggs, Helen; Dear, Paul H; Briggs, Adrian W; Bray, Sarah C E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Rabeder, Gernot; Matheus, Paul; Cooper, Alan; Slatkin, Montgomery; Paabo, Svante; Hofreiter, Michael

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

The mechanical control of nervous system development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Sweedler, J. V. and Saif, T. A. (2012) 'Mechanical tension modulates local and global vesicle dynamics in neurons', Cell Mol Bioeng 5(2): 155-164. Amin, L., Ercolini, E., Shahapure, R., Migliorini, E. and Torre, V. (2012) 'The role of membrane stiffness... and actin turnover on the force exerted by DRG lamellipodia', Biophys J 102(11): 2451-60. Anava, S., Greenbaum, A., Ben Jacob, E., Hanein, Y. and Ayali, A. (2009) 'The regulative role of neurite mechanical tension in network development', Biophys J 96...

Franze, Kristian

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

A QM/MM Study on the Aqueous Solvation of the Tetrahydroxouranylate [UO?(OH)?]? Complex Ion  

SciTech Connect

We report a QM augmented QM/MM study on the coordination of the tetrahydroxouranylate ion in aqueous solution. QM/MM geometry optimizations followed by full QM single-point calculations on the optimized structures show that a hexa-coordinated structure is more stable than the hepta-coordinated structure by 43 kJ/mol. Charge transfer of the tetrahydroxouranylate to the solvating water molecules is relatively modest, and can be modeled by including a solvation layer consisting of 12 explicit water molecules.

Infante, Ivan A.; van Stralen, Bas; Visscher, Lucas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fluorescence spectrum analysis using Fourier series modeling for Fluorescein solution in Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the fluorescence spectrum for fluorescein solution in ethanol with concentration 1 {\\times} 10-3 mol/liter at different temperatures from room temperature to freezing point of solvent, (T = 153, 183, 223, 253, and 303 K) using liquid nitrogen. Table curve 2D version 5.01 program has been used to determine the fitting curve and fitting equation for each fluorescence spectrum. Fourier series (3 {\\times} 2) was the most suitable fitting equation for all spectra. Theoretical fluorescence spectrum of fluorescein in ethanol at T = 183K was calculated and compared with experimental fluorescence spectrum at the same temperature. There is a good similarity between them.

Hadi, Mahasin F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Phase control in the synthesis of yttrium oxide nano and micro-particles by flame spray pyrolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project synthesizes phase pure Yttria particles using flame spray pyrolysis, and to experimentally determines the effect of various process parameters like residence time, adiabatic flame temperature and precursor droplet size on the phase of Yttria particles generated. Further, through experimentation and based on the understanding of the process, conditions that produce pure monoclinic Y2O3 particles were found. An ultrasonic atomization set-up was used to introduce precursor droplets (aqueous solution of yttrium nitrate hex hydrate) into the flame. A hydrogen-oxygen diffusion flame was used to realize the high temperature aerosol synthesis. The particles were collected on filters and analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Individual process parameters (flame temperature, residence time, precursor concentration, precursor droplet size) were varied in continuous trials, keeping the rest of the parameters constant. The effect of the varied parameter on the phase of the product Yttria particles was then analyzed. Pre-flame heating was undertaken using a nozzle heater at variable power. Precursor solution concentrations of 0.026 mol/L, 0.26 mol/L, and 0.65 mol/L were used. Residence time was varied by means of burner diameter (9.5 mm and 1.6 mm ID). Large precursor droplets were removed by means of an inertial impactor. The higher flame temperatures and precursor heating favor the formation of monoclinic yttrium oxide. The fraction of the cubic phase is closely related to the particle diameter. All particles larger than a critical size were of the cubic phase. Phase pure monoclinic yttrium oxide particles were successfully synthesized. The end conditions included a precursor concentration of 0.65 mol/L, a pure hydrogen-oxygen flame and a 1.6 mm burner. The precursor droplets entrained fuel gas was passed through a round jet impactor and preheated at full power (130 VA). The particles synthesized were in the size range of 0.350 to 1.7 m.

