Sample records for michigan basin project

  1. EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric tons of CO2 over a 4-year period. The project and EA are on hold.

  2. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  3. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in year 2 of this project is highlighted by the completing of the writing and testing of the project database, ''Atlas'', and populating it with all the project data gathered to date. This includes digitization of 17,000+ original Scout Tickets for the Michigan Basin. Work continues on the Driller's Reports, where they have scanned about 50,000 pages out of an estimated 300,000 pages. All of the scanned images have been attached to ''Atlas'', the visual database viewer developed for this project. A complete set of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan has been downloaded from the USGS Web sites, decompressed and converted to ArcView Grid files. A large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan. It presents unusual problems due to its size and they are working with vendors on compression and display algorithms (e.g. MrSID{copyright}) in an attempt to make it available over the Internet, both for viewing and download. A set of aeromagnetic data for the Michigan Basin has been acquired and is being incorporated into the study. As reported previously, the general fracture picture in the Michigan Basin is a dominant NW-SE trend with a conjugate NE-SW trend. Subsurface, DEM and gravity data support the interpretation of a graben-type deep basement structural trend coincident with the Michigan Basin Gravity High. They plan to incorporate the aeromagnetic data into this interpretation as well.

  4. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

  5. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  6. Geochemical analysis of crude oil from northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, J.A.; Cole, J.; Innes, C.; Juzwick, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1986, the Ohio Board of Regents awarded a research grant to Ashland College to investigate the basinal origin of crude oil through trace-element analysis. The major thrust of the project was to attempt to finger print crude oils of various ages and depths from the northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins, to learn if the oldest crudes may have migrated among the basins. This in turn might give a more definitive time for the separation of the three basins. Nickel to vanadium ratios, were chosen to be the discriminators. Nickel to vanadium ratios show that the Trenton oil from the fields at Lima, Ohio; Oak Harbor in Ottawa County, Ohio; Urbana, Indiana; Peru, Indiana; and Albion, Michigan, are all different. The Trempealeau oils in Harmony and Lincoln Townships, Morrow County, are similar but they are different from those in Peru and Bennington Townships. The Devonian oils of the Illinois and Appalachian basins are distinctly different. The Berea oil shows little or no variability along strike. The Mississippian oils of the Illinois basin are different from the Berea oils and the Salem oil is different from the Chester. The only thing consistent about the Clinton is its inconsistency.

  7. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration.

  8. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

  9. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the accomplishments of this past reporting period are obtaining a complete landgrid for the State of Michigan and the digital processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We can now extract lineations from the DEMs automatically using machine algorithms. One tentative result that may be very significant is that we may be seeing manifestations of buried structures in the DEM data. We are looking at a set of extracted lineations in the northern lower peninsula that appear to follow the trend of the pinnacle reefs (Silurian) which had relief approaching 300 feet but are now buried to greater than 3000 feet. We have also extracted the dolomite alteration data from all fields and can show that this is mainly confined to the basin center. It may be related to the paleo-rift suggested by the paleomagnetic and gravity data. As reported last time, the acquisition of a 3D seismic dataset over Stoney Point Field from Marathon Oil Company, is complete and attention is being devoted to incorporating the data into the project database and utilizing it. The surface lineation study is focusing on Stoney Point Field using the high-resolution DEM data and plotting of subsurface formation top data for the main reservoir, the Trenton (Ordovician) Formation. The fault pattern at Stoney Point is well documented by Marathon and we are looking for any manifestations on the surface. The main project database is now about as complete as it will be for this project. The main goals have been met, although the scanning of the paper records will have to continue beyond the scheduled end of the project due to the sheer number of records and the increased donations of data from companies as word spread of the project. One of the unanticipated benefits of the project has been the cooperation of gas and oil companies that are or were active in the Michigan Basin in donating material to the project. Both Michigan Tech and Western Michigan continue to receive donations at an accelerating pace. The data management software developed to handle the data, Atlas, is scheduled to undergo a 3rd revision before the project ends. The goals are to streamline access to the data by improving the display and add several new features, including the ability to turn the landgrid on and off. We may also be able to include the capability to calculate or recalculate footage calls as well. We discovered the reason that some of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan contain high levels of noise and are making one last attempt to acquire a set of good files before the project ends. This will greatly improve the large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) that has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan.

  10. Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

  11. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  12. Lithostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental reconstructions for Devonian strata in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, W.B. III (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian strata in the Michigan Basin are represented by variably thick sequences of open shelf, tidal flat and sabhka carbonates, interbedded with basin-centered and sabhka evaporites (anhydrite and halite). Although there are isolated outcrops around the margins of the basin, the lithofacies relationships of these strata can be best studied from subsurface data of cores, wireline logs, and drill cutting samples. This database is compiled from over 25,000 oil and gas wells that enter or entirely penetrate Devonian strata in Michigan. Most of the strata in the Michigan Basin Devonian are part of the Kaskaskia cratonic depositional sequence (Sloss, 1963). The sequence begins with the southeast to northwest transgression of a quartz arenite (Sylvania Ss.) sandstone facies onto a weathered, cherty carbonate (Bois Blanc Fm.) surface developed on Lower Devonian strata exposed during the post-Tippecanoe unconformity. With rising sea level, the basin sediments became dominated by open shelf, biohermal and locally restricted lagoon carbonates (Amherstberg Fm.). Much of the Middle Devonian is represented by thick basin-centered sabhka and salina evaporates and restricted-environment carbonates (Lucas Fm.). These interbedded and laterally gradational evaporite/carbonate facies are cyclic, showing gradual salinity changes during accumulation. Stratigraphically important K-Bentonite marker beds are prevalent in this part of the Michigan section. Overlying this restricted sequence are again open shelf, biohermal, and local restricted sabhka carbonate deposits (Dundee Fm.). Thin, but widespread and eastwardly thickening, terrigenous shales and mudstones are intercalated within another shelf carbonate package (Traverse Group). Devonian deposits in the Michigan Basin are capped by thick black shales and interbedded carbonates (Antrim Fm.).

  13. Sedimentation in Michigan basin during earliest Salina: evidence for an excursion from eustacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercone, K.R.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basal A-1 evaporite member of the Upper Silurian Salina Group, a marine evaporite sequence, appears to record a time of lowered sea level in the Michigan basin. Indicators of shallow sabkha deposition, such as nodular anhydrite and nonplanar stromatolites, occur in parts of the A-1 evaporite. This unit also contains scattered nodules of borate, a nonmarine evaporite, and the bittern salt sylvite. The petrologic evidence for lowered sea level is supported by studies showing that Middle Silurian reefal buildups within the Michigan basin were subaerially exposed during or immediately prior to A-1 evaporite deposition. However, other studies concluded that carbonate platforms in Indiana and Illinois continued to host flourishing Silurian reef communities throughout A-1 evaporite deposition, under conditions of high global sea levels. The conflicting evidence can be resolved only by postulating that the Michigan basin became isolated from surrounding epeiric seas during A-1 evaporite deposition. Tidal and peritidal carbonates - the Greenfield, Limberlost, Sugar Run, and Engadine dolomites - were deposited at the edge of the Michigan basin during this time. These units could have served both as sills and as shorelines that separated open epeiric seas from a partly desiccated basin. Evaporating brines, pooled below sea level in the basin, could have been replenished by seawater and meteoric water flowing through shallow inlets or seeping into the basin through the subsurface. Basin isolation may have been enhanced by minor eustatic fluctuations in sea level and by the constraints on shallow-water circulation in epeiric seas. Therefore, in analogy to the Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean, the large apparent drop in sea level recorded by the A-1 evaporite would have been a local rather than a eustatic change.

  14. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  15. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  16. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  17. Michigan Basin. Secondary recovery in reef trends yields more production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary recovery practices in reef trends in Michigan are described. Waterflooding in the Chester 18 Unit began in 1978; it currently has 6 injection wells and 11 production wells. The production wells use a submersible pumping unit, and current production levels are estimated at 3800 bopd. The present level of injection is ca. 17,000 bpd of water. The company operating the field has concluded that more barrels can be produced from a reef if a waterflood is started early. There are 55 to 60 such reefs with potential for supplemental recovery.

  18. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  19. Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit --A new Michigan State University GREEEN project -Bill Shane and Tom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit -- A new Michigan State University GREEEN project - Bill Shane and Tom Zabadal, Michigan State University Michigan's fresh market peach crop Michigan peaches to make wine and brandy but the high costs of removing pits by hand have hampered this use

  20. Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation (Devonian) of the Michigan Basin using horizontal drains. Final report, April 28, 1994--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, J.R.; Pennington, W.D.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total hydrocarbon production in the Michigan Basin has surpassed 1 billion barrels (Bbbls) and total unrecovered reserves are estimated at 1--2 BBbls. However, hydrocarbon production in Michigan has fallen from 35 MMbbls/yr in 1979 to about 10 MMbbls/yr in 1996. In an effort to slow this decline, a field demonstration project designed around using a horizontal well to recover bypassed oil was designed and carried out at Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI. The project had two goals: to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee Formation, and to characterize additional Dundee reservoirs (29) that are look alikes to the Crystal Field. As much as 85 percent of the oil known to exist in the Dundee Formation in the Michigan Basin remains in the ground as bypassed oil. Early production techniques in the 137 fields were poor, and the Dundee was at risk of being abandoned, leaving millions of barrels of oil behind. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, Michigan is a good example of a worn out field. Crystal Field was once a prolific producer which had been reduced to a handful of wells, the best of which produced only 5 barrels per day. The demonstration well drilled as a result of this project, however, has brought new life to the Crystal Field. Horizontal drilling is one of the most promising technologies available for oil production. The new well was completed successfully in October of 1995 and has been producing 100 barrels of oil per day, 20 times better than the best conventional well in the field.

  1. Michigan Business Development Program (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Business Development Program provides grants, loans, and other economic assistance to businesses for highly competitive projects that create jobs and/or provide investment. A minimum...

  2. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  3. Proceedings IGLC-15, July 2007, Michigan, USA LOGISTICS CENTERS TO SUPPORT PROJECT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Philip M.

    181 Proceedings IGLC-15, July 2007, Michigan, USA LOGISTICS CENTERS TO SUPPORT PROJECT- BASED. Managing logistics is one component at the core of such strategies. An effective logistics system ensures and rewarding all participants based on value added to the supply chain. As a component of a logistics system

  4. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  5. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 2009–2014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a practice called CO{sub 2} sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy?funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional?scale and point?scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo?engineering information was developed through a small?scale test of CO{sub 2} injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial?scale flow rate of CO{sub 2} injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial?scale mass of CO{sub 2} (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO{sub 2} within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS?related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional?scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial?scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional?scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO{sub 2} injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial?scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic?data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near?surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

  6. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  7. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  8. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirksey, Jim; Ansari, Sajjad; Malkewicz, Nick; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Knox Supergroup is a significant part of the Cambrian-Ordovician age sedimentary deposition in the Illinois Basin. While there is a very small amount of oil production associated with the upper Knox, it is more commonly used as a zone for both Class I and Class II disposal wells in certain areas around the state. Based on the three penetrations of the Knox Formation at the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration site in Macon County, Illinois, there is potential for certain zones in the Knox to be used for CO2 sequestration. More specifically, the Potosi member of the Knox Formation at about –3,670 feet (ft) subsea depth would be a candidate as all three penetrations had massive circulation losses while drilling through this interval. Each well required the setting of cement plugs to regain wellbore stability so that the intermediate casing could be set and successfully cemented to surface. Log and core analysis suggests significant karst porosity throughout the Potosi member. The purpose of this study is to develop a well plan for the drilling of a CO2 injection well with the capability to inject 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA] CO2 into the Knox Formation over a period of 30 years.

  9. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  10. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  11. CERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Selected Plan provides approximately 170,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage volume in a twoCERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida 23 August 2007 Abstract: The purpose of the Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir project

  12. Michigan Collateral Support Program (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Collateral Support Program, supported by the Michigan Growth Fund, aims to supply cash collateral accounts to lenders in order to assist borrowers collateral coverage needs. To...

  13. Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    1 Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): An Initial Exploration of Programming "The ASD-Michigan Project" August 3, 2011 Final Report Sara Bolt, Ph.D. and Summer Ferreri, Ph.D. College of Education Michigan State

  14. Michigan State University Northwestern Michigan College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University and Northwestern Michigan College Reverse Transfer Transcript Release Michigan State University 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150 East Lansing, MI 48824-2603 Phone: (517) 355 Northwestern Michigan College _____________________ Please forward a transcript to: Northwestern Michigan

  15. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  16. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  17. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault/fracture trends that are not necessarily related to structural elevation. Further work in Phase II will be focused on delineating the relative contribution to fracture-only dolomitization to that which occurs in conjunction with primary facies and/or sequence stratigraphic framework.

  18. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  19. Comparative analysis of discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase I - Southern Lake Michigan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Elcock, D.; Gasper, J. R.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BP Products North America Inc. (BP) owns and operates a petroleum refinery located on approximately 1,700 acres in Whiting, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan. BP provided funding to Purdue University-Calumet Water Institute (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct studies related to wastewater treatment and discharges. Purdue and Argonne are working jointly to identify and characterize technologies that BP could use to meet the previous discharge permit limits for total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia after refinery modernization. In addition to the technology characterization work, Argonne conducted a separate project task, which is the subject of this report. In Phase I of a two-part study, Argonne estimated the current levels of discharge to southern Lake Michigan from significant point and nonpoint sources in Illinois, Indiana, and portions of Michigan. The study does not consider all of the chemicals that are discharged. Rather, it is narrowly focused on a selected group of pollutants, referred to as the 'target pollutants'. These include: TSS, ammonia, total and hexavalent chromium, mercury, vanadium, and selenium. In Phase II of the study, Argonne will expand the analysis to cover the entire Lake Michigan drainage basin.

