National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mi stop time

  1. Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  2. The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations [with Iran], the labs would check and recheck one another, making sure the answers held up. May 15, 2015 The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" Los Alamos National Laboratory's main complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico National labs race to stop Iran Given the stakes in the sensitive

  3. A High Resolution, Multi-stop, Time-to-Digital Converter for Nuclear Time-of-Flight Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Spencer; J. Cole; M. Drigert; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-stop, time-to-digital converter (TDC) was designed and developed to precisely measure the times-of-flight (TOF) of incident neutrons responsible for induced fission and capture reactions on actinide targets. The minimum time resolution is 1 ns. The TDC design was implemented into a single, dual-wide CAMAC module. The CAMAC bus is used for command and control as well as an alternative data output. A high-speed ECL interface, compatible with LeCroy FERA modules, was also provided for the principle data output path. An Actel high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip was incorporated with an external oscillator and an internal multiple clock phasing system. This device implemented the majority of the high-speed register functions, the state machine for the FERA interface, and the high-speed counting circuit used for the TDC conversion. An external microcontroller was used to monitor and control system-level changes. In this work we discuss the performance of this TDC module as well as its application.

  4. Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" May 15, 2015 National labs race to stop Iran Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations with Iran, the labs would...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive

  6. Full Hybrid: Stopped

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Braking button Stopped button STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. All other systems, including the electric air conditioning, continue to run. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery,

  7. Stop/Start: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Driving button Braking button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Stop/Start hybrids are not true hybrids since electricity from the battery is not used to propel the vehicle. However, the Stop/Start feature is an important, energy-saving building block used in hybrid vehicles. Stop/Start technology conserves energy by shutting off the gasoline engine when the vehicle is at rest, such as at a traffic light, and automatically re-starting it when the driver pushes the gas pedal to go

  8. Sneaky light stop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this stealth stop scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemoreto the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.less

  9. Quick stop device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hipwell, Roger L. (35 Hounds Ditch La., Duxbury, MA 02332); Hazelton, Andrew J. (3877 Army St., San Francisco, CA 94131)

    1996-01-01

    A quick stop device for abruptly interrupting the cutting of a workpiece by a cutter is disclosed. The quick stop device employs an outer housing connected to an inner workpiece holder by at least one shear pin. The outer housing includes an appropriate shank designed to be received in the spindle of a machine, such as a machine tool. A cutter, such as a drill bit, is mounted in a stationary position and the workpiece, mounted to the workpiece holder, is rotated during engagement with the cutter. A trigger system includes at least one spring loaded punch disposed for movement into engagement with the workpiece holder to abruptly stop rotation of the workpiece holder. This action shears the shear pin and permits continued rotation of the spindle and outer housing without substantially disturbing the chip root formed during cutting.

  10. Stop/Start: Overview

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Braking button hilighted subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING PART 1 Stop/Start vehicles use a combination of regenerative and conventional friction braking to slow the vehicle. In regenerative braking, energy from the wheels turns the electric generator, creating electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the generator slows the vehicle. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric starter/generator visible. The car is

  11. Stop/Start: Driving

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Braking button subbanner graphic: gray bar PULLING OUT & DRIVING PART 1 The gasoline engine does not run when the vehicle is at rest. When pulling out, the electric starter/generator uses electricity from the battery to instantly start the gasoline engine---the sole source of propulsion for the vehicle. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric starter/generator visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

  12. CALCULATION OF STOPPING POWER VALUES AND RANGES OF FAST IONS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-18

    STOPOW calculates a set of stopping power values and ranges of fast ions in matter for any materials. Furthermore STOPOW can calculate a set of values for one special auxiliary function (e.g. kinematic factors, track structure parameters, time of flight or correction factors in the stopping function) . The user chooses the physical units for stopping powers and ranges and the energy range for calculations.

  13. Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" May 15, 2015 National labs race to stop Iran Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations [with Iran], the labs would check and recheck one another, making sure the answers held up. The natural rivalries among the labs sometimes worked to the negotiators' advantage: Los Alamos National Laboratory, in the mountains of New Mexico, the birthplace of the bomb, was happy to find flaws in calculations done elsewhere, and vice versa.

  14. Clouds' Role in Sunlight Stopping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds' Role in Sunlight Stopping For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Clouds are energy traffic cops, controlling how much sunlight reaches Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers used long-term observations to show that the sunlight stopping power of each type of typical tropical cloud, and how frequently they occur, must be accurately simulated in climate models. Otherwise,

  15. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the miR-200c/141 CpG island is closely linked to their inappropriate silencing in cancer cells. Since the miR-200c cluster plays a significant role in EMT, our results suggest an important role for DNA methylation in the control of phenotypic conversions in normal cells.

  16. Mixing stops at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find thatmore » they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.« less

  17. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Truck Stop Electrification Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Truck Stop Electrification Testing Photo of series of truck stop electrification pedestals near highway with heavy-duty truck parked in the background. NREL is monitoring the use of truck stop electrification sites across the nation. Photo courtesy of Shorepower Technologies NREL's fleet test and evaluation team is evaluating and documenting the use of 50 truck stop electrification (TSE) sites along the busiest transportation corridors in the United States. Truck drivers typically idle their

  19. Searching for Stopped Gluinos at CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnikov, Fedor

    2010-02-10

    We describe plans for a search for long-lived particles which will become stopped by the CMS detector. We will look for the subsequent decay of these particles during time intervals where there are no pp collisions in CMS: during gaps between crossings in the LHC beam structure, and during inter-fill periods between the beam being dumped and re-injection. Such long living particles decays will be recorded with dedicated calorimeter triggers. For models predicting these particles, such as split-susy gluinos, the large cross-section combined with good stopping power of CMS, yields a significant number of triggerable decays. If LHC instantaneous luminosity approaches 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} in 2009-10, 5sigma significance can be established in a matter of days, since these decays occur on top of a negligible background.Due to limited size, this paper concentrates on main idea and expected results. More details are available in https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/CMS/PhysicsResults.

  20. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  1. Quality Procedure - Stop Work | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stop Work Quality Procedure - Stop Work This Quality Procedure establishes the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance authority, responsibilities, and instructions to direct that unsafe work be stopped, during the execution and operations of its activities, specifically in oversight activities. this procedure is utilized and accomplished upon coordination with management of the Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters and Field Office. This procedure also provides provisions for the restart

  2. Fact #853 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Light Vehicles Produced | Department of Energy 3 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced Fact #853 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced Stop/Start technology improves fuel economy by reducing engine idle time. As a vehicle slows to a stop, the engine is shut down but then immediately restarts when the break pedal is released so that the vehicle can accelerate without delay. Hybrid

  3. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC MI OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  4. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  5. Boondocks Truck Stop Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Service Owner Boondocks Truck Stop Energy Purchaser Boondocks Truck Stop Location IA Coordinates 42.4703, -93.5624 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  6. Fact #787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Transportation mandates that truckers rest for 10 hours after driving for 11 hours, during which time they often park at truck stops idling the engines to provide heating,...

  7. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

  8. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jerry A. (Sandia Park, NM); Weckwerth, Mark V. (Pleasanton, CA); Baca, Wes E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  9. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  10. Which is Greener: Idle, or Stop and Restart? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This poster presents data comparing fuel use and emissions for short passenger-car stops vs. idling. Fuel use is always greater for idling over 6 seconds; crossover times vary by pollutant. PDF icon p-09_gaines.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2012 Cold-Start Performance and Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels in an SIDI Engine Using Transient Hardware-In-Loop Test Meth AVTA: Quantifying the Effects of Idle Stop Systems on Fuel Economy

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    03 Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. (MI.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Velsicol Chemical Corp. MI.03-1 Location: St. Louis , Michigan MI.03-2 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.03-3 Site Operations: Rare earth processing facility. MI.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC survey MI.03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  12. Energy Savers: Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades Energy Savers: Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades This is a presentation from Energy Impact Illinois posted on the...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Collection Methods Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods

  14. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to making a trip to that location. Some sites in our database have addresses that could not be located. This may result in the site appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at 800-254-6735. They will be able to assist

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Michigan - MI 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Michigan - MI 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN (MI.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Ann Arbor , Michigan MI.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.08-2 Site Operations: Conducted research with a supersonic reflectroscope to detect flaws within a metal slug and developed methods for testing the adequacy of coatings which are applied to pieces of uranium metal. MI.08-1 MI.08-3 Site Disposition:

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wolverine Tube Division (MI.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Wolverine Tube Division of Calumet & Hecla Consolidated Copper Co. Star Tool Hermes Automotive Manufacturing Corporation MI.05-1 MI.05-2 Location: 1411 Central Avenue , Detroit , Michigan MI.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.05-2 Site Operations: 1943 - Conducted research and development of methods for spinning

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Adrian - MI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Adrian, MI Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Co. Special Metals Extrusion Plant Bridgeport Brass Company General Motors General Motors Company, Adrian MI.01-1 Location: 1450 East Beecher Street, Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. MI.01-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s):

  18. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 23 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carboloy Co - MI 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carboloy Co. (MI.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric MI.12-1 Location: 11177 E. Eight Mile Road , Detroit , Michigan MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Evaluation Year: 1987-1991 MI.12-3 MI.12-4 MI.12-6 Site Operations: Turned-down the outer diameter of uranium metal slugs and conducted pilot plant scale operations for hot pressing uranium dioxide pellets

  20. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Geynisman et al.

    2003-09-15

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider, a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up-stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo-design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon stop prototype.

  1. Obama Administration's Rural Tour Stops in Western Alaska | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Administration's Rural Tour Stops in Western Alaska Obama Administration's Rural Tour Stops in Western Alaska August 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON D.C. - Four Cabinet Secretaries brought the Obama Administration's Rural Tour to rural Alaska today, with stops in Bethel and Hooper Bay, representing the largest Cabinet-level delegation to visit the state. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, and

  2. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator Now Available - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator Now Available Truck drivers can find idle reduction facilities using cell phones and PDAs September 15, 2009 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) expanded its suite of Web-based, fuel-efficiency tools by launching the Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator. This comprehensive mobile application helps truck drivers find public truck stops with idle reduction facilities using a cell phone,

  3. Energy Savers: Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades Energy Savers: Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades This is a presentation from Energy Impact Illinois posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. PDF icon Energy Savers from CNT Energy More Documents & Publications Energy Savers: A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building owners Energy Savers: Fireplaces Energy Impact Illinois:

  4. Stopping executions, saving computers with new malware detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tool Stopping executions, saving computers with new malware detection tool A computer tool that allows the machine to identify malicious executable files without being...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oliver Corp - MI 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1 Location: 433 East Michigan Avenue , Battle Creek , Michigan MI.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 MI.11-4 Site Operations: Conducted production scale briquetting of green salt and magnesium blend under AEC license Nos. SNM-591, SUB-579, and C-3725. MI.11-1 MI.11-3 Site

  6. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Naval Ordnance - MI 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naval Ordnance - MI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE NAVAL ORDNANCE (MI.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.02-2 Site Operations: Worked under contract with the Albuquerque Operations Office. No indication that radioactive material was involved under the contract. MI.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication radioactive

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Detrex Corp - MI 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Detrex Corp. (MI.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to pickling/degreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to small quantity of material handled - There is no

  9. Ionizing RadiationInducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor? (ER?) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ER? was overexpressed in those 2cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ER? in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. ?-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ER?-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPAR?, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that ?-estradiol/ER? signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor suppressor that inhibits cell proliferation by targeting cyclin A2.

  10. Fact #787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stops idling the engines to provide heating, cooling and use of electrical appliances. ... 8 Colorado 2 Connecticut 2 Delaware 2 District of Columbia 0 Florida 2 Georgia 5 Hawaii ...

  11. Nanomachines: How Viruses Work, and How We Can Stop Them

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    2010-01-08

    Nature's Nasty Nanomachines: How Viruses Work, and How We Can Stop Them. Carolyn Bertozzi, director of Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, discusses this topic at a Feb. 21, 2009 Nano*High talk.

  12. Stop and Restart Effects on Modern Vehicle Starting System Components |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Stop and Restart Effects on Modern Vehicle Starting System Components Title Stop and Restart Effects on Modern Vehicle Starting System Components Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2015 Authors Windover, PR, Owens, RJ, Levinson, TM, Laughlin, MD Date Published April 2015 Institution Argonne National Laboratory City Argonne, IL USA Report Number ANL-15/04 PDF https://anl.box.com/s/sfwulyouom8cllqwzqhg07ecc99y5m7z Google Scholar

  13. New Truck Stop Electrification Station Maps Help Truckers Reduce Idling -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL New Truck Stop Electrification Station Maps Help Truckers Reduce Idling April 21, 2006 Golden, Colo. - A new internet-based mapping program is helping truckers find truck stops with idle reduction facilities-on-site systems that can substantially cut fuel use while reducing air emissions. Idle reduction systems hold great promise for the approximately 500,000 long-haul trucks with sleeper cabs currently operating in the United States. Estimates show idle reduction

  14. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe; Gauthier, Maxence

    2013-01-15

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  15. Mean excitation energies for stopping power as derived from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oscillator-strength distributions. [Review] (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Mean excitation energies for stopping power as derived from oscillator-strength distributions. [Review] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mean excitation energies for stopping power as derived from oscillator-strength distributions. [Review] × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical

  16. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules You are ...

  17. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules Authors: ...

  18. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  19. Stopping Power and Range of Ions in Matter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-19

    SRIM is a group of programs which calculate the stopping and range of ions (10ev - 2 GeV/amu) into matter. TRIM (the Transport of Ions in Matter) is the most comprehensive program included. Trim will accept complex targets made of compound materials with up to eight layers, each with different materials. It will calculate both the final 3d distribution of the inner ions and also all kinetic phenomena associated with the ion''s energy loss; targetmore » damage, sputtering, ionization, and phonon production. All targets atom cascades in the target are followed in detail. It can be used for physics of recoil cascades, physics of sputtering, the stopping of ions in compounds and stopping power for ions in gases; This included radiation damage from neutron , electrons, and photons.« less

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Trucks Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Conserve Fuel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop

  2. Method and apparatus to debug an integrated circuit chip via synchronous clock stop and scan

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellofatto, Ralph E. (Ridgefield, CT); Ellavsky, Matthew R. (Rochester, MN); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Gooding, Thomas M. (Rochester, MN); Haring, Rudolf A. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hehenberger, Lance G. (Leander, TX); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2012-03-20

    An apparatus and method for evaluating a state of an electronic or integrated circuit (IC), each IC including one or more processor elements for controlling operations of IC sub-units, and each the IC supporting multiple frequency clock domains. The method comprises: generating a synchronized set of enable signals in correspondence with one or more IC sub-units for starting operation of one or more IC sub-units according to a determined timing configuration; counting, in response to one signal of the synchronized set of enable signals, a number of main processor IC clock cycles; and, upon attaining a desired clock cycle number, generating a stop signal for each unique frequency clock domain to synchronously stop a functional clock for each respective frequency clock domain; and, upon synchronously stopping all on-chip functional clocks on all frequency clock domains in a deterministic fashion, scanning out data values at a desired IC chip state. The apparatus and methodology enables construction of a cycle-by-cycle view of any part of the state of a running IC chip, using a combination of on-chip circuitry and software.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow Chemical Co - Midland - MI 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midland - MI 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow Chemical Co. - Midland (MI.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Midland , Michigan MI.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.06-2 Site Operations: Conducted development work for production of magnesium-thorium alloys. MI.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed site MI.06-1 MI.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  4. NNSA lab stops bad guys from weaseling into critical infrastructure |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration stops bad guys from weaseling into critical infrastructure | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  5. Capitol Christmas tree stops in Amarillo | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Capitol Christmas tree stops in Amarillo | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- General Motors Co - Flint - MI 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Motors Co - Flint - MI 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GENERAL MOTORS CO. (MI.07 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: A.C. Spark Plug Dort Highway Plant MI.07-1 MI.07-2 Location: Flint , Michigan MI.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.07-3 Site Operations: Processed thorium oxide, uranium oxide, and beryllium oxide into crucibles for the Chicago Area. MI.07-3 MI.07-4 MI.07-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  7. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 ... PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment ...

