Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric tons of CO2 over a 4-year period. The project and EA are on hold.

2

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in year 2 of this project is highlighted by the completing of the writing and testing of the project database, ''Atlas'', and populating it with all the project data gathered to date. This includes digitization of 17,000+ original Scout Tickets for the Michigan Basin. Work continues on the Driller's Reports, where they have scanned about 50,000 pages out of an estimated 300,000 pages. All of the scanned images have been attached to ''Atlas'', the visual database viewer developed for this project. A complete set of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan has been downloaded from the USGS Web sites, decompressed and converted to ArcView Grid files. A large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan. It presents unusual problems due to its size and they are working with vendors on compression and display algorithms (e.g. MrSID{copyright}) in an attempt to make it available over the Internet, both for viewing and download. A set of aeromagnetic data for the Michigan Basin has been acquired and is being incorporated into the study. As reported previously, the general fracture picture in the Michigan Basin is a dominant NW-SE trend with a conjugate NE-SW trend. Subsurface, DEM and gravity data support the interpretation of a graben-type deep basement structural trend coincident with the Michigan Basin Gravity High. They plan to incorporate the aeromagnetic data into this interpretation as well.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Weatherization Projects on the Rise in Michigan County | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weatherization Projects on the Rise in Michigan County Weatherization Projects on the Rise in Michigan County August 12, 2010 - 5:03pm Addthis Kevin Craft Monroe County Opportunity...

4

Geochemical analysis of crude oil from northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1986, the Ohio Board of Regents awarded a research grant to Ashland College to investigate the basinal origin of crude oil through trace-element analysis. The major thrust of the project was to attempt to finger print crude oils of various ages and depths from the northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins, to learn if the oldest crudes may have migrated among the basins. This in turn might give a more definitive time for the separation of the three basins. Nickel to vanadium ratios, were chosen to be the discriminators. Nickel to vanadium ratios show that the Trenton oil from the fields at Lima, Ohio; Oak Harbor in Ottawa County, Ohio; Urbana, Indiana; Peru, Indiana; and Albion, Michigan, are all different. The Trempealeau oils in Harmony and Lincoln Townships, Morrow County, are similar but they are different from those in Peru and Bennington Townships. The Devonian oils of the Illinois and Appalachian basins are distinctly different. The Berea oil shows little or no variability along strike. The Mississippian oils of the Illinois basin are different from the Berea oils and the Salem oil is different from the Chester. The only thing consistent about the Clinton is its inconsistency.

Noel, J.A.; Cole, J.; Innes, C.; Juzwick, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

G. Grammer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration.

Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the accomplishments of this past reporting period are obtaining a complete landgrid for the State of Michigan and the digital processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We can now extract lineations from the DEMs automatically using machine algorithms. One tentative result that may be very significant is that we may be seeing manifestations of buried structures in the DEM data. We are looking at a set of extracted lineations in the northern lower peninsula that appear to follow the trend of the pinnacle reefs (Silurian) which had relief approaching 300 feet but are now buried to greater than 3000 feet. We have also extracted the dolomite alteration data from all fields and can show that this is mainly confined to the basin center. It may be related to the paleo-rift suggested by the paleomagnetic and gravity data. As reported last time, the acquisition of a 3D seismic dataset over Stoney Point Field from Marathon Oil Company, is complete and attention is being devoted to incorporating the data into the project database and utilizing it. The surface lineation study is focusing on Stoney Point Field using the high-resolution DEM data and plotting of subsurface formation top data for the main reservoir, the Trenton (Ordovician) Formation. The fault pattern at Stoney Point is well documented by Marathon and we are looking for any manifestations on the surface. The main project database is now about as complete as it will be for this project. The main goals have been met, although the scanning of the paper records will have to continue beyond the scheduled end of the project due to the sheer number of records and the increased donations of data from companies as word spread of the project. One of the unanticipated benefits of the project has been the cooperation of gas and oil companies that are or were active in the Michigan Basin in donating material to the project. Both Michigan Tech and Western Michigan continue to receive donations at an accelerating pace. The data management software developed to handle the data, Atlas, is scheduled to undergo a 3rd revision before the project ends. The goals are to streamline access to the data by improving the display and add several new features, including the ability to turn the landgrid on and off. We may also be able to include the capability to calculate or recalculate footage calls as well. We discovered the reason that some of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan contain high levels of noise and are making one last attempt to acquire a set of good files before the project ends. This will greatly improve the large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) that has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Michigan Basin. Secondary recovery in reef trends yields more production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary recovery practices in reef trends in Michigan are described. Waterflooding in the Chester 18 Unit began in 1978; it currently has 6 injection wells and 11 production wells. The production wells use a submersible pumping unit, and current production levels are estimated at 3800 bopd. The present level of injection is ca. 17,000 bpd of water. The company operating the field has concluded that more barrels can be produced from a reef if a waterflood is started early. There are 55 to 60 such reefs with potential for supplemental recovery.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit --A new Michigan State University GREEEN project -Bill Shane and Tom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Alternative Markets for peach cull fruit -- A new Michigan State University GREEEN project - Bill Shane and Tom Zabadal, Michigan State University Michigan's fresh market peach crop Michigan peaches to make wine and brandy but the high costs of removing pits by hand have hampered this use

14

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

15

Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the southern basin of Lake Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the southern basin of Lake Michigan have planktonic, terrigenous, and petroleum residue origins. Surficial sediments collected near the eastern shore in 60-80 m of water contained more petroleum residue and planktonic hydrocarbons and exhibited less terrigenous character than sediments collected from the deepest location in the basin. Petroleum residue inputs have increased since 1900 as evidenced by a change in the flux of an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons from 6 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr to a flux of approximately 100 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr in 1980. Sediment profiles of the UCM exhibited subsurface concentration maxima that may be due to reduced inputs of combustion products or feeding by oligochaetes. Profiles of n-C{sub l7} and pristane indicated that planktonic n-alkanes undergo degradation in the aerobic, mixed zone of the sediments.

Doskey, P.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Division; Andren, A.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Water Chemistry Program

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation (Devonian) of the Michigan Basin using horizontal drains. Final report, April 28, 1994--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total hydrocarbon production in the Michigan Basin has surpassed 1 billion barrels (Bbbls) and total unrecovered reserves are estimated at 1--2 BBbls. However, hydrocarbon production in Michigan has fallen from 35 MMbbls/yr in 1979 to about 10 MMbbls/yr in 1996. In an effort to slow this decline, a field demonstration project designed around using a horizontal well to recover bypassed oil was designed and carried out at Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI. The project had two goals: to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee Formation, and to characterize additional Dundee reservoirs (29) that are look alikes to the Crystal Field. As much as 85 percent of the oil known to exist in the Dundee Formation in the Michigan Basin remains in the ground as bypassed oil. Early production techniques in the 137 fields were poor, and the Dundee was at risk of being abandoned, leaving millions of barrels of oil behind. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, Michigan is a good example of a worn out field. Crystal Field was once a prolific producer which had been reduced to a handful of wells, the best of which produced only 5 barrels per day. The demonstration well drilled as a result of this project, however, has brought new life to the Crystal Field. Horizontal drilling is one of the most promising technologies available for oil production. The new well was completed successfully in October of 1995 and has been producing 100 barrels of oil per day, 20 times better than the best conventional well in the field.

Wood, J.R.; Pennington, W.D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Michigan Business Development Program (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Michigan Business Development Program provides grants, loans, and other economic assistance to businesses for highly competitive projects that create jobs and/or provide investment. A minimum...

18

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (CityCountyState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit...

19

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies summarized herein were conducted during 2009–2014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a practice called CO{sub 2} sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy?funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional?scale and point?scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo?engineering information was developed through a small?scale test of CO{sub 2} injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial?scale flow rate of CO{sub 2} injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial?scale mass of CO{sub 2} (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO{sub 2} within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS?related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional?scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial?scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional?scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO{sub 2} injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial?scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic?data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near?surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

Leetaru, Hannes

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Knox Supergroup is a significant part of the Cambrian-Ordovician age sedimentary deposition in the Illinois Basin. While there is a very small amount of oil production associated with the upper Knox, it is more commonly used as a zone for both Class I and Class II disposal wells in certain areas around the state. Based on the three penetrations of the Knox Formation at the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration site in Macon County, Illinois, there is potential for certain zones in the Knox to be used for CO2 sequestration. More specifically, the Potosi member of the Knox Formation at about –3,670 feet (ft) subsea depth would be a candidate as all three penetrations had massive circulation losses while drilling through this interval. Each well required the setting of cement plugs to regain wellbore stability so that the intermediate casing could be set and successfully cemented to surface. Log and core analysis suggests significant karst porosity throughout the Potosi member. The purpose of this study is to develop a well plan for the drilling of a CO2 injection well with the capability to inject 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA] CO2 into the Knox Formation over a period of 30 years.

Kirksey, Jim; Ansari, Sajjad; Malkewicz, Nick; Leetaru, Hannes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects ANN DENISE FISSEKIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects By ANN DENISE FISSEKIS B.......................................................................6 Chapter III. Climate Change................................................................11 models...........................................................20 Climate change data

Lund, Jay R.

24

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected Plan provides approximately 170,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage volume in a twoCERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida 23 August 2007 Abstract: The purpose of the Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir project

US Army Corps of Engineers

26

Michigan Collateral Support Program (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Michigan Collateral Support Program, supported by the Michigan Growth Fund, aims to supply cash collateral accounts to lenders in order to assist borrowers collateral coverage needs. To...

27

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EERE has supported two innovative projects bringing hands-on education on electric drive vehicles to students. As part of a larger educational Recovery Act project, Michigan...

31

Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault/fracture trends that are not necessarily related to structural elevation. Further work in Phase II will be focused on delineating the relative contribution to fracture-only dolomitization to that which occurs in conjunction with primary facies and/or sequence stratigraphic framework.

G. Michael Grammer

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Comparative analysis of discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase I - Southern Lake Michigan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BP Products North America Inc. (BP) owns and operates a petroleum refinery located on approximately 1,700 acres in Whiting, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan. BP provided funding to Purdue University-Calumet Water Institute (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct studies related to wastewater treatment and discharges. Purdue and Argonne are working jointly to identify and characterize technologies that BP could use to meet the previous discharge permit limits for total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia after refinery modernization. In addition to the technology characterization work, Argonne conducted a separate project task, which is the subject of this report. In Phase I of a two-part study, Argonne estimated the current levels of discharge to southern Lake Michigan from significant point and nonpoint sources in Illinois, Indiana, and portions of Michigan. The study does not consider all of the chemicals that are discharged. Rather, it is narrowly focused on a selected group of pollutants, referred to as the 'target pollutants'. These include: TSS, ammonia, total and hexavalent chromium, mercury, vanadium, and selenium. In Phase II of the study, Argonne will expand the analysis to cover the entire Lake Michigan drainage basin.

Veil, J. A.; Elcock, D.; Gasper, J. R.; Environmental Science Division

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

35

Design criteria document, Fire Protection Task, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, Project W-405  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K Basin were constructed in the early 1950`s with a 20 year design life. The K Basins are currently in their third design life and are serving as a near term storage facility for irradiated N Reactor fuel until an interim fuel storage solution can be implemented. In April 1994, Project W-405, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, was established to address (among other things) the immediate fire protection needs of the 100K Area. A Fire Barrier Evaluation was performed for the wall between the active and inactive areas of the 105KE and 105KW buildings. This evaluation concludes that the wall is capable of being upgraded to provide an equivalent level of fire resistance as a qualified barrier having a fire resistance rating of 2 hours. The Fire Protection Task is one of four separate Tasks included within the scope of Project W405, K Basin Essential systems Recovery. The other three Tasks are the Water Distribution System Task, the Electrical System Task, and the Maintenance Shop/Support Facility Task. The purpose of Project W-405`s Fire Protection Task is to correct Life Safety Code (NFPA 101) non-compliances and to provide fire protection features in Buildings 105KE, 105KW and 190KE that are essential for assuring the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the 100K Area Facilities` Irradiated Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins).

Johnson, B.H.

1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives Initiatives Through aEnergyLowJoelProcess K Basins

38

Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

G. Michael Grammer

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Michigan State University Northwestern Michigan College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University and Northwestern Michigan College Reverse Transfer Transcript Release Michigan State University 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150 East Lansing, MI 48824-2603 Phone: (517) 355 Drive Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48858 I authorize Michigan State University to send my transcript

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

TheThird Century A Roadmap to the University of Michigan's Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TheThird Century A Roadmap to the University of Michigan's Future James J. Duderstadt The Millennium Project The University of Michigan #12;@ 2011 The Millennium Project, The University of Michigan All rights reserved. The Millennium Project The University of Michigan 2001 Duderstadt Center 2281

Kamat, Vineet R.

42

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Michigan E85 Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

Sandstrom, Matthew M.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM). The NTCRA is an interim action that reduces the risks to human health and the environment by minimizing the potential for release of hazardous substances. The interim action does not prejudice the final end-state alternative. (authors)

Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

49

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A joint venture between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the Strategic Growth Initiative Grant Program was...