  20. Design criteria document, Fire Protection Task, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, Project W-405

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.H.

    1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basin were constructed in the early 1950`s with a 20 year design life. The K Basins are currently in their third design life and are serving as a near term storage facility for irradiated N Reactor fuel until an interim fuel storage solution can be implemented. In April 1994, Project W-405, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, was established to address (among other things) the immediate fire protection needs of the 100K Area. A Fire Barrier Evaluation was performed for the wall between the active and inactive areas of the 105KE and 105KW buildings. This evaluation concludes that the wall is capable of being upgraded to provide an equivalent level of fire resistance as a qualified barrier having a fire resistance rating of 2 hours. The Fire Protection Task is one of four separate Tasks included within the scope of Project W405, K Basin Essential systems Recovery. The other three Tasks are the Water Distribution System Task, the Electrical System Task, and the Maintenance Shop/Support Facility Task. The purpose of Project W-405`s Fire Protection Task is to correct Life Safety Code (NFPA 101) non-compliances and to provide fire protection features in Buildings 105KE, 105KW and 190KE that are essential for assuring the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the 100K Area Facilities` Irradiated Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins).

  1. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

  2. Prepared for: Michigan Department of Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    Prepared for: Michigan Department of Natural Resources Natural Heritage Grants Program and USDA DISTRIBUTIONS IN GOGEBIC COUNTY, MICHIGAN Dr. Karen E. Francl University of Notre Dame Environmental Research October 2005 #12;2 Abstract This project sought to provide valuable data for the Michigan Herp Atlas

  3. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  4. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

  5. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT Prepared for the Northwest Power Planning Council October 1997 97-15 #12;Published October 1997 by the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 503-222-5161 Toll Free

  6. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

  7. Census Snapshot: Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE CENSUS SNAPSHOT | MICHIGAN | SEPTEMBER 2007INSTITUTE CENSUS SNAPSHOT | MICHIGAN | SEPTEMBER 2007 AboutMICHIGAN Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Amanda Baumle,

  8. Request for Proposals Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Request for Proposals Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems Building Shared Measurement Systems for Advancing the Michigan Good Food Charter Project Description The Michigan Good Food Charter (Charter) sets forth

  9. Western Gas Sands Project: production histories of the Piceance and Uinta basins of Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.; Kohout, J. (comp.)

    1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Current United States geological tight sand designations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins' Western Gas Sands Project include the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations. Others, such as the Dakota, Cedar Mountain, Morrison and Mancos may eventually be included. Future production from these formations will probably be closely associated with existing trends. Cumulative gas production through December 1979, of the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins is less than 275 billion cubic feet. This contrasts dramatically with potential gas in place estimates of 360 trillion cubic feet. If the geology can be fully understood and engineering problems surmounted, significant potential reserves can be exploited.

  10. TheThird Century A Roadmap to the University of Michigan's Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    TheThird Century A Roadmap to the University of Michigan's Future James J. Duderstadt The Millennium Project The University of Michigan #12;@ 2011 The Millennium Project, The University of Michigan All rights reserved. The Millennium Project The University of Michigan 2001 Duderstadt Center 2281

  11. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  12. Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM). The NTCRA is an interim action that reduces the risks to human health and the environment by minimizing the potential for release of hazardous substances. The interim action does not prejudice the final end-state alternative. (authors)

  13. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

  14. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  15. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  16. State DOT: Michigan State Report Questions on MEPDG Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State DOT: Michigan State Report Questions on MEPDG Implementation 1. Summarize your state's status as far as MEPDG Implementation. Michigan DOT has purchased a single copy of DARWin-ME for the statewide, a research project will begin with Michigan State University involving local calibration and validation

  17. Michigan State University Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Press FALL/ WINTER 2013 #12;MICHIGANSTATEUNIVERSITYPRESS This symbol:PALEOLITHICANIMALART.CAVELIONSATGROTTECHAUVET.PHOTO:DONHITCHCOCKFROMANIMALSASNEIGHBORS. INSIDECOVERIMAGE:STENAANECHRISTINE.BORNINDENMARKOCTOBER26,1864.SHEWASARESIDENTOFDIXON,AKENTCOUNTY,MICHIGAN,COMMUNITYCLOSETOTHEDANISHSETTLEMENTOF TRUFANTINMONTCALMCOUNTY.COURTESYOFTHEFLATRIVERHISTORICALSOCIETY,GREENVILLE,MICHIGAN,FROMDANESANDICELANDERSINMICHIGAN. NEW

  18. Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coming soon. Native Grassland Restoration in the Middle Trinity River Basin was published early in August #30;#29;#28;#30; for landowners in the Blackland Prairie and Post Oak Savannah ecoregions. Publications currently available in the Texas A...20 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Blake Alldredge and Danielle Kalisek Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin Fall 2012 tx H2O 21 ] The shores of Lake...

  19. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  20. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  1. Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A joint venture between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the Strategic Growth Initiative Grant Program was...

  2. 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities VOL 1 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is currently stored within two water filled pools, 105-KE Basin (KE Basin) and 105-KW Basin (KW Basin), at the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) is responsible to DOE for operation of these fuel storage pools and for the 2100 metric tons of SNF materials that they contain. The SNF Project mission includes safe removal and transportation of all SNF from these storage basins to a new storage facility in the 200 East Area. To accomplish this mission, the SNF Project modifies the existing KE Basin and KW Basin facilities and constructs two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), which drains and dries the SNF; and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building (CSB), which stores the SNF. The purpose of this document is to describe the design basis feed compositions for materials stored or processed by SNF Project facilities and activities. This document is not intended to replace the Hanford Spent Fuel Inventory Baseline (WHC 1994b), but only to supplement it by providing more detail on the chemical and radiological inventories in the fuel (this volume) and sludge. A variety of feed definitions is required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of these new facilities. Six separate feed types have been identified for development of new storage or processing facilities. The approach for using each feed during design evaluations is to calculate the proposed facility flowsheet assuming each feed. The process flowsheet would then provide a basis for material compositions and quantities which are used in follow-on calculations.

  3. Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies A DOE-sponsored project by Michigan Technological University 2002-2004 Michigan, between field and laboratory, and between field demonstrations and the scientific method. Michigan

  4. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  5. Michigan SHOPP

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubicDecadeFeet) YearperMICHIGAN

  6. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  7. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  8. Summary geologic report on the Missoula/Bitterroot Drilling Project, Missoula/Bitterroot Basins, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramiuk, I.N. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the drilling project was to obtain information to assess the favorability of the Tertiary sedimentary units in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys for uranium potential. The group of Montana Tertiary basins, including the Missoula and Bitterroot Basins, has been assigned a speculative uranium potential of 46,557 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at $100/lb by the 1980 National Uranium Resource Evaluation report. The seven drill holes, two in the Missoula Valley and five in the Bitterroot Valley, verified observations made during surface studies and provided additional information about the subsurface that was previously unknown. No uranium was found, although of the two localities the Bitterroot Valley is the more favorable. Three stratigraphic units were tentatively identified on the basis of lithology: pre-Renova clastic units, Renova Formation equivalents, and Sixmile Creek Formation equivalents. Of the three, the Renova Formation equivalents in the Bitterroot Valley appear to be the most favorable for possible uranium occurrences and the pre-Renova clastic units the least favorable.

  9. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  10. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  11. Documentation of key factors for successful reconstruction of high volume roadways: two case study projects in Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Las Casas Moncloa, Rodrigo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identified factors and practices that contributed to the success of highway concrete rehabilitation and reconstruction projects. The research was conducted on four specific topics related to highway projects: constructibility, contracting, scheduling...

  12. Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan Effect of Modulation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan Effect of Modulation on Single Grit Scratch Tests Weimin Qu, Michele H. Miller, Abhijit Chandra Department of ME-EM #12;Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan Introduction Grinding produces cracks that require a secondary process

  13. Michigan State University Alumni Association MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University Alumni Association Bylaws #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI of the organization shall be the Michigan State University Alumni Association (hereinafter, the "Association"). Section 2 Mission Statement The Michigan State University Alumni Association supports and enhances

  14. Coalbed methane production improvement/recompletion project in the Warrior basin. Final report, October 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, S.W.; Reeves, S.R.; Saulsberry, J.L.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production performance of many Black Warrior Basin coalbed methane wells has been economically attractive, but there are also approximately 2,000 poorly producing wells in the Basin. To help operators determine why these wells are producing poorly and what to do about it, the Gas Research Institute formed the Productivity Improvement Project (PIP). Three different study areas were selected to investigate why some wells are producing poorly, to develop effective remediation strategies, and to test various diagnostic tools and methods to identify remediation candidates.

  15. Chemistry of fluid inclusions in halite from the Salina group of the Michigan basin: Implications for Late Silurian seawater and the origin of sedimentary brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, N.; Horita, J.; Holland, H.D. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid was extracted from 18 fluid inclusions in halite of the Late Silurian Salina Group exposed in the Crystal Mine on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Compared with modern seawater evaporated to the same degree, the inclusion fluids are severely depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, somewhat depleted in Na{sup +} and Mg{sup +2}, and greatly enriched in Ca{sup +2}. The composition of the inclusion fluids can be derived from Silurian seawater with a composition close to that of modern seawater, if it is assumed that the composition of the Silurian seawater was modified by dolomitizing CaCO{sub 3}-rich sediments and by albitizing silicate minerals during its evolution into evaporite brines. Since the evolution of the brines involved a number of chemical reactions, it is impossible to recover the initial concentration of all of the major ions in the parent Silurian seawater from the composition of the inclusion fluids alone. It is likely, however, that the m{sub K+}/m{sub Br-} ratio and the functions in Late Silurian seawater had values close to those of modern seawater. Measurements of the isotopic composition of sulfur and of Sr in anhydrite within and associated with the halite host of the fluid inclusions are consistent with previous measurements of {delta}{sup 34}S in Silurian marine anhydrites and with the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of Late Silurian marine carbonates.

  16. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  17. University of Michigan -Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    University of Michigan - Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ Email __________________________________ University of Michigan/Clinic __________________________________ Address __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ University of Michigan

  18. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  19. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

  20. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi. Welcome to the Online Professional Master of Science), and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Michigan State University (MSU). This booklet contains important, Program Director Online Master of Science in Food Safety Michigan State University 1129 Farm Lane, Rm B 51

  1. Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.; Wright, M.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the N. Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. This study presents what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. Project monitoring procedures, established to control and optimize waterflood operations, have made it possible to develop the proper approach to the geochemical disruptions. The more important items in this program are the measurement of produced and injected volumes, transient pressure analyses, injection well profile surveys, chemical analysis of the injection and production fluid samples, radioactive injection tracers, and continuous bottom-hole pressures from submersible pumps. 15 references.

  2. Acceptance for Beneficial Use for the Canister Cleaning System for the K West basin Project A-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FARWICK, C.C.

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the documentation that is required to be turned over to Operations with the Canister Cleaning System (CCS). The Acceptance for Beneficial Use will be updated as required prior to turnover. This document is prepared for the purposes of documenting an agreement among the various disciplines and organizations within the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project as to what is required in terms of installed components of the CCS. This documentation will be used to achieve project closeout and turnover of ownership of the CCS to K Basins Operations.

  3. Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5210 269 387-4251 Fax 269 387-4227 THIRD PARTY BILLING POLICY Western Michigan University (WMU# (269) 387-4227 Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue E-mail: wmu

  4. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University PHILANTHROPIST AWARD. This award is presented-going financial support and leadership to Michigan State University. The candidates will have demonstrated

  5. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  6. Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the Northern Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. The design and operating programs initially planned for the projects have been proven successful. Operating data from some of the more mature projects indicate that the understanding and proper management of the geochemical systems for these projects will be crucial to the success of the project. The intent of this paper is to present what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. The geochemical system is here defined as all the various interconnected fluid environments constituting the project, namely the fresh water source system, the injection well system, the reservoir, the production wells, the production facilities, and the produced water disposal or reinjection facilities. Problem areas have been identified and corrective action has been taken or planned to counteract the detrimental effects of disruptions to the geochemical system. These upsets are brought about by injection of water into the reservoir where an equilibrium condition had existed between the formation fluids and the rock.

  7. Forestry Policies (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's 19 million acres of forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources, Forestry and Water Division. The Department issued its Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy document...

  8. Capital Access Program (CAP) (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Capital Access Program (CAP), utilizes public resources to generate private financing for small business in Michigan seeking access to capital. Funding from the Michigan Strategic Fund is...

  9. About Michigan Tech Michigan Tech is located in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrath, Richard E.

    About Michigan Tech Michigan Tech is located in Houghton, MI on the south shore of Lake Superior and in the community. Michigan Tech is rated as one of the safest college campuses in the United States, and the local and Environmental Engineering The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Michigan Tech includes 26

  10. Statement of work for definitive design of the K basins integrated water treatment system project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Statement of Work (SOW) identifies the scope of work and schedule requirements for completing definitive design of the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS) Subproject. This SOW shall form the contractual basis between WHC and the Design Agent for the Definitive Design.