  8. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  9. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMI-MINOS Neutrino Logo NuMI Beamline and MINOS Experiment Neutrino Logo The MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beamline Fermilab Logo MINOS Experiment Links ◊ MINOS for the Public ◊ Scientific Results ◊ MINOS at Work ◊ NuMI at Work ◊ MINOS+ Experiment Fermilab Neutrino Links ◊ Neutrino FAQ ◊ MINOS Underground Areas at Fermilab ◊ PPD Intensity Frontier Dept Back to - - - ◊ Fermilab at Work ◊ Fermilab Home the MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine MINOS collaborators assembling the

  10. miR-206 is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell proliferation through the up-regulation of cyclinD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Tian, Ye; Li, Juan; Lu, Binbin; Sun, Ming; Zou, Yanfen; Kong, Rong; Luo, Yanhong; Shi, Yongguo; Wang, Keming; Ji, Guozhong

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: ? miR-206 was downexpressed in tumor samples compared with matched normal samples. ? Enhanced expression of miR-206 could inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro. ? Luciferase confirmed miR-206 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting cyclinD2. ? A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 in breast cancer was found. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs act as important gene regulators in human genomes, and their aberrant expression is linked to many malignancies. Aberrant expression of miR-206 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in breast cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the relative expression levels of miR-206 in breast cancer and normal breast tissues. Lower expression of miR-206 in breast cancer tissues was associated with larger tumour size and a more advanced clinical stage. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-206 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth by blocking the G1/S transition and suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, implying that miR-206 functions as a tumour suppressor in the progression of breast cancer. Interestingly, Luciferase assays first revealed that miR-206 inhibited cyclinD2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3?-untranslated region of cyclinD2 mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-206 reduced cyclinD2 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 expression was noted in breast cancer tissues. Altogether, our results identify a crucial tumour suppressive role of miR-206 in the progression of breast cancer, at least partly via up-regulation of the expression of cyclinD2, and suggest that miR-206 might be a candidate prognostic predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for breast cancer patients.

  11. Conventional Start-Stop Vehicles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 Mazda 3 i-stop 2010 SmartCar MHD 2010 VW Golf TDI Bluemotion Alternative Fuel Vehicles Facilities Publications News About Us For ES Employees Staff Directory About Us For ES Employees Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory Energy Systems Research Facilities Publications News Research Advanced Combustion Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Advanced Vehicle Technologies Buildings and Climate-Environment Education and Outreach Energy, Power, and Decision Analytics Energy Systems

  12. Energy Savers: A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building owners Energy Savers: A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building owners This is a document from Energy...

  13. Your First Stop for Clean Energy Policy Support (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial and UN-Energy, helps governments design and adopt policies and programs that support the deployment of transformational low-carbon technologies. The Solutions Center serves as a first-stop clearinghouse of clean energy policy reports, data, and tools and provides expert assistance and peer-to-peer learning forums. This factsheet highlights key Solutions Center offerings, including 'ask an expert' assistance on clean energy policy matters, training and peer learning, and technical resources for policy makers worldwide.

  14. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  15. Oil Stop Valve : Oil Spill Containment Research and Development Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourn, Robert D.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the research and development project conducted by the Civil Engineering Section, Division of Substation and Control Engineering, to determine the effectiveness of the oil stop valve for use in the Bonneville Power Administration's Oil Spill Containment and Countermeasure Program. The most attractive alternative to lagoons and separator tanks was found in the oil stop valve manufactured by AFL/Clark Industries of Riviera Beach, Florida. This small, direct-acting and relatively inexpensive valve requires little maintenance and can either be employed independently, using existing drain lines for effluent storage, or in conjunction with oil separator tanks and lagoon systems. The AFL/Clark valve requires no power and has only one moving part, a ballasted float having a specific gravity between that of oil and water. In water, the float rides above the throat of the discharge pipe allowing water to flow out. When oil enters the water the float begins losing its relative bouyancy and sinks until it seats itself over the throat of the outlet, closing the valve. Usually installed in a manhole within a typical storm drainage system, the valve backs spilled oil into drainways and contains it for temporary storage within the switchyard.

  16. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data. Release Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  17. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REVERE COPPER AND BRASS CO. ( MI.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Revere Copper and Brass MI.04-1 Location: 5851 West Jefferson Street , Detroit , Michigan MI.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.04-2 Site Operations: Extrusion of tuballoy rods, myrnalloy rods and beryllium shapes in the 1940s. MI.04-3 MI.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  20. AVTA: 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel vehicle with stop-start technology. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  1. AVTA: 2010 Mazda 3 Hatchback Start-Stop Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Mazda3 hatchback with stop-start technology. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  2. Low velocity ion stopping in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashev, Bekbolat; Baimbetov, Fazylkhan; Deutsch, Claude; Fromy, Patrice

    2008-10-15

    Attention is focused on the low ion velocity stopping mechanisms in multicomponent and dense target plasmas built of quasiclassical electron fluids neutralizing binary ionic mixtures, such as, deuterium-tritium of current fusion interest, proton-heliumlike iron in the solar interior or proton-helium ions considered in planetology, as well as other mixtures of fiducial concern in the heavy ion beam production of warm dense matter at Bragg peak conditions. The target plasma is taken in a multicomponent dielectric formulation a la Fried-Conte. The occurrence of projectile ion velocities (so-called critical) for which target electron slowing down equals that of given target ion components is also considered. The corresponding multiquadrature computations, albeit rather heavy, can be monitored analytical through a very compact code operating a PC cluster. Slowing down results are systematically scanned with respect to target temperature and electron density, as well as ion composition.

  3. Search for stop pairs in the emu channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, Fabrice; /Clermont-Ferrand U.

    2007-10-01

    The Standard Model gives a satisfying description of subatomic processes at low energy (< 1 TeV). Beyond this energy scale, other models must be considered. Supersymmetry is one of them. It gives in an elegant way, solutions to several Standard Model short comings. This document reports the search for a supersymmetric signal characterized by the production of two stops decaying into two b-jets, one electron, one muon and missing energy. This study has been performed at the D0 experiment, located on the ring of Tevatron collider at FermiLab, (Chicago, USA), whose energy in the center of mass reaches {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data used for this analysis have been collected during Run IIa of D0 detector; from april 2003 to march 2006 ({approx} 1fb{sup -1}). The objects handled for this analysis require a good understanding of both calorimeters, muon detectors and trackers. As Tevatron is an hadronic collider and the number of Standard Model processes with the same signature as the signal is low, the background is thus dominated by QCD processes. After the selection cuts, no excess of data has been observed with respect to the Standard Model expectation. D0 experiment sensibility has been improved and the 95% CL exclusion area in [m{sub {bar {nu}}}, m{sub {bar t}{sub 1}}], extended up to stop masses of 170 GeV/c{sup 2} and sneutrino masses of 105 GeV/c{sup 2}. Besides, a part of my work for the collaboration consisted in elaborating a tool to discriminate calorimetric objects at level 3 trigger system; and also in calibrating the two simulated level 1 readouts.

  4. Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 8: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites Long haul truck drivers routinely idle their engines to heat or cool their cab during their rest period. (Federal laws require 10 hours of rest for every 11 hours on the road.) Truck Stop Electrification allows truckers to operate the heater, air conditioner, television, and other appliances without running the engine, which saves fuel, reduces air pollution, and reduces engine

  5. Energy Savers: A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    owners | Department of Energy A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building owners Energy Savers: A one-stop energy efficiency shop for multifamily building owners This is a document from Energy Impact Illinois posted on the website of U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. PDF icon Energy Savers program brochure More Documents & Publications Energy Savers: Your One Stop Shop for Energy Efficiency Upgrades Energy Savers: Fireplaces Saving Energy

  6. Stopping distance for high energy jets in weakly coupled quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Peter; Cantrell, Sean; Xiao Wei

    2010-02-15

    We derive a simple formula for the stopping distance for a high-energy quark traveling through a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The result is given to next-to-leading order in an expansion in inverse logarithms ln(E/T), where T is the temperature of the plasma. We also define a stopping distance for gluons and give a leading-log result. Discussion of stopping distance has a theoretical advantage over discussion of energy loss rates in that stopping distances can be generalized to the case of strong coupling, where one may not speak of individual partons.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MITTS-MERREL CO. (MI.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mitts & Merrell Co. MI.14-1 Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces on a small test scale during the mid-1950s. MI.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantity of

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow-Detroit Edison Project (MI.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. MI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at the site MI.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No

  10. The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NPR: Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima NPR: Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima August, 30 2015 - It's one of the greatest, and ...

  11. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  12. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI LNG Exports to All Countries

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amex Specialty Metal Corp (MI.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Coldwater , Michigan MI.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-01-1 Site Operations: No indication that AMEX performed work for MED or AEC activities. Originally included on FUSRAP list due to fact that AMEX purchased milling equipment from a company that had done uranium milling.

  14. Study of stopping power for a proton moving in a plasma with arbitrary degeneracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ya; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Excitation of bulk solid electrons with arbitrary degeneracy, by external charged particles, is investigated by a two-dimensional nonlinear quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. The nonlinear stopping power and wake potential are calculated by solving the nonlinear QHD equations with the flux corrected transport numerical method. Two cases of fully degenerated and partially degenerated electrons are compared and discussed in the same self-consistent QHD model. Our results are consistent with the well known dielectric calculation of the stopping power at higher velocity, but include the nonlinear terms of the interactions and give larger stopping power at smaller velocity.

  15. Optimization of the muon stopping target for the MU2E collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, Zachary Donovan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e Experiment utilizes state of the art accelerators, superconducting magnets, detectors, electronics, and other equipment to maximize the sensitivity to such a rare process. Many of the components of the Mu2e hardware are critical to the overall physics capability of the experiment. The muon stopping target, where muons are stopped and may interact via this very rare process, is one such component where any improvements beyond the base design can have a significant impact on the experiment. This thesis explores possible modifications to the geometry of the muon stopping target. The goal is to determine if any modifications can improve the sensitivity of observing the muon conversion process.

  16. Automatic generation of stop word lists for information retrieval and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Stuart J

    2013-01-08

    Methods and systems for automatically generating lists of stop words for information retrieval and analysis. Generation of the stop words can include providing a corpus of documents and a plurality of keywords. From the corpus of documents, a term list of all terms is constructed and both a keyword adjacency frequency and a keyword frequency are determined. If a ratio of the keyword adjacency frequency to the keyword frequency for a particular term on the term list is less than a predetermined value, then that term is excluded from the term list. The resulting term list is truncated based on predetermined criteria to form a stop word list.

  17. The ExoClean Filter System for Stop and Go Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The ExoClean Filter System for Stop and Go Vehicles The ExoClean Filter System for Stop and Go Vehicles 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_syed.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel-Borne Catalyst Assisted DPF regeneration on a Renault truck MD9 Engine Outfitted with SCR A New Active DPF System for "Stop and Go" Duty-Cycle Vehicles Combination of Diesel fuel system architectures and Ceria-based fuel-borne catalysts

  18. Using laser-driven neutrons to stop nuclear smugglers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. June 4, 2013 A burst of laser energy 50 times greater than the worldwide output of...

  19. Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop fromYukawa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A 12V Start-Stop Li Polymer Battery Pack

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by LG Chem Power at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about A 12V start-stop Li polymer...

  1. Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – Two locomotives that hauled irradiated fuel around the Hanford Site for a half-century will reach their final stop this week when they are delivered to the Historic B Reactor for preservation and public display.

  2. Method and apparatus for rapid stopping and starting of a thermoacoustic engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-11-11

    A thermoacoustic engine-driven system with a hot heat exchanger, a regenerator or stack, and an ambient heat exchanger includes a side branch load for rapid stopping and starting, the side branch load being attached to a location in the thermoacoustic system having a nonzero oscillating pressure and comprising a valve, a flow resistor, and a tank connected in series. The system is rapidly stopped simply by opening the valve and rapidly started by closing the valve.

  3. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Capsules (Conference) | SciTech Connect Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules Authors: Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [1] ; Jungman, Gerard [1] ; Boswell, Melissa [1] ; Fowler, Malcolm M. [1] ; Grim, Gary P. [1] ; Klein, Andreas [1] ; Rundberg, Robert S. [1] ; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [1] ; Wilson, Douglas Carl [1] ; Cerjan, Charles [2] ;

  4. Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation Authors: Kang, Zhaofeng ; Li, Tianjun ; Liu, Tao ; Tong, Chunli ; Yang, Jin Min Publication Date: 2012-11-16 OSTI Identifier: 1101779 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical

  5. DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards September 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that it has taken action against Air-Con, International, requiring

  6. U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smuggling | Department of Energy Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling May 6, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the overall U.S. strategy to prevent nuclear and dangerous radiological materials from falling into the hands of terrorists, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced today that an agreement with the government

  7. Reducing or stopping the uncontrolled flow of fluid such as oil from a well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E

    2014-02-18

    The uncontrolled flow of fluid from an oil or gas well may be reduced or stopped by injecting a composition including 2-cyanoacrylate ester monomer into the fluid stream. Injection of the monomer results in a rapid, perhaps instantaneous, polymerization of the monomer within the flow stream of the fluid. This polymerization results in formation of a solid plug that reduces or stops the flow of additional fluid from the well.

  8. Stop-catalyzed baryogenesis beyond the MSSM (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Stop-catalyzed baryogenesis beyond the MSSM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stop-catalyzed baryogenesis beyond the MSSM Authors: Katz, Andrey ; Perelstein, Maxim ; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. ; Winslow, Peter Publication Date: 2015-11-19 OSTI Identifier: 1226507 Grant/Contract Number: SC0011095 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher: American Physical

  9. How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Professional Energy Assessments |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Professional Energy Assessments How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Professional Energy Assessments April 19, 2011 - 10:59am Addthis Josiah Narog Staff with the Washington State University Extension Energy Program Several years ago my family moved into a beautiful townhouse. The neighborhood was lovely, there was a gigantic park directly across the sleepy residential street, and it was close enough to my work to bike every day

  10. Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for and Advanced Metallic Open-Flowfield

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Stack | Department of Energy and Advanced Metallic Open-Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for and Advanced Metallic Open-Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 2_nuvera.pdf More Documents & Publications Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an

  11. New Online Tool Creates One-Stop Shop for Federal Program Opportunities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    That Support Tribal Energy Development | Department of Energy Online Tool Creates One-Stop Shop for Federal Program Opportunities That Support Tribal Energy Development New Online Tool Creates One-Stop Shop for Federal Program Opportunities That Support Tribal Energy Development December 3, 2014 - 9:03am Addthis Today the White House Council on Native American Affairs Energy Subgroup launched a new Federal Grant, Loan, and Technical Assistance Programs for Tribal Energy Development online

  12. Coupled <mi>ππ>, <mi>K><mi>K>¯ scattering in <mi>P>-wave and the <mi>ρ> resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  13. Unraveling resistive versus collisional contributions to relativistic electron beam stopping power in cold-solid and in warm-dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vauzour, B.; Laboratoire d'Optique Applique, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau ; Debayle, A.; CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon ; Vaisseau, X.; Hulin, S.; Nicola, Ph.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; D'Humires, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Santos, J. J.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Baton, S. D.; Yahia, V.; Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 ; Honrubia, J. J.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Jarrot, L. C.; Benocci, R.; Volpe, L.; and others

    2014-03-15

    We present results on laser-driven relativistic electron beam propagation through aluminum samples, which are either solid and cold or compressed and heated by laser-induced shock. A full numerical description of fast electron generation and transport is found to reproduce the experimental absolute K{sub ?} yield and spot size measurements for varying target thicknesses, and to sequentially quantify the collisional and resistive electron stopping powers. The results demonstrate that both stopping mechanisms are enhanced in compressed Al samples and are attributed to the increase in the medium density and resistivity, respectively. For the achieved time- and space-averaged electronic current density, ?j{sub h}??810{sup 10}?A/cm{sup 2} in the samples, the collisional and resistive stopping powers in warm and compressed Al are estimated to be 1.5?keV/?m and 0.8?keV/?m, respectively. By contrast, for cold and solid Al, the corresponding estimated values are 1.1?keV/?m and 0.6?keV/?m. Prospective numerical simulations involving higher j{sub h} show that the resistive stopping power can reach the same level as the collisional one. In addition to the effects of compression, the effect of the transient behavior of the resistivity of Al during relativistic electron beam transport becomes progressively more dominant, and for a significantly high current density, j{sub h}?10{sup 12}?A/cm{sup 2}, cancels the difference in the electron resistive stopping power (or the total stopping power in units of areal density) between solid and compressed samples. Analytical calculations extend the analysis up to j{sub h}=10{sup 14}?A/cm{sup 2} (representative of the full-scale fast ignition scenario of inertial confinement fusion), where a very rapid transition to the Spitzer resistivity regime saturates the resistive stopping power, averaged over the electron beam duration, to values of ?1?keV/?m.

  14. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  15. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M.; Hosny, K.A.; Esmat, G.; Abdelaziz, A.I.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  16. Light Stops, Light Staus and the 125 GeV Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; Gori, Stefania; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-08-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently announced the discovery of a Higgs-like resonance with mass close to 125 GeV. Overall, the data is consistent with a Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs boson. Such a particle may arise in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM with average stop masses of the order of the TeV scale and a sizable stop mixing parameter. In this article we discuss properties of the SM-like Higgs production and decay rates induced by the possible presence of light staus and light stops. Light staus can affect the decay rate of the Higgs into di-photons and, in the case of sizable left-right mixing, induce an enhancement in this production channel up to $\\sim$ 50% of the Standard Model rate. Light stops may induce sizable modifications of the Higgs gluon fusion production rate and correlated modifications to the Higgs diphoton decay. Departures from SM values of the bottom-quark and tau-lepton couplings to the Higgs can be obtained due to Higgs mixing effects triggered by light third generation scalar superpartners. We describe the phenomenological implications of light staus on searches for light stops and non-standard Higgs bosons. Finally, we discuss the current status of the search for light staus produced in association with sneutrinos, in final states containing a $W$ gauge boson and a pair of $\\tau$s.