Mukundan, Mallika

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

iCycle: Integrated, multicriterial beam angle, and profile optimization for generation of coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT plans  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To introduce iCycle, a novel algorithm for integrated, multicriterial optimization of beam angles, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) profiles. Methods: A multicriterial plan optimization with iCycle is based on a prescription called wish-list, containing hard constraints and objectives with ascribed priorities. Priorities are ordinal parameters used for relative importance ranking of the objectives. The higher an objective priority is, the higher the probability that the corresponding objective will be met. Beam directions are selected from an input set of candidate directions. Input sets can be restricted, e.g., to allow only generation of coplanar plans, or to avoid collisions between patient/couch and the gantry in a noncoplanar setup. Obtaining clinically feasible calculation times was an important design criterium for development of iCycle. This could be realized by sequentially adding beams to the treatment plan in an iterative procedure. Each iteration loop starts with selection of the optimal direction to be added. Then, a Pareto-optimal IMRT plan is generated for the (fixed) beam setup that includes all so far selected directions, using a previously published algorithm for multicriterial optimization of fluence profiles for a fixed beam arrangement Breedveld et al.[Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 7199-7209 (2009)]. To select the next direction, each not yet selected candidate direction is temporarily added to the plan and an optimization problem, derived from the Lagrangian obtained from the just performed optimization for establishing the Pareto-optimal plan, is solved. For each patient, a single one-beam, two-beam, three-beam, etc. Pareto-optimal plan is generated until addition of beams does no longer result in significant plan quality improvement. Plan generation with iCycle is fully automated. Results: Performance and characteristics of iCycle are demonstrated by generating plans for a maxillary sinus case, a cervical cancer patient, and a liver patient treated with SBRT. Plans generated with beam angle optimization did better meet the clinical goals than equiangular or manually selected configurations. For the maxillary sinus and liver cases, significant improvements for noncoplanar setups were seen. The cervix case showed that also in IMRT with coplanar setups, beam angle optimization with iCycle may improve plan quality. Computation times for coplanar plans were around 1-2 h and for noncoplanar plans 4-7 h, depending on the number of beams and the complexity of the site. Conclusions: Integrated beam angle and profile optimization with iCycle may result in significant improvements in treatment plan quality. Due to automation, the plan generation workload is minimal. Clinical application has started.

Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Storchi, Pascal R. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

A dynamic soil chamber system coupled with a tunable diode laser for online measurements of delta-13C, delta-18O, and efflux rate of soil respired CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High frequency observations of the stable isotopic composition of CO(2) effluxes from soil have been sparse due in part to measurement challenges. We have developed an open-system method that utilizes a flow-through chamber coupled to a tunable diode laser (TDL) to quantify the rate of soil CO(2) efflux and its delta(13)C and delta(18)O values (delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively). We tested the method first in the laboratory using an artificial soil test column and then in a semi-arid woodland. We found that the CO(2) efflux rates of 1.2 to 7.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) measured by the chamber-TDL system were similar to measurements made using the chamber and an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) (R(2) = 0.99) and compared well with efflux rates generated from the soil test column (R(2) = 0.94). Measured delta(13)C and delta(18)O values of CO(2) efflux using the chamber-TDL system at 2 min intervals were not significantly different from source air values across all efflux rates after accounting for diffusive enrichment. Field measurements during drought demonstrated a strong dependency of CO(2) efflux and isotopic composition on soil water content. Addition of water to the soil beneath the chamber resulted in average changes of +6.9 micromol m(-2) s(-1), -5.0 per thousand, and -55.0 per thousand for soil CO(2) efflux, delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively. All three variables initiated responses within 2 min of water addition, with peak responses observed within 10 min for isotopes and 20 min for efflux. The observed delta(18)O(R) was more enriched than predicted from temperature-dependent H(2)O-CO(2) equilibration theory, similar to other recent observations of delta(18)O(R) from dry soils (Wingate L, Seibt U, Maseyk K, Ogee J, Almeida P, Yakir D, Pereira JS, Mencuccini M. Global Change Biol. 2008; 14: 2178). The soil chamber coupled with the TDL was found to be an effective method for capturing soil CO(2) efflux and its stable isotope composition at high temporal frequency.