  11. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  12. Climatology of Large Sediment Resuspension Events in Southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climatology of Large Sediment Resuspension Events in Southern Lake Michigan David J. Schwab1 the southern basin, is subject to recurrent episodes of mas- sive sediment resuspension by storm-induced waves with the largest events are examined. Our analysis indicates that significant resuspension events in southern Lake

  13. Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008 have read the Western Michigan University Third Party Billing Policy and agree to the terms. I am authorizing Western Michigan University to bill for the specified tuition and related fees for the term

  14. WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE Approved by The Western Michigan University Board Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Effective August 2008 #12;A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS... ...a for the Advancement of Teaching; Ernest L. Boyer (frwd.); Princeton, New Jersey; 1990 #12;WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

  15. Farming Captive Cervids in Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farming Captive Cervids in Michigan: A Review of Social, Economic, Ecological and Agricultural Opportunities and Risks Information current as of 2001 s Research Report WO1026 Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Michigan State University R E S E A R C H R E P O R T #12;2 Farming Captive Cervids in Michigan

  16. Inside Michigan Work First Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Inside Michigan Work First Programs April, 2000 Poverty and Social Policy Welfare Michigan Program and Vicki Enright of the Michigan Department of Career Development who provided additional comments. Also Associate Program on Poverty and Social Welfare Policy University of Michigan 540 East Liberty Street, Suite

  17. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  18. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

  20. Michigan Technological University Non-Disclosure Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Technological University Non-Disclosure Agreement PARTIES: Michigan Technological mutually agree as follows: 1. Michigan Technological University shall be: Disclosing Party Receiving Party Both Disclosing Party Receiving Party Both 2. DESIGNATED REPRESENTATIVES: Michigan Technological

  1. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  2. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  3. Climate Action Plan (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 14, 2007, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm issued Executive Order No. 2007-42 establishing the Michigan Climate Action Council (MCAC). The Council is comprised of members representing...

  4. MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy Information Basin Bay of Fundy

  5. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  6. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweetzer, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.

  7. Michigan: Michigan's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Michigan.

  8. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  9. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  10. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  11. Michigan Saves- Business Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan Saves is a non-profit that offers financing options for energy efficiency improvements throughout Michigan. The Business Energy Financing Program was started with seed funding from the...

  12. Advancing Michigan's State of Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jennifer Jing

    Advancing Michigan's State of Knowledge GRADUATE E D U C AT I O N "To attract and grow quality jobs for Michigan's Economic Future: Jobs, Education and Protecting Families State of the State Address - 2009 Michigan Graduate Education Day Thursday, April 23, 2009 , Andrews University Aquinas College Baker College

  13. NEW PINK BEAN for Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW from MSU Rosetta NEW PINK BEAN for Michigan Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-3185 December 2012 ROSETTA is a new erect pink-seeded bean variety from Michigan State University. Rosetta-down as Sedona pink bean, but it does not exhibit the stem breakage problem that exists in Sedona. As plants near

  14. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  15. Climate change projection of snowfall in the Colorado River Basin using dynamical downscaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    . Dominguez, M. Durcik, J. Valdes, H. F. Diaz, and C. L. Castro (2012), Climate change projection of snowfall Sungwook Wi,1 Francina Dominguez,2,3 Matej Durcik,3 Juan Valdes,1,3 Henry F. Diaz,4 and Christopher L approximately 85% of the river's 17.2 Ã? 109 m3 annual flow [Christensen and Lettenmaier, 2007; Serreze et al

  16. Adapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; this is the adaptation component. Communication of climate change information to various publicsAdapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin 52 Great Lakes in response to potential climate change and variability. When we were preparing for this talk on what we have

  17. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  18. Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Office ________________________________________________________ Provost Date #12;Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer 1. Undergraduate and Graduate. **May include graduate and undergraduate assistants, graders, and other support personnel. #12;Michigan

  19. Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form Please complete, sign, and return this release form to: Michigan State University of the Registrar at Michigan State University in writing. SIGNATURE: _______________________________________ DATE

  20. UMAY (University of Michigan Asks You) Survey 2011 "Why I Chose Michigan"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    UMAY (University of Michigan Asks You) Survey 2011 "Why I Chose Michigan" University of Michigan Asks You (UMAY) is a survey that the University administers or influences that prompted you to decide to attend the University of Michigan

  1. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

  2. Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatch, Douglas R.; Anders, Paul J., Evans, Allen F. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are artificially and in some cases severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea-trout (S. trutta). The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To address recovery, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and tested reconditioning and the effects of several diet formulations on its success at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakama Reservation. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from 12 March to 5 July 2001. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus and we tested the use of Ivermectin{trademark}to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups on 15 November 2001 and 18 January 2002. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived in captivity, gained weight, and the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 551 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 18.7% (551 of 2,942) of the entire 2000-2001Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments (208-323 days from capture), 108 fish (19.6%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 100 (94.3%) of 106 sex-identified specimens were female and we estimated that 96% of the reconditioned releases gained weight and developed mature gonads. Nearly one quarter (24.3%) of all reconditioned kelts survived for the duration of the experiment. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding Kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although higher survival rates would have been desirable, the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Nearly 20% of the kelts collected were successfully reconditioned, and radio telemetry allowed us to track some of these fish to the spawning grounds and to obtain documentation of successful redd construction. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

  3. Michigan Institute Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    . Kaita's present research interests focus on plasma-surface interactions and the use of liquid metalsMichigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Up Against the Wall: Liquid Lithium for the Chamber Technology Challenge in Fusion Energy Dr. Robert Kaita Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3:00 pm

  4. CRESCENT RD MICHIGAN AVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R E D C E D A R R I V E R CRESCENT RD MICHIGAN AVE KALAMAZOO ST TROWBRIDGE RD TROWBRIDGE RD GRAND University Village Apts Spartan Village Apts Cherry Lane Apts Owen Akers Hubbard VanHoosen IM Circle Spartan Stadium Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center MSU Union Library Hannah Administration Building Munn Ice

  5. michigan architecture 20082009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    2008­2009 michigan architecture Programs + Courses #12;#12;2008­2009 ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS + COURSE This bulletin provides an overview of policies, procedures, degree options, and courses for the U-M architecture of Architecture + Urban Planning 2150 Art + Architecture Building 2000 Bonisteel Boulevard Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  6. Michigan Bean Salad Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Michigan Bean Salad Ingredients: 1 pound great northern beans 1/2 bunch parsley 4 stalks celery 12 cherry tomatoes 3/4 cup light Italian salad dressing Directions 1. Wash and rinse great northern beans, add to large saucepan, and cover with cold water. Soak overnight. When ready to cook, drain water

  7. futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that Michigan's climate has been following a global trend toward warming. Other MAES scientists are studying how this warming trend will affect agricultural crops, weeds, insects and diseases. One component of global warming Leadership Council to study and identify trends, causes and consequences of urban sprawl, and to provide

  8. MEAD Documentation Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radev, Dragomir R.

    MEAD Documentation v3.09 Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan John Blitzer, University of Pennsylvania Adam Winkel, University of Michigan Tim Allison, University of Michigan Michael Topper, University of Michigan With contributions by: Arda C¸ elebi, USC/ISI Matthew Craig, University of Michigan Stanko

  9. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  10. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.69 19.60 -5.3% 74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New...

  11. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19.73 19.64 -0.4% 81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W 14.02 W 76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W...

  12. Transitioning to Certified Organic in Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.michigan.gov/mda http:// www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125-1567--.00.html - www.michigan organic.msu.edu 5 #12;Raphanus sativus #12;

  13. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN PERSONNEL HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECTION I MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN PERSONNEL HANDBOOK OF POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND PRACTICES _____________________________ SECTION II MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY FACULTY BYLAWS AND APPENDICES SEPTEMBER 2012 Revised January 2013, March 2013, April 2013 #12;Michigan State University

  14. Review: Michigan’s State Forests: A Century of Stewardship by William B. Botti and Michael D. Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Michigan’s State Forests: A Century of StewardshipB. and Moore, Michael D. Michigan’s State Forests: A Centuryof Stewardship. Michigan State University Press, East

  15. BetterBuildings for Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The BetterBuildings for Michigan program offers incentives and loans to residents of certain communities to implement energy efficiency improvements in their homes. Homeowners in the following...

  16. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve and ledges and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice

  17. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, part according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  18. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  19. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

  20. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  1. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  2. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: BUILDING MECHANIC II (Pay, parking lots, elevators, snow conditions, HVAC equipment temperature control systems, pool systems, ice

  3. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris

  4. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

  5. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month, part according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

  6. Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  7. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  8. Hospice of Michigan Grants Intern Job Description Page 1 of 2 HOSPICE OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Hospice of Michigan Grants Intern Job Description Page 1 of 2 HOSPICE OF MICHIGAN GRANTS academic term). Paid Internship: Hospice of Michigan will provide tuition for one course during the internship. Hospice of Michigan: Hospice of Michigan (HOM) is an independent, statewide, nonprofit hospice

  9. Preventing industrial pollution at its source: the final report of the Michigan source reduction initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a collaborative effort between NRDC, Dow Chemical, and Michigan Environmental Groups. The effort resulted in the identification and implementation of 17 pollution prevention projects that reduced substantial quantities of wastes and emissions and saved Dow considerable money.

  10. COUNCIL OF GRADUATE Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COUNCIL OF GRADUATE STUDENTS Michigan State University Student Services Bldg. 556 E. Circle Dr STUDENTS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Michigan State University Student Services Bldg. 556 E. Circle Dr to Michigan State University for the 2014- 2015 school year. We hope you had an enriching and relaxing summer

  11. Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station In Cooperation with the Michigan Potato Industry Commission Michigan Potato Research Report 2005 Volume 37 #12;Funding: Fed. Grant/MPIC 2005 POTATO. Hammerschmidt and W. Kirk Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University

  12. Michigan State University National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    Michigan State University National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory East Lansing, Michigan USA (University of Manchester, UK) Joseph CARLSON (Los Alamos National laboratory, USA) Mark DYKMAN (Michigan Lectureship Endowment at Michigan State University Please register by contacting lesliel@nscl.msu.edu The main

  13. University of Michigan Medical School Overview Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    University of Michigan Medical School Overview Introduction The University of Michigan opened its. The University of Michigan Medical School was among the first to change the role of the student from passive at the University of Michigan Medical School since the first graduating class of six students in 1851. Today, we

  14. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION 2004 Michigan Potato Research Report Volume 36 Left to Right: Ben Kudwa, MPIC; Caryn of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Cooperators: R.W. Chase, Ray

  15. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations of alumni for the Michigan State University DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD. The selection the prestige of Michigan State University. RECIPIENT SELECTION CRITERIA · Must have a degree from Michigan

  16. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION MICHIGAN POTATO RESEARCH REPORT 2003 Volume 35 Click Here to Open the 2003 Potato Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 INTRODUCTION Each year we

  17. Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station In Cooperation with the Michigan Potato Industry Commission Michigan Potato Research Report 2005 Volume 37 #12;2005 POTATO BREEDING AND GENETICS Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Cooperators: R.W. Chase

  18. Western Michigan University Office of Admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 Readmission Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 Returning Students (Good Standing __________________________________________________________________________ Date __________________________________ Please return to: Western Michigan University · Office

  19. Western Michigan University Office of Admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 for future reference) Eligibility REquiREmEnts Western Michigan University considers current high school: Western Michigan University AccountsReceivable 1903WMichiganAve KalamazooMI49008-5210 non-u.s. citiz

  20. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION MICHIGAN POTATO RESEARCH REPORT 2003 Volume 35 Click Here to Open the 2003 Potato, S. Cooper, L. Frank, J. Driscoll, and E. Estelle Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State

  1. Michigan State University 201112 Appropriation Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University 2011­12 Appropriation Request Michigan State University (MSU) ranks, and outreach needed to compete and innovate in the global knowledge-based economy for the benefit of Michigan and even save lives, or simply enhancing contributions to the coffers of the State of Michigan (State

  2. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION 2004 Michigan Potato Research Report Volume 36 Left to Right: Ben Kudwa, MPIC; Caryn and W. Kirk Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University East

  3. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate...

  4. Michigan -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Michigan -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Michigan -- SEP. Michigan -- SEP...

  5. Michigan Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary of Reported Data Michigan Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Michigan. Michigan Summary of Reported Data...

  6. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

  7. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR FORESTRY BIOFUEL STATEWIDE COLLABORATION CENTER (MICHIGAN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCourt, Donna M.; Miller, Raymond O.; Shonnard, David R.

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A team composed of scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) assembled to better understand, document, and improve systems for using forest-based biomass feedstocks in the production of energy products within Michigan. Work was funded by a grant (DE-EE-0000280) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was administered by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). The goal of the project was to improve the forest feedstock supply infrastructure to sustainably provide woody biomass for biofuel production in Michigan over the long-term. Work was divided into four broad areas with associated objectives: • TASK A: Develop a Forest-Based Biomass Assessment for Michigan – Define forest-based feedstock inventory, availability, and the potential of forest-based feedstock to support state and federal renewable energy goals while maintaining current uses. • TASK B: Improve Harvesting, Processing and Transportation Systems – Identify and develop cost, energy, and carbon efficient harvesting, processing and transportation systems. • TASK C: Improve Forest Feedstock Productivity and Sustainability – Identify and develop sustainable feedstock production systems through the establishment and monitoring of a statewide network of field trials in forests and energy plantations. • TASK D: Engage Stakeholders – Increase understanding of forest biomass production systems for biofuels by a broad range of stakeholders. The goal and objectives of this research and development project were fulfilled with key model deliverables including: 1) The Forest Biomass Inventory System (Sub-task A1) of feedstock inventory and availability and, 2) The Supply Chain Model (Sub-task B2). Both models are vital to Michigan’s forest biomass industry and support forecasting delivered cost, as well as carbon and energy balance. All of these elements are important to facilitate investor, operational and policy decisions. All other sub-tasks supported the development of these two tools either directly or by building out supporting information in the forest biomass supply chain. Outreach efforts have, and are continuing to get these user friendly models and information to decision makers to support biomass feedstock supply chain decisions across the areas of biomass inventory and availability, procurement, harvest, forwarding, transportation and processing. Outreach will continue on the project website at http://www.michiganforestbiofuels.org/ and http://www.michiganwoodbiofuels.org/

  8. Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University & Lake Michigan students who have transferred to Michigan State University (MSU) in completing an associate's degree at Lake Michigan College (LMC). This initiative is an extension of the transfer agreements already

  9. Michigan Technological University Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    them as customers." His father started a propane distribution service in Carney, Michigan, in 1945, and he grew the business into home heating and propane transportation. As a lad, Rick worked for his

  10. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current uniform

  11. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month/40 and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

  12. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current department uniform policy supervision may be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants

  13. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 mos and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

  14. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month/20 hours and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

  15. Michigan Questionnaire Documentation System (MQDS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Gina-Qian

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan Questionnaire Documentation System (MQDS) is a powerful tool used to help create questionnaire documentation, with or without summary statistics, and other documentation based on the Blaise data model for a study. MQDS works by: 1...