  17. USABC Development of 12 Volt Battery for Start-Stop Application: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tataria, H.; Gross, O.; Bae, C.; Cunningham, B.; Barnes, J. A.; Deppe, J.; Neubauer, J.

    2015-02-01

    Global automakers are accelerating the development of fuel efficient vehicles, as a part of meeting regional regulatory CO2 emissions requirements. The micro hybrid vehicles with auto start-stop functionality are considered economical solutions for the stringent European regulations. Flooded lead acid batteries were initially considered the most economical solution for idle-stop systems. However, the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at lower state-of-charge (SOC) was limiting the life of the batteries. While improved lead-acid batteries with AGM and VRLA features have improved battery longevity, they do not last the life of the vehicle. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (or USABC, a consortium of GM, Ford, and Chrysler) analyzed energy storage needs for a micro hybrid automobile with start-stop capability, and with a single power source. USABC has analyzed the start-stop behaviors of many drivers and has developed the requirements for the start-stop batteries (Table 3). The testing procedures to validate the performance and longevity were standardized and published. The guideline for the cost estimates calculations have also been provided, in order to determine the value of the newly developed modules. The analysis effort resulted in a set of requirements which will help the battery manufacturers to develop a module to meet the automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) micro hybrid vehicle requirements. Battery developers were invited to submit development proposals and two proposals were selected for 50% cost share with USABC/DOE.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  19. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  20. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  1. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Post-translational Modifications at Single-cell Resolution. Citation Details...

  2. Battery Test Manual For 12 Volt Start/Stop Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belt, Jeffrey R.

    2015-05-01

    This manual was prepared by and for the United Stated Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Electrochemical Energy Storage Team. It is based on the targets established for 12 Volt Start/Stop energy storage development and is similar (with some important changes) to an earlier manual for the former FreedomCAR program. The specific procedures were developed primarily to characterize the performance of energy storage devices relative to the USABC requirements. However, it is anticipated that these procedures will have some utility for characterizing 12 Volt Start/Stop hybrid energy storage device behavior in general.

  3. Secretary Bodman Makes "Energizing America for Energy Security" Tour Stops

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Launch New Solar Facility | Department of Energy Makes "Energizing America for Energy Security" Tour Stops to Launch New Solar Facility Secretary Bodman Makes "Energizing America for Energy Security" Tour Stops to Launch New Solar Facility July 14, 2005 - 2:10pm Addthis AUBURN HILLS, MICH - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman toured the world's largest amorphous silicon thin-fill solar manufacturing plant in Auburn Hills, Mich., today, and joined United Solar Ovonic

  4. ISU offers one-stop shop for Wellbeing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISU offers one-stop shop for Wellbeing In partnership with University Human Resources, Ames Lab Human Resources is excited to communicate a new website being rolled out by ISU Wellbeing. The website is meant to be utilized by faculty and staff as a one-stop shop for programs, services, resources and tools related to well-being at Iowa State University. Even though this website has just launched, plans to improve it are already underway. Future enhancements include building an individual-specific

  5. Stop Paying for Energy You Aren't Using | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stop Paying for Energy You Aren't Using Stop Paying for Energy You Aren't Using January 6, 2009 - 4:00am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL Back in October, we heard a lot about "energy vampires." A very convenient holiday metaphor, to be sure, but you're probably not in the Halloween spirit in January. Nonetheless, you may be in the mood to reduce your energy costs, and standby power is something worth considering all year round. Standby power is the minimum power used

  6. Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting You |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting You Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting You October 26, 2015 - 10:49am Addthis This Halloween, keep ghosts and goblins at bay -- while saving energy and money -- with these home energy efficiency tricks. | Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. This Halloween, keep ghosts and goblins at bay -- while saving energy and money -- with these

  7. Energy Vampires are Attacking Your Home - Here's How to Stop Them |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vampires are Attacking Your Home - Here's How to Stop Them Energy Vampires are Attacking Your Home - Here's How to Stop Them October 20, 2014 - 2:09pm Addthis Using a power strip to switch off appliances ensures your home won't be plagued by energy vampires. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/webking Using a power strip to switch off appliances ensures your home won't be plagued by energy vampires. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/webking Erik Hyrkas Erik

  8. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  9. Stop and Restart Effects on Modern Vehicle Starting System Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windover, Paul R.; Owens, Russell J.; Levinson, Terry M.; Laughlin, Michael; Gaines, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Many drivers of personal and commercial vehicles believe that turning the vehicle off and on frequently instead of idling will cause premature wear of the starter system (starter motor and starter battery). As a result, they are concerned that the replacement cost of the starter motor and/or battery due to increased manual engine cycling would be more than the cumulative cost of the fuel saved by not idling unnecessarily. A number of variables play a role in addressing this complex concern, including the number of starting cycles per day, the time between starting cycles, the intended design life of the starting system, the amount of fuel used to restart an engine, and the cumulative cost of the saved fuel. Qualitative and quantitative information from a variety of sources was used to develop a life-cycle economic model to evaluate the cost and quantify the realistic factors that are related to the permissible frequency of starter motor cycles for the average vehicle to economically minimize engine idle time. Annual cost savings can be calculated depending on shutdown duration and the number of shutdown cycles per day. Analysis shows that cost savings are realized by eliminating idling exceeding one minute by shutting down the engine and restarting it. For a typical motorist, the damage to starting system components resulting from additional daily start cycles will be negligible. Overall, it was found that starter life is mostly dependent on the total number of start cycles, while battery life is more dependent on ensuring a full charge between start events.

  10. Fact #853 December 29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #853: December  29, 2014 Stop/Start Technology is in nearly 5% of All New Light Vehicles Produced

  11. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  12. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Start-Stop (Micro) Hybrid Vehicles Performance Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Performance and testing data on the stop-start hybrid versions of the following vehicles is available: 2010 Smart Fortwo, 2010 Volkswagen Golf Diesel, and 2010 Mazda3 Hatchback.

  14. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, Edward W. (New Lenox, IL); August, Charles (Darien, IL)

    1985-01-01

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, E.W.; August, C.

    1983-08-11

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  17. Aug 2010 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 August 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 ARRA work continues Page 4 Sharing secrets with the public Page 5 Apprentices are a sure bet Page 6 Need a yo-yo? Stop by JA BizTown's Y-12 booth Page 8 Employees drop the pounds B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for

  18. Non-canonical microRNAs miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation in Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Choi, Michael Y.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) lacking non-canonical miRNAs proliferate slower. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 are two non-canonical miRNAs expressed in ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 targets p57 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-702 targets p21 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are known to contribute significantly to stem cell phenotype by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Most of our knowledge of microRNAs comes from the study of canonical microRNAs that require two sequential cleavages by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer and Dicer to generate mature products. In contrast, non-canonical microRNAs bypass the cleavage by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer within the nucleus but still require cytoplasmic cleavage by Dicer. The function of non-canonical microRNAs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains obscure. It has been hypothesized that non-canonical microRNAs have important roles in ESCs based upon the phenotypes of ESC lines that lack these specific classes of microRNAs; Dicer-deficient ESCs lacking both canonical and non-canonical microRNAs have much more severe proliferation defect than Dgcr8-deficient ESCs lacking only canonical microRNAs. Using these cell lines, we identified two non-canonical microRNAs, miR-320 and miR-702, that promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs by releasing them from G1 arrest. This is accomplished by targeting the 3 Prime -untranslated regions of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and p21 and thereby inhibiting their expression. This is the first report of the crucial role of non-canonical microRNAs in ESCs.

  19. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  20. Impact of individual nuclear masses on <mi>r>-process abundances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundance predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.

  1. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  2. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for ? particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-10-15

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for ? particles at very high temperatures (T?=?5?keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the ? particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the ? particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of ? particles, than that of a lower Z plasma.

  3. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.  B.; Frenje, J.  A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C.  K.; Collins, G.  W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S.  B.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2015-05-27

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e²/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories inmore » WDM plasma.« less

  4. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 1824 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  5. Freezing a Droplet to Stop the Ice | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Freezing a Droplet to Stop the Ice Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: Email Us More Information » 08.01.15 Freezing a

  6. From: Kathy Mikels To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: STOP CLEAN LINE, BLOCK GRAIN BELT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kathy Mikels To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: STOP CLEAN LINE, BLOCK GRAIN BELT Date: Monday, September 22, 2014 1:33:53 PM I am opposed to the establishment of National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC's) for the following reasons. First, the easements place an undo burden on landowners on and near the transmission lines. The compensation cannot begin to cover the all of the losses, tangible and intangible that landowners would suffer. Second, I believe that condemning

  7. AVTA: Quantifying the Effects of Idle Stop Systems on Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. This report gives an overall analysis of stop-start technology. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  8. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Schulz, A. E.; Boswell, M.; Fowler, M. M.; Grim, G.; Klein, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, D.; et al

    2015-08-06

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF (En > 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about 10–4 of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule, and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled (Γ~ 0.6) andmore » electron degenerate (θFermi/θe~ 4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. In conclusion, we find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions, and some models are ruled out by our analysis of these experiments.« less

  9. Dose calculations using MARS for Bremsstrahlung beam stops and collimators in APS beamline stations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooling, J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-11-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MARS is used to model the generation of gas bremsstrahlung (GB) radiation from 7-GeV electrons which scatter from residual gas atoms in undulator straight sections within the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Additionally, MARS is employed to model the interactions of the GB radiation with components along the x-ray beamlines and then determine the expected radiation dose-rates that result. In this manner, MARS can be used to assess the adequacy of existing shielding or the specifications for new shielding when required. The GB radiation generated in the 'thin-target' of an ID straight section will consist only of photons in a 1/E-distribution up to the full energy of the stored electron beam. Using this analytical model, the predicted GB power for a typical APS 15.38-m insertion device (ID) straight section is 4.59 x 10{sup -7} W/nTorr/mA, assuming a background gas composed of air (Z{sub eff} = 7.31) at room temperature (293K). The total GB power provides a useful benchmark for comparisons between analytical and numerical approaches. We find good agreement between MARS and analytical estimates for total GB power. The extended straight section 'target' creates a radial profile of GB, which is highly peaked centered on the electron beam. The GB distribution reflects the size of the electron beam that creates the radiation. Optimizing the performance of MARS in terms of CPU time per incident trajectory requires the use of a relatively short, high-density gas target (air); in this report, the target density is {rho}L = 2.89 x 10{sup -2} g/cm{sup 2} over a length of 24 cm. MARS results are compared with the contact dose levels reported in TB-20, which used EGS4 for radiation transport simulations. Maximum dose-rates in 1 cc of tissue phantom form the initial basis for comparison. MARS and EGS4 results are approximately the same for maximum 1-cc dose-rates and attenuation in the photon-dominated regions; for thicker targets, however, the dose-rate no longer depends only on photon attenuation, as photoneutrons (PNs) begin to dominate. The GB radiation-induced photoneutron measurements from four different metals (Fe, Cu, W, and Pb) are compared with MARS predictions. The simulated dose-rates for beamline 6-ID are approximately 3-5 times larger than the measured values, whereas those for beamline 11-ID are much closer. Given the uncertainty in local values of pressure and Z, the degree of agreement between MARS and the PN measurements is good. MARS simulations of GB-induced radiation in and around the FOE show the importance of using actual pressure and gas composition (Z{sub eff}) to obtain accurate PN dose. For a beam current of 300 mA, extrapolating pressure data measured in previously published studies predicts an average background gas pressure of 27 nTorr. An average atomic number of Z{sub eff} = 4.0 is obtained from the same studies. In addition, models of copper masks presently in use at the APS are included. Simulations show that inclusion of exit masks make significant differences in both the radiation spatial distribution within the FOE, as well as the peak intensity. Two studies have been conducted with MARS to assess shielding requirements. First, dose levels in contact with the outside wall of the FOE are examined when GB radiation strikes Pb or W beam stops of varying transverse size within the FOE. Four separate phantom regions are utilized to measure the dose, two at beam elevation and two at the horizontal beam position. The first two phantoms are used for scoring FOE dose along the outside and back walls, horizontally; the second two collect dose on the roof and vertically on the back wall. In all cases, the beam stop depth is maintained at 30 cm. Inclusion of front end (FE) exit masks typically cause a 1-2 order-of-magnitude increase in the dose-rates relative to the case with no masks. Masks place secondary bremsstrahlung sources inside the FOE, and therefore they must be shielded appropriately. The MARS model does not fully account for all shielding present

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted. The 2-story, 2,745-ft2 home has 2.5 inches of closed-cell spray foam in the 2x4 wall cavities, plus 1-inch of rigid exterior foam; a

  11. Stopping power for a charged particle moving through three-dimensional nonideal finite-temperature electron gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Ya; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the interaction of a charged particle with nonideal 3D electron gases by using the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. The stopping power for a nonideal electron gas at a finite-temperature has been theoretically analyzed and numerically calculated. In our calculation, the impact of nonideality and temperature on stopping power is stressed and clearly presented. The QHD dielectric function is obtained and compared to random-phase approximation result. It is shown that the QHD theory can properly describe the stopping power for higher particle velocities greater than the Bohr velocity.

  12. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  13. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  14. Search for decays of stopped long-lived particles produced in protonproton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-11

    A search has been performed for long-lived particles that could have come to rest within the CMS detector, using the time intervals between LHC beam crossings. The existence of such particles could be deduced from observation of their decays via energy deposits in the CMS calorimeter appearing at times that are well separated from any protonproton collisions. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.6fb? of 8TeV protonproton collisions, and a search interval corresponding to 281 h of trigger livetime, 10 events are observed, with a background prediction of 13.2+3.62.5 events. Limits are presented at 95 %moreconfidence level on gluino and top squark production, for over 13 orders of magnitude in the mean proper lifetime of the stopped particle. Assuming a cloud model of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass ?1000GeV and a top squark with mass ?525GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 1 ?s and 1000s. These results are the most stringent constraints on stopped particles to date.less

  15. Search for decays of stopped long-lived particles produced in protonproton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-11

    A search has been performed for long-lived particles that could have come to rest within the CMS detector, using the time intervals between LHC beam crossings. The existence of such particles could be deduced from observation of their decays via energy deposits in the CMS calorimeter appearing at times that are well separated from any protonproton collisions. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.6fb? of 8TeV protonproton collisions, and a search interval corresponding to 281 h of trigger livetime, 10 events are observed, with a background prediction of 13.2+3.62.5 events. Limits are presented at 95 % confidence level on gluino and top squark production, for over 13 orders of magnitude in the mean proper lifetime of the stopped particle. Assuming a cloud model of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass ?1000GeV and a top squark with mass ?525GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 1 ?s and 1000s. These results are the most stringent constraints on stopped particles to date.

  16. Search for decays of stopped long-lived particles produced in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}= 8\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-11

    A search has been performed for long-lived particles that could have come to rest within the CMS detector, using the time intervals between LHC beam crossings. The existence of such particles could be deduced from observation of their decays via energy deposits in the CMS calorimeter appearing at times that are well separated from any proton–proton collisions. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.6 fb-1 of 8 TeV proton–proton collisions, and a search interval corresponding to 281 h of trigger livetime, 10 events are observed, with a background prediction of 13.2+3.6 -2.5 events. Limits are presentedmore » at 95 % confidence level on gluino and top squark production, for over 13 orders of magnitude in the mean proper lifetime of the stopped particle. Assuming a cloud model of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass ≤1000 GeV and a top squark with mass ≤525 GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 1 µs and 1000 s. Finally, these results are the most stringent constraints on stopped particles to date.« less

  17. Quantifying the Effects of Idle-Stop Systems on Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wishart; Matthew Shirk

    2012-12-01

    Vehicles equipped with idle-stop (IS) systems are capable of engine shut down when the vehicle is stopped and rapid engine re-start for the vehicle launch. This capability reduces fuel consumption and emissions during periods when the engine is not being utilized to provide propulsion or to power accessories. IS systems are a low-cost and fast-growing technology in the industry-wide pursuit of increased vehicle efficiency, possibly becoming standard features in European vehicles in the near future. In contrast, currently there are only three non-hybrid vehicle models for sale in North America with IS systems and these models are distinctly low-volume models. As part of the United States Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, ECOtality North America has tested the real-world effect of IS systems on fuel consumption in three vehicle models imported from Europe. These vehicles were chosen to represent three types of systems: (1) spark ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; (2) compression ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; and (3) direct-injection spark ignition, with 12-V belt alternator starter/combustion restart. The vehicles have undergone both dynamometer and on-road testing; the test results show somewhat conflicting data. The laboratory data and the portion of the on-road data in which driving is conducted on a prescribed route with trained drivers produced significant fuel economy improvement. However, the fleet data do not corroborate improvement, even though the data show significant engine-off time. It is possible that the effects of the varying driving styles and routes in the fleet testing overshadowed the fuel economy improvements. More testing with the same driver over routes that are similar with the IS system-enabled and disabled is recommended. There is anecdotal evidence that current Environmental Protection Agency fuel economy test procedures do not capture the fuel economy gains that IS systems produce in real-world driving. The program test results provide information on the veracity of these claims.