Powers, Heath H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdowell, Nate [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hanson, David [UNM; Hunt, John [LANDCARE RESEARCH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)  

SciTech Connect

We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl{sup 2} electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO{sub 2} or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, {beta}-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the {beta}- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl{sup +} ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Assessment of reduction behavior of hematite iron ore pellets in coal fines for application in sponge ironmaking  

SciTech Connect

Studies on isothermal reduction kinetics (with F grade coal) in fired pellets of hematite iron ores, procured from four different mines of Orissa, were carried out in the temperature range of 850-1000C to provide information for the Indian sponge iron plants. The rate of reduction in all the fired iron ore pellets increased markedly with a rise of temperature up to 950C, and thereafter it decreased at 1000C. The rate was more intense in the first 30 minutes. All iron ores exhibited almost complete reduction in their pellets at temperatures of 900 and 950C in 2 hours' heating time duration, and the final product morphologies consisted of prominent cracks. The kinetic model equation 1-(1-a){sup 1/3}=kt was found to fit best to the experimental data, and the values of apparent activation energy were evaluated. Reductions of D. R. Pattnaik and M. G. Mohanty iron ore pellets were characterized by higher activation energies (183 and 150 kJ mol{sup -1}), indicating carbon gasification reaction to be the rate-controlling step. The results established lower values of activation energy (83 and 84 kJ mol{sup -1}) for the reduction of G. M. OMC Ltd. and Sakaruddin iron ore pellets, proposing their overall rates to be controlled by indirect reduction reactions.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Application of a nonisothermal thermogravimetric method to the kinetic study of the reduction of metallic oxides: Part 2. A theoretical treatment of powder bed reduction and its application to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical treatment of nonisothermal kinetic studies has been extended in the present work to gas-solid reactions in powder beds. An expression for the activation energies for the reaction has been derived on the basis that the reaction proceeds by the movement of the reaction front, the velocity of the movement being kept constant. The reliability of the method has been tested by applying the same to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen. The experiments were carried out using thermogravimetric technique under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The reaction front is considered to consist of a thin layer of small particles. The rate of the reduction seems to be controlled by the chemical reaction between the product and the unreacted core existing in each of the small particles. Using the expression derived in the present work, the activation energy of the reaction was calculated from the results of the nonisothermal experiments to be 83.62 kJ/mol. This value is in good agreement with the value of 83.17 kJ/mol evaluated from isothermal experiments.

Bustnes, J.A.; Sichen, D.; Seetharaman, S. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Theoretical Metallurgy)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Electrochemical Investigation of LiAl Anodes in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 500 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of 0.48 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 30.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 100 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 280 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Zhou, Y.N.; Yang, X.; Wang, X.J.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Haas, O.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

Angell, C. Austen (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tempe, AZ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved biogenic gases (DMS, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}) in the equatorial Pacific during the SAGA 3 experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial Pacific Ocean is a source of both sulfur and carbon to the atmosphere. In February and March 1990, as part of the Soviet-American Gases and Aerosols (SAGA 3) expedition, dimethylsulfide (DMS), methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) partial pressures were determined in both surface seawater and the overlying atmosphere of the central equatorial Pacific Ocean (15{degrees}N to 10{degrees}S, 145{degrees}W to 165{degrees}W). The partial pressures were used to calculate the net flux of these gases from the ocean to the atmosphere. The average regional DMS and CO fluxes were similar, 7.1 and 4.2 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/d, respectively. The mixing ratio of CH{sub 4} in surface seawater was close to equilibrium with the overlying atmosphere and hence the average flux was only 0.39 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/d. The flux of CO{sub 2} clearly dominated the air-sea carbon exchange with an average regional flux of 5.4 mmol/m{sup 2}/d. 64 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Bates, T.S.; Johnson, J.E. [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kelly, K.C. [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

484

Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that, because of their unique properties, halogen bonds have tremendous potential in the development of new pharmaceutical compounds and materials. In this study we investigate the phenomenon of halogen bonding by carrying out ab initio calculations on the halomethane-formaldehyde complexes as well as the fluorine substituted FnH?-nCX---OCH? dimers, where the halogen bonding halogens (X) are chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Coupled cluster (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ) calculations indicate that the binding energies for these type of interactions lie in the range between -1.05 kcal/mol (H?CCl---OCH?) and -3.72 kcal/mol (F?CI---OCH?). One of the most important findings in this study is that, according to symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) analyses, halogen bonds are largely dependent on both electrostatic and dispersion type interactions. As the halogen atom involved in halogen bonding becomes larger the interaction strength for this type of interaction also gets larger and, interestingly, more electrostatic (and less dispersive) in character. Halogen bonding interactions also become stronger and more electrostatic upon substitution of (the very electronegative) fluorines onto the halomethane molecule.