  16. Regulatory Project Manager for Salina and Permian Basins for the NWTS (National Waste Terminal Storage) Program: Final techical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of candidate sites for nuclear waste repositories involves geological and environmental studies to characterize potential sites. These investigations include the collection and analysis of detailed geological and environmental data and comparison of the data against predetermined site performance criteria, i.e., geologic characteristics, environmental protection, and socioeconomic impacts. The work summarized in this final technical report encompasses mainly ''environmental characterization'' studies in the Permian Basin in the Texas Panhandle during the period of 1977-86; in the earlier phase of the contract, regional environmental work was also done in the Salina Basin (1977-79) and certain licensing support activities and safety analyses were conducted (1977-82). Considerable regulatory support work was also performed during 1986. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Production technology experience in Shell's Michigan waterfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in Northern Michigan in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by the spring of 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by: 1. Very favorable oil production response. 2. Timely and definitive surveillance techniques. 3. Systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior. 4. Innovative application of artificial lift technology. 5. Aggressive future planning to maintain and improve oil production response.

  18. Production technology experience in Shell's Michigan waterfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in N. Michigan in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 Waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by the spring of 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by (1) a favorable oil production response, (2) timely and definitive surveillance techniques, (3) systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior, (4) innovative application of artificial lift technology; and (5) aggressive future planning to maintain and improve oil production response.

  19. Production technology experience in Michigan waterfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in northern Michigan in 1978 with Shell Oil Co.'s Chester 18 waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by Spring 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by very favorable oil production response, timely and definitive surveillance techniques, systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior, innovative application of artificial lift technology, and aggressive future planning to maintain and to improve oil production response. This paper elaborates on these waterflood program characterizations.

  20. About the State of Michigan With almost 10 million residents, Michigan is the country's eighth most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    About the State of Michigan With almost 10 million residents, Michigan is the country's eighth most sales hit Michigan hard in the early 2000s, but the state has mounted an impressive comeback, overcoming double-digit unemployment and creating more than 200,000 private sector jobs. Situation As Michigan

  1. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center Weekly Update, Grand Rapids 2015 1/13-14 NW Michigan Orchard & Vineyard Show Grand Traverse Resort, Acme, MI 2 ­ Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center 3/4-6 Michigan Grape & Wine Conference MSU ­ Kellogg Hotel & Conference

  2. 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan 2015 Request for Proposals Released August 24, 2014 The Corn Marketing Program of Michigan (CMPM for increasing economic viability of corn production in Michigan through innovative research and market

  3. EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management is preparing an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington, and a new Three Rivers Substation on Western's reserved lands.

  4. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  5. Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa: Forty Years of Partnerships African President of South Africa 1994-1999 #12;ii Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa Table of Contents Introduction: Michigan and MSU Engagement in Africa and South Africa The Beginnings

  6. Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN University Travel Warning Destination Liability/College/Business Unit: Destination: Travel Start Date: Travel End Date: I understand that the University of Michigan the Regents of the University of Michigan, ("University"), and all of its employees and agents from any claim

  7. THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication ACTION REQUEST Subject: Report of Faculty of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Michigan-Flint, retired from active the University of Michigan-Flint faculty as an assistant professor in 1974 and was promoted to associate

  8. Michigan State University Student Employment Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Student Employment Office Criminal Background Check Policy Statement be completed by student) I understand that Michigan State University conducts a criminal record history search with Michigan State University. 1. Have you ever been convicted of a crime? Yes No 2. Are there criminal charges

  9. THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication ACTION REQUEST Subject: Report of Faculty Death.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Michigan, continuing her dance studies with Esther Pease to the University of Michigan as a faculty member in the newly formed Department of Dance. She was chair

  10. PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: 1852-1950 VOLUME I THE HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY ALFRED C. RAPHELSON UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FLINT COLLEGE 1968 #12;i PREFACE When I was first at Michigan during those less hectic years before the Second World War. To provide a complete and systematic

  11. PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: VOLUME II BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF FACULTY MEMBERS SERVING ON THE STAFF DURING THE YEARS 1897-1945 ALFRED C. RAPHELSON UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FLINT COLLEGE at Michigan. These details gradually pieced together what for us were the very human and personal dimensions

  12. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations of graduates or former students for the Michigan State University ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD. The selection is made from candidates who have demonstrated continuing outstanding volunteer service to Michigan

  13. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD. The selection is made from candidates who high standards of integrity and character to positively reflect and enhance the prestige of Michigan

  14. Michigan State IntegritySPONSORED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Michigan State Research IntegritySPONSORED BY · The Office of Research Ethics and Standards CONTROL & MANAGEMENT AND AUTHORSHIP GUIDELINES AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY: THE NEED FOR BEST PRACTICES Integrity Michigan State University Research Integrity's (R.I.) audience has expanded since publishing

  15. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  16. The Michigan Almanac ERRATA (November 6, 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    The Michigan Almanac ERRATA (November 6, 2013) Chapter 1, page 3. The totals for faculty and staff.6.4 (November 6, 2013). Chapter 3, page 36. Data source label is corrected to read "University of Michigan Asks You (UMAY) undergraduate survey." Chapter 5, page 59. The placement of the U Michigan label in the top

  17. West Michigan Strategic Alliance Greg Northrup, President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Michigan Strategic Alliance Greg Northrup, President 951 Wealthy Street SE P.O. Box 68046://www.wm-alliance.org/ The West Michigan Strategic Alliance (WMSA) is a 501 (C)3 not-for-profit organization comprised in creating regional partnerships and collaborations. The vision of WMSA is to make West Michigan a best place

  18. Michigan State University Child Development Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University Child Development Laboratories Department of Human Development and Family FACILITIES 17 #12;3 The Child Development Laboratories OVERVIEW The Michigan State University Child of Michigan launched its tiered quality rating system in 2011. Great Start to Quality, http

  19. Action Requested: THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Subject: Action Requested: THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN REGENTS COMMUNICATION ACTION REQUEST on the basis of being Michigan residents. Second, the proposed Guidelines significantly expand the ways an alternative test for establishing eligibility for in-state tuition based on attendance at Michigan high

  20. A NEW PINTO BEAN for Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW from MSU Eldorado A NEW PINTO BEAN for Michigan Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-3183 December 2012 ELDORADO is a new erect, high-yielding pinto bean variety from Michigan State pinto beans go into a 15- to 20-day maturity phase when leaves turn yellow and eventually drop. Eldorado

  1. NEW WHITE KIDNEY BEAN for Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW from MSU Snowdon NEW WHITE KIDNEY BEAN for Michigan Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-3184 December 2012 SNOWDON is a new large- seeded white kidney bean variety from Michigan State bush growth habit. Snowdon is resistant to strains of bean rust, anthracnose and bean common mosaic

  2. Sub-Barrier Fusion Cross-Sections of Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei Indiana University, GANIL, Western Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ. Theory support: Vanderbilt Univ.(Oberacker & Umar); Indiana Univ. (C

  3. Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.; Nass, Bryan L.; Arterburn, John E.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data. This report documents the design, installation, operation and evaluation of mainstem and tributary video systems in the Okanogan River Basin. The species-specific data collected by these fish enumeration systems are presented along with an evaluation of the operation of a facility that provides a count of fish using an automated method. Information collected by the Colville Tribes Fish & Wildlife Department, specifically the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP), is intended to provide a relative abundance indicator for anadromous fish runs migrating past Zosel Dam and is not intended as an absolute census count. Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected fish passage data between October 2005 and December 2006. Video counting stations were deployed and data were collected at two locations in the basin: on the mainstem Okanogan River at Zosel Dam near Oroville, Washington, and on Bonaparte Creek, a tributary to the Okanogan River, in the town of Tonasket, Washington. Counts at Zosel Dam between 10 October 2005 and 28 February 2006 are considered partial, pilot year data as they were obtained from the operation of a single video array on the west bank fishway, and covered only a portion of the steelhead migration. A complete description of the apparatus and methodology can be found in 'Fish Enumeration Using Underwater Video Imagery - Operational Protocol' (Nass 2007). At Zosel Dam, totals of 57 and 481 adult Chinook salmon were observed with the video monitoring system in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Run timing for Chinook in 2006 indicated that peak passage occurred in early October and daily peak passage was noted on 5 October when 52 fish passed the dam. Hourly passage estimates of Chinook salmon counts for 2005 and 2006 at Zosel Dam revealed a slight diel pattern as Chinook passage events tended to remain low from 1900 hours to 0600 hours relative to other hours of the day. Chinook salmon showed a slight preference for passing the dam through the video chutes on the east bank (52%) relative to the west bank (48%). A total of 48 adult sockeye salmon in 2005 and 19,245 in 2006 were counted passing through the video chutes at Zosel Dam. The 2006 run timing pattern was characterized by a large peak in passage from 3 August through 10 August when 17,698 fish (92% of total run observed for the year) were observed passing through the video chutes. The daily peak of 5,853 fish occurred on 4 August. Hourly passage estimates of sockeye salmon counts for 2005 and 2006 at the dam showed a strong diel pattern with increased passage during nighttime hours relative to daytime hours. Sockeye showed a strong preference for passing Zosel Dam on the east bank (72%) relative to the west bank (28%). A total of 298 adult upstream-migrating steelhead were counted at Zosel Dam in 2005 and 2006, representing the 2006 cohort based on passage data from 5 October 2005 through 15 July 2006. Eighty-seven percent (87%) of the total steelhead observed passed the dam between 23 March and 25 April with a peak passage occurring on 6 April when 31 fish were observed. Steelhead passage at Zosel Dam exhibited no diel pattern. In contrast to both Chinook and sockeye salmon, steelhead were shown to have a preference for passing the dam on the west bank (71%) relative to the east bank (29%). Both Chinook and sockeye passage at Zosel Dam were influenced by Okanogan River water temperature. When water temperatures peaked in late July (daily mean exceeded 24 C and daily maximum exceeded 26.5 C), Chinook and sockeye counts went to zero. A subsequent decrease in water temperature resulted in sharp increases in both C

  4. Preliminary Investigations on Uncertainty Analysis of Wind-Wave Predictions in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekouee, Navid

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data were analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects were compared during a period where wind had a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase error in predictions up to 35%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis showed that both models are able to reveal the time scale of the wave variation with same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations ...

  5. Michigan Fuel Forward

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    13 Electrical Inspector Workshop Grand Rapids, MI 12113 Electrical Inspector Workshop Ann Arbor, MI Accomplishments (cont.) Market DevelopmentOutreach 11 Project Newsletters...

  6. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  7. Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    This talk will focus on the achievements of the Drexel Plasma Institute in direct application of plasmasMichigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Plasma Medicine: Mechanisms of Direct Non-Thermal Plasma Interaction with Living Tissue Prof. Alexander Fridman Drexel University

  8. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION Job Title: STAFF ASSISTANT (N6) Department: J. ROBERT VAN PELT LIBRARY Hourly Rate: MINIMUM $12.65 ­ MAXIMUM $16.20 Supervisor: STRATEGIC INITIATIVES LIBRARIAN SUMMARY: This position participates in a variety of digital library and service

  9. Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LON-CAPA Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University January 2008 #12;LON-CAPA · Course Management Management: Use same material in different courses Universities can share online content #12;Online Content · Growth of shared content pool #12;Open Source, Free · No licensing cost · Universities can

  10. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: BUILDING MECHANIC II (pay: Accountable for supervision and maintenance of all operating units in the SDC, MacInnes Ice Arena, Child Care, maintenance, sanitation, customer services and enforcement of SDC, MacInnes Ice Arena, Child Care Center

  11. July 2009 NW Michigan Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter CALENDER OF EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .6 million in grant and loan assistance for rural Michigan energy projects. Eligible projects in the 11 use), hydrogen, solar (small and large), wind (small and large), and energy efficiency improvements, and plumbing fixtures. Grants can cover up to 25% of total eligible costs. The minimum energy efficiency grant

  12. Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AGENDA Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University 9:30 a.m. ­ August. Resignations, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan Tech

  13. Western Michigan University -Extended University Programs How to Get Started

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Western Michigan University - Extended University Programs How to Get Started Interested in takingThe first toWestern Michigan University, Office of Admissions,1903W. Michigan Ave,Kalamazoo,MI 49008Western Michigan University,Office of Admissions,1903W.Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo,MI 49008-5211;the other

  14. adaptation project pay: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is adapting Linux for use in enterprise-scale networking Michigan, University of 445 Siemens Global Studio Project: Experiences Adopting an Integrated GSD Infrastructure...

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  16. Program of Study_________________________ Michigan Technological University Graduate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program of Study_________________________ Michigan Technological University Graduate School Letter, to the Graduate School, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931. Name. ____________________________________ Applicant's signature Date The undersigned, if admitted to graduate study at Michigan Technological

  17. M.A. TESOL PROGRAM GRADUATE Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M.A. TESOL PROGRAM GRADUATE HANDBOOK Michigan State University Department of Linguistics & Germanic................................................................. 18 VIII. Michigan State University Resources................................................................................................................................... 26 8/15/2014 2 #12;I. Program Overview Administered through the Michigan State University Department

  18. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    / 1 #12; 2005 4 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 19 Center University of Michigan, Georgetown University, University of Nebraska, University of Kansas University

  19. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES AND COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION GENEALOGICAL & Copper Country Historical Collection J. Robert Van Pelt Library Michigan Technological University local high schools and Michigan Technological University, centennial books, and local history titles

  20. Michigan v. Bryant: The Counter-Revolution Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Kenneth W. Jr.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010). Oral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894,2010). Oral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894,2010). Oral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894,

  1. BetterBuildings for Michigan: Residential Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Michigan: Residential Program BetterBuildings for Michigan: Residential Program This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S....