  18. HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine-STOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, W. and N. Dancy

    2010-06-15

    The HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the UNCFSP HBCU Screening, Testing, Outreach, and Prevention (STOP) HIV/AIDS Program project members to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based organizations

  19. 2575 Sand Hill Road * Mail Stop 103 * Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    575 Sand Hill Road * Mail Stop 103 * Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015 650-926-2288 * Fax 650-926-4695 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory LCLS Users' Newsletter, Issue 1, April 8, 2009 Dear Colleagues: We would like to present to you the first issue of the LCLS Users' Newsletter. We are pleased to report that we have recruited Henia Kamil as the LCLS User Research Administrator Manager. Please join me in welcoming Henia and feel

  20. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang; Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 ; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Jian; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3′UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  1. Stopping Power of Different Ions in Si Measured with a Bulk Sample Method and Bayesian Inference Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Siketic, Z.; Radovic, I. Bogdanovic

    2009-03-10

    The accuracy of ion beam analysis experiments depends critically on the stopping power values available. While for H and He ions accuracies normally better than 5% are achieved by usual interpolative schemes such as SRIM, for heavier ions the accuracy is worse. One of the main reasons is that the experimental data bases are very sparse, even for important materials such as Si. New measurements are therefore needed. Measurement of stopping power is often made with transmission in thin films, with the usual problems of film thickness homogeneity. We have previously developed an alternative method based on measuring bulk spectra, and fitting the yield by treating the stopping power as a fit parameter in a Bayesian inference Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure included in the standard IBA code NDF. We report on improvements of the method and on its application to the determination of the stopping power of {sup 7}Li in Si. To validate the method, we also apply it to the stopping of {sup 4}He in Si, which is known with 2% accuracy.

  2. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  3. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  4. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canad

  5. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  6. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  7. Role of <mi>Ce>4+ in the scintillation mechanism of codoped <mi>Gd>3<mi>Ga>3<mi>Al>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>12:<mi>Ce>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration...

  9. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  10. Search for Stopped Gluinos in pp collisions at sqrt s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The results of the first search for long-lived gluinos produced in 7 TeV pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are presented. The search looks for evidence of long-lived particles that stop in the CMS detector and decay in the quiescent periods between beam crossings. In a dataset with a peak instantaneous luminosity of 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, an integrated luminosity of 10 inverse picobarns, and a search interval corresponding to 62 hours of LHC operation, no significant excess above background was observed. Limits at the 95% confidence level on gluino pair production over 13 orders of magnitude of gluino lifetime are set. For a mass difference between the gluino and the neutralino greater than 100 GeV/c^2, and assuming a branching ratio for gluino to gluon+neutralino of 100%, gluinos of mass less than 370 GeV/c^2 are excluded for lifetimes from 10 microseconds to 1000 s.

  11. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3 Prime -UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  12. Topeka’s “Green Light Tunnel” Saves Fuel and Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topeka, Kansas is saving their motorists time and gasoline through the use of a real-time, adaptive "green light tunnel". A traffic signal system that synchronizes traffic lights in order to create a series of green lights that result in fewer stops and less travel time.

  13. Strangeness suppression of <mi>q><mi>q> creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  14. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  15. Levels in <mi mathvariant='normal'>Nmi>12 via the <mi mathvariant='normal'>Nmi>14 (<mi>pmi>,t>) reaction using the JENSA gas-jet target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Greife, U.; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2015-09-25

    As one of a series of physics cases to demonstrate the unique benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics gas-jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the ?N (p, t)N reaction was studied for the first time, using a pure jet of nitrogen, in an attempt to resolve conflicting information on the structure of N. A new level at 4.561-MeV excitation energy in N was found.

  16. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  17. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870; BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Lee, Sun Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  18. Two-leg <mi>SU>(2<mi>n>) spin ladder: A low-energy effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lecheminant, P.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2015-05-07

    We present a field-theory analysis of a model of two SU(2n)-invariant magnetic chains coupled by a generic interaction preserving time reversal and inversion symmetry. Contrary to the SU(2)-invariant case the zero-temperature phase diagram of such two-leg spin ladder does not contain topological phases. Thus, only generalized Valence Bond Solid phases are stabilized when n > 1 with different wave vectors and ground-state degeneracies. In particular, we find a phase which is made of a cluster of 2n spins put in an SU(2n) singlet state. For n = 3, this cluster phase is relevant to ?Yb ultracold atoms, with an emergent SU(6) symmetry, loaded in a double-well optical lattice.

  19. New lifetime measurements in <mi>Pd>109 and the onset of deformation at <mi>N>=60

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  20. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, ZhengHua; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  1. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  2. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, 2014 Model Home, Midland, MI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cobblestone Homes 2014 Model Home Midland, MI DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  3. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e ) l.CoNTRACTIDCODE ~ . . U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7.

  4. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed <mi>Yb>2<mi>Ti>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7, as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  5. Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

  6. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Off Time Off A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505)...

  7. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-10

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

  8. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  9. Influence of a strong laser field on Coulomb explosion and stopping power of energetic H{sub 3}{sup +} clusters in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Guiqiu; Gao Hong; Wang Yaochuan; Yao Li; Zhong Haiyang; Cheng Lihong; Yang Kun; Liu Wei [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); E Peng; Xu Dianguo [Department of Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang Younian; Hu Zhanghu [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2012-09-15

    The influence of a high-intensity laser field on the Coulomb explosion and stopping power for a swift H{sub 3}{sup +} cluster ion in a plasma target is studied by means of the molecular dynamic (MD) method based on the linearized Vlasov-Poisson theory. Excitations of the plasma are described by the classical plasma dielectric function. In the presence of the laser field, the general expressions for the induced potential in the target and the interaction force among the ions within the cluster are derived. Based on the numerical solution of the equations of motion for the constituent ions, the Coulomb explosion patterns and the cluster's stopping power are discussed for a range of laser parameters. Numerical results show that the laser field affects the correlation between the ions and contributes to weaken the wake effect and the stopping power as compared to the laser-free case. On the other hand, the stopping power ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} cluster is higher than the situation of dicluster of H{sub 2}{sup +} due to the vicinage effect in the cluster.

  10. Projectile stopping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA); Pittenger, Lee C. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile.

  11. Study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}A' reaction at DA{Phi}NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnello, M.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Gianotti, P.; Lucherini, V.; Bhang, H. C.; Bonomi, G.; Moia, F.; Zenoni, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Busso, L.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Wheadon, R.

    2010-12-28

    This work describes an experimental study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}A' reaction performed with the FINUDA spectrometer at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory. The reaction is studied via the detection of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events on {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O.

  12. Study of collisons of supersymmetric top Quark in the channel stop anti-stop -> e+- mu-+ sneutrino anti-sneutrino b anti-b with the experience of D0 at the Tevatron. Callibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter at D0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Aurelien; /Marseille U., Luminy

    2006-10-01

    Supersymmetry is one of the most natural extensions of the Standard Model. At low energy it may consist in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model which is the framework chosen to perform the search of the stop with 350 pb{sup -1} of data collected by D0 during the RunIIa period of the TeVatron. They selected the events with an electron, a muon, missing transverse energy and non-isolated tracks, signature for the stop decay in 3-body ({bar t} {yields} bl{bar {nu}}). Since no significant excess of signal is seen, the results are interpreted in terms of limit on the stop production cross-sections, in such a way that they extend the existing exclusion region in the parameter space (m{sub {bar t}},m{sub {bar {nu}}}) up to stop masses of 168 (140) GeV for sneutrino masses of 50 (94) GeV. Finally because of the crucial role of the electromagnetic calorimeter, a fine calibration was performed using Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events, which improved significantly the energy resolution.

  13. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  14. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction <mi>He>3?(<mi>emi>,<mi>emi>')

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovi?, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; John, J. St.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; irca, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He? (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3He asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)?. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.

  15. Recoding of the stop codon UGA to glycine by a BD1-5/SN-2 bacterium and niche partitioning between Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria in a tidal sediment microbial community naturally selected in a laboratory chemostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanke, Anna; Hamann, Emmo; Sharma, Ritin; Geelhoed, Jeanine; Hargesheimer, Theresa; Kraft, Beate; Meyer, Volker; Lenk, Sabine; Osmers, Harald; Wu, Rong; Makinwa, Kofi; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Tegetmeyer, Halina; Strouss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sandy coastal sediments are global hot spots for microbial mineralization of organic matter and denitrification. These sediments are characterized by advective pore water flow, tidal cycling and an active and complex microbial community. Metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities sampled from such sediments showed that potential sulfuroxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and members of the enigmaticBD1-5/ SN-2 candidatephylumwereabundantinsitu (>10% and 2% respectively). By mimicking the dynamic oxic/anoxic environmental conditions of the sedimentin a laboratory chemostat, a simplified microbial community was selected from the more complex inoculum. Metagenomics, proteomics and fluorescenceinsituhybridization showed that this simplified community contained both a potential sulfuroxidizing Gamma proteobacteria (at 24 2% abundance) and a member of the BD1-5 / SN-2candidatephylum (at 7 6%abundance). Despite the abundant supply of organic substrates to the chemostat, proteomic analysis suggested that the selected gamma proteobacterium grew partially auto trophically and performed hydrogen/formate oxidation. The enrichment of a member of the BD1-5/SN-2candidatephylum enabled, for the first time, direct microscopic observation by fluorescent insitu hybridization and the experimental validation of the previously predicted translation of the stop codon UGA into glycine.

  16. Thermal conductivity in large-<mi>J> two-dimensional antiferromagnets: Role of phonon scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernyshev, A. L.; Brenig, Wolfram

    2015-08-05

    Different types of relaxation processes for magnon heat current are discussed, with a particular focus on coupling to three-dimensional phonons. There is thermal conductivity by these in-plane magnetic excitations using two distinct techniques: Boltzmann formalism within the relaxation-time approximation and memory-function approach. Also considered are the scattering of magnons by both acoustic and optical branches of phonons. We demonstrate an accord between the two methods, regarding the asymptotic behavior of the effective relaxation rates.

    It is strongly suggested that scattering from optical or zone-boundary phonons is important for magnon heat current relaxation in a high-temperature window of ?D?T<< J.

  17. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  18. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  19. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  20. Balancing particle absorption with structural support of the muon beam stop in muons-to-electrons experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is seeking a full conversion from muon to electron. The design for Mu2e is based off MECO, another proposed experiment that sought a full conversion from muon to electron at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s. Mu2e will provide sensitivity that is four times the sensitivity of the previous experiment, SINDRUM II. Discovering muon to electron conversions could help explain physics beyond the standard model of the particle physics.

  1. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-08-24

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  2. Resonances in Coupled <mimi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>ηK> Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  3. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  4. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  5. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Posttranslational Modifications at Single-Cell Resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    Cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, andmoreflow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cells physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.less

  6. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  7. Daylight Savings Time Starts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daylight Savings Time Starts Daylight Savings Time Starts WHEN: Mar 08, 2015 3:00 AM - 11:59 PM WHERE: World Time Zones CATEGORY: Holiday INTERNAL: Calendar Login Daylight Savings...

  8. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The Univa Grid Engine Scheduler cycle performs a number of important tasks, including: Prioritizing Jobs Reserving Resources for jobs requesting more resources (slots / memory) Dispatching jobs or tasks to the compute nodes Evaluating job dependencies The "cycle time" is the length of time it takes the scheduler

  9. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  10. Time of Flight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beam is pulsed, the energy of the neutrons that are produced can be determined by Time-of-Flight (TOF) techniques. Neutron Time-of-Flight Since the LANSCE proton beam is...

  11. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging...

  12. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  13. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  14. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619), dated November 9, 1978

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95- 619), dated November 9, 1978. The following is MI's legislative mandate. PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment of Office of Minority Economic Impact -- Title II of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131 - - 7139) is amended by adding at the end thereof

  15. Task Time Tracker

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    This client-side web app tracks the amount of time spent on arbitrary tasks. It allosw the creation of an unlimited number of arbitrarily named tasks ans via simple interactions, tracks the amount of time spent working on the drfined tasks.

  16. Prompt Neutron Time Decay in Single HEU and DU Metal Annular Storage Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Previous measurements of highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage castings performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the Y-12 National Security Complex showed a prompt neutron time decay that is not exponential. These measurements showed that multiple time constants originating from multiplication, time-of-flight, scattering in the assembly and room return could be associated with this prompt neutron decay. In this work, the contribution not associated with neutron multiplication was investigated via measurements with a depleted uranium (DU) casting. The measurements at ORNL used an annular (5.0-in OD, 3.5-in ID, 6.0-in H) DU casting with a time-tagged 252Cf source, centered vertically on the axis, and four closely coupled 1 1 6-in.-long plastic scintillators with -in.- thick lead shielding adjacent to the outer surface of the casting. This setup was identical to the configuration used in the previously performed measurements with HEU castings at Y-12. The time correlation between fission events and detections in the plastic scintillators was measured, as well as the time distribution of coincidences between multiple detectors within a 512-ns time window. The measurement results were then compared to MCNP-PoliMi calculations and the previous HEU measurements. Time constants from decay fits to the HEU and DU data were compared to characterize the contributions resulting from multiplication, time-of-flight, and scattering.

  17. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  18. Parallel time integration software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    This package implements an optimal-scaling multigrid solver for the (non) linear systems that arise from the discretization of problems with evolutionary behavior. Typically, solution algorithms for evolution equations are based on a time-marching approach, solving sequentially for one time step after the other. Parallelism in these traditional time-integrarion techniques is limited to spatial parallelism. However, current trends in computer architectures are leading twards system with more, but not faster. processors. Therefore, faster compute speeds mustmore » come from greater parallelism. One approach to achieve parallelism in time is with multigrid, but extending classical multigrid methods for elliptic poerators to this setting is a significant achievement. In this software, we implement a non-intrusive, optimal-scaling time-parallel method based on multigrid reduction techniques. The examples in the package demonstrate optimality of our multigrid-reduction-in-time algorithm (MGRIT) for solving a variety of parabolic equations in two and three sparial dimensions. These examples can also be used to show that MGRIT can achieve significant speedup in comparison to sequential time marching on modern architectures.« less

  19. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  20. X Time Series

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    11 Figure 5-11: 1-Hour Ozone Time Series Observed (C506) v. Predicted (CAMx) for WRF AACOG Base Case Run 3, 2006 5-12 5.3.2 Hourly NO X Time Series Time series plots of modeled and predicted hourly NO X for each monitor located in the San Antonio MSA were constructed. The model over predicted NO X emissions at the C58 monitor on almost every day during the June 2006 episode. The average predicted hourly NO X was 7.3 ppb, while the average observed hourly NO X was only 3.9 ppb. Likewise, the

  1. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  3. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter X-Ray Imaging of...

  4. Time Card Entry System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore » payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  5. Genepool Time Heatmaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots <1h 1-2h 2-6h 6-12h 12-24h 24-36h 36-48h 48h-1wk >1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09

  6. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  7. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  8. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  9. Discrete-Time Pricing and Optimal Exercise of American Perpetual Warrants in the Geometric Random Walk Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderbei, Robert J.; P Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I nar, Mustafa C.; Bozkaya, Efe B.

    2013-02-15

    An American option (or, warrant) is the right, but not the obligation, to purchase or sell an underlying equity at any time up to a predetermined expiration date for a predetermined amount. A perpetual American option differs from a plain American option in that it does not expire. In this study, we solve the optimal stopping problem of a perpetual American option (both call and put) in discrete time using linear programming duality. Under the assumption that the underlying stock price follows a discrete time and discrete state Markov process, namely a geometric random walk, we formulate the pricing problem as an infinite dimensional linear programming (LP) problem using the excessive-majorant property of the value function. This formulation allows us to solve complementary slackness conditions in closed-form, revealing an optimal stopping strategy which highlights the set of stock-prices where the option should be exercised. The analysis for the call option reveals that such a critical value exists only in some cases, depending on a combination of state-transition probabilities and the economic discount factor (i.e., the prevailing interest rate) whereas it ceases to be an issue for the put.

  10. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  11. Dec 09 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 December 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Pages 2 and 3 The Top 10 of 2009 Pages 4 and 5 More Q and A with Darrel Kohlhorst: What's ahead for 2010 Page 6 Holiday wishes to you and yours Page 8 Sharing the holiday spirit with those who protect our country B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security

  12. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E. (Fremont, CA); Struve, Kenneth W. (Albuquerque, NM); Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  13. Date Times Group Speakers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meetings - Spring 2014 Date Times Group Speakers Tues, 1-13 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Fri, 1-24 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting Emmanuel Giannelis Fri, 1-31 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Apostolos Enotiadis; Nikki Ritzert & Megan Holtz Fri, 2-7 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting CHESS Mon, 2-10 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Will Dichtel Fri, 2-14 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Frank DiSalvo Fri, 2-21 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting Lynden Archer Fri, 2-28

  14. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  15. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, Karl M. (Minneapolis, MN); Fundakowski, Richard A. (Saint Paul, MN); Levitt, Tod S. (Minneapolis, MN); Overland, John E. (Plymouth, MN); Suresh, Bindinganavle R. (New Brighton, MN); Ulrich, Franz W. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges are segmented out by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections.