Riley, Kevin E.; Hobza, Pavel

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

485

Preparation, characterization of the Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activity under visible-light illumination  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a novel catalyst of the Ta-doped ZnO nanocrystals prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method using the water-soluble tantalum precursor as the sources of Ta. The catalysts were characterized by means of various analytical techniques as a function of Ta content (x=0-4 mol%) systematically. A remarkable advantage of the results was confirmed that dopant Ta enhanced the visible-light absorption of ZnO and the low-solubility tantalum doping could restrain the growth of crystal and minish the particle size. The relationship between the physicochemical property and the photocatalytic performance was discussed, and it was found that the photocatalytic activity in the photochemical degradation of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation (lambda>=420 nm) was dependent on the contents of the dopant, which could affect the particle size, concentration of surface hydroxyl groups and active hydrogen-related defect sites, and the visible-light absorption. The highest photocatalytic activity was obtained for the 1.0 mol% Ta-doped ZnO sample. - Graphical abstract: The addition of the tantalum into ZnO prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method not only restrains the growth of crystal, minish the particle size, but also changes the nanocrystal morphology.

Kong Jizhou [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li Aidong, E-mail: adli@nju.edu.c [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhai Haifa; Gong Youpin; Li Hui; Wu Di [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Electrochemical Investigation of Li-Al Anodes in Oligo (ethylene glycol) Dimethyl ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 5 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of .48 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 3.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 1 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 28 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Y Zhou; X Wang; H Lee; K Nam; X Yang; O Haas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Spontaneous combustion prediction of coal by C80 and ARC techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many coal fires were caused by spontaneous combustion in coal mines or coal storehouses, which resulted in a great loss and energy wastage. To identify and evaluate the hazardous degree of coal stockpile, a C80 microcalorimeter and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were employed in this work. The coal samples undergo an exothermal process start at 80 {sup o}C with heat generation of -75.1 J g{sup -1} (mean value) detected by C80 experiment. The activation energies of the first exothermal process were calculated for the three experiments, and the mean value is 80.76 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is lower than that of obtained from the ARC result, 127.0 kJ mol{sup -1}. For a 300 tons coal stockpile, the self-heating oxidation temperatures (SHOT) were calculated as 164, 60, 90, and 68{sup o}C based on the ARC experiment and three C80 experiments, respectively. Further research on the mass effect on SHOT shows that if the coal mass is less than 12 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is less. However, if the mass amount is more than 12000 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is difficult to avoid even at ambient temperature if no special measures are taken. 38 refs., 9 figs.

Qingsong Wang; Song Guo; Jinhua Sun [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). State Key Laboratory of Fire Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Effect of Yttria Content on the Zirconia Unit Cell Parameters  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between yttria concentration and the unit cell parameters in partially and fully stabilized zirconia has been reassessed, motivated by the need to improve the accuracy of phase analysis upon decomposition of t{prime}-based thermal barrier coatings. Compositions ranging from 6 to 18 mol% YO{sub 1.5} were synthesized and examined by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Lattice parameters were determined using the Rietveld refinement method, a whole-pattern fitting procedure. The revised empirical relationships fall within the range of those published previously. However, efforts to achieve superior homogeneity of the materials, as well as accuracy of the composition and lattice parameters, provide increased confidence in the reliability of these correlations for use in future studies. Additional insight into the potential sources for scatter previously reported for the transition region ({approx}12-14 mol% YO{sub 1.5}), where tetragonal and cubic phases have been observed to coexist, is also provided. Implications on the current understanding of stabilization mechanisms in zirconia are discussed.