  2. NAME: Theresa M. Lee OFFICE: University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Theresa

    1 VITA NAME: Theresa M. Lee OFFICE: University of Michigan Department of Psychology 4030 East Hall of Biological Science PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: Professor, University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, 1999 - . Research Scientist, University of Michigan, Reproductive Science Program, 1999 - . Professor, University

  3. Connectedness at Michigan: What Our Undergrads Have to Say

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Connectedness at Michigan: What Our Undergrads Have to Say Executive Summary The 2011 University of Michigan Asks You (UMAY) survey asked undergrads of Michigan. Their responses provide an interesting glimpse into the factors

  4. AWEA State Wind Energy Forum - Michigan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Wind Energy Forum - Michigan AWEA State Wind Energy Forum - Michigan January 20, 2015 8:00AM to 5:00PM EST Lansing, MI Michigan has 988 MW of installed wind capacity,...

  5. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -long program will emphasize the design, use and maintenance of irrigation systems. Spend the morning learning/11 Michigan Spring Peach Update Meeting SW Michigan Research & Extension Center 3/12 Northwest MI Irrigation coordinator Dr. Bill Shane at 269-944-1477 ext. 205, 269-208-1652 cell. NORTHWEST MICHIGAN IRRIGATION WORKSHOP

  6. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  7. MICHIGAN SWEEPS NEIGHBORHOODS WITH ENERGY UPGRADES | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BetterBuildings for Michigan established a system of checks and balances, as well as standards for contractors and participants, to ensure that all work followed program...

  8. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Michigan as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  9. Indiana Michigan Power- Energy Savings Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana Michigan Power's Energy Saver Program provides its customers incentives for upgrading to energy efficient equipment and for properly disposing of old equipment. Residential customers are...

  10. Governor Rick Snyder has highlighted the skyrocketing rates of obesity in Michigan as one of his top priorities on the Michigan Dashboard. Currently, more than 30% of Michigan's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Governor Rick Snyder has highlighted the skyrocketing rates of obesity in Michigan as one of his top priorities on the Michigan Dashboard. Currently, more than 30% of Michigan's adults and 12% of Michigan's children are obese. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; lack of physical

  11. RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

  12. EECBG Success Story: A Michigan County Unearths Savings with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Michigan County Unearths Savings with Geothermal Energy EECBG Success Story: A Michigan County Unearths Savings with Geothermal Energy January 22, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Kent...

  13. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  14. augusta michigan installation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hygiene Plan Michigan State University Environmental Health and Safety Engineering Research Complex 1449 Engineering Research Court C125 East Lansing, Michigan 48824...

  15. COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST...

  16. Department Colloquium Speaker: Jack Kalbfleisch, University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offin, Dan

    Department Colloquium Speaker: Jack Kalbfleisch, University of Michigan Date: October 15, 2010 Time Li, and Yan Zhou from the University of Michigan. #12;

  17. Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits  (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan implements the federal requirements of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) through state regulations. Michigan's Rule 821 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with...

  18. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better...

  19. It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees...

  20. Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Weidian

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, “Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan” was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 – 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to “renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better.” We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

  1. China Initiatives at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China Initiatives at Michigan State University Office of China Programs The Office of International Studies and Programs at Michigan State University established the Office of China Programs in July 2005 to help implement President Lou Anna K. Simon's "China Initiative," part of the university's long

  2. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  3. The University of Michigan Dearborn Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    The University of Michigan ­ Dearborn Department of Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Position in Bioengineering The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan -Dearborn years. The University of Michigan-Dearborn is one of the three campuses of the University of Michigan

  4. RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA American Hornbeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    slower to establish. Native to Michigan and eastern U.S. Pests: Prone to ice damage. Two-line chestnut bore can be a problem when plants are stressed DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Michigan State University Michigan State University #12;RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE

  5. University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results Name Institution Specialty Michael Ambrose U Michigan Hosps-Ann Arbor Pediatrics Kate Anderson Exempla St Joseph Hosp-CO Family Medicine Ketti Augusztiny U Michigan Hosps-Ann Arbor Family Med/Ypsilanti Kathryn Baker U Michigan Hosps

  6. The Michigan Blueberry Industry Mark Longstroth and Eric Hanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Michigan Blueberry Industry Mark Longstroth and Eric Hanson Michigan State University Blueberries are native to Michigan. Lowbush blueberries are common in the Upper Peninsula and the northern. The development of the modern blueberry industry began in the early 1900s. In Michigan, Dr. Stanley Johnston led

  7. Page 1 of 4 Michigan Technological University Computer Use Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 4 Michigan Technological University Computer Use Policy Developed by Michigan Tech of Interest and Intellectual Property policy and procedure. Use of Michigan Technological University a violation of University rules, certain computer misconduct is prohibited under Michigan Laws. Act 53

  8. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN SOUTHERN DIVISION COALITION TO DEFEND PARTY, Plaintiffs, v. JENNIFER GRANHOLM, in her official capacity as Governor of the State of Michigan, the REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, the BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY, the BOARD

  9. 2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Curricular Advancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Curricular Advancements: Tools of Engagement Valley State College Visit to Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan September 13, 2007 MSU Tools of Engagement #12;© 2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 2 UOE has developed a series

  10. University of Michigan campuses are smoke-free environments,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    University of Michigan campuses are smoke-free environments, both indoors and outdoors. A smoke) 936-5988 THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Julia Donovan Darlow, Ann Arbor Laurence B. Deitch Mary Sue Coleman, ex officio © 2011 Regents of the University of Michigan. The University of Michigan

  11. Michigan Apple Committee 2014/15 Request for Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1 Michigan Apple Committee 2014/15 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC subcommittee established the following as its charter in early 2009: To help the Michigan Apple Committee realize its mission by enhancing the reputation of Michigan Apples, improve their share of sales in target

  12. The Michigan Benchmark: A Microbenchmark for XML Query Processing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runapongsa, Kanda

    The Michigan Benchmark: A Microbenchmark for XML Query Processing Systems£ Kanda Runapongsa Jignesh The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA krunapon, jignesh, jag, shurug @eecs is called the Michigan benchmark. In the Michigan benchmark, we primarily attempt to capture the rich

  13. Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council Research and Extension Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council Research and Extension Priorities 1. Michigan Grape Impact Analysis of the Michigan wine industry ­ underway July ­ November 2014 2. Research and Education and grape productivity through testing of varieties / clones, both new to Michigan and established

  14. Michigan Apple Committee 2013/14 Request for Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Michigan Apple Committee 2013/14 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC that helps achieve this mission. In keeping with the spirit of the MAC's mission, the Michigan Apple Research Subcommittee (MARS) established the following as its charter in early 2009: To help the Michigan Apple

  15. Michigan Apple Committee 2012/13 Request for Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Apple Committee 2012/13 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC) announces achieve this mission. In keeping with the spirit of the MAC's mission, the Michigan Apple Research Subcommittee (MARS) established the following as its charter in early 2009: To help the Michigan Apple

  16. Fermilab Today | University of Michigan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe,Michigan0Manchester

  17. Computer modeling and simulation of Black Warrior Basin formation: Annual report for the 1987--1988 SOMED (School of Mines and Energy Development) project year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations have been performed, aimed at achieving a better understanding of the geological and physical processes involved in the formation of sedimentary basins in general and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi in particular. Microscopic-level computer modeling of sandstone porosity reduction has been done, elucidating the detailed small-scale dynamics which lead to the geological phenomenon of pressure solution. A new technique has been developed for 1D burial and thermal modeling of sedimentary basins based on stratigraphic data from test wells. It is significantly faster than previous methods, and can be used in interactive menu-oriented program requiring relatively little learning time or prior computer experience. This allows a geologist to rapidly determine the results of various different hypotheses about basin formation, providing insight which may help determine which is correct. A program has also been written to simulate tectonic-plate collisions and rifting processes using viscoelastic hydrodynamics.

  18. January 2008 NW Michigan Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tustin, Michigan. This is a chance to discuss your project with seasoned CSA growers! The format of this year's program will be two in-depth presentations focusing on "Using Tubing & Vacuum Systems Effectively for Sap Collection" and "Using Your Reverse Osmosis (RO) Equipment Effectively". Both

  19. Nanoimprinting over topography and multilayer three-dimensional printing Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 X. Cheng Solid of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 X. D. Huang Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 A. F. Yee

  20. Polymer inking as a micro-and nanopatterning technique Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 L. Tan Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid State Electronics Laboratory, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 State Electronics Laboratory, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 A. F. Yee Department

  1. Michigan Matching Initiative for Student Support The Michigan Matching Initiative for Student Support offers an extra incentive for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Michigan Matching Initiative for Student Support The Michigan Matching Initiative for Student scholarships for Michigan students. Terms of the matching program are as follows: Gifts eligible for matching, graduate, or professional scholarships at the University of Michigan. Qualifying gifts will be matched

  2. VISION 2000 A blueprint for the future of the Northwest Michigan fruit industry created by the Northwest Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISION 2000 A blueprint for the future of the Northwest Michigan fruit industry created by the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Foundation Introduction The Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station is uniquely situated on the sandy hills of northwest Michigan, surrounded by abundant

  3. Design and operating factors that affect waterflood performance in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinker, G.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the Northern Michigan Saline Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 Waterflood. Nine projects had been installed by the end of 1981 so that operational results are available to expand and reinforce the reservoir simulation based design and operating program. The small areal size of these pinnacle reef fields, variations in rock quality, and uncertain reservoir continuity have made successful waterflood design difficult to achieve. Some existing wells are being redrilled at the start of a project and others may have to be redrilled later in the life of a waterflood to allow the various porosity zones to be fully exploited within the flood pattern and to maintain adequate well spacing for oil bank formation. The operating strategies for these projects are based upon a reservoir simulation study which stressed increased oil recovery and project economics. One of the most successful of these operational techniques has been the use of high volume submersible pumps to maintain oil production response with increasing volumes of water, to give flexibility to injection pattern design, and to increase ultimate recovery. The mobility ratio in these reservoirs is very favorable so that early water production is due to channelling and, in some cases, bottom water coning rather than fingering. Project monitoring procedures were carefully planned to facilitate project evaluation and changes in operating policy. It is believed that the design and operating policies as developed in this study have continued application for the many waterfloods planned in Northern Michigan and to some extent for projects in other areas.

  4. U.S. DEPARTI\\1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Michigan page I or L STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the...

  5. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Questions and Answers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions and answers from the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003, in Southfield, Michigan.

  6. us. DEP.-\\RThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth PROJECT TITLE: SEP ARRA - Michigan Slate University. BioEnergy Page 1 of2 STATE: MI Funding Opportunity Announcement Number...

  7. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Supporting Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting information and objectives for the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003 in Southfield, Michigan.

  8. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,DennisDenver Basin Map

  9. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  10. Measuring Scholarly Outreach at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generating, transmitting, applying, and preserving knowledge for the direct benefit of external audiences, 1993, University Outreach at Michigan State University: Extending Knowledge to Serve Society #12;Reason · Business & Industrial Management · Children, Youth, and Families (non-school related) · Civic

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Michigan, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  12. Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations As of June 30, 2013 Current LT Series) Refunding of 2003 & 2004 Fixed Rate Bond Issues SDC Ice Plant and Partial Roof of SDC Total

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: University of Michigan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michigan Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors To Receive Up To 121.5M Over Five Years On February 24, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy,...

  14. Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    RADARSAT Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR INSTALLATION DOCUMENT October, 1999 ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF MICHIGAN CENTER FOR EARTH SCIENCES ALASKA SAR FACILITY BYRD POLAR RESEARCH...................................................................................................................................................3 Active Radar Calibrator Testing

  15. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  16. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  17. This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 06 September 2011, At: 12:09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 06 September 2011, At: 12:09 Publisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA b Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann

  18. Forecasting and assessing the impact of urban sprawl in coastal watersheds along eastern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan RUNNING TITLE: Urban Sprawl along Lake Michigan Bryan C. Pijanowski1,2 , Bradley Shellito3 Miles Building 1405 S. Harrison Road Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan USA 48824 (517 Science Building Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan USA 48824 3 Department of Geography #12

  19. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacted by streptomycin resistance. Posted on September 24, 2014, MSUE News, by George Sundin, Michigan had Kasumin available in Michigan via a Section 18 specific exemption since 2010 in counties impacted continue to use the fire blight disease prediction model available on the MSU Enviro-weather website

  20. Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection Fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, Robert J.

    1 Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection (TTR). In mammals, TTR is a T4-specific binding protein. However, in nonmammalian species, TTR binds 3 competitive binding assays with several PCB congeners or hydroxylated PCBs to determine whether they exhibit

  1. Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

  2. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

  3. Michigan v. Bryant: The Counter-Revolution Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Kenneth W. Jr.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    § 5001, p. 36 (2005). Bryant v. Davis; The CounterevolutionOral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894, p. 6 (Oral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894, p. 6 (

  4. Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan September Exchange Method for the Free Energy of Conformational Fluctuations Michigan State University 3:05-3:30 Role

  5. Collecting and Using Engagement Data at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collecting and Using Engagement Data at Michigan State University Diane L. Zimmerman Director Delegation ­ Michigan Public University and Community College Presidents and Higher Education Officers, National Center for the Study of University Engagement University Outreach and Engagement Burton A

  6. Stature, Age, and Gender Effects on Reach Motion Postures Don B. Chaffin and Julian J. Faraway, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraway, Julian

    , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Xudong Zhang, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, and Charles Woolley, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan The rapid adoption of software to simulate of Michigan, Ann Arbor. M1 48019-2117; dchaffin@umich.edu. HUMAN FACTORS, Vol. 42, No. 3, Fall 2000. pp. 408

  7. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  8. Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project evaluation of multi-canister overpack venting and monitoring options during staging of K basins fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiborg, J.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study recommends whether multi-canister overpacks containing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford K Basins should be staged in vented or a sealed, but ventable, condition during staging at the Canister Storage Building prior to hot vacuum conditioning and interim storage. The integrally related issues of MCO monitoring, end point criteria, and assessing the practicality of avoiding venting and Hot Vacuum Conditioning for a portion of the spent fuel are also considered.