  16. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  17. Day/Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day/Time Mon, 12:00 - 6:00 pm Mon, 5:00 pm Mon, 7:00 pm Tues, 7:00 am Tues, 8:00 am Tues, 8:10 am Tues, 8:25 am Tues, 9:25 am Tues, 9:45 am Tues, 11:15 am Tues, 3:45 pm Tues, 4:05 pm Tues, 6:00 pm Wednesday, March 30th Wed, 7:00 am Tues, 7:45 am Tues, 8:00 am Wed, 8:30 am Wed, 12:20 pm Wed, 4:10 pm Wed, 4:30 pm Thursday, March 31st Thurs, 7:00 am Thurs, 11:00 am Thurs, 11:20 am Thurs, 12:30 pm Thurs, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm P o s t e r s D i s p l a y e d Continental Breakfast / Posters (Salon Del Ray

  18. Date centerdTimes New Roman

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Audit of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's NOvA Project OAS-RA-L-10-02 April 2010 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The NuMI Off-Axis electron neutrino (v e ) Appearance (NOvA) experiment is a neutrino physics research project conducted by the Office of Science's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The goal of the NOvA experiment is to advance the understanding of neutrino particles. Fermilab, in

  19. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between HM and MS bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between MS in [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between HCu in [HCuSH]{sup ?} to quite strong covalent bonding between HAu in [HAuSH]{sup ?}, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  20. Improved Measurement of the <mi>?>?<mi mathvariant='normal'>emi>?> Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  1. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine—, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine —powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine— represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  2. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumbling, Deana

    2008-04-02

    Each of the 20 1-kg sample bags of Paducah soil will be sampled using a multi-increment (MI) strategy. These MI samples will be analyzed for total PCBs by the Abraxis PCB-HC kit. Processed soil samples will also be pooled to create sufficient volume for analysis for PAHs and PCB Aroclors by the ERT-Edison laboratory. Methanol extracts from Abraxis extractions will be analyzed by the ERT-Edison lab, the Abraxis lab, and the XDS laboratory for TEQ analytes.

  3. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  4. On-chip single-copy real-time reverse-transcription PCR in isolated picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, N R; Wheeler, E; Lee-Houghton, L; Watkins, N; Nasarabadi, S; Hebert, N; Leung, P; Arnold, D; Bailey, C; Colston, B

    2007-12-19

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and RNA isolation, followed by reverse transcription, and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection in the trapped droplets has been developed. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a fused silica device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter-scale droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing thermal cycling for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification without droplet motion. This combination of the established real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy RNA and virions from a complex environment, and will be useful in viral discovery and gene-profiling applications.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1: Insights into the metabolic versatility of a gram-positive sulfate- and metal-reducing bacterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Otwell, Anne E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, the proteomes of the metabolically versatile and poorly characterized Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 were compared across four cultivation conditions including sulfate reduction, soluble Fe(III) reduction, insoluble Fe(III) reduction, and pyruvate fermentation. Collectively across conditions, we observed at high confidence ~38% of genome-encoded proteins. Here, we focus on proteins that display significant differential abundance on conditions tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first full-proteome study focused on a Gram-positive organism cultivated either on sulfate or metal-reducing conditions. Several proteins with uncharacterized function encoded within heterodisulfide reductase (hdr)-containing loci were upregulated on either sulfatemore » (Dred_0633-4, Dred_0689-90, and Dred_1325-30) or Fe(III)-citrate-reducing conditions (Dred_0432-3 and Dred_1778-84). Two of these hdr-containing loci display homology to recently described flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) pathways (Dred_1325-30 and Dred_1778-84). Additionally, we propose that a cluster of proteins, which is homologous to a described FBEB lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) complex, is performing lactate oxidation in D. reducens (Dred_0367-9). Analysis of the putative sulfate reduction machinery in D. reducens revealed that most of these proteins are constitutively expressed across cultivation conditions tested. In addition, peptides from the single multiheme c-type cytochrome (MHC) in the genome were exclusively observed on the insoluble Fe(III) condition, suggesting that this MHC may play a role in reduction of insoluble metals.« less

  6. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  7. Nagios Down-Time scripts

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-11-11

    The Nagios Down-Time scripts are a set of Python scripts that create a commandline interface to Nagios' scheduled down-times. This allows for large-scale management of down-times, beyond what is feasible with the default web interface. Additionally, one of the scripts can be setup to periodically send emails of down-times that are scheduled to end within a specified amount of time after the script has been run; for example, it could run once a day andmore » send an email including down-times ending within the next 24 hours.« less

  8. Sept 16 (all times EDT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sept 16 (all times EDT): 10 am: Welcome, Kick off, and overview of NEET: Sue Lesica 10:30 ... topics 4:30-5:00: Break Sept 17 (all times EDT): 10 am: Welcome, Open QA on CINR FOA and ...

  9. Charging Your Time - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Safety Exposition Charging Your Time About Us Charging Your Time Committee Members Contact Us Electronic Registration Form Exhibitor and Vendor Information EXPO 2016 Sponsors EXPO Award Criteria Special Events What is EXPO Why Should I Participate in EXPO Charging Your Time Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size How Do I Charge My Time Spent at EXPO? Each Hanford Prime Contractor may have different policies for attending EXPO during working

  10. On-chip real-time single-copy polymerase chain reaction in picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, N R; Hindson, B; Wheeler, E; Hall, S B; Rose, K A; Kennedy, I; Colston, B

    2007-04-20

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection has performed PCR in isolated droplets at volumes 10{sup 6} smaller than commercial real-time PCR systems. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a silicon device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing them to be thermal cycled through the PCR protocol without droplet motion. With this system a 10-pL droplet, encapsulating less than one copy of viral genomic DNA through Poisson statistics, showed real-time PCR amplification curves with a cycle threshold of {approx}18, twenty cycles earlier than commercial instruments. This combination of the established real-time PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy nucleic acids in a complex environment.

  11. Resonant <mi>?+?>?<mi>?+?>0 amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceo, Ral A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  12. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  13. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  14. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  15. STOP WORK POLICY for Hanford Site Contractors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conditions exist that pose a danger to the health and safety of workers or the public; or Conditions exist, that if allowed to continue, could adversely affect the...

  16. Monodisperse microdroplet generation and stopping without coalescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2015-04-21

    A system for monodispersed microdroplet generation and trapping including providing a flow channel in a microchip; producing microdroplets in the flow channel, the microdroplets movable in the flow channel; providing carrier fluid in the flow channel using a pump or pressure source; controlling movement of the microdroplets in the flow channel and trapping the microdroplets in a desired location in the flow channel. The system includes a microchip; a flow channel in the microchip; a droplet maker that generates microdroplets, the droplet maker connected to the flow channel; a carrier fluid in the flow channel, the carrier fluid introduced to the flow channel by a source of carrier fluid, the source of carrier fluid including a pump or pressure source; a valve connected to the carrier fluid that controls flow of the carrier fluid and enables trapping of the microdroplets.

  17. Stopping Illicit Procurement: Lessons from Global Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-06-19

    Government regulators and the financial sector cooperate to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. This information-sharing relationship is built upon a strong legislative foundation and effective operational procedures. As with money-laundering and terrorist financing, halting the illicit procurement of dual-use commodities requires close coordination between government and industry. However, many of the legal and operational features present in financial threat cooperation do not exist in the export control realm. This article analyzes the applicability of financial industry cooperative measures to nonproliferation.

  18. MI_07-5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Powering the World One Poop at a Time

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Genesee Career Institute in Flint, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  20. A Web-Based Common Framework to Support the Test and Evaluation Process Any Time, Anywhere, and Anyhow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schur, Anne ); Brown, James C. ); Eaton, Sharon L. ); Gibson, Alex G. ); Scott, Ryan T. ); Tanasse, Ted E. )

    2001-01-01

    Test and evaluation (T and E) is an enterprise. For any product, large or small, performance data is desired on many aspects to evaluate the product?s effectiveness for the intended users. Representing the many T and E facets without bewildering the user is challenging when there is a range of people, from the system developers to the manager of the organization, that want specific feedback. A web-based One-Stop Evaluation Center was created to meet these needs for a particular project. The evaluation center is usable at any time in the systems development lifecycle and streamlines the T and E enterprise. This paper discusses a common framework that unifies the T and E process with many stakeholders involved and is flexible to accommodate each stakeholders?specific evaluative processes and content. Our success has translated to many cost savings by enabling quick responses to change and a better line of communication between the users, developers, and managers.

  1. Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2009-03-17

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  2. ARM - Measurement - Extreme event time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsExtreme event time ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Extreme event time The time of extreme meteorological events such as min/max temperature and wind gusts. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  3. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the ...

  4. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  5. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  6. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  7. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  8. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  9. Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-27

    FRANTIC-3 was developed to evaluate system unreliability using time-dependent techniques. The code provides two major options: to evaluate standby system unavailability or, in addition to the unavailability to calculate the total system failure probability by including both the unavailability of the system on demand as well as the probability that it will operate for an arbitrary time period following the demand. The FRANTIC-3 time dependent reliability models provide a large selection of repair and testingmore » policies applicable to standby or continously operating systems consisting of periodically tested, monitored, and non-repairable (non-testable) components. Time-dependent and test frequency dependent failures, as well as demand stress related failure, test-caused degradation and wear-out, test associated human errors, test deficiencies, test override, unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, component renewal and replacement policies, and test strategies can be prescribed. The conditional system unavailabilities associated with the downtimes of the user specified failed component are also evaluated. Optionally, the code can perform a sensitivity study for system unavailability or total failure probability to the failure characteristics of the standby components.« less

  10. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  11. Time Ordered Astrophysics Scalable Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-14

    This software package provides tools for astrophysical experiments which record data in the form of individual time streams from discrete detectors. TOAST provides tools from meta-data manipulation and job set up, I/O operation, telescope pointing reconstruction, and map-making. It also provides tools for constructing simulated observations.

  12. User Experiment Time-Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiment Time-Line Event Target Call for proposal 2 months before proposals are due PAC Proposals Due 7 weeks before PAC meeting TAC Report for PAC Proposals (includes Independent Technical Review) 4 weeks after proposals are due PAC Report Published 1-2 months after PAC

  13. Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-02-17

    This program is used to compute the predicted normalized elution time (NET) for a list of peptide sequences. It includes the Kangas/Petritis neural network trained model, the Krokhin hydrophobicity model, and the Mant hydrophobicity model. In addition, it can compute the predicted strong cation exchange (SCX) fraction (on a 0 to 1 scale) in which a given peptide will appear.

  14. Time and Resource Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-08

    RESTORE is a computer software tool that allows one to model a complex set of steps required to accomplish a goal (e.g., repair a ruptured natural gas pipeline and restore service to customers). However, the time necessary to complete step may be uncertain and may be affected by conditions, such as the weather, the time of day, the day of the week. Therefore, "nature" can influence which steps are taken and the time needed tomore » complete each step. In addition, the tool allows one to model the costs for each step, which also may be uncertain. RESTORE allows the user to estimate the time and cost, both of which may be uncertain, to achieve an intermediate stage of completion, as well as overall completion. The software also makes it possible to model parallel, competing groups of activities (i.e., parallel paths) so that progreSs at a ‘merge point’ can proceed before other competing activities are completed. For example, RESTORE permits one to model a workaround and a simultaneous complete repair to determine a probability distribution for the earliest time service can be restored to a critical customer. The tool identifies the ‘most active path’ through the network of tasks, which is extremely important information for assessing the most effective way to speed-up or slow-down progress. Unlike other project planning and risk analysis tools, RESTORE provides an intuitive, graphical, and object-oriented environment for structuring a model and setting its parameters.« less

  15. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  16. Assessing Energy Impact of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Significance of Daily Distance Variation over Time and Among Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on petroleum and electricity consumption is a necessary step toward effective policies. Variations in daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) over time and among drivers affect PHEV energy impact, but the significance is not well understood. This paper uses a graphical illustration, a mathematical derivation, and an empirical study to examine the cause and significance of such an effect. The first two methods reveal that ignoring daily variation in VMT always causes underestimation of petroleum consumption and overestimation of electricity consumption by PHEVs; both biases increase as the assumed PHEV charge-depleting (CD) range moves closer to the average daily VMT. The empirical analysis based on national travel survey data shows that the assumption of uniform daily VMT over time and among drivers causes nearly 68% underestimation of expected petroleum use and nearly 48% overestimation of expected electricity use by PHEVs with a 40-mi CD range (PHEV40s). Also for PHEV40s, consideration of daily variation in VMT over time but not among drivers similar to the way the utility factor curve is derived in SAE Standard SAE J2841 causes underestimation of expected petroleum use by more than 24% and overestimation of expected electricity use by about 17%. Underestimation of petroleum use and overestimation of electricity use increase with larger-battery PHEVs.

  17. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Weidner, S. E.; Alexander, N.

    2015-05-15

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ?10 eV/q40 keV/q plasma ionsCoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ?30 keV10 MeV energetic ionsCoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  18. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  19. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  20. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That! Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the cell phone application EcoData: Radiation are expanding their global network of radiation monitoring stations to include up-to-date readings from the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) based out of southern Nevada. The CEMP was established in 1981 to monitor manmade and natural radiation levels surrounding

  1. dec11-Times.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 December 2011 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Governance Transformation at Y-12 Page 3 Employees bring benefi ts to life Pages 4 and 5 A healthy start to 2012 Page 6 A visit from Christmas past Page 8 Have a plan - just in case B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for

  2. October 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 October 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Cynthia Ensor Ryn Etter Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Brett Pate I N S I D E Page 2 HR director's plan for success Page 3 Apprenticeship program gets boost with job training grant Page 3 Wellness coordinator is fi red up Page 4 It's offi cial: Y-12 is

  3. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  4. jul10_Times.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 July 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Want to know about Y-12's budget? Read what Darrel Kohlhorst said. Page 3 Y-12 employees get a LIFE Center Pages 4 and 5 Safeguards, Security and Emergency Services' Sentinel Page 6 Employees raise money for Relay for Life Page 8 Refl ections of Y-12's history B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel

  5. January 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/y12times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Campbell Cloar Ken Davis Kathy Fahey John Holbrook Jamie Loveday Brett Pate Cindy Robinson Ray Smith Donna Watson I N S I D E Page 2 Angels in our midst Page 3 Preparing for a widespread fl u outbreak Page 3 10 tips to help you say what you mean Pages 4 and 5 Bunton, Domm and

  6. May 2008 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Sharon McConathy Patrick McCoy I N S I D E Page 3 Fire department members come to the rescue Page 4 Driving green to protect our natural resources Page 5 73s: Best regards from Y-12's hams Page8 What's the secret? Mary Murray Brett Pate

  7. Sept 16 (all times EDT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sept 16 (all times EDT): 10 am: Welcome, Kick off, and overview of NEET: Sue Lesica 10:30 - 1: Select NEET FOA award presentations and discussion (Sue Lesica, Stu Maloy, and Jeremy Busby to lead) - 10:30-11:00: Michael Nastasi - 11:00-11:30: Afsaneh Rabiei - 11:30-12:00: Meimei Li - 12:00-12:30: Lizhen Tan - 12:30-1:00: Kevin Field 1 - 1:30: break 1:30 - 4: LWRS overview and select LWRS highlights (Keith Leonard and Jeremy Busby to lead) - 1:30-2:30: LWRS MAaD Overview, Keith Leonard -

  8. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  9. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  10. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  11. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  12. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  13. March 2009 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track

  14. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  15. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real time sub math display inline mi mi math ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski Christian Wang Lin Wang...

  16. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene","Kisielowski, Christian;...

  17. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x--a scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-02-06

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  18. Time to Start Getting Ready for Cori

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time to Start Getting Ready for Cori Time to Start Getting Ready for Cori February 4, 2015 by Richard Gerber Cori is coming and it's time to start getting ready. Yes, NERSC's Intel...

  19. Timing Carbon Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Timing Carbon Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Timing Carbon Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100022 Product: UK registered, China based CDM and voluntary...

  20. Space-Time Insight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space-Time Insight Jump to: navigation, search Name: Space-Time Insight Address: 45680 Northport Loop East Place: Fremont, California Zip: 94538 Region: Bay Area Sector: Efficiency...

  1. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-02-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

  2. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  3. Lattice dynamics of <mi>BaFe>2<mi>X>3(<mi>X= mathvariant='normal'>Smi>,<mi>Se>) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovi?, Z. V.; ?epanovi?, M.; Lazarevi?, N.; Opa?i?, M.; Radonji?, M. M.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by the lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.

  4. Search for proton decay via <mi>p>?<mi>?K>+ using 260 <mi>kilotonyear> data of Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Yokozawa, T.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K.?P.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J.?L.; Stone, J.?L.; Sulak, L.?R.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W.?R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M.?B.; Sobel, H.?W.; Ganezer, K.?S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W.?E.; Jang, J.?S.; Kim, J.?Y.; Lim, I.?T.; Albert, J.?B.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.?W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J.?G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S.?N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A.?T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C.?K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Takeuchi, J.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S.?B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Obayashi, Y.; Vagins, M.?R.; Chen, S.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R.?J.