51

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Summary geologic report on the Missoula/Bitterroot Drilling Project, Missoula/Bitterroot Basins, Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the drilling project was to obtain information to assess the favorability of the Tertiary sedimentary units in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys for uranium potential. The group of Montana Tertiary basins, including the Missoula and Bitterroot Basins, has been assigned a speculative uranium potential of 46,557 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at $100/lb by the 1980 National Uranium Resource Evaluation report. The seven drill holes, two in the Missoula Valley and five in the Bitterroot Valley, verified observations made during surface studies and provided additional information about the subsurface that was previously unknown. No uranium was found, although of the two localities the Bitterroot Valley is the more favorable. Three stratigraphic units were tentatively identified on the basis of lithology: pre-Renova clastic units, Renova Formation equivalents, and Sixmile Creek Formation equivalents. Of the three, the Renova Formation equivalents in the Bitterroot Valley appear to be the most favorable for possible uranium occurrences and the pre-Renova clastic units the least favorable.

Abramiuk, I.N. (comp.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Michigan State University Alumni Association MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Alumni Association Bylaws #12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI of the organization shall be the Michigan State University Alumni Association (hereinafter, the "Association"). Section 2 Mission Statement The Michigan State University Alumni Association supports and enhances

56

Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan Effect of Modulation on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan Effect of Modulation on Single Grit Scratch University Houghton, Michigan Introduction Grinding produces cracks that require a secondary process Technological University Houghton, Michigan Background : Modulation Assisted Machining · Reduction of effective

Endres. William J.

57

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

University of Michigan -Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan - Traveler Contact Information Name __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ Email __________________________________ University of Michigan/Clinic __________________________________ Address __________________________________ Phone __________________________________ University of Michigan

Eustice, Ryan

60

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi. Welcome to the Online Professional Master of Science), and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Michigan State University (MSU). This booklet contains important, Program Director Online Master of Science in Food Safety Michigan State University 1129 Farm Lane, Rm B 51

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Indiana Michigan Power Co (Michigan) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany:Information IDSDloomis'sTransportTERI ProjectsMichigan

63

Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the N. Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. This study presents what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. Project monitoring procedures, established to control and optimize waterflood operations, have made it possible to develop the proper approach to the geochemical disruptions. The more important items in this program are the measurement of produced and injected volumes, transient pressure analyses, injection well profile surveys, chemical analysis of the injection and production fluid samples, radioactive injection tracers, and continuous bottom-hole pressures from submersible pumps. 15 references.

Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.; Wright, M.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5210 269 387-4251 Fax 269 387-4227 THIRD PARTY BILLING POLICY Western Michigan University (WMU# (269) 387-4227 Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue E-mail: wmu

de Doncker, Elise

65

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geochemical aspects of Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the Northern Michigan Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten projects had been installed by the end of 1982 so that significant operational results are available for evaluation. The design and operating programs initially planned for the projects have been proven successful. Operating data from some of the more mature projects indicate that the understanding and proper management of the geochemical systems for these projects will be crucial to the success of the project. The intent of this paper is to present what is currently known and understood about the geochemistry of Michigan waterfloods. The geochemical system is here defined as all the various interconnected fluid environments constituting the project, namely the fresh water source system, the injection well system, the reservoir, the production wells, the production facilities, and the produced water disposal or reinjection facilities. Problem areas have been identified and corrective action has been taken or planned to counteract the detrimental effects of disruptions to the geochemical system. These upsets are brought about by injection of water into the reservoir where an equilibrium condition had existed between the formation fluids and the rock.

Tinker, G.E.; Barnes, P.F.; Olson, E.E.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University PHILANTHROPIST AWARD. This award is presented-going financial support and leadership to Michigan State University. The candidates will have demonstrated

68

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies A DOE-sponsored project by Michigan Technological University 2002-2004 Michigan Technological University has been awarded a contract from the US Department of Energy to establish a set

70

The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Design criteria document, electrical system, K-Basin essential systems recovery, Project W-405  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Design Criteria Document provides the criteria for design and construction of electrical system modifications for 100K Area that are essential to protect the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel in the K-Basin facilities.

Hoyle, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Forestry Policies (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan's 19 million acres of forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources, Forestry and Water Division. The Department issued its Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy document...

73

Michigan Institute Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Onset of Fast Magnetic Reconnection's magnetosphere, and solar flares. These observations place strong constraints on theory, which must explain

Shyy, Wei

74

Michigan Institute Plasma Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Neutral Atom Imaging of the Terrestrial re- search includes ion heating in the solar corona, electric double layers, magne- tosphere neutral

Shyy, Wei

75

Capital Access Program (CAP) (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Capital Access Program (CAP), utilizes public resources to generate private financing for small business in Michigan seeking access to capital. Funding from the Michigan Strategic Fund is...

76

Michigan Institute Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Universal Magnetic Structures Prof. Mark Moldwin Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Thursday, 19 Nov and provide examples on how thinking about discrete structures can add to our understanding of the solar

Shyy, Wei

77

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE Approved by The Western Michigan University Board Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Effective August 2008 #12;A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS... ...a for the Advancement of Teaching; Ernest L. Boyer (frwd.); Princeton, New Jersey; 1990 #12;WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

de Doncker, Elise

78

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008 have read the Western Michigan University Third Party Billing Policy and agree to the terms. I am authorizing Western Michigan University to bill for the specified tuition and related fees for the term

de Doncker, Elise

79

K Basin sludge treatment project chemical procesing baseline time diagram study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an initial basis for determining the duration of operating steps and the required resources for chemically treating K Basin sludge before transporting it to Tank Farms. It was assumed that all operations would take place within a TPA specified 13-month timeframe.

KLIMPER, S.C.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

PNIC*FF2a U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RECIPIENT:Michigan Economic Development Corporation STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE : Michigan Biogas Center of Excellence Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument...

85

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Four intracratonic basins of North America, the Hudson Bay, Michigan, Illinois and Williston. The Williston and Illinois basins are associated with wide (V200 km) and thin anomalies (V100 km), whereas basin and 270 km beneath the Williston [4,6]. For two ba- sins of similar age located on the same Precam

Kaminski, Edouard

88

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Michigan: Michigan's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Michigan.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.

Sweetzer, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Michigan Saves- Business Energy Financing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan Saves is a non-profit that offers financing options for energy efficiency improvements throughout Michigan. The Business Energy Financing Program was started with seed funding from the...

93

Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Robertson, Shawn W.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Project EARTH-13-SHELL2: Controls on the distribution of methane hydrates in sedimentary basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unconventional gas exploration, since they host a significant fraction of the world's gas reserves. This project dominant in given contexts, so that future prediction of hydrate reserves is more accurate, and hydrate, nodular), and these have different implications for reserve estimations and for geohazards. For example

Henderson, Gideon

96

Climate change projection of snowfall in the Colorado River Basin using dynamical downscaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dominguez, M. Durcik, J. Valdes, H. F. Diaz, and C. L. Castro (2012), Climate change projection of snowfall Sungwook Wi,1 Francina Dominguez,2,3 Matej Durcik,3 Juan Valdes,1,3 Henry F. Diaz,4 and Christopher L approximately 85% of the river's 17.2 Ã? 109 m3 annual flow [Christensen and Lettenmaier, 2007; Serreze et al

Castro, Christopher L.

97

Michigan Institute Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The unique capabilities of these and other new facilities, and the challenges and a post-doctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory before joining the faculty at UM in 1973. His

Shyy, Wei

98

futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in both the plant and animal sciences to improve disease resistance and reduce dependency on chemicals, as well as research to identify and develop value- added opportunities for agriculture Economic and Environmental Needs -- was conceived in 1995, its goal was to make Michigan agri- cultural

99

Michigan Institute Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kaita's present research interests focus on plasma-surface interactions and the use of liquid metalsMichigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Up Against the Wall: Liquid Lithium for the Chamber Technology Challenge in Fusion Energy Dr. Robert Kaita Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3:00 pm

Shyy, Wei

100

michigan architecture 20082009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008­2009 michigan architecture Programs + Courses #12;#12;2008­2009 ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS + COURSE This bulletin provides an overview of policies, procedures, degree options, and courses for the U-M architecture of Architecture + Urban Planning 2150 Art + Architecture Building 2000 Bonisteel Boulevard Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Kamat, Vineet R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Office ________________________________________________________ Provost Date #12;Michigan State University is an equal opportunity employer 1. Undergraduate and Graduate. **May include graduate and undergraduate assistants, graders, and other support personnel. #12;Michigan

Liu, Taosheng

102

UMAY (University of Michigan Asks You) Survey 2011 "Why I Chose Michigan"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UMAY (University of Michigan Asks You) Survey 2011 "Why I Chose Michigan" University of Michigan Asks You (UMAY) is a survey that the University administers or influences that prompted you to decide to attend the University of Michigan

Eustice, Ryan

103

Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form Please complete, sign, and return this release form to: Michigan State University of the Registrar at Michigan State University in writing. SIGNATURE: _______________________________________ DATE

104

Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

Hanley, D

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Adapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; this is the adaptation component. Communication of climate change information to various publicsAdapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin 52 Great Lakes in response to potential climate change and variability. When we were preparing for this talk on what we have

106

MEAD Documentation Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEAD Documentation v3.09 Dragomir Radev, University of Michigan John Blitzer, University of Pennsylvania Adam Winkel, University of Michigan Tim Allison, University of Michigan Michael Topper, University of Michigan With contributions by: Arda C¸ elebi, USC/ISI Matthew Craig, University of Michigan Stanko

Radev, Dragomir R.

107

Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from March 12 to June 13, 2002. In total, 899 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 19.8% (899 of 4,525) of the entire 2001-2002 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and were fed freeze-dried krill, Moore-Clark pellets, altered Moore-Clark pellets (soaked in krill extract and dyed), or a combination of the altered Moore-Clark/unaltered Moore-Clark pellets. Formalin was used to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were then subsequently split into two groups for either 1 or 2-month reconditioning. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups, corresponding with reconditioning duration, with releases on May 20/28, 2002. Survival rates for both short-term experiments were high. Long-term reconditioned kelts were subsequently split into three groups that were given three different diet formulations and then released on December 10, 2002. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. A total of 60 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although survival rates were higher in 2002, even higher survival rates would be desirable; overall the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Trial Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are artificially and in some cases severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea-trout (S. trutta). The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To address recovery, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and tested reconditioning and the effects of several diet formulations on its success at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakama Reservation. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from 12 March to 5 July 2001. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus and we tested the use of Ivermectin{trademark}to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups on 15 November 2001 and 18 January 2002. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived in captivity, gained weight, and the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 551 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 18.7% (551 of 2,942) of the entire 2000-2001Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments (208-323 days from capture), 108 fish (19.6%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 100 (94.3%) of 106 sex-identified specimens were female and we estimated that 96% of the reconditioned releases gained weight and developed mature gonads. Nearly one quarter (24.3%) of all reconditioned kelts survived for the duration of the experiment. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding Kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although higher survival rates would have been desirable, the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Nearly 20% of the kelts collected were successfully reconditioned, and radio telemetry allowed us to track some of these fish to the spawning grounds and to obtain documentation of successful redd construction. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Anders, Paul J., Evans, Allen F. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Michigan Technological University Non-Disclosure Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Technological University Non-Disclosure Agreement PARTIES: Michigan Technological mutually agree as follows: 1. Michigan Technological University shall be: Disclosing Party Receiving Party University 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton, MI 49931 Company Name and address In consideration of the mutual

111

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN PERSONNEL HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION I MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN PERSONNEL HANDBOOK OF POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND PRACTICES _____________________________ SECTION II MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY FACULTY BYLAWS AND APPENDICES SEPTEMBER 2012 Revised January 2013, March 2013, April 2013 #12;Michigan State University

112

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 12 March to 28 May 2003. In total, 690 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.8% (690 of 2,235) of the entire 2002-2003 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks, fed freeze-dried krill and received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement; long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets. Oxytetracycline was administered to reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. Formalin was also administered to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 7 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on June 4, 2003. Survival-to-release was very good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 89.9%. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for 5-9 months then released on December 8, 2003. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts increased as well with 62.4% surviving to release and 91.7% rematuring. A total of 47 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. The authors were very pleased with the high survival rates. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival of long-term reconditioned fish and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

BetterBuildings for Michigan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The BetterBuildings for Michigan program offers incentives and loans to residents of certain communities to implement energy efficiency improvements in their homes. Homeowners in the following...

114

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve and ledges and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice

Endres. William J.

115

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, part according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

116

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

117

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

118

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (Regular; Twelve according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

119

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

120

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: BUILDING MECHANIC II (Pay, parking lots, elevators, snow conditions, HVAC equipment temperature control systems, pool systems, ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris

122

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12-month, full and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying

123

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month, part according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere

124

Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

125

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family salmonidae. Natural rates of repeat spawning for Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. Increasing this repeat spawning rate using fish culture techniques could assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to grow and develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for local populations. The primary purpose of this project in 2000 was to test the general feasibility of collecting, feeding, and treating steelhead kelts in a captive environment. Steelhead kelts were collected from the Yakima River at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (Rkm 48) from 12 March to 13 June 2000. Kelts were reconditioned at adjacent Prosser Hatchery in both rectangular and circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus, and we tested the use of ivermectin to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Some the kelts that died during the reconditioning process were analyzed via pathology and gonad histology to ascertain the possible cause of death and to describe their reproductive development at the time of death. All surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on 12 December 2000. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived captivity, gained weight, and on the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 512 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 37% (512/1,380) of the entire 1999-2000 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments ({approx}240 days from capture), 91 fish (18%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 87 (96%) of 91 specimens were female, and we estimated 62 fish (12% of the total collected) had successfully reconditioned. Unfortunately, the majority (82%) of the kelts collected died during the experiment, with the bulk of the moralities occurring during the first 100 days of captivity. Much was learned from the mortalities and modifications were made to the facility to reduce loss for future projects. Overall, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although the reconditioning success rate achieved (estimated at 12%) was substantially lower than we initially hoped yet still six times higher than the natural rate of respawning and the authors are encouraged by the results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study will be incorporated into the experimental design for the upcoming year of research and is expected to increase survival.