Krogstad, Jessica A.; Lepple, Maren; Gao, Yan; Lipkin, Don M.; Levi, Carlos G. (UCSB); (GE Global)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

489

PROTON-CONDUCTING DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dense perovskite-type structured ceramic membranes, SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm), of different thickness, were prepared by the dry-press method. Membrane thickness was varied from 3 mm to 150 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation flux was found to be inversely proportional to the thickness of the dense films, indicating that the bulk diffusion rather than the surface reaction played a dominant role in the H{sub 2} transport through these dense membranes within the studied thickness range. Hydrogen permeation flux increases with increasing upstream hydrogen partial pressure and decreasing downstream hydrogen partial pressure. The activation energy for hydrogen permeation through the SCTm membrane is about 116 kJ/mol in 600-700 C and 16 kJ/mol in 750-950 C. This indicates a change in the electrical and protonic conduction mechanism at around 700 C. Pd-Cu thin films were synthesized with elemental palladium and copper targets by the sequential R.F. sputter deposition on porous substrates. Pd-Cu alloy films could be formed after proper annealing. The deposited Pd-Cu films were gas-tight. This result demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining an ultrathin SCTm film by the sequential sputter deposition of Sr, Ce and Tm metals followed by proper annealing and oxidation. Such ultrathin SCTm membranes will offer sufficiently high hydrogen permeance for practical applications.

Jerry Y. S. Lin; Scott Cheng; Vineet Gupta

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride was studied by solvent extraction at 25, 40 and 55 C in 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4}. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases decreased as the concentration of fluoride was increased due to the formation of Pu(IV)-F complexes in the aqueous phase. Two complexes, PuF{sup 3+} and PuF{sub 2}{sup 2+}, were identified under the conditions in this work and their stability constants at 25, 40 and 55 C and I = 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4} were determined from the distribution data. The Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to extrapolate the constants to the state of infinite dilution. Data from this work indicate that the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride is endothermic and entropy-driven. The complexation becomes stronger at higher temperatures.

Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, P. P.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

491

Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO{sub 3} and WO{sub x} phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO{sub 2} and NiWO{sub 4} were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO{sub x} was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO{sub 3} oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E{sub a} = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E{sub a} {approx} 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO{sub 2}, and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO{sub 4} for W-N-Ni coatings.

Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-Polo II, Coimbra (Portugal)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Release from Ethane 1,2-di-amineborane  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (H2) release from ethane 1,2-di-amineborane (EDAB, BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) were measured using Calvet and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure-composition isotherms, and volumetric gas-burette experiments. The results presented here indicate that EDAB releases ~ 9 wt.% H2 at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 200 C in two moderately exothermic steps, approximately -101 kJ/mol H2 and -3.81 kJ/mol H2. Isothermal kinetic analysis shows that EDAB is more stable than ammonia borane (AB) at temperatures lower than 100C; however, the rates of hydrogen release are faster for EDAB than for AB at temperatures higher than 120C. In addition, no volatile impurities in the H2 released by EDAB were detected by mass spectrometry upon heating with 1C/min to 200C in a calorimeter.

Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark; Choi, Young Joon; Luedtke, Avery T.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Fisher, Allison M.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Autrey, Thomas

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Distillation of hydrogen isotopes for polarized HD target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a cryogenic distillation system to purify Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for a polarized HD target in LEPS experiments at SPring-8. A small amount of ortho-H$_2$ ($\\sim$0.01%) in the HD gas plays an important role in efficiently polarizing the HD target. Since there are 1$\\sim$5% impurities of H$_2$ and D$_2$ in commercially available HD gases, it is inevitable that the HD gas is purified up to $\\sim$99.99%. The distillation system has a cryogenic pot (17$\\sim$21 K) containing many small stainless steel cells called Heli-pack. Commercial HD gas with an amount of 5.2 mol is fed into the pot. We carried out three distillation runs by changing temperatures (17.5 K and 20.5 K) and gas extraction speeds (1.3 ml/min and 5.2 ml/min). The extracted gas was analyzed by using a gas analyzer system combining a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a gas chromatograph. The HD gas of 1 mol with a purity better than 99.99% has been successfully obtained. The effective NTS (Number of Theoretical Stages), which is...

Ohta, T; Didelez, J -P; Fujiwara, M; Fukuda, K; Kohri, H; Kunimatsu, T; Morisaki, C; Ono, S; Rouill', G; Tanaka, M; Ueda, K; Uraki, M; Utsuro, M; Wang, S Y; Yosoi, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Testing the comet nature of main belt comets. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the visible spectrum of MBCs 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR, as well as three Themis family asteroids: (62) Erato, (379), Huenna and (383) Janina, obtained in 2007 using three telescopes at "El Roque de los Muchachos"' Observatory, in La Palma, Spain, and the 8m Kueyen (UT2) VLT telescope at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The spectra of 133P and 176P resemble best those of B-type asteroid and are very similar to those of Themis family members and are significantly different from the spectrum of comet 162P/Siding-Spring and most of the observed cometary nuclei. CN gas emission is not detected in the spectrum of 133P. We determine an upper limit for the CN production rate Q(CN) = $= 2.8 \\times 10^{21}$ mol/s, three orders of magnitude lower than the Q(CN) of Jupiter family comets observed at similar heliocentric distances. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR confirm that they are likely members of the Themis family of asteroids, fragments that probably retained volatiles, and unlikely have a c...