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  5. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-23

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

  6. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

  7. How many times can LANL reuse water?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How many times can LANL reuse water? How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. August 1, 2013 LANL reuses water up to 8 times. How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. These uses are in place, not theoretical. Most systems in New Mexico mine water from the aquifer, use

  8. Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All About Proposals Users Home Apply for Beam Time Deadlines Proposal Types Concepts, Definitions, and Help My APS Portal My APS Portal Apply for Beam Time Next Proposal Deadline...

  9. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  10. Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  11. Enabling time travel for the scholarly web

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web An international team of information scientists has begun a study to investigate how web links ...

  12. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation. 8 figs.

  13. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation.

  14. Time-resolved compression of a capsule with a cone to high density for fast-ignition laser fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Beg, F. N.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Habara, H.; Ivancic, S.; Jarrott, L. C.; Marshall, F. J.; McKiernan, G.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Patel, P. K.; Pérez, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Shvydky, A.; Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S.

    2014-12-12

    The advent of high-intensity lasers enables us to recreate and study the behaviour of matter under the extreme densities and pressures that exist in many astrophysical objects. It may also enable us to develop a power source based on laser-driven nuclear fusion. Achieving such conditions usually requires a target that is highly uniform and spherically symmetric. Here we show that it is possible to generate high densities in a so-called fast-ignition target that consists of a thin shell whose spherical symmetry is interrupted by the inclusion of a metal cone. Using picosecond-time-resolved X-ray radiography, we show that we can achieve areal densities in excess of 300 mg cm#2;-2 with a nanosecond-duration compression pulse -- the highest areal density ever reported for a cone-in-shell target. Such densities are high enough to stop MeV electrons, which is necessary for igniting the fuel with a subsequent picosecond pulse focused into the resulting plasma.

  15. Time-resolved compression of a capsule with a cone to high density for fast-ignition laser fusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Beg, F. N.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Habara, H.; et al

    2014-12-12

    The advent of high-intensity lasers enables us to recreate and study the behaviour of matter under the extreme densities and pressures that exist in many astrophysical objects. It may also enable us to develop a power source based on laser-driven nuclear fusion. Achieving such conditions usually requires a target that is highly uniform and spherically symmetric. Here we show that it is possible to generate high densities in a so-called fast-ignition target that consists of a thin shell whose spherical symmetry is interrupted by the inclusion of a metal cone. Using picosecond-time-resolved X-ray radiography, we show that we can achievemore » areal densities in excess of 300 mg cm#2;-2 with a nanosecond-duration compression pulse -- the highest areal density ever reported for a cone-in-shell target. Such densities are high enough to stop MeV electrons, which is necessary for igniting the fuel with a subsequent picosecond pulse focused into the resulting plasma.« less

  16. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  17. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  18. Superconducting and magnetic properties of <mi>Sr>3<mi>Ir>4<mi>Sn>13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  19. Two nucleon systems at <mi>mmi><mi>π>~450<mi>MeV> from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  20. Time Reversal of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-08-15

    Using Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we study the time reversibility of Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in kicked optical lattices, showing that in the regime of quantum chaos, the dynamics can be inverted from explosion to collapse. The accuracy of time reversal decreases with the increase of atom interactions in BEC, until it is completely lost. Surprisingly, quantum chaos helps to restore time reversibility. These predictions can be tested with existing experimental setups.

  1. Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time limits The length of participation in the undergraduate program is limited to a maximum of six years for students pursuing a bachelor's degree and three years for students pursuing an

  2. Sandia Energy - Time-Resolved FTIR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these vibrationally or electronically excited molecules, emission-based time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy (TR-FTS) can be a fruitful way to study the reaction rate,...

  3. Count-doubling time safety circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rusch, Gordon K.; Keefe, Donald J.; McDowell, William P.

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a nuclear reactor count-factor-increase time monitoring circuit which includes a pulse-type neutron detector, and means for counting the number of detected pulses during specific time periods. Counts are compared and the comparison is utilized to develop a reactor scram signal, if necessary.

  4. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  5. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Ng, Esmond G. (Concord, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

  6. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, Gary W. (Los Alamos, NM); Funk, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Asay, Blaine W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  7. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

    1998-09-29

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

  8. Fractal analysis of time varying data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Sadana, Ajit (Oxford, MS)

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

  9. Observation of <mi>D>0 meson nuclear modifications in <mi>Au+Au> collisions at <mi>smi><mi>NN>=200 <mi>GeV>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J.?K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M.?M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C.?D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.?C.; Averichev, G.?S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D.?R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.?K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.?C.; Bordyuzhin, I.?G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.?V.; Brovko, S.?G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T.?P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.?C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.?F.; Chen, J.?H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M.?J.?M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J.?G.; Crawford, H.?J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L.?C.; Debbe, R.?R.; Dedovich, T.?G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A.?A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.?L.; Draper, J.?E.; Du, C.?M.; Dunkelberger, L.?E.; Dunlop, J.?C.; Efimov, L.?G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K.?S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C.?E.; Gagliardi, C.?A.; Gangadharan, D.?R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D.?S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J.?W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G.?W.; Hofman, D.?J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.?Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T.?J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W.?W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E.?G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H.?W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z.?H.; Kikola, D.?P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D.?D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A.?F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R.?A.; Lamont, M.?A.?C.; Landgraf, J.?M.; Landry, K.?D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J.?H.; LeVine, M.?J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.?M.; Lisa, M.?A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.?J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R.?S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.?L.; Ma, Y.?G.; Madagodagettige Don, D.?M.?M.?D.; Mahapatra, D.?P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.?S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.?S.; Minaev, N.?G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.?M.; Morozov, D.?A.; Mustafa, M.?K.; Nandi, B.?K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T.?K.; Nelson, J.?M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L.?V.; Noh, S.?Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S.?B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.?W.; Olvitt, D.?L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.?S.; Pal, S.?K.; Pan, Y.?X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A.?M.; Pruthi, N.?K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P.?R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.?L.; Riley, C.?K.; Ritter, H.?G.; Roberts, J.?B.; Rogachevskiy, O.?V.; Romero, J.?L.; Ross, J.?F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N.?R.; Sahu, P.?K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.?P.; Schmah, A.?M.; Schmidke, W.?B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P.?V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W.?Q.; Shi, S.?S.; Shou, Q.?Y.; Sichtermann, E.?P.; Singaraju, R.?N.; Skoby, M.?J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H.?M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.?D.?S.; Stevens, J.?R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.?M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.?N.; Symons, T.?J.?M.; Szelezniak, M.?A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.?H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J.?H.; Timmins, A.?R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R.?E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B.?A.; Tsai, O.?D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.?G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J.?A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.?M.?S.; Vasiliev, A.?N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y.?P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.?S.; Wang, X.?L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.?C.; Westfall, G.?D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.?W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.?F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0?K-+?+) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  10. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic <mi mathvariant='normal'>Hmi>2 ( <mi>e>, <mi>emi>'<mi>ps> ) <mi>X> scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, S.; Baillie, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Zhang, J.; Arrington, J.; Bosted, P.; Bltmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zonta, I.

    2014-04-24

    In this study, much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  11. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in<mi>p><mi>p>?<mi>Zmi>/?>*?<mi>emi>+<mi>e>-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. ?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. ?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. ?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B.? C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. ?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. ?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. ?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. ?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. ?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. ?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. ?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. ?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. ?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. ?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. ?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W. ?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. ?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. ?L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. ?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. ?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. ?M.; Popov, A.? V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.? N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M.? P.; Santos, A. ?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. ?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. ?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.? R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.? A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.? V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.? M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.? W.; Vasilyev, I.? A.; Verkheev, A. ?Y.; Vertogradov, L. ?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2??eff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp?Z/?*?e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2??eff=0.231470.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  12. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  13. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  14. As you prepare for your upcoming beam time, please be aware that construction is planned to update SLAC Gate 17 with RFID proximity card access hardware and to change the stairs next to the Security hut to an ADA compliant ramp. Please forward this to your proposal collaborators (and ensure that all users have registered and completed training before they arrive). This construction is scheduled to begin Tuesday 5/28 and be completed by 6/28. During this construction, access to the LCLS and SSRL buildings and experimental facilities will be provided as follows: VEHICLES ONLY THROUGH GATE 17 5/28-6/28 0600-1530 (6 am-3:30 pm) Construction Zone. Only VEHICLE traffic will be allowed access through Gate 17 and flagman will provide traffic control. 1530-1800 (3:30-6:00 pm) Assumes construction will have stopped for the day; both traffic lanes will be open for vehicles. 1800-0600 (6 pm-6 am) As now, Gate 17 will be closed or barricaded overnight. PEDESTRIANS ONLY THROUGH GATE 16 5/28-6/28 The pedestrian turnstile at Gate 16A will not change. The turnstile is available for pedestrian use 24/7 as long as the individual has a valid SLAC ID badge (and there is a guard at Gate 30 to 'buzz' them through). 0700-1600 (6 am-4 pm) Pedestrians who would normally walk through Gate 17 will instead follow the detour to Gate 16 swing gate which will be unlocked and staffed by Security. A valid SLAC ID badge is needed to enter; new users without IDs will be allowed to proceed for check-in and badging after confirmation with the User Research Administration Office (see detour map attached). FYI - After the construction is completed and proximity card readers are fully functional, users and staff will enter Gates 17 and 30 using an activated RFID proximity card. More details to follow.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automated Proximity Access at Gate 17 and Sector 30 New SLAC ID badges with embedded RFID are used to activate these gates and for off-hours access at the main entrance off Sand Hill Road as well as Alpine Road (gates will be accessible 24/7) . New user badges include this proximity gate activation feature, but older photo IDs need to be updated. Users are advised to register, complete training and contact the User Research Administration (URA) office before arrival for beam time to help

  15. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forwardmore » travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.« less

  16. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; et al

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.71.71.7 cm3 lutetiumyttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.52.1 psmorefor an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.52.520 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 5911 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 545 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.less

  17. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.

    1998-01-06

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body. 14 figs.

  18. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Jofr, E.; Cneo, V.; Gmez, M.; Martnez, C.

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54s.

  19. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body.

  20. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email Time Limits The length of participation in the graduate program is limited as follows: With a bachelor's pursuing a master's degree: 4 years With a bachelor's pursuing a PhD: 7 years With a master's

  1. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013...

  2. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,925 22,198 41,964 42,866 35,273 24,583 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.85 4.87 4.48 3.18 3.98 5.45 1996...

  3. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of <mi>γγ><mimi>+<mimi>-,<mi>π>0<mi>π>0 and <mi>K>¯<mi>K> below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  4. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent Halides<mi>AB>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Imi>5:<mi>Eu>2+(<mi>Ami>=<mi>Limi>Cs>;<mi>B=Sr>, Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer the B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.

  5. Comprehensive description of <mi>J/?> production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/? production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ?' production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  6. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 21 79 19 0 165 188 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.53 8.37 5.17 -- 4.44 5.26 1996-2014

  7. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    275 43,690 50,347 50,439 46,981 37,528 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.69 4.26 3.10 4.04 5.36 2.91

  8. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-<mi>Tc> superconductor and a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Lee, Yong Kiat; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Jain, Achint; Xu, Zhijun; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Jia, Shuang; Cava, Robert J.; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2014-12-09

    In this research, high-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.

  9. Microsoft Word - MI.01-8.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ORNL/RASA-96/7 Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the Remedial Action Performed at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Adrian, Michigan (AD001V) M. E. Murray S. P. McKenzie R. F. Carrier C. A. Johnson ORNL/RASA-96/7 LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Certification Documentation Review, Investigation, and Completion: Internal Activity No. 14B477101) Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the

  10. It's Time to ACT | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Americans back to work in the process. There are plenty of actions we can take to reduce oil consumption. Let's start accepting and committing. What do you think? Is it time to...

  11. Time Structure of the LANSCE Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The proton beam is delivered to Target-1 after passing through the proton storage ring (PSR). The time it takes an 800 MeV proton to travel one circuit of the PSR is 360 ns. The...

  12. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tanabe, Tada-aki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  13. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  14. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tristan, I. Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-15

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  15. Real-time and imaginary-time quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Real-time and imaginary-time quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Real-time and imaginary-time quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations We consider a quantum mechanical system represented in phase space (referred to hereafter as "Wigner space"), coupled to a harmonic oscillator bath. We derive quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck (QHFP) equations not only in real time but also in imaginary time,

  16. REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

    2008-08-15

    The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

  17. Component Repair Times Obtained from MSPI Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven A.

    2015-05-01

    Information concerning times to repair or restore equipment to service given a failure is valuable to probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Examples of such uses in modern PRAs include estimation of the probability of failing to restore a failed component within a specified time period (typically tied to recovering a mitigating system before core damage occurs at nuclear power plants) and the determination of mission times for support system initiating event (SSIE) fault tree models. Information on equipment repair or restoration times applicable to PRA modeling is limited and dated for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. However, the Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) program covering all U.S. commercial nuclear power plants provides up-to-date information on restoration times for a limited set of component types. This paper describes the MSPI program data available and analyzes the data to obtain median and mean component restoration times as well as non-restoration cumulative probability curves. The MSPI program provides guidance for monitoring both planned and unplanned outages of trains of selected mitigating systems deemed important to safety. For systems included within the MSPI program, plants monitor both train UA and component unreliability (UR) against baseline values. If the combined system UA and UR increases sufficiently above established baseline results (converted to an estimated change in core damage frequency or CDF), a white (or worse) indicator is generated for that system. That in turn results in increased oversight by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and can impact a plants insurance rating. Therefore, there is pressure to return MSPI program components to service as soon as possible after a failure occurs. Three sets of unplanned outages might be used to determine the component repair durations desired in this article: all unplanned outages for the train type that includes the component of interest, only unplanned outages associated with failures of the component of interest, and only unplanned outages associated with PRA failures of the component of interest. The paper will describe how component repair times can be generated from each set and which approach is most applicable. Repair time information will be summarized for MSPI pumps and diesel generators using data over 2003 2007. Also, trend information over 2003 2012 will be presented to indicate whether the 2003 2007 repair time information is still considered applicable. For certain types of pumps, mean repair times are significantly higher than the typically assumed 24 h duration.

  18. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Alan J.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several machines in this country that produce short bursts of neutrons for various applications. A few examples are the Zmachine, operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM; the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY; and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) operated by the Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. They all incorporate neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors which measure neutron yield, and the shapes of the waveforms from these detectors contain germane information about the plasma conditions that produce the neutrons. However, the signals can also be %E2%80%9Cclouded%E2%80%9D by a certain fraction of neutrons that scatter off structural components and also arrive at the detectors, thereby making analysis of the plasma conditions more difficult. These detectors operate in current mode - i.e., they have no discrimination, and all the photomultiplier anode charges are integrated rather than counted individually as they are in single event counting. Up to now, there has not been a method for modeling an nTOF detector operating in current mode. MCNPPoliMiwas developed in 2002 to simulate neutron and gammaray detection in a plastic scintillator, which produces a collision data output table about each neutron and photon interaction occurring within the scintillator; however, the postprocessing code which accompanies MCNPPoliMi assumes a detector operating in singleevent counting mode and not current mode. Therefore, the idea for this work had been born: could a new postprocessing code be written to simulate an nTOF detector operating in current mode? And if so, could this process be used to address such issues as the impact of neutron scattering on the primary signal? Also, could it possibly even identify sources of scattering (i.e., structural materials) that could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

  19. Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity Pricing Beneficial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity Pricing Beneficial to Solar PV in New ... Location New York, New York United States See map: Google Maps Date July 2009 Topic ...

  20. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  1. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  2. Time reversal signal processing for communication.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

    2011-09-01

    Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

  3. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  4. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  5. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  6. Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer (ROCA) produces an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scans the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converts the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. Changes in the occupancy grid can be reported in real time to support a number of tracking capabilities. The benefit of ROCA is that rather than only providing a vector tomore » the detected change, it provides the actual x,y position of the change.« less

  7. Nov 2010 The Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 November 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Dispositioning weapon components in real time Page 3 Off to sea Page 5 Y-12 through the decades Page 6 Catching up with retiree Sue Paulus Page 6 Exercise 24/7 on-site B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for employees and

  8. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  9. Statistical analysis of random duration times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report presents basic statistical methods for analyzing data obtained by observing random time durations. It gives nonparametric estimates of the cumulative distribution function, reliability function and cumulative hazard function. These results can be applied with either complete or censored data. Several models which are commonly used with time data are discussed, and methods for model checking and goodness-of-fit tests are discussed. Maximum likelihood estimates and confidence limits are given for the various models considered. Some results for situations where repeated durations such as repairable systems are also discussed.

  10. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  11. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  12. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Eto, Joe; Lesieutre, Bernard; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Parashar, Manu

    2008-07-07

    The increased need to manage California?s electricity grid in real time is a result of the ongoing transition from a system operated by vertically-integrated utilities serving native loads to one operated by an independent system operator supporting competitive energy markets. During this transition period, the traditional approach to reliability management -- construction of new transmission lines -- has not been pursued due to unresolved issues related to the financing and recovery of transmission project costs. In the absence of investments in new transmission infrastructure, the best strategy for managing reliability is to equip system operators with better real-time information about actual operating margins so that they can better understand and manage the risk of operating closer to the edge. A companion strategy is to address known deficiencies in offline modeling tools that are needed to ground the use of improved real-time tools. This project: (1) developed and conducted first-ever demonstrations of two prototype real-time software tools for voltage security assessment and phasor monitoring; and (2) prepared a scoping study on improving load and generator response models. Additional funding through two separate subsequent work authorizations has already been provided to build upon the work initiated in this project.