  9. Speaker: Professor Stephen DeBacker, University of Michigan Title ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 24, 2012 ... PURDUE UNIVERSITY. Department of Mathematics Colloquium. Speaker: Professor Stephen DeBacker, University of Michigan.

  10. 1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS VERSION 4, APRIL 30, 2012 #12;2michigan state university brand STandardS TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 brand baSicS 5 The Michigan STaTe UniverSiTy brandUrTher gUidance #12;3michigan state university brand STandardS 1. BrANd BASICS 1a whaT iS a brand? We build

  11. ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 The comeback ooze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 Sanctuary in paradise Rare Hawaiian birds find refuge in tiny island forests, Sarah Bird. Send your comments to the editor at mlgoodri@mtu.edu. Learn more about research at Michigan for bigger people--by design Rising sun A new dawn for solar power 16 19 20 3RESE ARCH 2012 | Michigan

  12. Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Campus: the U-M Environmental Data;#12;Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Campus: The U-M Environmental Data Repository;DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ANN ARBOR CAMPUS: THE U

  13. Analysis with Kernel Density Estimation University of Michigan / HERMES Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis with Kernel Density Estimation S. Gliske University of Michigan / HERMES Collaboration Transverse Parton Structure of the Hadron Yerevan, Armenia 25 June, 2009 Gliske (HERMES / Michigan) Analysis/Smearing Effects SIDIS cos(n) Conclusion Gliske (HERMES / Michigan) Analysis with KDEs TPSH `09 2 / 24 #12

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ACADEMIC AFFAIRS POLICIES & PROCEDURES MANUAL in the Department of Psychology at The University of Michigan. Program areas may have more detailed requirements....................................................................................... 26 #12;3 INTRODUCTION The University of Michigan Psychology Graduate Program is one of the largest

  15. SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN 1931 AND 1932

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    413 SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN 1931 AND 1932 Marine Biological Laboratory x,i23:r jKernan, Director SURFACE CURRENTS OF LAKE MICHIGAN, 1931 AND 1932 by John Van Oosten United States Fish Introduction 1 History of Lake Michigan current samiec 1 Materials and methods 3 Releases and recoveries

  16. COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 Marine Biological Laboratory COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 By Ralph Hile and Howard J . Buettner #12;ABSTRACT The chub fishery of Lake Michigan is based on 7 deep-water species of coregonines . Small

  17. SURFACE CURRENTS IN LAKE MICHIGAN 1954 and 1955

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE CURRENTS IN LAKE MICHIGAN 1954 and 1955 j Mafine Biological Laboratory .-'Ml 41960 'i WOODS, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Amle J. Suoaela, Commissioner SURFACE CURREirrS IN LAKE MICHIGAN, 1954 Page Introduction 1 General features of Lake Michigan Current -generating agents and modifying factors

  18. Michigan Apple Committee Research Priorities for 2014/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Michigan Apple Committee Research Priorities for 2014/15 Following are the 2014/15 priorities of the Michigan Apple Committee. (In priority order.) 1. Increase demand To conduct consumer related research that will help sell Michigan Apples more profitably. a. Market research b. Value ­ convenience, apples versus

  19. The Distribution of Spodosol Soils in Southern Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    The Distribution of Spodosol Soils in Southern Michigan: A Climatic Interpretation Randall J.Schaetzl* and Scott A. hard** *Department of Geography, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 of Michigan reveals that well and moderately well-drained, sandy Spodosolsare found pri- marily

  20. K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN Shannon Curry1 , Michael Ahlers University of Michigan 2455 Hayward St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA cruf@umich.edu 2 DTU Space Technical resolution. A K-Band airborne version has been built and flown across southeast Michigan. A kurtosis detector

  1. Water Quality of Streams Tributary to Lakes Superior and Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    559 Water Quality of Streams Tributary to Lakes Superior and Michigan Marine Biological Laboratory and Michigan By JEROME W. ZIMMERMAN United States Fish and Wildlife Service Special Scientific Report Superior and Michigan 16 Causes of changes in water quality 35 Literature cited 35 Appendix. Streams

  2. Michigan State University 2013/14 Spring Continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University 2013/14 Spring Continuation Student Health Insurance Enrollment Form. Spouse/Dom. Partner $1,873 $1,873 7. One Child $1,117 $1,117 8. All Children $1,467 $1,467 #12;Michigan presently enrolled in the Michigan State University Insurance Plan are eligible to continue their coverage

  3. University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presenter: Jeremy Fox University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice Models;Identification of Discrete Choice Models for Bundles and Binary Games Jeremy T. Fox University of Michigan and NBER Natalia Lazzati University of Michigan March 2014 Abstract We study nonparametric identification

  4. MICHIGAN FARM TO SCHOOL: DIGGING IN AND TAKING ROOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN FARM TO SCHOOL: DIGGING IN AND TAKING ROOT WHAT IS FARM TO SCHOOL? Farm to School centers in Michigan, including school garden programs, fundraisers using local agricultural products, farmer visits. WHO IS INVOLVED IN MICHIGAN FARM TO SCHOOL? Food service professionals, farmers and distributors have

  5. Michigan Law School Pro Bono Program Organization Evaluation of Student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Michigan Law School Pro Bono Program Organization Evaluation of Student Date Student Name the student perform in a professionally responsible manner? Would you supervise another Michigan Law student.) Comments or suggestions regarding Michigan Law School's Pro Bono Program. From: I certify that completed

  6. University of Michigan Bibliography for Public Art Webpage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    1 University of Michigan Bibliography for Public Art Webpage GENERAL SOURCES FOR INFORMATION ON MANY PIECES · Outdoor Sculpture, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Campus by Ellen A. Plummer the University Planner's Office, University of Michigan, 326 East Hoover, Ann Arbor (734-764-2455 or email

  7. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

  8. Market Barriers to Solar in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E.; Nobler, E.; Wolf, C.; Doris, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar industry in the United States is at a turning point; the cost of PV hardware has declined substantially in recent years, placing new attention on reducing the balance of system (BOS) costs of solar that now contribute to a growing percentage of installation expenses. How states address these costs through the creation of a favorable policy and regulatory environment is proving to be a critical determinant of a thriving statewide solar market. This report addresses the permitting and tax issues that may stimulate the solar market growth in Michigan. By making PV installations easier to complete through reduced BOS costs, Michigan would become a more attractive location for manufacturers and installers. As PV module costs decline and BOS costs make up a greater share of the cost of solar, action taken today on these issues will prove beneficial in the long term, providing Michigan an opportunity to establish a leadership position in the solar industry.

  9. Contesting an Illusion of Equity: A Textual Analysis of “Friend of the Court” Briefs in the University of Michigan’s Affirmative Action Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledesma, María C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Affirmative action at the University of Michigan (pp. 97-188). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Harris, C. (action at the University of Michigan (pp. 17-59). Ann Arbor,

  10. Temperature effects induced by climate change on the growth and consumption by salmonines in Lakes Michigan and Huron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Abstract We used bioenergetics models to investigate temperature effects induced by climate change (1964­1993) and projected in the future period (2043­2070). Bioenergetics simula- tions were run across change . Bioenergetics models . Salmonines . Lake michigan . Lake huron Introduction Following the global

  11. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support for MTRI programs focused on the application of programming and geospatial analysis to solving governmental and societal needs through sponsored research. The ability to connect geospatial models research projects. Understand geospatial and remote sensing concepts that enable appropriate integration

  12. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. Michigan Technological University Annual Placement Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    work on eight vehicles that include, in part, an underwater remotely-operated vehicle, an electric motorcycle, a supermileage vehicle, an off-road vehicle, and a solar-powered car. Michigan Tech has hosted for their community service. Students Alex Cotton and Collin Veele developed and produced a device that prevents

  14. University of Michigan College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    publication 2006-2007 Michigan Entrepreneur Year-in-Review. Also in the picture, which was taken..... 4 Jenkins Alumni of Year ...... 6 Zurbuchen Directing CEP.. 9 Space Comic Books......... 13 First:// www.bayweekly.com/year07/issuexv40/ leadxv40_2.html. SPRL Director and AOSS Professor Christopher Ruf

  15. Michigan Technological University Generations of Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Tech to acquire the resources needed to continue to grow as a premier research university, the University also has been able to establish the Pavlis Institute for Global Technological Leadership and bring Mineral Museum, and Sherman Field. Alumni play a key role in any capital campaign. We invite you and other

  16. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PSY 992 Organizational Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PSY 992 Organizational Behavior Spring 2014 Monday 2:30pm ­ 5:10pm to industrial and organizational psychology, organizational behavior, and human resource development. This course is a survey of topics relevant to the field of organizational behavior. The course introduces

  17. University of Michigan College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Honored ................. 4 Solar Car Win...................... 6 New Faculty ...................... 10 space travel to Mars by 2030, a brighter light has been shone on this growing deficiency. In the July: Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan 1521C SRB 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI

  18. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES Fall Semester 2011 Report, and socially. The opportunities for a wide variety of recreational experiences that enhance student university SEMESTER 2011 Total Participants - 2,457 Women - 446 Men - 2,011 Teams - 230 The Intramural ice hockey

  19. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURALRECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL­RECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES ICE HOCKEY RULES I) can only play on one team in Intramural Ice Hockey! C. Managers and players read the Eligibility Rules a form at IM Office, or see the supervisor at the ice rink. Make sure the players are on the team roster

  20. Spatial variations and chronologies of aliphatic hydrocarbons in Lake Michigan sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doskey, P. V.; Environmental Research

    2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four sediment cores were collected in fine-grained depositional areas of the southern basin of Lake Michigan. Spatial variations of aliphatic hydrocarbons in surficial sediments were consistent with a lakeward movement of riverine sediments in a series of resuspension-settling cycles in which an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons associated with dense sediments is deposited in nearshore areas, fine-grained sediments of terrestrial origin accumulate in the deep basin, and planktonic hydrocarbons are depleted by microbial degradation during transport to the deep basin. The rate of accumulation of the UCM (a marker of petroleum residues) in deep basin sediments has increased by more than an order of magnitude since 1880, from 60 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1} to approximately 960 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1} in 1980. Crude estimates of the atmospheric loading of the UCM (1100 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}) indicate that accumulations in deep-basin sediments might be supported by atmospheric deposition. Agreement was poor between the atmospheric flux of the terrestrial n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 25}, C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}) to the deep basin (3200 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}) and the sediment accumulation rate (660 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}). Understanding of atmospheric fluxes, estimated from the very few available data, would be improved by more frequent measurement of the levels of aliphatic hydrocarbons in air and precipitation and a better knowledge of the particle deposition velocities and precipitation scavenging coefficients.

  1. This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 01 May 2013, At: 07:20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Daniel G.

    This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 01 May 2013, At: 07:20 Publisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c Institute for Social Research, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Published online: 16 Aug 2011

  2. This article was downloaded by:[University of Michigan] On: 25 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    This article was downloaded by:[University of Michigan] On: 25 February 2008 Access Details. Rosenberg abc ; Randa Tao b a Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA b Center for Computational Medicine and Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c

  3. Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-ANN ARBOR FY2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Mission Statement II. Instructional Programming The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence

  4. Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-ANN ARBOR TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Mission Statement II. Instructional Programming III The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence

  5. Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature Influence on Commercial Lake Whitefish Harvest in Eastern Lake Michigan Holly Price1 of Statistics University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 2Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 3NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental

  6. Combating Invasive Species Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioenergetics model that indicates Asian carp cannot survive in Lake Michigan given the available food types and bioenergetics modeling are providing information for the first two projects. Bioenergetics is the study

  7. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  8. Development of a Network-Based Information Infrastructure for Fisheries and Hydropower Information in the Columbia River Basin : Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary E.; Perkins, Bill

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to help develop technology and a unified structure to access and disseminate information related to the Bonneville Power Administration's fish and wildlife responsibility in the Pacific Northwest. BPA desires to increase access to, and exchange of, information produced by the Environment Fish, and Wildlife Group in concert with regional partners. Historically, data and information have been managed through numerous centralized, controlled information systems. Fisheries information has been fragmented and not widely exchanged. Where exchange has occurred, it often is not timely enough to allow resource managers to effectively use the information to guide planning and decision making. This project (and related projects) have successfully developed and piloted a network-based infrastructure that will serve as a vehicle to transparently connect existing information systems in a manner that makes information exchange efficient and inexpensive. This project was designed to provide a mechanism to help BPA address measures in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife program: 3.2H Disseminate Research and Monitoring Information and 5.1A.5 manage water supplies in accordance with the Annual Implementation Work Plan. This project also provided resources that can be used to assist monitoring and evaluation of the Program.

  9. Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMER 2012 Scholarship 2012 | givingto.msu.edu DEVELOPMENTS For Donors and Friends of Michigan State University MSUDevelopments,publishedthreetimeseachyear,isdevotedtotheinspirationand impact ofprivatephilanthropyatMichiganStateUniversity

  10. Engagement and Outreach at Michigan State University Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engagement and Outreach at Michigan State University Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement University Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology Michigan on University Outreach (1993) University Outreach at Michigan State University: Extending Knowledge to Serve

  11. CAMPAIGNING, CANVASSING AND PETITION DRIVES ON THE MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    CAMPAIGNING, CANVASSING AND PETITION DRIVES ON THE MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS - GUIDELINES - Michigan State University encourages students to be informed about and participate in the political process campaigning, canvassing and petitioning drives on the Michigan State University campus. These statements

  12. Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University includes the following: student's name,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University designated below will be held as confidential by Western Michigan University until I notify the Office Western Michigan University responsible for list/information already printed, published, or available

  13. Michigan – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 (Department of Treasury, Michigan Higher Education Studentat *2. 73 Id. at *16. MICHIGAN Williams Institute Employment62-91, § 1, 11-4-91). MICHIGAN Williams Institute Employment

  14. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

  15. http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;2 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;3 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;4 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;5 http

  16. Hybrid Wall Evaluation for Ten New Construction Homes in Wyandotte, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukachco, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report will detail the design and construction of 10 new houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for new construction at these homes.