Evans, Allen F.; Beaty, Roy E.; Hatch, Douglas R. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Preventing industrial pollution at its source: the final report of the Michigan source reduction initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a collaborative effort between NRDC, Dow Chemical, and Michigan Environmental Groups. The effort resulted in the identification and implementation of 17 pollution prevention projects that reduced substantial quantities of wastes and emissions and saved Dow considerable money.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Cooperators: R.W. Chase, Ray INDUSTRY COMMISSION 2004 Michigan Potato Research Report Volume 36 Left to Right: Ben Kudwa, MPIC; Caryn

Douches, David S.

130

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 for future reference) Eligibility REquiREmEnts Western Michigan University considers current high school: Western Michigan University AccountsReceivable 1903WMichiganAve KalamazooMI49008-5210 non-u.s. citiz

de Doncker, Elise

131

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION MICHIGAN POTATO RESEARCH REPORT 2003 Volume 35 Click Here to Open the 2003 Potato, S. Cooper, L. Frank, J. Driscoll, and E. Estelle Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State

Douches, David S.

132

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 __________________________________________________________________________ Date __________________________________ Please return to: Western Michigan University · Office Readmission Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 Returning Students (Good Standing

de Doncker, Elise

133

Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station In Cooperation with the Michigan Potato Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Cooperators: R.W. Chase At Michigan State University we are breeding potatoes for the chip-processing and tablestock markets

Douches, David S.

134

Michigan State University 201112 Appropriation Request  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University 2011­12 Appropriation Request Michigan State University (MSU) ranks) because its alumni earn high-end salaries, Michigan State University's economic impact of approximately $4.1 billion is essential to Michigan's current and future growth. The three University Research Corridor (URC

135

Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Agricultural Experiment Station In Cooperation with the Michigan Potato. Hammerschmidt and W. Kirk Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University potato selections from the Michigan State University and other potato breeding programs at the Montcalm

Douches, David S.

136

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO and W. Kirk Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University East selections from the Michigan State University and other potato breeding programs at the Montcalm Research

Douches, David S.

137

COUNCIL OF GRADUATE Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUNCIL OF GRADUATE STUDENTS Michigan State University Student Services Bldg. 556 E. Circle Dr STUDENTS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Michigan State University Student Services Bldg. 556 E. Circle Dr to Michigan State University for the 2014- 2015 school year. We hope you had an enriching and relaxing summer

138

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO Sciences and Plant Pathology Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 INTRODUCTION Each year we conduct a series of variety trials to assess advanced potato selections from the Michigan State University

Douches, David S.

139

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations of alumni for the Michigan State University DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD. The selection the prestige of Michigan State University. RECIPIENT SELECTION CRITERIA · Must have a degree from Michigan

140

University of Michigan Medical School Overview Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Medical School Overview Introduction The University of Michigan opened its. The University of Michigan Medical School was among the first to change the role of the student from passive at the University of Michigan Medical School since the first graduating class of six students in 1851. Today, we

Kirschner, Denise

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Michigan Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Summary of Reported Data Michigan Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Michigan. Michigan Summary of Reported Data...

142

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION Job Title: DIRECTOR Department: CENTER faculty in developing and assessing course goals in support of program and university learning goals for online and blended learning. Provide assistance in evaluating and implementing educational technologies

Endres. William J.

144

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN/EVENT ASSOCIATE to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current uniform

Endres. William J.

145

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month/40 and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

146

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 month and ice, applying sand and salt, and removing debris. Adhere to current department uniform policy supervision may be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants

147

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (12 mos and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

148

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: CUSTODIAN (9 month/20 hours and clean fixtures. Maintain building entrances according to conditions by removing snow and ice, applying be exercised over seasonal/temporary university employees and student assistants. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

149

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR FORESTRY BIOFUEL STATEWIDE COLLABORATION CENTER (MICHIGAN)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team composed of scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) assembled to better understand, document, and improve systems for using forest-based biomass feedstocks in the production of energy products within Michigan. Work was funded by a grant (DE-EE-0000280) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was administered by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). The goal of the project was to improve the forest feedstock supply infrastructure to sustainably provide woody biomass for biofuel production in Michigan over the long-term. Work was divided into four broad areas with associated objectives: • TASK A: Develop a Forest-Based Biomass Assessment for Michigan – Define forest-based feedstock inventory, availability, and the potential of forest-based feedstock to support state and federal renewable energy goals while maintaining current uses. • TASK B: Improve Harvesting, Processing and Transportation Systems – Identify and develop cost, energy, and carbon efficient harvesting, processing and transportation systems. • TASK C: Improve Forest Feedstock Productivity and Sustainability – Identify and develop sustainable feedstock production systems through the establishment and monitoring of a statewide network of field trials in forests and energy plantations. • TASK D: Engage Stakeholders – Increase understanding of forest biomass production systems for biofuels by a broad range of stakeholders. The goal and objectives of this research and development project were fulfilled with key model deliverables including: 1) The Forest Biomass Inventory System (Sub-task A1) of feedstock inventory and availability and, 2) The Supply Chain Model (Sub-task B2). Both models are vital to Michigan’s forest biomass industry and support forecasting delivered cost, as well as carbon and energy balance. All of these elements are important to facilitate investor, operational and policy decisions. All other sub-tasks supported the development of these two tools either directly or by building out supporting information in the forest biomass supply chain. Outreach efforts have, and are continuing to get these user friendly models and information to decision makers to support biomass feedstock supply chain decisions across the areas of biomass inventory and availability, procurement, harvest, forwarding, transportation and processing. Outreach will continue on the project website at http://www.michiganforestbiofuels.org/ and http://www.michiganwoodbiofuels.org/

LaCourt, Donna M.; Miller, Raymond O.; Shonnard, David R.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University & Lake Michigan students who have transferred to Michigan State University (MSU) in completing an associate's degree at Lake Michigan College (LMC). This initiative is an extension of the transfer agreements already

151

Production technology experience in Shell's Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in Northern Michigan in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by the spring of 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by: 1. Very favorable oil production response. 2. Timely and definitive surveillance techniques. 3. Systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior. 4. Innovative application of artificial lift technology. 5. Aggressive future planning to maintain and improve oil production response.

Barnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Production technology experience in Shell's Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in N. Michigan in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 Waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by the spring of 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by (1) a favorable oil production response, (2) timely and definitive surveillance techniques, (3) systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior, (4) innovative application of artificial lift technology; and (5) aggressive future planning to maintain and improve oil production response.

Barnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Production technology experience in Michigan waterfloods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the Niagaran carbonate reef oil reservoirs in northern Michigan in 1978 with Shell Oil Co.'s Chester 18 waterflood. Ten waterflood projects had been installed by Spring 1983. As a result of this experience, significant production technology practices have become established. The majority of the waterflood experience has been in Shell's Gaylord Production Unit located primarily in Otsego and Crawford counties. Specifically, the projects discussed are the Chester 18, Chester 21, Frederic 10, Hayes 15, Hayes 21A, and Mid-Charlton 10 waterfloods. In general, the waterflood program can be characterized by very favorable oil production response, timely and definitive surveillance techniques, systematic and timely well work on injectors and producers to maintain optimum reservoir withdrawal behavior, innovative application of artificial lift technology, and aggressive future planning to maintain and to improve oil production response. This paper elaborates on these waterflood program characterizations.

Burnes, P.F.; Tinker, G.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

University of Michigan College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan College of Engineering Daily PlanetSUMMER/FALL 2005 The Department Honored ................. 4 Solar Car Win...................... 6 New Faculty ...................... 10: Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan 1521C SRB 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI

Eustice, Ryan

156

EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management is preparing an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington, and a new Three Rivers Substation on Western's reserved lands.

157

Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa: Forty Years of Partnerships African President of South Africa 1994-1999 #12;ii Michigan State University Cooperation with South Africa Table of Contents Introduction: Michigan and MSU Engagement in Africa and South Africa The Beginnings

Liu, Taosheng

158

Action Requested: THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Action Requested: THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN REGENTS COMMUNICATION ACTION REQUEST schools and Michigan middle or junior high schools and matriculation at the University within 28 months President for Academic Affairs July 2013 Attachment #12;UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GUIDELINES FOR QUALIFYING

Kamat, Vineet R.

159

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations of graduates or former students for the Michigan State University ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD the prestige of Michigan State University. RECIPIENT SELECTION CRITERIA · Must be a graduate or have previously

160

Michigan State University Child Development Laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Child Development Laboratories Department of Human Development and Family FACILITIES 17 #12;3 The Child Development Laboratories OVERVIEW The Michigan State University Child of Michigan launched its tiered quality rating system in 2011. Great Start to Quality, http

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HONORARY ALUMNI AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HONORARY ALUMNI AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations of graduates or former students for the Michigan State University HONORARY ALUMNI service to Michigan State University on a local, state, national or international level, and who possess

162

Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN University Travel Warning Destination Liability/College/Business Unit: Destination: Travel Start Date: Travel End Date: I understand that the University of Michigan the Regents of the University of Michigan, ("University"), and all of its employees and agents from any claim

Eustice, Ryan

163

PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: VOLUME II BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF FACULTY MEMBERS SERVING ON THE STAFF DURING THE YEARS 1897-1945 ALFRED C. RAPHELSON UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FLINT COLLEGE at Michigan. These details gradually pieced together what for us were the very human and personal dimensions

Michigan, University of

164

PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: 1852-1950 VOLUME I THE HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY ALFRED C. RAPHELSON UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FLINT COLLEGE 1968 #12;i PREFACE When I was first of the history of psychology at the University of Michigan. It begins with the work carried out

Michigan, University of

165

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication ACTION REQUEST Subject: Report of Faculty of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Michigan-Flint, retired from active the University of Michigan-Flint faculty as an assistant professor in 1974 and was promoted to associate

Kamat, Vineet R.

166

Michigan State University Student Employment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Student Employment Office Criminal Background Check Policy Statement be completed by student) I understand that Michigan State University conducts a criminal record history search with Michigan State University. 1. Have you ever been convicted of a crime? Yes No 2. Are there criminal charges

Liu, Taosheng

167

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Regents Communication ACTION REQUEST Subject: Report of Faculty Death.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Michigan, continuing her dance studies with Esther Pease to the University of Michigan as a faculty member in the newly formed Department of Dance. She was chair

Kamat, Vineet R.

168

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD The MSU Alumni Association annually seeks and accepts nominations for the Michigan State University YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD. The selection is made from candidates who State University. These individuals demonstrate a commitment to Michigan State University by continuing

169

Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data. This report documents the design, installation, operation and evaluation of mainstem and tributary video systems in the Okanogan River Basin. The species-specific data collected by these fish enumeration systems are presented along with an evaluation of the operation of a facility that provides a count of fish using an automated method. Information collected by the Colville Tribes Fish & Wildlife Department, specifically the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP), is intended to provide a relative abundance indicator for anadromous fish runs migrating past Zosel Dam and is not intended as an absolute census count. Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected fish passage data between October 2005 and December 2006. Video counting stations were deployed and data were collected at two locations in the basin: on the mainstem Okanogan River at Zosel Dam near Oroville, Washington, and on Bonaparte Creek, a tributary to the Okanogan River, in the town of Tonasket, Washington. Counts at Zosel Dam between 10 October 2005 and 28 February 2006 are considered partial, pilot year data as they were obtained from the operation of a single video array on the west bank fishway, and covered only a portion of the steelhead migration. A complete description of the apparatus and methodology can be found in 'Fish Enumeration Using Underwater Video Imagery - Operational Protocol' (Nass 2007). At Zosel Dam, totals of 57 and 481 adult Chinook salmon were observed with the video monitoring system in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Run timing for Chinook in 2006 indicated that peak passage occurred in early October and daily peak passage was noted on 5 October when 52 fish passed the dam. Hourly passage estimates of Chinook salmon counts for 2005 and 2006 at Zosel Dam revealed a slight diel pattern as Chinook passage events tended to remain low from 1900 hours to 0600 hours relative to other hours of the day. Chinook salmon showed a slight preference for passing the dam through the video chutes on the east bank (52%) relative to the west bank (48%). A total of 48 adult sockeye salmon in 2005 and 19,245 in 2006 were counted passing through the video chutes at Zosel Dam. The 2006 run timing pattern was characterized by a large peak in passage from 3 August through 10 August when 17,698 fish (92% of total run observed for the year) were observed passing through the video chutes. The daily peak of 5,853 fish occurred on 4 August. Hourly passage estimates of sockeye salmon counts for 2005 and 2006 at the dam showed a strong diel pattern with increased passage during nighttime hours relative to daytime hours. Sockeye showed a strong preference for passing Zosel Dam on the east bank (72%) relative to the west bank (28%). A total of 298 adult upstream-migrating steelhead were counted at Zosel Dam in 2005 and 2006, representing the 2006 cohort based on passage data from 5 October 2005 through 15 July 2006. Eighty-seven percent (87%) of the total steelhead observed passed the dam between 23 March and 25 April with a peak passage occurring on 6 April when 31 fish were observed. Steelhead passage at Zosel Dam exhibited no diel pattern. In contrast to both Chinook and sockeye salmon, steelhead were shown to have a preference for passing the dam on the west bank (71%) relative to the east bank (29%). Both Chinook and sockeye passage at Zosel Dam were influenced by Okanogan River water temperature. When water temperatures peaked in late July (daily mean exceeded 24 C and daily maximum exceeded 26.5 C), Chinook and sockeye counts went to zero. A subsequent decrease in water temperature resulted in sharp increases in both C

Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.; Nass, Bryan L.; Arterburn, John E.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration, wildlife and livestock management, and educational and economic resources. #31;e website has contact information for water and land management experts, tips on becoming involved, information on ongoing conservation projects, #25;nancial... plans and determining implementation costs. #31;ese datasets and tools provide baseline support for projects addressing wildlife habitat management and water quality, particularly native grassland and wetland restoration, and bo#26;omland hardwood...

Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LON-CAPA Gerd Kortemeyer Michigan State University January 2008 #12;LON-CAPA · Course Management Management: Use same material in different courses Universities can share online content #12;Online Content · Growth of shared content pool #12;Open Source, Free · No licensing cost · Universities can

172

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk will focus on the achievements of the Drexel Plasma Institute in direct application of plasmasMichigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Plasma Medicine: Mechanisms of Direct Non-Thermal Plasma Interaction with Living Tissue Prof. Alexander Fridman Drexel University

Shyy, Wei

173

Electric industry restructuring in Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Staff Report suggests a modified approach designed to significantly increase the ability of all customer classes to participate and share in the benefits of competition. The concepts discussed in this Report are designed to ensure that rates are not increased for any customers as a result of restructuring and, where possible, rates are reduced through the use of rate reduction bonds. The program outlined in this Report is designed to fulfill five objectives. First, it protects the interests of smaller customers, including low-income residential customers and senior citizens. Second, the program provides opportunities to strengthen Michigan`s business community. Third, the program includes funding for employee retraining to assure that utility employees are not negatively impacted by restructuring. Fourth, the phase-in program provides the utilities with the opportunity to prepare for competition so that they remain Michigan-based companies. Fifth, the program is designed to foster competition upon a level playing field. The Commission has jurisdiction over all investor electric utilities and rural electric cooperatives in Michigan. Municipal electric utilities are not subject to Commission jurisdiction. Although this Report discusses details regarding Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, its concepts and principles are intended to apply to all jurisdictional electric utilities.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Turbulent Plasmas in Astrophysics of turbulent fluc- tuations in the solar wind. While magnetohydrodynamics remains the appro- priate theory the labora- tory, to study naturally turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and in more distant

Shyy, Wei

175

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of three study groups (direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 15 March to 21 June 2004. In total, 842 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.5% (842 of 2,755) of the entire 2003-2004 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially or for the duration of the experiment. All steelhead kelts received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement as a means to improve initial nutrition. Long-term steelhead kelts received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used, first, after initial capture an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Next, a Formalin drip was used for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. Captured kelts were separated into three experimental groups: short-term reconditioning, long-term reconditioning, and direct transport and release. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on May 11, 2004. Survival-to-release was good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 79.0%. Long-term steelhead kelts are currently being held for a 6-9 month period with a scheduled release in December 2004. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts has not been determined and will be presented in the 2005 annual report. Direct transport and release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts were radio or acoustic tagged to assess their travel time and migratory behaviors below Bonneville Dam. A total of 29 direct-transport and release kelts and 29 short-term reconditioned kelts received surgically implanted radio tags, and a total of 28 direct-transport/release and 26 short-term reconditioned fish received surgically implanted hydro acoustic tags. These tags will allow us to determine outm

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

EA-1827: Suniva, Inc.'s ARTisun Photovoltaic Manufacturing Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 EA-1827: Final Environmental Assessment Suniva Solar Project Site Community Development Block Grant in Thomas Township, Saginaw County, Michigan October 5, 2010 EA-1827: Finding...

177

Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGENDA Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University 9:30 a.m. ­ August. Resignations, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan Tech

178

Western Michigan University -Extended University Programs How to Get Started  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University - Extended University Programs How to Get Started Interested in takingThe first toWestern Michigan University, Office of Admissions,1903W. Michigan Ave,Kalamazoo,MI 49008Western Michigan University,Office of Admissions,1903W.Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo,MI 49008-5211;the other

de Doncker, Elise

179

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Program of Study_________________________ Michigan Technological University Graduate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program of Study_________________________ Michigan Technological University Graduate School Letter, to the Graduate School, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931. Name. ____________________________________ Applicant's signature Date The undersigned, if admitted to graduate study at Michigan Technological

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NAME: Theresa M. Lee OFFICE: University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 VITA NAME: Theresa M. Lee OFFICE: University of Michigan Department of Psychology 4030 East Hall of Biological Science PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: Professor, University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, 1999 - . Research Scientist, University of Michigan, Reproductive Science Program, 1999 - . Professor, University

Lee, Theresa

182

M.A. TESOL PROGRAM GRADUATE Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.A. TESOL PROGRAM GRADUATE HANDBOOK Michigan State University Department of Linguistics & Germanic................................................................. 18 VIII. Michigan State University Resources................................................................................................................................... 26 8/15/2014 2 #12;I. Program Overview Administered through the Michigan State University Department

183

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ 1 #12; 2005 4 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Indiana University, Bloomington University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 19 Center University of Michigan, Georgetown University, University of Nebraska, University of Kansas University

Wu, Yih-Min

184

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES AND COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION GENEALOGICAL & Copper Country Historical Collection J. Robert Van Pelt Library Michigan Technological University local high schools and Michigan Technological University, centennial books, and local history titles

185

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high populations is the same, potential feeding damage to tree trunks. The most effective way.mosesorganic.org 3/1-3/8 ANR Week (Formerly Farmers' Week) MSU www.anrweek.canr.msu.edu 3/1 2014 Growing Michigan Succession in MI Workshop GT Conservation District 3/11 Michigan Spring Peach Update Meeting SW Michigan

187

MICHIGAN SWEEPS NEIGHBORHOODS WITH ENERGY UPGRADES | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on supporting local businesses and employment. BetterBuildings for Michigan developed a sustainable market for energy efficiency upgrades and thousands of qualified professionals...

188

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Michigan as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

189

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

EECBG Success Story: A Michigan County Unearths Savings with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Michigan County Unearths Savings with Geothermal Energy EECBG Success Story: A Michigan County Unearths Savings with Geothermal Energy January 22, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Kent...

191

It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees...

192

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success BetterBuildings for Michigan: Residential Program It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees...

193

RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

194

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits  (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan implements the federal requirements of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) through state regulations. Michigan's Rule 821 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with...

195

Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

196

Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

197

COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR...

198

Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, “Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan” was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 – 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to “renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better.” We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

Shen, Weidian

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

China Initiatives at Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China Initiatives at Michigan State University Office of China Programs The Office of International Studies and Programs at Michigan State University established the Office of China Programs in July 2005 to help implement President Lou Anna K. Simon's "China Initiative," part of the university's long

200

University of Michigan College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan College of Engineering Daily PlanetThe Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic Research Professor, was awarded the University of Michigan Research Faculty Achieve- ment Award. C. Robert concentrates on the impacts of magnetospheric inputs; global scale solar wind; physics of magnetic storms; and

Eustice, Ryan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

University of Michigan College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction. AOSS undergraduate Brad Charboneau was the meteorologist for the University of Michigan Solar CarUniversity of Michigan College of Engineering Daily PlanetSUMMER/Fall 2008 The Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences Newsletter I N S I D E AOSS Accolades................. 2 Solar Car Win

Eustice, Ryan

202

University of Michigan College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan College of Engineering Daily PlanetWINTER 2004 The Newsletter ........................ 6 Student Designs ................. 9 Solar Storm News ............ 10 #12;2 aoss: Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan 1521C SRB 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Eustice, Ryan

203

Recovery Act State Memos Michigan  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09 SectionGeorgiaMichigan For questions

204

2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Curricular Advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Curricular Advancements: Tools of Engagement Valley State College Visit to Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan September 13, 2007 MSU Tools of Engagement #12;© 2007 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 2 UOE has developed a series

205

Page 1 of 4 Michigan Technological University Computer Use Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 4 Michigan Technological University Computer Use Policy Developed by Michigan Tech of Interest and Intellectual Property policy and procedure. Use of Michigan Technological University a violation of University rules, certain computer misconduct is prohibited under Michigan Laws. Act 53

206

The University of Michigan Dearborn Department of Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Michigan ­ Dearborn Department of Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Position in Bioengineering The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan -Dearborn years. The University of Michigan-Dearborn is one of the three campuses of the University of Michigan

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

207

University of Michigan campuses are smoke-free environments,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan campuses are smoke-free environments, both indoors and outdoors. A smoke) 936-5988 THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Julia Donovan Darlow, Ann Arbor Laurence B. Deitch Mary Sue Coleman, ex officio © 2011 Regents of the University of Michigan. The University of Michigan

Eustice, Ryan

208

RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA American Hornbeam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slower to establish. Native to Michigan and eastern U.S. Pests: Prone to ice damage. Two-line chestnut bore can be a problem when plants are stressed DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Michigan State University Michigan State University #12;RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE

Isaacs, Rufus

209

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE)/K West (KW) Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site have been used for storage of irradiated N Reactor and single-pass reactor fuel. Remaining spent fuel is continuing to be stored underwater in racks and canisters in the basins while fuel retrieval activities proceed to remove the fuel from the basins. The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is adding equipment to the facility in preparation for removing the fuel and sludge from the basins In preparing this hazard analysis, a variety of hazard analysis techniques were used by the K Basins hazard analysis team, including hazard and operability studies, preliminary hazard analyses, and ''what if'' analyses (WHC-SD-SNF-PHA-001, HNF-2032, HNF-2456, and HNF-SD-SNF-SAD-002). This document summarizes the hazard analyses performed as part of the safety evaluations for the various modification projects and combines them with the original hazard analyses to create a living hazard analysis document. As additional operational activities and modifications are developed, this document will be updated as needed to ensure it covers all the hazards at the K Basins in a summary form and to ensure the subsequent safety analysis is bounding. This hazard analysis also identifies the preliminary set of design features and controls that the facility could rely on to prevent or reduce the frequency or mitigate consequences of identified accident conditions based on their importance and significance to safety. The operational controls and institutional programs relied on for prevention or mitigation of an uncontrolled release are identified as potential technical safety requirements. All operational activities and energy sources at the K Basins are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions and external events (e.g., earthquakes) that have the potential for causing undesirable consequences to the facility worker, the onsite individual, or the public. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and complies with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

SEMMENS, L.S.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design and operating factors that affect waterflood performance in Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding started in the carbonate oil reservoirs of the Northern Michigan Saline Niagaran reef trend in 1978 with Shell's Chester 18 Waterflood. Nine projects had been installed by the end of 1981 so that operational results are available to expand and reinforce the reservoir simulation based design and operating program. The small areal size of these pinnacle reef fields, variations in rock quality, and uncertain reservoir continuity have made successful waterflood design difficult to achieve. Some existing wells are being redrilled at the start of a project and others may have to be redrilled later in the life of a waterflood to allow the various porosity zones to be fully exploited within the flood pattern and to maintain adequate well spacing for oil bank formation. The operating strategies for these projects are based upon a reservoir simulation study which stressed increased oil recovery and project economics. One of the most successful of these operational techniques has been the use of high volume submersible pumps to maintain oil production response with increasing volumes of water, to give flexibility to injection pattern design, and to increase ultimate recovery. The mobility ratio in these reservoirs is very favorable so that early water production is due to channelling and, in some cases, bottom water coning rather than fingering. Project monitoring procedures were carefully planned to facilitate project evaluation and changes in operating policy. It is believed that the design and operating policies as developed in this study have continued application for the many waterfloods planned in Northern Michigan and to some extent for projects in other areas.

Tinker, G.E.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Polymer inking as a micro-and nanopatterning technique Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 L. Tan Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid State Electronics Laboratory, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 State Electronics Laboratory, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 A. F. Yee Department

George, Steven C.

212

Nanoimprinting over topography and multilayer three-dimensional printing Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 X. Cheng Solid of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 A. F. Yee of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 Received 28 May

George, Steven C.

213

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Supporting Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Supporting information and objectives for the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003 in Southfield, Michigan.

214

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Pre-Solicitation Meeting: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Questions and answers from the pre-solicitation meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project held March 19, 2003, in Southfield, Michigan.

215

U.S. DEPARTI\\1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Michigan page I or L STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the...

216

Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Technological University Debt Service Obligations As of June 30, 2013 Current LT Series) Refunding of 2003 & 2004 Fixed Rate Bond Issues SDC Ice Plant and Partial Roof of SDC Total

217

Igor L. Markov University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Know Your Limits Igor L. Markov University of Michigan h IT IS UNUSUAL to review a book published.g., GPS navigation satellites use solar energy to power their continual transmissions. Another example

Markov, Igor

218

Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADARSAT Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR INSTALLATION DOCUMENT October, 1999 ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF MICHIGAN CENTER FOR EARTH SCIENCES ALASKA SAR FACILITY BYRD POLAR RESEARCH...................................................................................................................................................3 Active Radar Calibrator Testing

Howat, Ian M.

219

Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacted by streptomycin resistance. Posted on September 24, 2014, MSUE News, by George Sundin, Michigan had Kasumin available in Michigan via a Section 18 specific exemption since 2010 in counties impacted continue to use the fire blight disease prediction model available on the MSU Enviro-weather website

220

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 06 September 2011, At: 12:09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 06 September 2011, At: 12:09 Publisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA b Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

222

Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training July 6, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Tom Bos is one of nine employees...