  13. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laabs, Gary W.; Funk, David J.; Asay, Blaine W.

    1996-12-01

    A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved by pneumatic means and free the projectile.

  14. Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    used is given off as heat. By replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs with energy-saving lights, you can save about 50 per year -- all while repelling vampires. Learn more...

  15. AVTA: 2010 Smart Fortwo Start-Stop Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  16. QP-5.3 Stop Work Rev0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  17. Obama Administration's Rural Tour Stops in Western Alaska | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Zanesville, OH, to discuss green jobs and a new energy economy, with a focus on renewable energies. AUGUST 17TH Secretaries Arne Duncan and Tom Vilsack will travel to Hamlet,...

  18. DOE and FERC Joint Public Statement on Back Stop Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. – U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today his decision that the Department of Energy will work more closely with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in...

  19. Boosted di-boson from a mixed heavy stop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy

    2013-12-01

    The lighter mass eigenstate ($\\widetilde{t}_1$) of the two top squarks, the scalar superpartners of the top quark, is extremely difficult to discover if it is almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino ($\\widetilde{\\chi}_1^0$), the lightest and stable supersymmetric particle in the R-parity conserving supersymmetry. The current experimental bound on $\\widetilde{t}_1$ mass in this scenario stands only around 200 GeV. For such a light $\\widetilde{t}_1$, the heavier top squark ($\\widetilde{t}_2$) can also be around the TeV scale. Moreover, the high value of the higgs ($h$) mass prefers the left and right handed top squarks to be highly mixed allowing the possibility of a considerable branching ratio for $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 h$ and $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 Z$. In this paper, we explore the above possibility together with the pair production of $\\widetilde{t}_2$ $\\widetilde{t}_2^*$ giving rise to the spectacular di-boson + missing transverse energy final state. For an approximately 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ and a few hundred GeV $\\widetilde{t}_1$ the final state particles can be moderately boosted which encourages us to propose a novel search strategy employing the jet substructure technique to tag the boosted $h$ and $Z$. The reconstruction of the $h$ and $Z$ momenta also allows us to construct the stransverse mass $M_{T2}$ providing an additional efficient handle to fight the backgrounds. We show that a 4--5$\\sigma$ signal can be observed at the 14 TeV LHC for $\\sim$ 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ with 100 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity.

  20. Newly Invented Shielding For Stopping Neutrons Cold | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    down neutrons, a material to absorb them, and a thin lead layer to halt any residual radiation. In Hall C, where the system is now being installed, the lead layer is covered with...

  1. Conventional Start-Stop Vehicles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facilities Publications News Research Advanced Combustion Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Advanced Vehicle Technologies Buildings and Climate-Environment Education...

  2. Time-stretch microscopy based on time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chi Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-07-28

    Time-stretch microscopy has emerged as an ultrafast optical imaging concept offering the unprecedented combination of the imaging speed and sensitivity. However, dedicated wideband and coherence optical pulse source with high shot-to-shot stability has been mandated for time-wavelength mappingthe enabling process for ultrahigh speed wavelength-encoded image retrieval. From the practical point of view, exploiting methods to relax the stringent requirements (e.g., temporal stability and coherence) for the source of time-stretch microscopy is thus of great value. In this paper, we demonstrated time-stretch microscopy by reconstructing the time-wavelength mapping sequence from a wideband incoherent source. Utilizing the time-lens focusing mechanism mediated by a narrow-band pulse source, this approach allows generation of a wideband incoherent source, with the spectral efficiency enhanced by a factor of 18. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, time-stretch imaging with the scan rate as high as MHz and diffraction-limited resolution is achieved based on the wideband incoherent source. We note that the concept of time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source can also be generalized to any high-speed optical real-time measurements, where wavelength is acted as the information carrier.

  3. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  4. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottschalk, Bernard (Palo Alto, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  5. Visualizations for Real-time Pricing Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinovici, Maria C.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.; Widergren, Steven E.; Dayley, Greg K.

    2014-10-13

    In this paper, the visualization tools created for monitoring the operations of a real-time pricing demonstration system that runs at a distribution feeder level are presented. The information these tools provide gives insights into demand behavior from automated price responsive devices, distribution feeder characteristics, impact of weather on system’s development, and other significant dynamics. Given the large number of devices that bid into a feeder-level real-time electricity market, new techniques are explored to summarize the present state of the system and contrast that with previous trends as well as future projections. To better understand the system behavior and correctly inform decision-making procedures, effective visualization of the data is imperative.

  6. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottschalk, B.

    1981-07-30

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting is described. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  7. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  8. Multiplexer and time duration measuring circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Jr., James

    1980-01-01

    A multiplexer device is provided for multiplexing data in the form of randomly developed, variable width pulses from a plurality of pulse sources to a master storage. The device includes a first multiplexer unit which includes a plurality of input circuits each coupled to one of the pulse sources, with all input circuits being disabled when one input circuit receives an input pulse so that only one input pulse is multiplexed by the multiplexer unit at any one time.

  9. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-06-03

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor''s hardware.

  10. Method and apparatus for time dispersive spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2003-06-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  11. Time Dispersive Spectrometer Using Digital Switching Means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarver, III, Edward E. (Livermore, CA); Siems, William F. (Spokane, WA)

    2004-09-07

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  12. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Daytime Load Calculation and Screening Page 1 of 30 Kristen Ardani, Dora Nakfuji, Anthony Hong, and Babak Enayati Page 1 of 30 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us today for our DG interconnection collaborative informational webinar. Today we are going to talk about minimum day time load calculation and screening procedures and their role in the distributed PV interconnection process. We're going to hear from Babak Enayati of the Massachusetts

  13. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of Distribution Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Standardization of

  14. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC) "Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of

  15. Continuous flow PCB radiolysis with real time assessment by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Aaron Ruhter; Rene' Rodriguez; Richard Brey

    2006-05-01

    Recently, the treatment of environmentally recalcitrant pollutants such as PCBs has been studied using a number of so-called, advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs). As a group, the AOTs are ultimate treatment technologies that seek to mineralize the hazardous compounds to be treated (Cooper et al., 2004). One of the most versatile of the AOTs is radiolysis, usually practiced using machine-generated sources of radiation (Cooper et al., 2004, Mincher and Cooper, 2003). The radiolytic decomposition of PCBs has been reviewed (Curry and Mincher, 1999). While earlier experiments have been performed in alkaline isopropanol (Singh et al., 1985, Mucka et al., 1997), recent literature has begun to examine the radiolysis of PCBs in more real-world solvents, such as transformer oil (Arbon and Mincher, 1996, Mincher et al., 2000, Chaychian et al., 1999). These experiments have generally been performed in batch fashion, with small volumes of PCB-contaminated solvents placed in front of a gamma-ray source or the bremmstrahlung or e-beam of an accelerator for predetermined periods of time, to give a desired absorbed dose. These samples were then retrieved to analyze the post-irradiation PCB concentration. We report here what we believe is the first example of the radiolysis of PCBs in a process, continuous flow stream, as opposed to typical batch irradiations. The PCB-containing transformer oil was recirculated through an irradiation cell located in the path of an e-beam. Multiple passes through the cell allowed for the delivery of any desired radiation dose. This system required the development of an on-line analytical system that could provide PCB concentration values in real time. In the current experiment, a pulsed plasma electron capture detector (PDECD) was used in conjunction with a new sample preparation scheme. The new sampling scheme bypasses the need for removal or powering down of the radiation source, which would be undesirable during process PCB treatment. Dilution of the samples using volumetric glassware or balances at a site remote to the irradiation, and manual injection of the diluted samples in a remote GC is not required. Thus, the error and time delays associated with stopping and restarting the accelerator are eliminated and kinetic investigations are more easily performed. The PCB levels can be determined within a few minutes of delivering a specified dose to the sample while the process stream continues to be irradiated. Additionally, any possible chemical species in the oil with reactive lifetimes on the order of just a few minutes could be observed with this method. It has previously been reported that the addition of alkaline isopropanol spikes to PCB oils has a catalytic effect on PCB decomposition by radiolysis (Mincher et al., 2000, Mincher et al., 2002). Here we report the results of process irradiation of transformer oil contaminated with PCBs for unadulterated oils, and for oils spiked with alkaline isopropanol to decrease the time and dose required for treatment.

  16. Real Time Simulation of Power Grid Disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinthavali, Supriya; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Fernandez, Steven J; Groer, Christopher S; Nutaro, James J; Olama, Mohammed M; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Spafford, Kyle L; Vacaliuc, Bogdan

    2012-11-01

    DOE-OE and DOE-SC workshops (Reference 1-3) identified the key power grid problem that requires insight addressable by the next generation of exascale computing is coupling of real-time data streams (1-2 TB per hour) as the streams are ingested to dynamic models. These models would then identify predicted disruptions in time (2-4 seconds) to trigger the smart grid s self healing functions. This project attempted to establish the feasibility of this approach and defined the scientific issues, and demonstrated example solutions to important smart grid simulation problems. These objectives were accomplished by 1) using the existing frequency recorders on the national grid to establish a representative and scalable real-time data stream; 2) invoking ORNL signature identification algorithms; 3) modeling dynamically a representative region of the Eastern interconnect using an institutional cluster, measuring the scalability and computational benchmarks for a national capability; and 4) constructing a prototype simulation for the system s concept of smart grid deployment. The delivered ORNL enduring capability included: 1) data processing and simulation metrics to design a national capability justifying exascale applications; 2) Software and intellectual property built around the example solutions; 3) demonstrated dynamic models to design few second self-healing.

  17. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  18. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  19. SU-E-J-158: Experimental Investigation of Proton Radiography Based On Time-Resolved Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, M; Paganetti, H; Lu, H-M; Doolan, P; H, Bentefour E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use proton radiography for i) in-vivo range verification of the brain fields of medulloblastoma patients in order to reduce the exit dose to the cranial skin and thus the risk of permanent alopecia; ii) for performing patient specific optimization of the calibration from CT-Hounsfield units to proton relative stopping power in order to minimize uncertainties of proton rang Methods: We developed and tested a prototype proton radiography system based on a single-plane scintillation screen coupled with a fast CCD camera (1ms sampling rate, 0.29x0.29 mm{sup 2} pixel size, 3030 cm{sup 2} field of view). The method is based on the principle that, for passively scattered beams, the radiological depth of any point in the plateau of a spread-out Bragg-Peak (SOBP) can be inferred from the time-pattern of the dose rate measurements. We performed detector characterization measurements using complex-shape homogeneous phantoms and an Alderson phanto Results: Detector characterization tests confirmed the robustness of the technique. The results of the phantom measurements are encouraging in terms of achievable accuracy of the water equivalent thickness. A technique to minimize the degradation of spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed. Our novel radiographic technique is rapid (100 ms) and simultaneous over the whole field. The dose required to produce one radiograph, with the current settings, is ?3 cG Conclusion: The results obtained with this simple and innovative radiography method are promising and motivate further development of technique. The system requires only a single-plane 2D dosimeter and it uses the clinical beam for a fraction of second with low dose to the patient.

  20. Beyond standard model searches in the MiniBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei; Conrad, Janet M.

    2014-08-05

    The MiniBooNE experiment has contributed substantially to beyond standard model searches in the neutrino sector. The experiment was originally designed to test the <mi mathvariant='normal'>Δmi>m>2~1eV2 region of the sterile neutrino hypothesis by observing <mimi><mi>e>(<mimi>-<mi>e>) charged current quasielastic signals from a <mimi><mi>μ>(<mimi>-<mi>μ>) beam. MiniBooNE observed excesses of <mimi>e> and <mimi>-<mi>e> candidate events in neutrino and antineutrino mode, respectively. To date, these excesses have not been explained within the neutrino standard model (<mi>ν>SM); the standard model extended for three massive neutrinos. Confirmation is required by future experiments such as MicroBooNE. MiniBooNE also provided an opportunity for precision studies of Lorentz violation. The results set strict limits for the first time on several parameters of the standard-model extension, the generic formalism for considering Lorentz violation. Most recently, an extension to MiniBooNE running, with a beam tuned in beam-dump mode, is being performed to search for dark sector particles. In addition, this review describes these studies, demonstrating that short baseline neutrino experiments are rich environments in new physics searches.

  1. Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

    1982-05-04

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

  2. Elementary wideband timing of radio pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M. E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template 'portrait', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a 'fiducial component', and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J18242452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  3. DECORRELATION TIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC FIELDS AND FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, B. T.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-03-10

    We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.''3), high-cadence ({approx_equal} 2 minute) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the narrowband filter imager of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite over 2006 December 12 and 13. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms' susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval {Delta}t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter {sigma} used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, {tau}. For {Delta}t > {tau}, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and {Delta}t.

  4. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the advantage of offering smooth animations, while spatial compression can handle volumes of larger dimensions.

  5. Real Time Telemetry Data Capture and Storage

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-05-14

    This program is used to capture telemetry data from remote instrumentation systems. The data can be captured at the rate of 1M bit per second. The data can come in one of several formats, NRZ, RZ, and Bi-Phase. The DECOM software takes the serial data stream and locks on to a unique code word. By tracking the code word the software can strip out the information. Thus the program can display the incoming data realmore »time while saving the data to disk.« less

  6. the Y-12 Times, March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 March 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Y-12's nuclear forensics role Page 3 First Y-12 demolition funded by ARRA Page 4 Bird's-eye view enhances security Page 6 Y-12 UW campaign has best year ever Page 6 Turn your bright idea into a patent B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A

  7. January 2009 The Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Beth Eckerman Kathy Fahey John Holbrook Jamie Loveday Brett Pate I N S I D E Pages 2 and 3 Employees ask; Kohlhorst answers Pages 4 and 5 Your benefi ts, your rights Page 6 The ties that bind: Mentor-Protégé partnership strengthens Page 7 A 'towering' project

  8. Date Time Event Description/Participants Location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated: 06/11/2015 Date Time Event Description/Participants Location Point of Contact 11 thru 12 All Day Meeting Todd Allen, deputy director of Science and Technology at INL, has been invited to speak at the Idaho Society of Professional Engineers (ISPE) annual meeting. Coeur d'Alene, ID Sara Prentice, 526-9591 18 9:00 AM Education Outreach Approximately 50 iSTEM students and instructors will tour various INL Idaho Falls facilities Idaho Falls, ID INL Tours Office, 526-0050 23 All Day Meeting

  9. Making web annotations persistent over time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, Robert; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  10. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voegele, Michael D. [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)] [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States); Vieth, Donald [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)] [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste legislation to the floor of the Senate, overcoming existing House support for Yucca Mountain; 3. Change the longstanding focus of Congress from disposal to storage; 4. Change the funding concepts embodied in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to allow the Nuclear Waste fund to be used to pay for interim storage; 5. Reverse the Congressional policy not to give states or tribes veto or consent authority, and to reserve to Congress the authority to override a state or tribal disapproval; 6. Promulgate interim storage facility siting regulations to reflect the new policies after such changes to policy and law; 7. Complete already underway changes to storage and transportation regulations, possibly incorporating changes to reflect changes to waste disposal law; 8. Promulgate new repository siting regulations if the interim storage facility is to support repository development; 9. Identify volunteer sites, negotiate agreements, and get Congressional approval for negotiated benefits packages; 10. Design, License and develop the interim storage facility. The time required to accomplish these ten items depends on many factors. The estimate developed assumes that certain of the items must be completed before other items are started; given past criticisms of the current program, such an assumption appears appropriate. Estimated times for completion of individual items are based on historical precedent. (authors)

  11. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties alter s particle dispersion. The joint particle - temperature dispersion leads to a distribution of temperature histories predicted by the ODT . Predictions are shown for the lower moments an d the full distributions of the particle positions, particle - observed gas temperatures and particle temperatures. An analysis of the time scales affecting particle - temperature interactions covers Lagrangian integral time scales based on temperature autoco rrelations, rates of temperature change associated with particle motion relative to the temperature field and rates of diffusional change of temperatures. These latter two time scales have not been investigated previously; they are shown to be strongly in termittent having peaked distributions with long tails. The logarithm of the absolute value of these time scales exhibits a distribution closer to normal. A cknowledgements This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under their Counter - Weapons of Mass Destruction Basic Research Program in the area of Chemical and Biological Agent Defeat under award number HDTRA1 - 11 - 4503I to Sandia National Laboratories. The authors would like to express their appreciation for the guidance provi ded by Dr. Suhithi Peiris to this project and to the Science to Defeat Weapons of Mass Destruction program.

  12. Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

  13. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, George E.; Struve, Walter S.; Homer, John F.

    1987-01-01

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user.

  14. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, G.E.; Struve, W.S.; Homer, J.F.

    1987-02-03

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user. 19 figs.