  17. Project ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin ~ Response to ISRP/RME Proposal Review Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Synder et al. 2002). The shifting habitat mosaic is controlled by the coupled relationship between flowProject ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia. 1. The ISRP cited a need to "provide better evidence of the linkages of changes in flow regimes

  18. BetterBuildings for Michigan Residential Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a document from BetterBuilding for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program.

  19. BetterBuildings for Michigan Reese Farms Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

  20. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods 1 Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives With support from the U.S. Energy Department's Better Buildings...

  1. It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State University (GVSU) about the successful partnership with two BetterBuildings for Michigan leaders: Mary Templeton, program manager, and Selma Tucker, Grand Rapids regional...

  2. BetterBuildings for Michigan: Commercial Program Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

  3. Energy Department's Fossil Energy Chief to Tour Western Michigan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department's Fossil Energy Chief to Tour Western Michigan University's Clean Coal Research Facilities, Host Business Roundtable Energy Department's Fossil Energy Chief to Tour...

  4. arbor michigan usa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    linguistic Lewis, Richard 2 Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2009) August 16-20, 2009, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Engineering Websites Summary:...

  5. Indiana Michigan Power- Commercial and Industrial Rebates Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana Michigan Power offers rebates for HVAC equipment, variable frequency drives, commercial refrigeration equipments, food service equipment and lighting measures for commercial and industrial...

  6. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  7. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  8. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  9. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  10. Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

  11. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  12. Michigan Offshore Wind Pilot Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  13. The aftermath of silurian faulting in southeast Michigan, and its effect on oil and gas exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, J.H. (Polaris Energy, Jackson, MI (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Macomb Township of Macomb County, southeast Michigan, is found a sinuous normal fault extending along a N82[degrees]W strike, from end to end only 6 mi long, but with more than 260 ft of maximum displacement at the Trenton level. Through about 3 mi of its midsection extent, the main fault is paired with another normal fault with opposite displacement sense, forming a very narrow graben. The timing of development of this divergent wrench feature coincides with Caledonian tectonic activity, a period of intense structural disturbance and regional subsidence throughout the Michigan basin. The fault appears to cut no higher than A[sub 1] Carbonate, although relationships are obscured by subsequent dissolution of more than 500 ft of Salina A[sub 1], A[sub 2], B, D, and F salts along and beyond the trace of the fault. Collapse of interbedded carbonates and shales is evident, although the apparent lack of brecciation indicates salt removal was not rapid. Further, salt removal proceeded throughout the Devonian, producing dramatic compensatory thickening in overlying units. The development of this large feature in prime Niagaran reef territory may have prevented the discovery of reefs by obscuring what is otherwise well-known stratigraphy and seismic signature. The presence of oil production in dolomitized fracture zones in the Trenton/Black River rocks of nearby Ontario may point to similar potential yet remaining along the Macomb faulted trend.

  14. Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil A. B profile across the Parnaiba cratonic basin in NorthEast Brazil. The purpose of this project is to acquire margin of Parnaíba Basin, Brazil. Geophysics 64: 337-356. Ussami N, Cogo de Sa N, Molina EC. 1993

  15. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Annual Outcome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Annual Outcome Assessment and Continuous and Construction Mission and Goals 4 Mission of Construction Management 4 II Academic Quality Plan 5 Program, Context and Mission History of the CM Undergraduate Program Construction Management at Michigan State

  16. May 2 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    May 2 ­ 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Young Researchers and Grad Students of Michigan, Chair, Craig Evans ­ Univ of California, Berkeley, Tai-Ping Liu ­ Stanford, Craig Tracy ­ Univ, Institute of Mathematics and its Applications-University of Minnesota, Department of Mathematics-University

  17. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to orchards of the future. The Benzie-Manistee Horticultural Society in collaboration with Michigan State agricultural water uses (irrigation, cooling, animal, watering, etc.) from both surface and ground water Reporting Program. An online tutorial on the use of the new reporting system is also available. Alternate

  18. CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin â?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

  19. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  20. Post-doctoral Data Analyst University of Michigan Company Information: The University of Michigan Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center (UM-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    Post-doctoral Data Analyst University of Michigan Company Information: The University of Michigan Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center (UM- KECC) is an interdisciplinary research group drawing from-doctoral Data Analyst Duties & Responsibilities: We are inviting applicants to a Post-doctoral Data Analyst

  1. Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

  2. Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Facilities and Operations October 31, 2014 #12;FIVE-YEAR MASTER PLAN UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN of Contents 1 #12;Section I Mission Statement #12;MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the University of Michigan

  3. Version 11/24/2014 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version 11/24/2014 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University Overview of Resources and Services in accordance with University policy. #12;Version 11/24/2014 Page 2 of 5 Consortium of Michigan Veteran Educators http://global.cmich.edu/CMVE Michigan State University is a member of the Consortium of Michigan

  4. Version 9/27/2013 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version 9/27/2013 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University Overview of Resources and Services in accordance with University policy. #12;Version 9/27/2013 Page 2 of 5 Consortium of Michigan Veteran Educators http://global.cmich.edu/CMVE Michigan State University is a member of the Consortium of Michigan

  5. Christiane Jablonowski Phone: 734 763 6238 University of Michigan Fax: 734 936 0503

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Christiane Jablonowski Phone: 734 763 6238 University of Michigan Fax: 734 936 0503 Department ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Associate Professor Sep. 2012 ­ current University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences (AOSS) Assistant Professor Sep. 2006 ­ Aug 2012 University of Michigan

  6. This article was downloaded by: [Michigan State University] On: 27 March 2013, At: 06:03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jianliang

    , Michigan, USA 3 Department of Mathematics and ICES, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USAThis article was downloaded by: [Michigan State University] On: 27 March 2013, At: 06:03 Publisher b Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA c Department

  7. Biophysical Model of Larval Yellow Perch Advection and Settlement in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biophysical Model of Larval Yellow Perch Advection and Settlement in Lake Michigan Dmitry Beletsky1. Dettmers6, 1CILER, SNRE University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 2NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 3Institute for Fisheries Research School of Natural Resources

  8. Abstract We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002­2004. We determined Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained

  9. University of Michigan college of engineering 1 2010 2011 BUlletin IntroductIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    University of Michigan · college of engineering 1 2010 · 2011 BUlletin IntroductIon For students the University of Michigan College of Engineering. Michigan Engineering offers a rare combination of high. Michigan Engineers--at the graduate and undergraduate levels--learn how to apply the latest developments

  10. First Finding of the Amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus and the Mussel Dreissena bugensis in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Thomas F. Nalepa1, Don W. Schloesser2, Steve A. Pothoven3, Darryl W. Hondorp3, David L. Fanslow1 Commonwealth Blvd. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48015 2Great Lakes Science Center, USGS 1451 Green Rd. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48015 3Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research University of Michigan 2200

  11. Modeling the 19982003 summer circulation and thermal structure in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the 1998­2003 summer circulation and thermal structure in Lake Michigan Dmitry Beletsky,1 to Lake Michigan on a 2 km grid for 6 consecutive years to study interannual variability of summer. Circulation in southern Lake Michigan appears to be more variable than circulation in northern Lake Michigan

  12. Evidence for periodic, Holocene loess deposition in kettles in a sandy, interlobate landscape, Michigan, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    , Michigan, USA Trevor Hobbs, Randall J. Schaetzl , Michael D. Luehmann Department of Geography, Michigan-continental North America, but are rare in Michigan, and most loess found in this region is of last-glacial age. We kettled, interlobate upland in southern Michigan, which we named the Evart Upland, for its location near

  13. Energy Incentive Programs, Michigan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFactIowa EnergyMaineMichigan Energy

  14. Linden, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting ControlWyoming:RhodeLienHwa LLH JumpMichigan:

  15. Lowell, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole,Lotsee,Energy InformationMichigan: Energy

  16. Ahmeek, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) |Agawam,Ahmeek, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump

  17. Waterford, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump|Michigan:

  18. Webberville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to:Ohio: EnergyWebGen Systems Jump to:Michigan: Energy

  19. Charlotte, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEICharlotte County, Virginia: EnergyMichigan:

  20. Farmington, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway,Farmers Mutual ElectricMichigan: Energy

  1. Kentwood, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington: Energy Resources JumpKentwood, Michigan:

  2. Kingsley, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County,Kingsley, Michigan: Energy

  3. Holly, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation,Jersey:Heights, New Jersey:Michigan: Energy

  4. Holt, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation,Jersey:Heights, NewOhio:Michigan: Energy

  5. Otsego, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy ResourcesOtsego, Michigan: Energy

  6. Oxford, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan: Energy

  7. Fermilab Today | Michigan State University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe,Michigan State University August

  8. Michigan Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015 RDSHARP SupportingMarchofMichigan's ShiawasseeThe

  9. Michigan Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergyInstitute of StandardsMichiganData

  10. Douglas, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan,Nevada:Massachusetts:

  11. Northport, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNew Jersey: EnergyNorthgridMichigan:

  12. Northville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNew Jersey:NorthstarMichigan: Energy

  13. Mason, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to:

  14. Michigan Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| Open EnergyEnergy Information MianyangMichigan

  15. Milford, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware:Midwest,Center, Ohio:Michigan:

  16. Dexter, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan:Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona: Energy3697°,

  17. Dimondale, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search

  18. Allegan, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisinInformation ASHRAEAlkane0754°,Allegan, Michigan:

  19. Beechwood, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County,SouthCity County,New York:Beechwood, Michigan:

  20. Bellevue, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County,SouthCityStrategyMichigan: Energy Resources Jump

  1. University of Michigan Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAGUnitilMichigan Hydrodynamics Jump to:

  2. Rochester, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee:Rochelle,Illinois:Michigan:

  3. Frankenmuth, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbsSalonga,Francis Creek,Frankenmuth, Michigan:

  4. Franklin, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604° Show Map LoadingIllinois: EnergyMichigan: Energy

  5. Gaines, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStormGLOBALGabbsGaines, Michigan:

  6. Glacial Energy Holdings (Michigan) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <Glacial Energy Holdings (Michigan) Jump to:

  7. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  8. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  9. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  10. Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

  11. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2006-November 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the third year of system operation, from December 1, 2006, until November 30, 2007. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation and provides some comparisons with system performance in previous years. The performance of the groundwater restoration systems at Utica in earlier years was summarized in greater detail previously (Argonne 2005, 2006).

  12. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  13. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  14. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

  15. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  16. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  17. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  18. Functions and requirements for the 105 K-East Base Dose Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creed, R.F.

    1994-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the high level functions and requirements for the 105 K-East Basin Dose Reduction Project.

  19. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  20. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  1. The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 195451295127198522195131138225145449924096478081Non-Michigan 269294211198921569066191811758757117911193818156616736Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 11899 1087 2742 825 873 573 1229 44 140 51 500 157 8629 250 528 12 Non-Michigan 5563 473 1720 391

  2. The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 215801744973128422143128118718736135720015527554Non-Michigan 61114366312065197656441371271988766117011343951185817159Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 12109 1319 2847 863 880 581 1367 95 116 36 484 151 8294 412 968 44 Non-Michigan 5202 414 1398 275

  3. The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 195431575071168478184127127524342445622186327832Non-Michigan 34100154311914212678501631091822797121611683879174516794Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 11983 1224 2819 863 880 581 1282 71 135 44 522 167 8472 339 692 22 Non-Michigan 5619 482 1657 366

  4. Pre-solicitation Meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given to attendees of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project pre-solicitation meeting held in Detroit, Michigan, on March 19, 2003.

  5. Draft 'Michigan Saves' Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund. Author: State of Michigan

  6. Proceedings of the Conference on a Michigan Biomaterials Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the Conference on a Michigan Biomaterials Initiative Biomaterials Conference Proceedings Oct. 3-4, 2013 3 Table of Contents All.mtu.edu/forest/biomaterials Section Heading Page Executive Summary of Conference Proceedings

  7. Diamond Substrate Development at the Michigan State University...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diamond Substrate Development at the Michigan State University and Fraunhofer USA's Center for Coatings and Diamond Technologies May 4, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Thomas...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Michigan Fuel Forward

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Clean Energy Coalition at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Michigan Fuel Forward.

  9. Farmington Hills Partners With Michigan Saves With Eyes on the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hills is one of 50 communities competing to reduce energy over the next two years to win GUEP's 5 million prize. "We don't want financing to be a barrier," Michigan Saves...

  10. Oxford Area Community School District (Michigan) Bonds Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan’s Oxford Area Community School District entered into an energy savings performance contract and issued limited tax general obligation bonds to fund the up-front costs of almost $3 million of energy-related improvements. Case study is excerpted from Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements. Author: Merrian Borgeson and Mark Zimring

  11. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  12. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  13. Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published* Department of Chemistry, Michigan State UniVersity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 ReceiVed August 19, 2008; Re

  14. Michigan State University's commitment to outreach and engagement begins with its institutional mission statement, which reflects the institution's founding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University's commitment to outreach and engagement begins with its institutional's Committee on University Outreach issued a report, University Outreach at Michigan State University and research. Since the publication of the Provost's Committee report, Michigan State University has been

  15. Operator Licensing Policy Outline the policy to ensure proper licensure of operators at the University of Michigan (U-M)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    at the University of Michigan (U-M) according to State of Michigan law. Policy 1. In order to operate a U-M vehicle, State of Michigan and federal guidelines require that the operator possess the appropriate vehicle

  16. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  17. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6, 1945: Trinity Test JulyDepartmentJust PlainK

  18. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14..., '' is a general discussion of the economic factors as they are related to demand for water in each basin. In addition to a statewide outlook, a separate discussion for each basin is presented which includes future population projections. In closing...