224

Michigan v. Bryant: The Counter-Revolution Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

§ 5001, p. 36 (2005). Bryant v. Davis; The CounterevolutionOral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894, p. 6 (Oral Argument, MIchigan v. Bryant, 2010 WL 3907894, p. 6 (

Graham, Kenneth W. Jr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Collecting and Using Engagement Data at Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collecting and Using Engagement Data at Michigan State University Diane L. Zimmerman Director Delegation ­ Michigan Public University and Community College Presidents and Higher Education Officers, National Center for the Study of University Engagement University Outreach and Engagement Burton A

226

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Speaker: Professor Stephen DeBacker, University of Michigan Title ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 24, 2012 ... PURDUE UNIVERSITY. Department of Mathematics Colloquium. Speaker: Professor Stephen DeBacker, University of Michigan.

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS VERSION 4, APRIL 30, 2012 #12;2michigan state university brand STandardS TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 brand baSicS 5 The Michigan STaTe UniverSiTy brandUrTher gUidance #12;3michigan state university brand STandardS 1. BrANd BASICS 1a whaT iS a brand? We build

230

University of Michigan Bibliography for Public Art Webpage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 University of Michigan Bibliography for Public Art Webpage GENERAL SOURCES FOR INFORMATION ON MANY PIECES · Outdoor Sculpture, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Campus by Ellen A. Plummer the University Planner's Office, University of Michigan, 326 East Hoover, Ann Arbor (734-764-2455 or email

Shyy, Wei

231

Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Campus: the U-M Environmental Data;#12;Environmental Reporting for the University of Michigan Ann Arbor Campus: The U-M Environmental Data Repository;DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ANN ARBOR CAMPUS: THE U

Eustice, Ryan

232

Analysis with Kernel Density Estimation University of Michigan / HERMES Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis with Kernel Density Estimation S. Gliske University of Michigan / HERMES Collaboration Transverse Parton Structure of the Hadron Yerevan, Armenia 25 June, 2009 Gliske (HERMES / Michigan) Analysis/Smearing Effects SIDIS cos(n) Conclusion Gliske (HERMES / Michigan) Analysis with KDEs TPSH `09 2 / 24 #12

233

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ACADEMIC AFFAIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ACADEMIC AFFAIRS POLICIES & PROCEDURES MANUAL in the Department of Psychology at The University of Michigan. Program areas may have more detailed requirements....................................................................................... 26 #12;3 INTRODUCTION The University of Michigan Psychology Graduate Program is one of the largest

Michigan, University of

234

Michigan State University 2013/14 Spring Continuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University 2013/14 Spring Continuation Student Health Insurance Enrollment Form presently enrolled in the Michigan State University Insurance Plan are eligible to continue their coverage by enrolling in the Michigan State University Continuation Plan. This Continuation Plan is only available

235

University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presenter: Jeremy Fox University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice Models;Identification of Discrete Choice Models for Bundles and Binary Games Jeremy T. Fox University of Michigan and NBER Natalia Lazzati University of Michigan March 2014 Abstract We study nonparametric identification

236

University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results Name Institution SpecialtyGaw/NMH/VA-IL Surgery-Preliminary Northwestern University Feinberg School Urological Surgery Michyla Bowerson Michigan-VT Pediatrics #12;University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results Name Institution Specialty

Shyy, Wei

237

Directory of Early Michigan Photographers David V. Tinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directory of Early Michigan Photographers David V. Tinder Edited by Clayton A. Lewis Copyright, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Online edition updated December 2013. #12;The Directory of Early Michigan for directories of this type. While a dearth of information has kept some entries brief, the lives of many have

Edwards, Paul N.

238

Michigan Apple Committee 2013/14 Request for Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Michigan Apple Committee 2013/14 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC the profitability of apple growing through improving production information and techniques; developing new markets that helps achieve this mission. In keeping with the spirit of the MAC's mission, the Michigan Apple Research

239

Michigan Apple Committee 2014/15 Request for Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Michigan Apple Committee 2014/15 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC the profitability of apple growing through improving production information and techniques; developing new markets subcommittee established the following as its charter in early 2009: To help the Michigan Apple Committee

Douches, David S.

240

Michigan Apple Committee 2012/13 Request for Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Apple Committee 2012/13 Request for Proposals The Michigan Apple Committee (MAC) announces of apple growing through improving production information and techniques; developing new markets and new achieve this mission. In keeping with the spirit of the MAC's mission, the Michigan Apple Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SW MICHIGAN APPLE MATURITY REPORT ISSUE 1 August 25, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SW MICHIGAN APPLE MATURITY REPORT ISSUE 1 ­ August 25, 2010 Bill Shane, Diane Brown-Rytlewski, and Mark Longstroth Michigan State University This is the first of weekly apple maturity report for SW. See the Michigan State University apple web site (apples.msu.edu) for more information, including

242

Michigan Apple Committee Research Priorities for 2014/15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Apple Committee Research Priorities for 2014/15 Following are the 2014/15 priorities of the Michigan Apple Committee. (In priority order.) 1. Increase demand To conduct consumer related research that will help sell Michigan Apples more profitably. a. Market research b. Value ­ convenience, apples versus

Douches, David S.

243

ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 The comeback ooze  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 Sanctuary in paradise Rare Hawaiian birds find refuge in tiny island forests, Sarah Bird. Send your comments to the editor at mlgoodri@mtu.edu. Learn more about research at Michigan for bigger people--by design Rising sun A new dawn for solar power 16 19 20 3RESE ARCH 2012 | Michigan

244

University of Michigan 2009 Sept Curriculum Vitae: Brian E. Gilchrist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advisor for Michigan's student Solar Car Race Team and the Student Space Systems Fabrication Laboratory (SUniversity of Michigan 2009 Sept - 1 Curriculum Vitae: Brian E. Gilchrist Dept. of Electrical and Computer Science (EECS), University of Michigan. Professor, Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space

Eustice, Ryan

245

Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project evaluation of multi-canister overpack venting and monitoring options during staging of K basins fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering study recommends whether multi-canister overpacks containing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford K Basins should be staged in vented or a sealed, but ventable, condition during staging at the Canister Storage Building prior to hot vacuum conditioning and interim storage. The integrally related issues of MCO monitoring, end point criteria, and assessing the practicality of avoiding venting and Hot Vacuum Conditioning for a portion of the spent fuel are also considered.

Wiborg, J.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

247

Market Barriers to Solar in Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar industry in the United States is at a turning point; the cost of PV hardware has declined substantially in recent years, placing new attention on reducing the balance of system (BOS) costs of solar that now contribute to a growing percentage of installation expenses. How states address these costs through the creation of a favorable policy and regulatory environment is proving to be a critical determinant of a thriving statewide solar market. This report addresses the permitting and tax issues that may stimulate the solar market growth in Michigan. By making PV installations easier to complete through reduced BOS costs, Michigan would become a more attractive location for manufacturers and installers. As PV module costs decline and BOS costs make up a greater share of the cost of solar, action taken today on these issues will prove beneficial in the long term, providing Michigan an opportunity to establish a leadership position in the solar industry.

Miller, E.; Nobler, E.; Wolf, C.; Doris, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

MEDIEVAL DISTORTIONS: THE PROJECTIONS OF ANCIENT MAPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDIEVAL DISTORTIONS: THE PROJECTIONS OF ANCIENT MAPS W.R TOBLER University of Michigan, Ann Arbor ABSTRACT. Estimates of the map projection employed for an ancient map is a prerequisite for a variety for the Hereford map and illustrated the agreement of a portolan chart with an oblique Mercator projection

Tobler, Waldo

250

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support for MTRI programs focused on the application of programming and geospatial analysis to solving governmental and societal needs through sponsored research. The ability to connect geospatial models research projects. Understand geospatial and remote sensing concepts that enable appropriate integration

251

Contesting an Illusion of Equity: A Textual Analysis of “Friend of the Court” Briefs in the University of Michigan’s Affirmative Action Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Affirmative action at the University of Michigan (pp. 97-188). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Harris, C. (action at the University of Michigan (pp. 17-59). Ann Arbor,

Ledesma, María C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Exploratory energy research program at the University of Michigan. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DOE grant to the University of Michigan for an Exploratory Energy Research Program is being used by the U-M Office of Energy Research (OER) to support faculty research and grad student research assistantships. Progress on activity during the first six months of the program is described and brief status reports on 20 energy-related faculty research projects in the physical, engineering, biological, and behavioral sciences are presented.

Kerr, W.

1980-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Integrated Assessment #12;Agenda · Welcome and introduction and timeline · Panel presentation and discussion · Facilitated Q & A · Closing remarks #12;Hydraulic Fracturing · Leverages resources IA BENEFITS Benefits of Integrated Assessment #12;Key Points: · Hydraulic Fracturing (HF

Kamat, Vineet R.

255

Prepared for: Michigan Department of Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fences, visual searches of 25 m x 25 m plots, incidental captures, and visual open water surveys (Lehtinen et al., 1999), acid rain, collections for the pet trade (Michigan Department of Natural Resources, date unknown), and other activities associated with urban sprawl (Kolozsvary and Swihart, 1999

Notre Dame, University of

256

Michigan Technological University Generations of Discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Tech to acquire the resources needed to continue to grow as a premier research university, the University also has been able to establish the Pavlis Institute for Global Technological Leadership and bring Mineral Museum, and Sherman Field. Alumni play a key role in any capital campaign. We invite you and other

257

Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Michael Klepinger, Extension Specialist Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relatively cheaper (Duke, 2006). Now that wind power is competitively priced, it offers real advantages over power are beginning to come of age in Michigan. Publication of new wind potential maps in 2004 helped fuel an increase in landowner interest in wind energy across the state (USDOE, 2004). Wind power

259

Michigan Technological University Annual Placement Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work on eight vehicles that include, in part, an underwater remotely-operated vehicle, an electric motorcycle, a supermileage vehicle, an off-road vehicle, and a solar-powered car. Michigan Tech has hosted advised a student team that designed a human- powered, off-road wheelchair to help disabled people enjoy

260

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY / 2014 of engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S I T Y #12;Mapping dangerous algae in the Great Lakes S cientists from the Michigan Tech Research Lakes and determine what threats they may pose to water quality and public health. There's algae in all is another driver; algae tend to thrive in warmer water, and the Great Lakes' temperature is on the rise

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES Fall Semester 2011 Report, and socially. The opportunities for a wide variety of recreational experiences that enhance student university SEMESTER 2011 Total Participants - 2,457 Women - 446 Men - 2,011 Teams - 230 The Intramural ice hockey

262

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURALRECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY INTRAMURAL­RECREATIONAL SPORTS SERVICES ICE HOCKEY RULES I) can only play on one team in Intramural Ice Hockey! C. Managers and players read the Eligibility Rules a form at IM Office, or see the supervisor at the ice rink. Make sure the players are on the team roster

263

The University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a major collection of peonies (see article by Richard K. Meader). Later, Detroit Edison donated acres., Forest Hill Cemetery, the Wilkinson Foundation, the Detroit Edison Foundation, the Benard L. MaasThe University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum Annual Report July

Shyy, Wei

264

University of Michigan College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan College of Engineering Daily PlanetFALL 2004 The Department of Atmospheric exploring the solar system. Born in Healdton, Oklahoma on May 23, 1921, Tom grew up in Kansas City solar system planets with instruments flown on sounding rockets and spacecraft. He became Professor

Eustice, Ryan

265

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 01 May 2013, At: 07:20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 01 May 2013, At: 07:20 Publisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c Institute for Social Research, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Published online: 16 Aug 2011

Brown, Daniel G.

267

University of Michigan college of engineering 1 2010 2011 BUlletin IntroductIon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan · college of engineering 1 2010 · 2011 BUlletin IntroductIon For students the University of Michigan College of Engineering. Michigan Engineering offers a rare combination of high of Michigan · college of engineering 1 2010-2011 University of Michigan College of Engineering Bulletin

Papalambros, Panos

268

This article was downloaded by:[University of Michigan] On: 25 February 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article was downloaded by:[University of Michigan] On: 25 February 2008 Access Details. Rosenberg abc ; Randa Tao b a Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA b Center for Computational Medicine and Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA c

Rosenberg, Noah

269

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-ANN ARBOR FY2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Mission Statement II. Instructional Programming The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence

Kamat, Vineet R.

270

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-ANN ARBOR TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Mission Statement II. Instructional Programming III The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence

Kamat, Vineet R.

271

Hybrid Wall Evaluation for Ten New Construction Homes in Wyandotte, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report will detail the design and construction of 10 new houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for new construction at these homes.