Licandro, J; Tozzi, G P; de Len, J; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Boehnhardt, H; Hainaut, O R; .,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advance coal gasification technologies using low-rank coal is a promising alternative for meeting future demand for hydrogen. Steam gasification tests conducted at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 800/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure resulted in product gas compositions matching those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, 63-65 mol% hydrogen and less then 1 mol% methane. Steam gasification tests with four low-rank coals and a single bituminous coal were performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C to evaluate process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. Catalysts screened included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and recycled lignite ash. North Dakota and Texas lignite chars were slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal char and eight to ten times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal char. Pure and mineral (trona nd nahcolite) alkali carbonates and recycled ash from K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed steam gasification tests substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates. The reactivities obtained using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification were the highest, at nearly 3.5 times those without catalysts.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Galegher, S.J.; Willson, W.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Changes in cadmium mobility during composting and after soil application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of twelve weeks of composting on the mobility and bioavailability of cadmium in six composts containing sewage sludge, wood chips and grass was studied, along with the cadmium immobilization capacity of compost. Two different soils were used and Cd accumulation measured in above-ground oat biomass (Avena sativa L.). Increasing pH appears to be an important cause of the observed decreases in available cadmium through the composting process. A pot experiment was performed with two different amounts of compost (9.6 and 28.8 g per kg of soil) added into Fluvisol with total Cd 0.255 mg kg{sup -1}, and contaminated Cambisol with total Cd 6.16 mg kg{sup -1}. Decrease of extractable Cd (0.01 mol l{sup -1} CaCl{sub 2}) was found in both soils after compost application. The higher amount of compost immobilized an exchangeable portion of Cd (0.11 mol l{sup -1} CH{sub 3}COOH extractable) in contaminated Cambisol unlike in light Fluvisol. The addition of a low amount of compost decreased the content of Cd in associated above-ground oat biomass grown in both soils, while a high amount of compost decreased the Cd content in oats only in the Cambisol.

Hanc, Ales [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: hanc@af.czu.cz; Tlustos, Pavel; Szakova, Jirina; Habart, Jan [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

498

The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium in the temperature range 475 to 825 degrees centigrade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solubility of hydrogen (H) in plutonium metal (Pu) was measured in the temperature range of 475 to 825{degree}C for unalloyed Pu (UA) and in the temperature range of 475 to 625{degree}C for Pu containing two-weight-percent gallium (TWP). For TWP metal, in the temperature range 475 to 600{degree}C, the saturated solution has a maximum hydrogen to plutonium ration (H/Pu) of 0.00998 and the standard enthalpy of formation ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)}) is (-0.128 {plus minus} 0.0123) kcal/mol. The phase boundary of the solid solution in equilibrium with plutonium dihydride (PuH{sub 2}) is temperature independent. In the temperature range 475 to 625{degree}C, UA metal has a maximum solubility at H/Pu = 0.011. The phase boundary between the solid solution region and the metal+PuH{sub 2} two-phase region is temperature dependent. The solubility of hydrogen in UA metal was also measured in the temperature range 650 to 825{degree}C with {Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)} = (-0.104 {plus minus} 0.0143) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{degree}{sub f(s)} = 0. The phase boundary is temperature dependent and the maximum hydrogen solubility has H/Pu = 0.0674 at 825{degree}C. 52 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

Allen, T.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Hydrogen Generation through Indirect Biophotolysis in Batch Cultures of the Non-Heterocystous Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nitrogen-fixing non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO2 to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg?day or 7.3 ?mol/mg?day) ) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 ?mol/m2?sec. The addition of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU did not reduce hydrogen production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 hours, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at photosystem II (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Carter, Blaine M.; Gerschler, Jared J.; Benemann, John R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z