  19. BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

  20. Overview of the Michigan DNR Forest Certification Program By Dennis Nezich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Overview of the Michigan DNR Forest Certification Program By Dennis Nezich January 27, 2011 OF CERTIFICATION: The scope of certification includes 3.9 million acres of state land within the Michigan State

  1. Residents Learn to Open Their Doors to Energy Efficiency in Michigan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Logo of BetterBuildings for Michigan. BetterBuildings for Michigan conducts neighborhood "sweeps" that have already marketed the program's offerings to more than 11,000 homeowners...

  2. Moving Violation Policy Outline the policy regarding moving violations issued to operators in University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    to operators in University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles. Vehicle Use Policy 1. Staff members are responsible 1. Operators must be properly licensed according to the laws of the State of Michigan and federal

  3. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  4. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  5. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  6. Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3088

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BILL COOK, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION FORESTER JANUARY 2010 Where Does Michigan's Wood Supply Michigan forest land? Can woody biomass be harvested, transported, and delivered at a profit? Will woody biomass harvesting compete with existing forest industries? How does the woody biomass potential compare

  7. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  8. CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhavnani, Suresh K.

    CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research Suresh), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Abstract Numerous biomedical resources (e.g. websites to help find of biomedical resources at the University of Michigan revealed that the resources can be organized along

  9. Florian Enescu Ph.D. in Mathematics (August 2001), University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enescu, Florian

    Florian Enescu EDUCATION · Ph.D. in Mathematics (August 2001), University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (thesis advisor: Professor Melvin Hochster) · Master of Science (August 1999), University of Michigan, Berkeley, California · (1996 - 1999) Graduate Student Instructor, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

  10. Revised:01/2011 A PLEDGE OF SUPPORT FOR MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised:01/2011 A PLEDGE OF SUPPORT FOR MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY #12;Personal Information: Name):__________________________________ _______________________________________________________ My/Our_total_gift_will_be_paid_as_indicated: _ A_check_payable_to_Michigan_State_University _ A) _ Employer(s):___________________________________________ Make_checks_payable_to_"Michigan_State_University

  11. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from the following Universities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY · DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from School of Professional PSY - PsyD University of Michigan ­ MSW & MPH Western Michigan University - MA MSU the following Universities and Professional Schools to learn about their graduate programs, admission

  12. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HOMER HIGBEE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HOMER HIGBEE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION awareness at Michigan State University through involvement in programs that promote cross exchange during the 25 years that he served in the Office of International Studies and Programs at Michigan

  13. Leading innovation in food, natural resources and energy Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Leading innovation in food, natural resources and energy Michigan State University #12;#12;Leading innovation through collaboration AgBioResearch scientists represent six colleges at Michigan State University than 120 years, AgBioResearch (formerly the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station or MAES) has

  14. Revoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University includes the following: student's name,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Revoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University Michigan University to release all information considered Directory Information until I notify the Office. This is to certify that I wish to remove my name from the privacy list at Western Michigan University. I understand

  15. December 7, 2012 Re: Michigan State University's Tribal Natural Resource Internship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    December 7, 2012 Re: Michigan State University's Tribal Natural Resource Internship Program Dear MSU Student, The Native American Institute at Michigan State University is pleased to announce by securing placement for them in tribal offices here in Michigan. The Native American Institute has partnered

  16. GARY C. STEINHARDT B.S. 1966 Agricultural Science, Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    1 VITA GARY C. STEINHARDT EDUCATION B.S. 1966 Agricultural Science, Michigan State University M.S. 1968 Soil Science, Michigan State University Ph.D. 1976 Agronomy, Purdue University EXPERIENCE 1966-1968 Graduate Assistant, Michigan State University 1971-1976 Graduate Assistant and Instructor, Purdue

  17. Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Boulder (MSF373-8) Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University Douches at Michigan State University (517-355- 0271 x 194, douchesd@msu.edu). Morphological and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Plant Variety Protection: In application Strengths: Boulder

  18. Lecture 16 : Definitions, theorems, proofs MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 1 / 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magyar, Peter

    ). MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 2 / 8 #12;Group Axioms Definition299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 3 / 8 #12;Group Axioms Definition Is Z with + a group? MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 3 / 8 #12;Group

  19. A History of the Department of Statistics and Probability Michigan State University*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RM-691 A History of the Department of Statistics and Probability Michigan State University* www of the Department of Statistics. W. Dowell Baten (PhD, University of Michigan, 1929) came to MSU as an AssociateD, University of Michigan, 1946) joined in 1946; Ingram Olkin (PhD, University of North Carolina, 1951) joined

  20. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 12 May Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany e Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, US Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, US (Received 23 June 2009; final

  1. USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME AND MARKS IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME AND MARKS IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS and political organizations may not use the trademarks of the University of Michigan as part of their campaign materials or communications. For instance, they may not use the Block-M, the University seal, the Michigan

  2. Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY WINTER 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY WINTER 2014 Trail Blazing ofprivatephilanthropyatMichiganStateUniversity. Vice President for University Advancement Robert W. Groves Editorial Team Creative Partners Michigan State University University Advancement University Development Spartan Way 535

  3. OSL ages on glaciofluvial sediment in northern Lower Michigan constrain expansion of the Laurentide ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    , Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1117, USA b Department of Earth and Environmental for the MIS 2 (late Wisconsin) advance into central northern Lower Michigan. We suggest that widespread ice chronologic control on the advancing MIS 2 ice margin in this part of Lower Michigan and refine the under

  4. A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan Jing Lou and David J. Schwab NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan Dmitry Beletsky1 Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Nathan Hawley NOAA

  5. University of Michigan ADVANCE Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    University of Michigan ADVANCE Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Sekaquaptewa received her undergraduate degree in psychology from) and joined Michigan faculty in 1987. He serves as the Editor of the ASME J. Vibration and Acoustics and has

  6. Circulation during winter and northerly storm events in southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circulation during winter and northerly storm events in southern Lake Michigan Y. R. Rao National Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA C. R. Murthy National Water Research Institute, Burlington, Ontario. [1] Moored observations of winds, currents, and temperature made off the southeastern Lake Michigan

  7. FALL/WINTER 2014 Volume 32, Nos. 3 & 4 Research in Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    FALL/WINTER 2014 · Volume 32, Nos. 3 & 4 Research in Michigan reaps great rewards LAKE EFFECT #12;I feel fortunate to have been raised in Michigan and to have spent countless vacations within the Great of Michigan wine. This past summer, we rented a cottage in the heart of Glen Arbor -- the home of the Sleeping

  8. Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY Spring IN THIS ISSUE INTRODUCTION Research Mentoring P.1 RESEARCH ETHICS SYMPOSIUM Michigan State University April 1 N. Henry, Assistant Professor Department of Physiology Michigan State University P.3 ETHICS

  9. Pluripotential theory in a non-archimedean Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonsson, Mattias

    Pluripotential theory in a non-archimedean setting Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) NUS, Jan 6, 2011 Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) Pluripotential theory in a non with S. Boucksom and C. Favre. Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) Pluripotential theory in a non

  10. Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM recognizes the gift intentions of: Donor: Address: City: State: Zip Telephone: Email: to Michigan State University through the Michigan State University Foundation. This gift of: (Please include model & serial

  11. High-Stakes Testing and State Financial Aid: Evidence From Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    High-Stakes Testing and State Financial Aid: Evidence From Michigan Paper Presented at the ASHE for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education University of Michigan School of Education 610 East of Michigan School of Education 610 East University, 2117 SEB Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259 734-764-9472 dtshapir

  12. Legal Challenges to High-Stakes Testing: A Case of Disparate Impact in Michigan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Legal Challenges to High-Stakes Testing: A Case of Disparate Impact in Michigan? Paper Presented University of Michigan School of Education 610 East University, 2108D SEB Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259 734 of Higher and Postsecondary Education University of Michigan School of Education 610 East University, 2117

  13. Geostatistical modeling of the spatial variability of arsenic in groundwater of southeast Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geostatistical modeling of the spatial variability of arsenic in groundwater of southeast Michigan in groundwater of southeast Michigan, accounting for arsenic data collected at private residential wells and the hydrogeochemistry of the area. The arsenic data set, which was provided by the Michigan Department of Environmental

  14. Revised 01//2011 Michigan State University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised 01//2011 Michigan State University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. AUTHORIZATION TO INVOICE MSU EMPLOYEE OUTSIDE OF LANSING AREA Bill to: Michigan State University Workers of services to be provided by Michigan State University if the services are for a work related injury. 3

  15. Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan Michael D. Luehmann , Randall J. Schaetzl, Bradley A. Miller, Michael E. Bigsby Department of Geography, Michigan November 2012 Available online 1 February 2013 Keywords: Loess Michigan Particle size filtering Bimodal

  16. Copyright 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees Learning to Give

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Copyright 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees Learning to Give Learning from the Pilot Schools February 8, 2006 Report by the MSU Evaluation Team #12;© Copyright 2006 Michigan State Michigan State University Board of Trustees MSU/LTG · Formative phase: 1997-2000 ­ Teacher experiences

  17. The History of Summer Surveying Camp at The University of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    The History of Summer Surveying Camp at The University of Michigan by Eugene A. Glysson, Ph.D., P.E., D.E.E., Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering The University of Michigan has the very first such camp in Whitmore Lake in 1874. The camp moved from place to place within Michigan

  18. University of Michigan Office of the Vice President and Secretary of the University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    University of Michigan Office of the Vice President and Secretary of the University USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME, MARKS, SEAL, AND IMAGES IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS, but not limited to, the Internal Revenue Code and the Michigan Campaign Finance Law. 1. The trademarks and service

  19. DIVISION S-5-PEDOLOGY Secondary Carbonates in Three Fine and Fine-loamy Alfisols in Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    DIVISION S-5-PEDOLOGY Secondary Carbonates in Three Fine and Fine-loamy Alfisols in Michigan can be troublesome. We studied three Alfisol pedons in Michigan that contained secondary carbonates are young soils or those in drier climates. The Late Wisconsinan glaciated region of Michigan and nearby

  20. A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan food web in Lake Michigan were examined using a three- dimensional (3-D) coupled biological to simulate the heterotrophic process in southern Lake Michigan. INDEX TERMS: 4815 Oceanography: Biological

  1. Aftershocks of an Explosively Induced Mine Collapse at White Pine, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aftershocks of an Explosively Induced Mine Collapse at White Pine, Michigan W. Scott Phillips1 , D collapse and subsequent aftershocks at White Pine, Michigan, using an array of 12 seismic stations, sited controlled mine collapse at White Pine, Michigan gave us the opportunity to study a collapse

  2. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

  3. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the RGBI project, formally titled Efficient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin, involves about 150 researchers, specialists, and county... the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program...

  4. The ending of an era: After more than 10 years, the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available for the people of the basin, Lacewell said. In addition, desalination use in South Texas has grown and become competitive with municipal water production. Project sponsor NIFA o#17;en uses data produced through RGBI because it is broad..., the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes Summer 2013 tx H2O 9 Scientists with the Rio Grande Basin Initiative used aquatic weed control methods and herbicides to control invasive water plants such as water hyacinth, pictured. Photo by Danielle...

  5. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

  6. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  7. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  8. The Intelligent Systems and Control Laboratory in the Mechanical Engineering -Engineering Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites applications for a PhD Student Fellowship resume to Professor Gordon Parker at ggparker@mtu.edu. Michigan Technological University is an equal control, optimal control, etc.). Michigan Tech is in the small community of Houghton, Michigan. It lies

  9. CHI 97 . 22-27 MARCH 1997 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEWS HCI at the University of Michigan's School of Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Judith S.

    CHI 97 . 22-27 MARCH 1997 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEWS HCI at the University of Michigan's School of Information University of Michigan 550 East University Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1092 USA +1 313 764 The School of Information at the University of Michigan is a new graduate school that offers highly

  10. Medical Certification Policy Outline the policy to ensure proper licensure of operators at the University of Michigan (U-M)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    at the University of Michigan (U-M) according to State of Michigan law. Policy 1. In order to operate a U-M vehicle, State of Michigan and federal guidelines require that the operator possess the appropriate vehicle card) to operate. 3. Federal guidelines and State of Michigan law require operators of the following

  11. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  12. Detroit Beach, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:Detroit Beach, Michigan: Energy

  13. Dickinson County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan:Dewey-Humboldt,Dickenson County,Michigan: Energy

  14. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  15. Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen Nellesen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

  16. Tuesday, January 17, 2012 303 International Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , reservoirs, wetlands, ponds and other pooled water make up more than 90% of the readily available fresh water global water debates. Join Dr. Masahisa Nakamura as he discusses an approach termed as Integrated Lake Basin Management (ILBM). Find out what is known about these water systems and how crises

  17. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  18. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  19. State Registration Number Michigan Department Of Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality Division RENEWABLE OPERATING PERMIT STAFF REPORT Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility SRN: M4148 located at 5700 Russell Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48211-2545 RO Pennit Number 199600325 Permit Number: Staff Report Date: RO Penmit Issuance Date: RO Permit Expiration Date: 199600325 October 14, 2003

  20. THE MICHIGAN TECH T~ ~ FOR~ST~R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but h e also is able to see practical forestry at work. Three large private timber-owing companies. The Calumet and Hecla Copper Mining Company has set aside a large tract of virgin northern hardwoods timber The Michigan College of Mining and Technology is located at Houghton in the heart 01' the timber