Lukachco, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMER 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SUMMER 2012 Scholarship 2012 | givingto.msu.edu DEVELOPMENTS For Donors and Friends of Michigan State University MSUDevelopments,publishedthreetimeseachyear,isdevotedtotheinspirationand impact ofprivatephilanthropyatMichiganStateUniversity

Liu, Taosheng

273

Engagement and Outreach at Michigan State University Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engagement and Outreach at Michigan State University Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement University Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology Michigan on University Outreach (1993) University Outreach at Michigan State University: Extending Knowledge to Serve

274

CAMPAIGNING, CANVASSING AND PETITION DRIVES ON THE MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAMPAIGNING, CANVASSING AND PETITION DRIVES ON THE MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS - GUIDELINES - Michigan State University encourages students to be informed about and participate in the political process campaigning, canvassing and petitioning drives on the Michigan State University campus. These statements

Liu, Taosheng

275

Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University includes the following: student's name,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University designated below will be held as confidential by Western Michigan University until I notify the Office Western Michigan University responsible for list/information already printed, published, or available

de Doncker, Elise

276

Okemos, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy ResourcesCo Jump to:Ohio:Okay,Okeechobee

277

Olivet, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy ResourcesCoMaine: Energy

278

Leonard, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville,LeightonLeola, Wisconsin: EnergyLeonard, Michigan:

279

Maybee, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis aMaury County, Tennessee: EnergyMaybee, Michigan:

280

Michigan Public Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichigan Public Power Agency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to:Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search

282

Alanson, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuri BiomassWheeler County,Alanson, Michigan:

283

Gaines, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier,JumpGahanna, Ohio: EnergyGaines, Michigan:

284

Petersburg, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources JumpPerryman,Petersburg, Michigan: Energy

285

Kentwood, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

286

Freeland, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpediaFredonia, Arizona:Freeland, Michigan: Energy

287

Stature, Age, and Gender Effects on Reach Motion Postures Don B. Chaffin and Julian J. Faraway, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Xudong Zhang, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, and Charles Woolley, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan The rapid adoption of software to simulate (Karwowski, Genaidy, & Addrcss correspondence to Don B. Chaffin, Center for Ergonomics. University

Faraway, Julian

288

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity-1432, 734-763-0235, TTY 734-647-1388. For other University of Michigan information call 734-764-1817. © 2013

Michigan, University of

289

Michigan Offshore Wind Pilot Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchBlasnick

290

Project ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin ~ Response to ISRP/RME Proposal Review Comments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Synder et al. 2002). The shifting habitat mosaic is controlled by the coupled relationship between flowProject ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia. 1. The ISRP cited a need to "provide better evidence of the linkages of changes in flow regimes

291

,"Michigan Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2013,"6302009" ,"Release...

292

Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Michigan is not known for its sunshine, Ann Arbor receives 25% more sunlight than Germany, a world leader in solar energy utilization. Ann Arbor believed that its...

293

BetterBuildings for Michigan: Commercial Program Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

294

BetterBuildings for Michigan Residential Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuilding for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program.

295

BetterBuildings for Michigan Reese Farms Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

296

Indiana Michigan Power- Commercial and Industrial Rebates Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Indiana Michigan Power offers rebates for HVAC equipment, variable frequency drives, commercial refrigeration equipments, food service equipment and lighting measures for commercial and industrial...

297

Positron Emission Tomography-Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0795, to support the DOE decision to provide a grant of $7,953,600 to be used in support of a proposed Positron Emission Tomography Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan. Based upon the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affected the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

U.S. Department of Energy Selects Michigan State University To...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Michigan State University To Design and Establish Facility for Rare Isotope Beams U.S. Department of Energy Selects Michigan State University To Design and Establish Facility for...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - arbor michigan usa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related... Dept., University of Michigan, Ann ... Source: Murty, Katta G. - Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan Collection: Engineering 45...

300

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

May 2 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2 ­ 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Young Researchers and Grad Students of Michigan, Chair, Craig Evans ­ Univ of California, Berkeley, Tai-Ping Liu ­ Stanford, Craig Tracy ­ Univ, Institute of Mathematics and its Applications-University of Minnesota, Department of Mathematics-University

Temple, Blake

304

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Annual Outcome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY Annual Outcome Assessment and Continuous and Construction Mission and Goals 4 Mission of Construction Management 4 II Academic Quality Plan 5 Program, Context and Mission History of the CM Undergraduate Program Construction Management at Michigan State

Liu, Taosheng

305

the university of michigan 2007 annual environmental report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the university of michigan 2007 annual environmental report #12;table of contentsU-M 2007 Annual Environmental Report Figures 3 Executive Summary 4 Introduction 6 The Move Toward Sustainability 8 Environmental Reporting at the University of Michigan 8 Report Objectives 9 Report Element and Scope 9 Environmental

Eustice, Ryan

306

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Michigan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:JuneNovember 26, 20149DepartmentMichigan Categorical Exclusion

307

Cutlerville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County,Curran,784067°,Cutlerville, Michigan:

308

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office ofReportingEnergyRetrospectiveMichigan Program Type

309

University of Michigan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 etWisconsin: EnergyTown-EnergyMichigan Place: Ann

310

Waterford, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa| Open EnergyWaterford, Michigan:

311

Holt, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel JumpHoard, Wisconsin:Holiday59. ItHolt, Michigan: Energy

312

Energy Incentive Programs, Michigan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessin Jamaica,Idaho Energy IncentiveMaryland EnergyMichigan

313

Michigan/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources Jump to:InformationMichigan/Incentives <

314

Michigan/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources Jump to:InformationMichigan/Incentives

315

Addison, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskeyEnergyAd-VentaAddison is a village in DuPageMichigan:

316

Michigan Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMay 20Field Studies MethaneMichaelMichigan Data

317

Pontiac, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power Inc Jump to:Venture,149. ItPomfret,Pontiac, Michigan:

318

Allegan, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil Jump to: navigation, search Name: AlgoilTypeAllMerusAllegan, Michigan:

319

Casnovia, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascade Sierra Solutions CSS JumpCasnovia, Michigan: Energy

320

Michigan Save Energy Now | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps More Documents &Small2011FY 2011 MethaneMichigan Industry is a vital

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chesaning, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information onChemithon EnterprisesGrove, Ohio:Chesaning, Michigan:

322

Clawson, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to:Clawson, Michigan: Energy Resources

323

Sparta, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551°Farms LtdLLCCompanies |Sparta, Michigan:

324

Sunfield, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota:36052°,Sunfield, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to:

325

Troy, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverseEnergy. ItTroy, Michigan: Energy

326

Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five-Year Master Plan University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Prepared by: University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Facilities and Operations October 31, 2014 #12;FIVE-YEAR MASTER PLAN UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN of Contents 1 #12;Section I Mission Statement #12;MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the University of Michigan

Kamat, Vineet R.

328

Version 11/24/2014 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Version 11/24/2014 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University Overview of Resources and Services in accordance with University policy. #12;Version 11/24/2014 Page 2 of 5 Consortium of Michigan Veteran Educators http://global.cmich.edu/CMVE Michigan State University is a member of the Consortium of Michigan

329

Version 9/27/2013 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Version 9/27/2013 Page 1 of 5 Michigan State University Overview of Resources and Services in accordance with University policy. #12;Version 9/27/2013 Page 2 of 5 Consortium of Michigan Veteran Educators http://global.cmich.edu/CMVE Michigan State University is a member of the Consortium of Michigan

330

Christiane Jablonowski Phone: 734 763 6238 University of Michigan Fax: 734 936 0503  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Christiane Jablonowski Phone: 734 763 6238 University of Michigan Fax: 734 936 0503 Department ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Associate Professor Sep. 2012 ­ current University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences (AOSS) Assistant Professor Sep. 2006 ­ Aug 2012 University of Michigan

Jablonowski, Christiane

331

This article was downloaded by: [Michigan State University] On: 27 March 2013, At: 06:03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michigan, USA 3 Department of Mathematics and ICES, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USAThis article was downloaded by: [Michigan State University] On: 27 March 2013, At: 06:03 Publisher b Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA c Department

Qian, Jianliang

332

Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2006-November 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the third year of system operation, from December 1, 2006, until November 30, 2007. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation and provides some comparisons with system performance in previous years. The performance of the groundwater restoration systems at Utica in earlier years was summarized in greater detail previously (Argonne 2005, 2006).

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

340

Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

Yu, Winston

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin â?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sub-Barrier Fusion Cross-Sections of Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei Indiana University, GANIL, Western Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sub-Barrier Fusion Cross-Sections of Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei Indiana University, GANIL, Western Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ. Theory support: Vanderbilt Univ.(Oberacker & Umar); Indiana Univ. (C

de Souza, Romualdo T.

343

Pre-solicitation Meeting for the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given to attendees of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project pre-solicitation meeting held in Detroit, Michigan, on March 19, 2003.

344

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 195431575071168478184127127524342445622186327832Non-Michigan 34100154311914212678501631091822797121611683879174516794Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 11983 1224 2819 863 880 581 1282 71 135 44 522 167 8472 339 692 22 Non-Michigan 5619 482 1657 366

Shyy, Wei

345

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 195451295127198522195131138225145449924096478081Non-Michigan 269294211198921569066191811758757117911193818156616736Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 11899 1087 2742 825 873 573 1229 44 140 51 500 157 8629 250 528 12 Non-Michigan 5563 473 1720 391

Shyy, Wei

346

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies Program, Entry Type, and Residency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnicity, Comprehensive Studies 215801744973128422143128118718736135720015527554Non-Michigan 61114366312065197656441371271988766117011343951185817159Michigan Minority Group Native Michigan 12109 1319 2847 863 880 581 1367 95 116 36 484 151 8294 412 968 44 Non-Michigan 5202 414 1398 275

Shyy, Wei

347

Michigan utilities begin implementation of cogeneration programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Michigan's two major utilities, Consumers Power Corporation and Detroit Edison, are beginning to implement cogeneration and small power programs, although their approaches differ. Consumers Power is entering agreements to purchase cogenerated power at reasonable buyback rates to meet near-future capacity needs, while Detroit Edison is offering rate breaks to keep customers on the grid with an on-site cogeneration alternative rider because of excess capacity. Once its excess capacity is absorbed, Detroit Edison will encourage pursue the approach of Consumers Power. The latter recently filed to convert a Midland cancelled nuclear plant into a gas-fired cogeneration facility. The author reviews complications in this and other contracts and utility commission decisions. 2 tables.

Not Available

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Michigan Fuel Forward  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Clean Energy Coalition at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Michigan Fuel Forward.

349

Farmington Hills Partners With Michigan Saves With Eyes on the...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the camera via Skype. Better Buildings Residential Network member Farmington Hills, Michigan, held a January kick-off event to announce its plans to launch a host of programs...

350

NORTHERN CHAPTER OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYORS SCHOLARSHIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program located in the state of Michigan, and qualify for some form of financial aid which can be verified __________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________ MI Zip Code ________________ App Classification: ____Fr ______________________________________ A complete Scholarship Application must include the following: 1. A statement expressing your educational

351

Draft 'Michigan Saves' Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund. Author: State of Michigan

352

Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tanks to Turbines Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines June 8, 2010 - 6:13pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Editor's Note: This story was updated Oct. 13, 2010, to reflect the additional...

353

Oxford Area Community School District (Michigan) Bonds Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan’s Oxford Area Community School District entered into an energy savings performance contract and issued limited tax general obligation bonds to fund the up-front costs of almost $3 million of energy-related improvements. Case study is excerpted from Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements. Author: Merrian Borgeson and Mark Zimring

354

Orchard Lake Village, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarterVirginia. Its FIPSVillage, Michigan:

355

Michigan Technological University is an equal opportunity educational institution/equal opportunity employer. The Michigan Tech Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reserves for both MUSIC and each member are actuarially determined on an annual basis. MUSIC will be self-sustaining by state statute. Due to State of Michigan House Bill HB4047, University employees hired after December 31

356

Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published* Department of Chemistry, Michigan State UniVersity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 ReceiVed August 19, 2008; Re

Weliky, David

357

Michigan State University's commitment to outreach and engagement begins with its institutional mission statement, which reflects the institution's founding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University's commitment to outreach and engagement begins with its institutional's Committee on University Outreach issued a report, University Outreach at Michigan State University and research. Since the publication of the Provost's Committee report, Michigan State University has been

358

Operator Licensing Policy Outline the policy to ensure proper licensure of operators at the University of Michigan (U-M)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Michigan (U-M) according to State of Michigan law. Policy 1. In order to operate a U-M vehicle, State of Michigan and federal guidelines require that the operator possess the appropriate vehicle

Kirschner, Denise

359

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DC 20585on notice ofThe5 Webinar to1776KK

362

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

363

Request for Proposals Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the efficacy of specific organizational programs and practices. The MSU Center and processors. 2. Michigan farmers will profitably supply 20% of all Michigan institutional by 100% of school meals and 75% of schools selling food outside school meal

364

Moving Violation Policy Outline the policy regarding moving violations issued to operators in University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to operators in University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles. Vehicle Use Policy 1. Staff members are responsible 1. Operators must be properly licensed according to the laws of the State of Michigan and federal

Kirschner, Denise

365

K Basin safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

Project Title: Translating Solanaceae Sequence Diversity and Trait Variation into Applied Outcomes through Integrative Research, Education, and Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Title: Translating Solanaceae Sequence Diversity and Trait Variation into Applied Outcomes. Project Director: David Douches (douchesd@msu.edu), Michigan State University Co-Directors: Robin Buell@hort.oregonstate.edu), Oregon State University Project Website: http://solcap.msu.edu The SolCAP project was initiated September

Douches, David S.

367

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

Isaacs, Rufus

368

CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CaTER: University of Michigan's Web Portal for Clinical and Translational Empowered Research Suresh), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Abstract Numerous biomedical resources (e.g. websites to help find of biomedical resources at the University of Michigan revealed that the resources can be organized along

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

369

Florian Enescu Ph.D. in Mathematics (August 2001), University of Michigan at Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Florian Enescu EDUCATION · Ph.D. in Mathematics (August 2001), University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (thesis advisor: Professor Melvin Hochster) · Master of Science (August 1999), University of Michigan, Berkeley, California · (1996 - 1999) Graduate Student Instructor, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Enescu, Florian

370

Copyright 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees Learning to Give  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Copyright 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees Learning to Give Learning from Michigan State University Board of Trustees MSU/LTG · Formative phase: 1997-2000 ­ Teacher experiences 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees Formative Phase 1997-2000 · Teacher surveys

371

University of Michigan ADVANCE Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan ADVANCE Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Sekaquaptewa received her undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Michigan. He remains active in commercialization activities for MEMS-based sports training

Maxwell, Bruce D.

372

Revised:01/2011 A PLEDGE OF SUPPORT FOR MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised:01/2011 A PLEDGE OF SUPPORT FOR MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY #12;Personal Information: Name):__________________________________ _______________________________________________________ My/Our_total_gift_will_be_paid_as_indicated: _ A_check_payable_to_Michigan_State_University _ A) _ Employer(s):___________________________________________ Make_checks_payable_to_"Michigan_State_University

373

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from the following Universities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY · DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from School of Professional PSY - PsyD University of Michigan ­ MSW & MPH Western Michigan University - MA MSU the following Universities and Professional Schools to learn about their graduate programs, admission

Liu, Taosheng

374

The History of Summer Surveying Camp at The University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The History of Summer Surveying Camp at The University of Michigan by Eugene A. Glysson, Ph.D., P.E., D.E.E., Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering The University of Michigan has 1909-1928. It should be noted that the University of Michigan biological station was also established

Kamat, Vineet R.

375

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HOMER HIGBEE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY HOMER HIGBEE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION awareness at Michigan State University through involvement in programs that promote cross exchange during the 25 years that he served in the Office of International Studies and Programs at Michigan

376

Leading innovation in food, natural resources and energy Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leading innovation in food, natural resources and energy Michigan State University #12;#12;Leading innovation through collaboration AgBioResearch scientists represent six colleges at Michigan State University than 120 years, AgBioResearch (formerly the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station or MAES) has

Liu, Taosheng

377

Revoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University includes the following: student's name,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University Michigan University to release all information considered Directory Information until I notify the Office. This is to certify that I wish to remove my name from the privacy list at Western Michigan University. I understand

de Doncker, Elise

378

December 7, 2012 Re: Michigan State University's Tribal Natural Resource Internship Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 7, 2012 Re: Michigan State University's Tribal Natural Resource Internship Program Dear MSU Student, The Native American Institute at Michigan State University is pleased to announce by securing placement for them in tribal offices here in Michigan. The Native American Institute has partnered

Liu, Taosheng

379

GARY C. STEINHARDT B.S. 1966 Agricultural Science, Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 VITA GARY C. STEINHARDT EDUCATION B.S. 1966 Agricultural Science, Michigan State University M.S. 1968 Soil Science, Michigan State University Ph.D. 1976 Agronomy, Purdue University EXPERIENCE 1966-1968 Graduate Assistant, Michigan State University 1971-1976 Graduate Assistant and Instructor, Purdue

Jackson, Scott A.

380

Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boulder (MSF373-8) Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University Douches at Michigan State University (517-355- 0271 x 194, douchesd@msu.edu). Morphological and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Plant Variety Protection: In application Strengths: Boulder

Douches, David S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lecture 16 : Definitions, theorems, proofs MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 1 / 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 2 / 8 #12;Group Axioms Definition299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 3 / 8 #12;Group Axioms Definition Is Z with + a group? MTH299 Transition to Formal Mathematics Michigan State University 3 / 8 #12;Group

Magyar, Peter

382

Kronk, Hudson V., Associate Professor, PhD, 1964, Michigan State University: Graph theory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

227 Kronk, Hudson V., Associate Professor, PhD, 1964, Michigan State University: Graph theory) Schick, Anton, Associate Professor, PhD, 1983, Michigan State University: Statistics, probability. (1984, conformal field theory. (1979) Ferry, Steven, Distinguished Professor, PhD, 1973, University of Michigan

Suzuki, Masatsugu

383

A History of the Department of Statistics and Probability Michigan State University*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RM-691 A History of the Department of Statistics and Probability Michigan State University* www of the Department of Statistics. W. Dowell Baten (PhD, University of Michigan, 1929) came to MSU as an AssociateD, University of Michigan, 1946) joined in 1946; Ingram Olkin (PhD, University of North Carolina, 1951) joined

384

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Michigan] On: 12 May Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany e Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, US Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, US (Received 23 June 2009; final

385

Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM University through the Michigan State University Foundation. This gift of: (Please include model & serial to Michigan State University for the specific purpose/use for: The value of my gift to MSU/MSU Foundation is

Liu, Taosheng

386

USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME AND MARKS IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME AND MARKS IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS and political organizations may not use the trademarks of the University of Michigan as part of their campaign materials or communications. For instance, they may not use the Block-M, the University seal, the Michigan

Kamat, Vineet R.

387

University of Michigan Office of the Vice President and Secretary of the University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Office of the Vice President and Secretary of the University USE OF UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NAME, MARKS, SEAL, AND IMAGES IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR BY POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS marks--including but not limited to the Block M and the seal of the University of Michigan (the "Marks

Shyy, Wei

388

2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Karen McKnight Casey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2006 Michigan State University Board of Trustees 1 Karen McKnight Casey Director Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Michigan State University UOE Presentation to Utah Valley State State University The mission of the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement at Michigan State

389

Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan State University Research Integrity, Vol.3 No. 2 Spring 1999 RESEARCH INTEGRITY Spring IN THIS ISSUE INTRODUCTION Research Mentoring P.1 RESEARCH ETHICS SYMPOSIUM Michigan State University April 1 N. Henry, Assistant Professor Department of Physiology Michigan State University P.3 ETHICS

390

Pluripotential theory in a non-archimedean Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pluripotential theory in a non-archimedean setting Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) NUS, Jan 6, 2011 Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) Pluripotential theory in a non with S. Boucksom and C. Favre. Mattias Jonsson (University of Michigan) Pluripotential theory in a non

Jonsson, Mattias

391

Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY WINTER 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developments | i FOR DONORS AND FRIENDS OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY WINTER 2014 Trail Blazing ofprivatephilanthropyatMichiganStateUniversity. Vice President for University Advancement Robert W. Groves Editorial Team Creative Partners Michigan State University University Advancement University Development Spartan Way 535

392

Revised 01//2011 Michigan State University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 01//2011 Michigan State University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. AUTHORIZATION TO INVOICE MSU EMPLOYEE OUTSIDE OF LANSING AREA Bill to: Michigan State University Workers of services to be provided by Michigan State University if the services are for a work related injury. 3

393

OSL ages on glaciofluvial sediment in northern Lower Michigan constrain expansion of the Laurentide ice sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1117, USA b Department of Earth and Environmental for the MIS 2 (late Wisconsin) advance into central northern Lower Michigan. We suggest that widespread ice chronologic control on the advancing MIS 2 ice margin in this part of Lower Michigan and refine the under

Schaetzl, Randall

394

World Network Speed Record Shattered Caltech, SLAC, Fermilab, CERN, Michigan, Florida,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Network Speed Record Shattered Caltech, SLAC, Fermilab, CERN, Michigan, Florida, Brookhaven, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Fermilab, CERN, and the University of Michigan and partners and Fermilab and an optimized Linux kernel developed at Michigan. Professor Harvey Newman of Caltech, head

Low, Steven H.

395

Changes in the Pelagic Food Web of Southern Lake Michigan Primary Investigator: Henry Vanderploeg -NOAA GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of seasonal offshore-onshore differences in nutrients and plankton abundance and community structure Michigan We built upon GLERL's 1994-1998 pelagic monitoring program offshore of Muskegon, Michigan (110-m by the University of Michigan near there and in the intakes of the Cook Power Plant. Introducing and Evaluating

396

The Transport and Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Transport and Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan: A Case Study Dr. Mark Cohen NOAA Air and Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan: A Case Study Presentation Outline Ã?Ã? Policy Making Context Need to Know It? Ã?Ã? Atmospheric Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan Ã?Ã? Uncertainty Analysis Ã?Ã?

397

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3088  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BILL COOK, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION FORESTER JANUARY 2010 Where Does Michigan's Wood Supply Michigan forest land? Can woody biomass be harvested, transported, and delivered at a profit? Will woody biomass harvesting compete with existing forest industries? How does the woody biomass potential compare

398

www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013 Northwest Michigan Horticultural the newest carbohydrate model for NW Michigan. As you can see, the model is predicting a surplus of energy is now for most apples throughout the region. #12;2 www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu NWHRS Solar Rad Min Max

399

www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center NW Michigan Carbohydrate Model for Thinning 6-11-13 According to Phil Schwallier, we that for some reason, it is taking longer than normal for fruitlets to thin. NWHRS Solar Rad Min Max Carb

400

www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.agbioresearch.anr.msu.edu Northern Michigan FruitNet 2013 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center NW Michigan Carbohydrate Model for Thinning 6-14-13 This model will be the last one. June 14, 2013 NWHRS Solar Rad Min Max Carb Balance 4 Day Ave Recommendation 6/5/13 5.8 46 59 -19.1 16

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reservoir Characterization and Enhanced Oil Recovery Potential in Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone Reservoirs, Michigan Basin, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Middle Devonian Rogers City and subjacent Dundee Limestone formations have combined oil production in excess of 375 MMBO. In general, hydrocarbon production occurs in… (more)

Abduslam, Abrahim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

SolCAP PROJECT OVERVIEW The Basis of SolCAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SolCAP PROJECT OVERVIEW The Basis of SolCAP: Leverage knowledge and resources from the Solanaceae Project Co-Directors: David Douches1, Robin Buell1, David Francis2, Allen Van Deynze3, Walter De Jong4, Lukas Mueller4 and Alexandra Stone5, Project Assistant: Kelly Zarka1 1: Michigan State University, 2

Douches, David S.

403

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan's regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)) [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type [open quote]inverted Gaussian function[close quote] that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type {open_quote}inverted Gaussian function{close_quote} that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 303 International Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reservoirs, wetlands, ponds and other pooled water make up more than 90% of the readily available fresh water global water debates. Join Dr. Masahisa Nakamura as he discusses an approach termed as Integrated Lake Basin Management (ILBM). Find out what is known about these water systems and how crises

407

BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Intelligent Systems and Control Laboratory in the Mechanical Engineering -Engineering Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites applications for a PhD Student Fellowship resume to Professor Gordon Parker at ggparker@mtu.edu. Michigan Technological University is an equal control, optimal control, etc.). Michigan Tech is in the small community of Houghton, Michigan. It lies

Endres. William J.

409

CHI 97 . 22-27 MARCH 1997 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEWS HCI at the University of Michigan's School of Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHI 97 . 22-27 MARCH 1997 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEWS HCI at the University of Michigan's School of Information University of Michigan 550 East University Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1092 USA +1 313 764 The School of Information at the University of Michigan is a new graduate school that offers highly

Olson, Judith S.

410

Medical Certification Policy Outline the policy to ensure proper licensure of operators at the University of Michigan (U-M)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Michigan (U-M) according to State of Michigan law. Policy 1. In order to operate a U-M vehicle, State of Michigan and federal guidelines require that the operator possess the appropriate vehicle card) to operate. 3. Federal guidelines and State of Michigan law require operators of the following

Kirschner, Denise

411

Books and articles that have drawn on the resources of the Michigan Tech Archives NHPRC Application #RP-50059  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press, Discovering the Peoples of Michigan Series, 2009). Martin, Susan, "Copper Quarries on Isle Royale

412

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

K Basins Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

WEBB, R.H.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sludge fertilization of state forest land in Northern Michigan. Final report, June 1980-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-year research-demonstration project to examine the logistic, economic, environmental and sociological aspects of municipal wastewater sludge application was conducted on State Forest land occupied by forest types of major commercial importance in northern Michigan. The procedures utilized for site preparation, sludge transportation and sludge application proved to be cost-effective and made possible uniform distribution of sludge upon the forest floor. As the public comes to recognize the environmental hazards and economic limitations inherent with incineration and the value of sludge as a byproduct resource, forest land application should receive increasing attention as a major sludge management alternative. State regulatory and resource management authorities are committed to use of the newly developed technology in addressing waste management and land management issues.

Brockway, D.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Field and Lab Methods & Protocols University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAFETY AND ORDERING PROCEDURES 309 (VIII-4) HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND WASTE 313 (VIII-5) PRINTERS 315 (VIIIField and Lab Methods & Protocols Kling Lab University of Michigan Updated: December 2012 In use from: May 2012 Protocol version: v2.9 Last update: 8 November 2013 1 #12;LAST UPDATE: 29 MAY 2013 1

Kling, George W.

418

NW Michigan Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Traverse City 12/19 Tel-Farm Appointments NWMHRS 2009 1/8 Wind Energy Workshop NWMHRS 1/15 Get Farming & Extension Center 2/25-27 Michigan Wine Industry Annual Meeting Crystal Mountain Resort 4/1 Water Use on wine grape production: grape berry moth control, eradicating powdery mildew, and an interesting view

419

THE MICHIGAN TECH T~ ~ FOR~ST~R  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but h e also is able to see practical forestry at work. Three large private timber-owing companies. The Calumet and Hecla Copper Mining Company has set aside a large tract of virgin northern hardwoods timber The Michigan College of Mining and Technology is located at Houghton in the heart 01' the timber

420

Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's Apprentice," published by Huron River and author of "Builders Apprentice," confronted that suspicion in the mid-1980s while mulling grad school's Apprentice" Andy Hoffman reflects on crafting a custom-built life By Domenica Trevor May 29, 2010 #12;And

Hoffman, Andrew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SURFACE CURRENTS IN LAKE MICHIGAN 1954 and 1955  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Wind Density Morphology Coriolis force 2 Hydraulic currents 2 Types of drift units 2 Drift bottles 2 Plastic tubes 5 Drift envelopes 5 Releases and recoveries 5 Central and southern Lake Michigan, 1954 5 6 2. Number of drift bottles released and recovered, percentage recovered, and average rates

422

State Registration Number Michigan Department Of Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Division RENEWABLE OPERATING PERMIT STAFF REPORT Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility SRN: M4148 located at 5700 Russell Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48211-2545 RO Pennit Number 199600325 Permit Number: Staff Report Date: RO Penmit Issuance Date: RO Permit Expiration Date: 199600325 October 14, 2003

423

Smart lakefront plants Rebecca Finneran, Michigan State University Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected their delicate Michigan lake ecosystems, water quality and tourism. Even our everyday gardening property owner wouldn't appreciate the pristine, relaxing environment found right at the water's edge? For most of us, it seems logical for our lush, green lawns to be clear of vegetation right down

424

ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2011 APOCALYPSE THEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Medici recognized for fuel-cell discoveries 25 18 20 24 25 23 3Michigan Technological University #12 the strongest acids and alkalies. History of greed, power, and the Golden Gate receives accolades Historian history. Paying the Toll: Local Power, Regional Politics, and the Golden Gate Bridge tells the tale

425

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Charlevoix, Mich. residents are taking steps to become a more environmentally-conscious community, and a $50,000 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant will help that cause. The funding will be used to launch projects aimed at energy efficiency and sustainability, such as retrofitting the city’s fire and emergency vehicles with new, energy-efficient lighting.

427

Michigan State University Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for safety as well as energy usage. With the collected data, the goal of the project is to maximize. To understand quantum theory is to understand chemical bonding and molecular dynamics of atoms involved. Energy will consider some examples in where group theory allows us to reach conclusions we would not have been able

428

System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

DERUSSEAU, R.R.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

Allen Nellesen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

We thank the Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station for financial support that made this work possible.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 We thank the Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment a grower attempts to grow a relatively cold-tender grape variety. One method of avoiding such injury and an adjustable storage leg for this unit when it is not being used. The disc plows themselves were mounted

Isaacs, Rufus

431

Novi, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)References ↑InformationGeothermal Project | OpenNovi

432

Whitehall, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,Geothermal Project JumpOpen

433

ProjectRanking(Economic) District Potentially Impacted USACE Navigation Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;102 Detroit DETROIT RIVER MICHIGAN (0004710) MI 1 X 137 Detroit ST. CLAIR RIVER MICHIGAN (0017300) MI 1 X 152 Detroit ROUGE RIVER MICHIGAN (0015590) MI 1 X 156 Detroit BELLE RIVER, MI (0074197) MI 1 X 161 Detroit CHANNELS IN LAKE ST. CLAIR MICHIGAN (0002940) MI 1 X 170 Detroit CLINTON RIVER, MI (0003490) MI 1 X 193

US Army Corps of Engineers

434

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin Mediterranean) have been affected by a geochemically diverse igneous activity, offshore and onshore, since to our initial project. Key-Words: Mediterranean, Ligurian margins and Basin, Offshore Corsica, Miocene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

437

Deep temperatures in the Paris Basin using tectonic Damien Bonte1,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Claude Keywords: Temperature, Modelling, Paris Basin, geothermal energy. ABSTRACT The determination of deep temperatures in a basin is one of the key parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy. This study, carried out as part of 2 project, presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

439

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

440

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Empire, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classifiedProject) |Emeryville,Empire Natural Gas

442

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

443

MONITORING AND HABITAT ANALYSIS FOR WOLVES IN UPPER MARCEL J. POTVIN,1 School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources and Environmental Science Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA THOMAS D. DRUMMER, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA DEAN E. BEYER, JR., Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Marquette

444

Norton Shores, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)References ↑ USNorthglenn,Louis,Norton Shores, Michigan: Energy

445

Oceana County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent

446

Ogemaw County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy Resources JumpBuildings usedOgemaw County,

447

Ontonagon County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy ResourcesCoMaine:OmOnley,Ontario is

448

Lenawee County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville,Leighton Contractors PtyLenawee County, Michigan:

449

Michigan Saves - Home Energy Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |CharlesDepartment ofChemistryW.CostMichigan

450

West Bloomfield Township, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDSWawarsing,WebbWellsboro,Information Township, Michigan:

451

Luna Pier, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska: EnergyLudlow,Lumeta IncPier, Michigan:

452

Michigan's 11st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichigan Public Power

453

Michigan's 12th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichigan Public

454

Michigan's 13th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichigan PublicInformation

455

Michigan's 14th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichigan

456

Michigan's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,MetalysisMiMichiganInformation

457

Wexford County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview, Florida: Energy ResourcesWexford County, Michigan:

458

Grand Rapids, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy ResourcesGordon, Alabama:5 ClimateCountyMichigan: Energy

459

Pleasant Ridge, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: EnergyPierceJump81647°Pleak, Texas:Michigan: Energy Resources

460

Jackson County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005) |JMalucelliIowa Andrew, Iowa Baldwin,Michigan:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Kent City, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 ClimateKamas,KelseyMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:

462

City of Croswell, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) Jump to:Chicopee,ColmanCroswell, Michigan (Utility

463

City of Portland, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby, Illinois (UtilityPortland Place: Michigan References: EIA Form

464

City of Stephenson, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby, IllinoisSchulenburg,SpencerStephenson, Michigan (Utility

465

Huntington Woods, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy ResourcesPark, California:Michigan: Energy

466

Native American Studies in the Program in American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native American Studies in the Program in American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor1 Gregory Evans Dowd Background and Goals The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has a long, uneven history with American Indians. Today... the university publicly avows that its veiy origins lie in a land grant obtained in Article 16 of the Treaty of Fort Meigs (1817). Yet in the last quarter of the twentieth century, even as Michigan emerged as a leading national proponent of diversity...

Dowd, Gegory Evans

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

"Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University Patrick Russell LeBeau Motto Realizing the dreams of generations past, through preserving those of the future. Undergraduates... logo depicting the circle of life and situating the colors as we have, the American Indian Studies Program (AISP) at Michigan State University honors the Three Fires People of Michigan, the Chippewa (Ojibwe), Ottawa (Odawa), Pottawatomie (Potawatomie...

LeBeau, Patrick Russell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI to the transition frequencies. Thomas Stace, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Thermometry

Magee, Joseph W.

470

Toward improving the effectiveness of wolf management approaches in Michigan: insights from a 2010 statewide survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changes (e.g., federal delisting, regulated hunting seasons); public responses management. Current events in Michigan (e.g., delisting) provide an ideal time

Nelson, Michael P.

471

University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy (IRLEE) Mission innovation, increasing entrepreneurship, and improving the economy; (5) Foster a core of interdisciplinary

Shyy, Wei

472

Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Fall 2011 Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Fall 2011 Seminar Series Date, Time EECS Dr. Joe Borovsky AOSS and Los Alamos National Laboratory The Solar Wind Plasma Wednesday

Shyy, Wei

473

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

474

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

476

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

477

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

478

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang Institute of Information Security, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract. This paper presents our experience of knowledge and technology transfer within the lessons learned and what we would do differently in future technology transfer projects. Keywords

Basin, David

480

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "michigan basin project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

482

The Daya Bay Nuclear Plant Project in the Light of International Environmental Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ministry of Nuclear Industry; PACIFIC BASIN LAW JOURNAL [international law prohibits a state from building a nuclearNUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IN THE LIGHT OF INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Mushkat, Roda

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mapping the physiography of Michigan with GIS Randall J. Schaetzl*, Helen Enander, Michael D. Luehmann, David P. Lusch, Carolyn Fish,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping the physiography of Michigan with GIS Randall J. Schaetzl*, Helen Enander, Michael D.1080/02723646.2013.778531 Ã? 2013 Taylor & Francis Downloadedby[MichiganStateUniversity],[RandallSchaetzl]at09:0116April2013

Schaetzl, Randall

484

Management and Development of the Western Resources Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to manage the Western Resources Project, which included a comprehensive, basin-wide set of experiments investigating the impacts of coal bed methane (CBM; a.k.a. coal bed natural gas, CBNG) production on surface and groundwater in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. This project included a number of participants including Apache Corporation, Conoco Phillips, Marathon, the Ucross Foundation, Stanford University, the University of Wyoming, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, and Western Research Institute.

Terry Brown

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan Jing Lou-three-dimensional suspended sediment transport model was developed and generalized to include combined wave-current effects to study bottom sediment resuspension and transport in southern Lake Michigan. The results from a three

486

CREATING A PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE INDUSTRY CLUSTER IN MICHIGAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

303 CREATING A PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE INDUSTRY CLUSTER IN MICHIGAN: PROSPECTS AND POLICY OPTIONS a Plug-In Electric Vehicle Industry Cluster in Michigan: Prospects and Policy Options, 18 MICH. TELECOMM.......................................................308 II. Will the Electric Vehicle Industry Cluster?....................309 A. Why Do Industries

Lyon, Thomas P.

487

LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

Eloranta, Edwin W.

488

Amer J of Potato Res (2001) 78:421424 421 Michigan Purple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amer J of Potato Res (2001) 78:421424 421 Michigan Purple: A Purple-Skinned Tablestock Variety D. S-ovoid shaped, purple- skinnedtablestock potato variety (Solanum tuberosum L.) devel- oped at Michigan State Purple from field trial at Montcalm Potato Research Farm. Accepted for publicationAugust2, 2001

Douches, David S.

489

The Transport and Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the consequences of this exposure? An analysis and discussion of the effects of dioxin contamination in LakeThe Transport and Deposition of Dioxin to Lake Michigan: A Case Study Mark Cohen NOAA Air Resources, data on the atmospheric deposition of dioxin to Lake Michigan are presented and discussed. Included

490

Data Administration Guidelines for Institutional Data Resources The University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Administration Guidelines for Institutional Data Resources The University of Michigan be sold. #12;#12;UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Data Administration Guidelines for Institutional Data Resources Created February 1996 Updated February 2012 1.0 PURPOSE The following guidelines recognize data

Kamat, Vineet R.

491

NW Michigan Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter -January 2011 CALENDAR OF EVENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manage all aspects of a 10-acre certified organic farm, including passive solar greenhouses used for year://www.maes.msu.edu/nwmihort/getfarming11.pdf Michigan Works Conference Room 1/22 Northern Michigan Small Farm Conference http://smallfarmconference.com/ Grayling High School 1/24 Whole Farm Planning: Holistic Management for Fun & Profit http

492

Curriculum Vitae: William P. Abbett B. S., 1991 (With Honor), Mathematics Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae: William P. Abbett Education: B. S., 1991 (With Honor), Mathematics Michigan State University Ph. D., 1998, Physics, Michigan State University Experience: Dr. William P. Abbett is an associate between magnetic fields existing below the visible surface of the Sun, and those observed in the solar

Abbett, Bill

493

The University of Michigan Department of Astronomy Exhibit Museum of Natural History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Michigan Department of Astronomy Exhibit Museum of Natural History Student Astronomical Society and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics present A distinguished speaker series solar system SouthwestResearchInstitute Friday Our local microcosmos CarlHeiles October5 Universityof

Oey, Sally

494

Woody Biomass for Energy in Michigan TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AND INQUIRY EXTENSION BULLETIN E-3085  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BILL COOK, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION FORESTER JANUARY 2010 Energy Use in Michigan Before we sources--woody biomass, agricultural products (food and non-food), wind, solar, hydro and ground heat of renewable sources--woody biomass, agricultural products (food and non-food), wind, solar, hydro and ground

495

The research project GLOWA-Danube (www.glowa-danube.de) investigates Global Change effects on the water cycle of the Upper Danube river basin (Germany, ~80.0000 km) involving 11 different disciplines from natural and social sciences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Danube GLOWA The research project GLOWA-Danube (www.glowa-danube.de) investigates Global Change in the simulation system DANUBIA. A primary scope of DANUBIA is to evaluate consequences of IPCC derived climate DANUBIA ­ A coupled simulation system Socioeconomic response to Global Change is quite often based

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

496

2004 Michigan Technological University Alicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. CandidateAlicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. Candidate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2004 Michigan Technological University Alicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. CandidateAlicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Computer Science Michigan Technological University athorsen@mtu.edu Graphs, Parallel Michigan Technological University Combinatorial Scientific Computing (CSC)Combinatorial Scientific

497

Annual Technical Progress Report Michigan Technological University DE-AC26-98BC15135 October, 2001 Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Technical Progress Report Michigan Technological University DE-AC26-98BC15135 October, 2001. Pennington Department of Geological Engineering and Sciences Michigan Technological University 1400 Townsend Anastasia Minaeva James Wood Deyi Xie #12;Annual Technical Progress Report Michigan Technological University

498

Published with the assistance of the Earl D. Babst Fund, an endowment of the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical Library, University of Michigan. Bentley Historical Library Bulletin No. 54, revised, June 2010 © 2010--Bentley Historical Library The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan 1150 Beal Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2113 USA Phone: 734-764-3482 Reference e

Michigan, University of

499

Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subscriber access provided by MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY | MSU LIBRARIES Biochemistry is published. Nethercott, Yechiel Shai,§ and David P. Weliky*, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State UniVersity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, and Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Reho

Weliky, David

500

University of Michigan, EECS, Ann Arbor The Midwest Computer Vision Workshop (MCVW) 2011 is an informal meeting of academic and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 5th & 6th , 2010 University of Michigan, EECS, Ann Arbor The Midwest Computer Vision Workshop will be presented. Steering Comittee: Silvio Savarese, University of Michigan Derek Hoiem, University of Illinois Technological Institute at Chicago Local organizers Silvio Savarese, University of Michigan Byung-Soo Kim

Eustice, Ryan