  15. Real-time airborne particle analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2012-10-16

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  16. In-line real time air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN); Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    An in-line gas monitor capable of accurate gas composition analysis in a continuous real time manner even under strong applied vacuum conditions operates by mixing an air sample with helium forming a sample gas in two complementary sample loops embedded in a manifold which includes two pairs of 3-way solenoid valves. The sample gas is then analyzed in an ion trap mass spectrometer on a continuous basis. Two valve drivers actuate the two pairs of 3-way valves in a reciprocating fashion, so that there is always flow through the in-line gas monitor via one or the other of the sample loops. The duty cycle for the two pairs of 3-way valves is varied by tuning the two valve drivers to a duty cycle typically between 0.2 to 0.7 seconds.

  17. In-line real time air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, M.B.; Thompson, C.V.

    1998-07-14

    An in-line gas monitor capable of accurate gas composition analysis in a continuous real time manner even under strong applied vacuum conditions operates by mixing an air sample with helium forming a sample gas in two complementary sample loops embedded in a manifold which includes two pairs of 3-way solenoid valves. The sample gas is then analyzed in an ion trap mass spectrometer on a continuous basis. Two valve drivers actuate the two pairs of 3-way valves in a reciprocating fashion, so that there is always flow through the in-line gas monitor via one or the other of the sample loops. The duty cycle for the two pairs of 3-way valves is varied by tuning the two valve drivers to a duty cycle typically between 0.2 to 0.7 seconds. 3 figs.

  18. REAL TIME DATA FOR REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES [11505

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROCK CT

    2011-01-13

    Health physicists from the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company collaborated with Berkeley Nucleonics Corporation to modify the SAM 940 isotope identifier instrument to be used for nuclear waste remediation. These modifications coupled with existing capabilities of the SAM 940 have proven to be invaluable during remediation activities, reducing disposal costs by allowing swift remediation of targeted areas that have been identified as having isotopes of concern (IOC), and eliminating multiple visits to sites by declaring an excavation site clear of IOCs before demobilizing from the site. These advantages are enabled by accumulating spectral data for specific isotopes that is nearly 100 percent free of false positives, which are filtered out in 'real time.'

  19. GUT-inspired supersymmetric model for <mi>h> ? <mi>?> <mi>?> and the muon <mi>g> - 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-05-06

    We study a grand unified theories inspired supersymmetric model with nonuniversal gaugino masses that can explain the observed muon g-2 anomaly while simultaneously accommodating an enhancement or suppression in the h??? decay channel. In order to accommodate these observations and mh?125 to 126 GeV, the model requires a spectrum consisting of relatively light sleptons whereas the colored sparticles are heavy. The predicted stau mass range corresponding to R???1.1 is 100 GeV?m??200 GeV. The constraint on the slepton masses, particularly on the smuons, arising from considerations of muon g-2 is somewhat milder. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range. The colored sparticles turn out to be considerably heavier with mg?4.5 TeV and mt??3.5 TeV, which makes it challenging for these to be observed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  20. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in <mi>Eu>3<mi>Bi>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Smi>4<mi mathvariant='normal'>Fmi>4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Zhu -An; Cao, Guang -Han; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher Tc emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa?p?2.00 GPa, the high-Tc phase coexists with the low-Tc phase. Hall effect measurements reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between the two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-Tc phase.

  1. https://mi3.ncdc.noaa.gov/mi3report/MISC/asos-stations.txt

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NCDCID WBAN COOPID CALL NAME ALT_NAME COUNTRY ST COUNTY LAT LO -------- ----- ------ ---- ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------------- -- ------------------------------ 20028647 15908 YRL RED LAKE RED LAKE CANADA ON 51.06667 20030346 41415 914226 GUM GUAM INTL AP GUAM NWSO TIYAN GUAM GU GUAM 13.48361 14 20030369 41418 914855 GSN SAIPAN INTL AP SAIPAN INTL AP NORTHERN MARIANA ISL MP SAIPAN 15.11889 14 20022040 26451 500280 ANC ANCHORAGE INTL AP ANCHORAGE INTL

  2. Spin-liquid ground state in the frustrated <mi>J>1-<mi>J>2 zigzag chain system <mi>BaTb>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, A. A.; Li, L.; Garlea, V. O.; Yan, J. -Q.; Weickert, F.; Zapf, V. S.; Movshovich, R.; Jaime, M.; Baker, P. J.; Keppens, V.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-07-13

    We have investigated polycrystalline samples of the zigzag chain system BaTb2O4 with magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, neutron powder diffraction, and muon spin relaxation measurements. No magnetic transitions are observed in the bulk measurements, while neutron diffraction reveals low-temperature, short-range, intrachain magnetic correlations between Tb3+ ions. Muon spin relaxation measurements indicate that these correlations are dynamic, as the technique detects no signatures of static magnetism down to 0.095 K. Altogether these findings provide strong evidence for a spin liquid ground state in BaTb2O4.

  3. Further investigation of <mi>g> factors for the lead monofluoride ground state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Baum, A. L.; Sears, T. J.; Grabow, J. -U.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of our theoretical study and analysis of earlier experimental data for the g-factor tensor components of the ground 2II1/2 state of the free PbF radical. These values obtained both within the relativistic coupled-cluster method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and with our fit of the experimental data from [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011); A. L. Baum, B.A. thesis, Pomona College, 2011]. The obtained results agree very well with each other but contradict the previous fit performed in the cited works. Our final prediction for g factors is G?=0.081(5),G?=0.27(1).

  4. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1983-1984 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1985-12-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration In spring, 1984. We operated smolt monitoring traps at Whitebird from March 14 to May 12, Snake River from March 22 to May 15 and Clearwater from March 29 to May 13. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week In April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Median migration rates for branded chinook salmon between release sites and Whitebird were 3, 17 and 15 miles/day for Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat smolts, respectively, an average of 11.6 miles/day. Average migration rate for these three groups between Whitebird and Snake River trap was 28 miles/day. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Descaling rate often Increased about 1% at release sites. Classical descaling at Whitebird, Clearwater and Snake River traps averaged 4.5, 2.5 and 1.5% for chinook salmon, 2.1, 0.4 and 1.4% for wild steelhead and 8.7, 4.1 and 5.5% for hatchery steelhead, respectively. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) + 1 mm. The largest chinook salmon smolts came from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery on the Clearwater River. Hatchery steelhead were smallest (2 = 203 mm) at the Clearwater trap and largest (2 = 239 mm) at the Whitebird trap. Wild steelhead were also smallest at Clearwater trap ({bar x} = 178 mm) and largest at Whitebird trap ({bar x} = 193 mm). Purse seining to evaluate rates of descaling before and after smolts passed Lower Granite Dam was largely ineffective since we were unable to catch sufficient numbers of smolts in the tailrace, and winds in the forebay area altered descaling rates in sampled smolts.

  5. Real time viability detection of bacterial spores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Obiso, Richard J.

    2003-07-29

    This invention relates to a process for detecting the presence of viable bacterial spores in a sample and to a spore detection system, the process including placing a sample in a germination medium for a period of time sufficient for commitment of any present viable bacterial spores to occur, mixing the sample with a solution of a lanthanide capable of forming a fluorescent complex with dipicolinic acid, and, measuring the sample for the presence of dipicolinic acid, and the system including a germination chamber having inlets from a sample chamber, a germinant chamber and a bleach chamber, the germination chamber further including an outlet through a filtering means, the outlet connected to a detection chamber, the detection chamber having an inlet from a fluorescence promoting metal chamber and the detection chamber including a spectral excitation source and a means of measuring emission spectra from a sample, the detection chamber further connected to a waste chamber. A germination reaction mixture useful for promoting commitment of any viable bacterial spores in a sample including a combination of L-alanine, L-asparagine and D-glucose is also described.

  6. Real-time and imaginary-time quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-04-14

    We consider a quantum mechanical system represented in phase space (referred to hereafter as “Wigner space”), coupled to a harmonic oscillator bath. We derive quantum hierarchal Fokker-Planck (QHFP) equations not only in real time but also in imaginary time, which represents an inverse temperature. This is an extension of a previous work, in which we studied a spin-boson system, to a Brownian system. It is shown that the QHFP in real time obtained from a correlated thermal equilibrium state of the total system possesses the same form as those obtained from a factorized initial state. A modified terminator for the hierarchal equations of motion is introduced to treat the non-Markovian case more efficiently. Using the imaginary-time QHFP, numerous thermodynamic quantities, including the free energy, entropy, internal energy, heat capacity, and susceptibility, can be evaluated for any potential. These equations allow us to treat non-Markovian, non-perturbative system-bath interactions at finite temperature. Through numerical integration of the real-time QHFP for a harmonic system, we obtain the equilibrium distributions, the auto-correlation function, and the first- and second-order response functions. These results are compared with analytically exact results for the same quantities. This provides a critical test of the formalism for a non-factorized thermal state and elucidates the roles of fluctuation, dissipation, non-Markovian effects, and system-bath coherence. Employing numerical solutions of the imaginary-time QHFP, we demonstrate the capability of this method to obtain thermodynamic quantities for any potential surface. It is shown that both types of QHFP equations can produce numerical results of any desired accuracy. The FORTRAN source codes that we developed, which allow for the treatment of Wigner space dynamics with any potential form (TanimuranFP15 and ImTanimuranFP15), are provided as the supplementary material.

  7. Is space-time symmetry a suitable generalization of parity-time symmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore, Paolo; Fernández, Francisco M.; Garcia, Javier

    2014-11-15

    We discuss space-time symmetric Hamiltonian operators of the form H=H{sub 0}+igH{sup ′}, where H{sub 0} is Hermitian and g real. H{sub 0} is invariant under the unitary operations of a point group G while H{sup ′} is invariant under transformation by elements of a subgroup G{sup ′} of G. If G exhibits irreducible representations of dimension greater than unity, then it is possible that H has complex eigenvalues for sufficiently small nonzero values of g. In the particular case that H is parity-time symmetric then it appears to exhibit real eigenvalues for all 00. We illustrate the main theoretical results and conclusions of this paper by means of two- and three-dimensional Hamiltonians exhibiting a variety of different point-group symmetries. - Highlights: • Space-time symmetry is a generalization of PT symmetry. • The eigenvalues of a space-time Hamiltonian are either real or appear as pairs of complex conjugate numbers. • In some cases all the eigenvalues are real for some values of a potential-strength parameter g. • At some value of g space-time symmetry is broken and complex eigenvalues appear. • Some multidimensional oscillators exhibit broken space-time symmetry for all values of g.

  8. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is ... Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results ...

  9. Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Time-based electricity programs encourage you to use energy when the demand is low by giving you a lower price for electricity during those times. Time-based electricity programs...

  10. Real time PV manufacturing diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Crawford, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    The main obstacle Photovoltaic (PV) industry is facing at present is the higher cost of PV energy compared to that of fossil energy. While solar cell efficiencies continue to make incremental gains these improvements are so far insufficient to drive PV costs down to match that of fossil energy. Improved in-line diagnostics however, has the potential to significantly increase the productivity and reduce cost by improving the yield of the process. On this Phase I/Phase II SBIR project MicroXact developed and demonstrated at CIGS pilot manufacturing line a high-throughput in-line PV manufacturing diagnostic system, which was verified to provide fast and accurate data on the spatial uniformity of thickness, an composition of the thin films comprising the solar cell as the solar cell is processed reel-to-reel. In Phase II project MicroXact developed a stand-alone system prototype and demonstrated the following technical characteristics: 1) ability of real time defect/composition inconsistency detection over 60cm wide web at web speeds up to 3m/minute; 2) Better than 1mm spatial resolution on 60cm wide web; 3) an average better than 20nm spectral resolution resulting in more than sufficient sensitivity to composition imperfections (copper-rich and copper-poor regions were detected). The system was verified to be high vacuum compatible. Phase II results completely validated both technical and economic feasibility of the proposed concept. MicroXact’s solution is an enabling technique for in-line PV manufacturing diagnostics to increase the productivity of PV manufacturing lines and reduce the cost of solar energy, thus reducing the US dependency on foreign oil while simultaneously reducing emission of greenhouse gasses.

  11. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SA-miRNAs are involved in the regulation of IR-induced senescence, so targeting these miRNAs may be a novel approach for modulating cellular response to radiation exposure.

  12. Time dependent particle emission from fission products (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time dependent particle emission from fission products Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time dependent particle emission from fission products You are accessing a...

  13. Breakthrough Time and Mechanical Properties of Edge Sealing in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough Time and Mechanical Properties of Edge Sealing in Different Environmental Conditions Breakthrough Time and Mechanical Properties of Edge Sealing in Different...

  14. Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent Neutron Survival...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent Neutron Survival Probability. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent...

  15. EIS-0287: Notice of Extension for Time for Comments | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extension for Time for Comments EIS-0287: Notice of Extension for Time for Comments Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology In response to a public request, the...

  16. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Soda...

  17. Category:Time-Domain Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Time-Domain Electromagnetics page? For detailed...

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Real Time Energy Management, Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Standard Time. This webinar will feature three Better Buildings Challenge partners that are employing real-time energy management to achieve their energy reduction goals. ...

  19. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have ... The ability to image the chemical reactions in living cells in real time, especially in ...

  20. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation ... cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time, without bias. ...

  1. Development of Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology - Fact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project partners, will bring together real-time, gas quality sensor technology with ... PDF icon Development of Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology More Documents & ...

  2. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-time Monitoring And Diagnostics Detecting pathogens and predators to quickly recover ... Real-time Monitoring With Online Algal Reflectance Monitor System Researchers have ...

  3. Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Steps to establish a real-time transmission monitoring system for transmission owners and ... Eastern and Western Interconnections real-time information on the functional status of ...

  4. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation ...

  5. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers ...

  6. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Wednesday, 25 August 2010 00:00 Scientists have ...

  7. Development of Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology Introduction Landfll gas (LFG), composed largely ... By providing the capability for near real-time monitoring of the composition of these ...

  8. Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene Prev Next Title: Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in...

  9. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models ...

  10. Patent: Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | DOEpatents Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope Citation Details Title: Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope

  11. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME ...

  12. BIOMAP Time-Enabled Mapping and Dissemination Tool for Biofuels...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BIOMAP Time-Enabled Mapping and Dissemination Tool for Biofuels Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BIOMAP Time-Enabled Mapping and Dissemination...

  13. ARM - Time in ARM NetCDF Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govDataTime in ARM NetCDF Files Page Contents Introduction Time Zones Epoch Time Time Variables Conversion Examples and Hints Perl Example C Example Fortran Example IDL Example Notes on Generating Epoch Times Contact Information Time in ARM NetCDF Files Introduction This document explains most of the issues related to the use of time in ARM netCDF data files. Time Zones All ARM netCDF files are in UTC. Note that this has some implications for solar-based data; we tend to split our files at

  14. Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Physics of Intrinsic Plasma Rotation Explained for First Time Key understanding for modeling future fusion reactors ...

  15. LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update...

  16. LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LCLS Femto-Second Timing and Synchronization System Update You...

  17. Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory of Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic ...

  18. Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Presentation). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

  19. OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Abstract). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and...

  20. Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex biochemical processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simplicity of first passage time...

  1. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state in<mi>B>0?<mi>Jmi>/<mi>?mi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>?mi>+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  2. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  3. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

  4. Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory PDF icon 2002_deer_imre.pdf More Documents & Publications Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of Single Ultrafine Diesel Tailpipe Particles Microsoft PowerPoint - 4. ORNL- deer.ppt [Read-Only] Real-Time Measurement of Diesel Trap Efficiency

  5. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxiesthe ones at the centers of galaxy clustersdepends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the H? properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  6. Time Synchronization in Hierarchical TESLA Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    Time synchronization and event time correlation are important in wireless sensor networks. In particular, time is used to create a sequence events or time line to answer questions of cause and effect. Time is also used as a basis for determining the freshness of received packets and the validity of cryptographic certificates. This paper presents secure method of time synchronization and event time correlation for TESLA-based hierarchical wireless sensor networks. The method demonstrates that events in a TESLA network can be accurately timestamped by adding only a few pieces of data to the existing protocol.

  7. Real-time study of fast-electron transport inside dense hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, A.S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Sengupta, S.; Das, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2006-03-15

    We offer a method to study transport of fast electrons in dense hot media. The technique relies on temporal profiling of the laser induced magnetic fields and offers a unique capability to map the hot electron currents and their neutralization (or lack of it) by the return currents in the plasma. We report direct quantitative measurements of strong electric inhibition in insulators and turbulence induced anomalous stopping of hot electrons in conductors. The present technique can prove extremely important from the point of view of fast ignition scheme, which relies on the penetration of fast electrons into the fusion core.

  8. First-time measurements will advance turbulence models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First-time measurements will advance turbulence models First-time measurements will advance turbulence models An interdisciplinary Los Alamos team took a series of first-time measurements of turbulent mixing, providing new insights for turbulence modelers. February 11, 2014 The flow structure evolves in time and rapidly mixes as it moves from left to right on the image. The flow structure evolves in time and rapidly mixes as it moves from left to right on the image. Turbulent mixing has

  9. First-time measurements will advance turbulence models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First-time measurements will advance turbulence models First-time measurements will advance turbulence models An interdisciplinary Los Alamos team took a series of first-time measurements of turbulent mixing, providing new insights for turbulence modelers. February 11, 2014 The flow structure evolves in time and rapidly mixes as it moves from left to right on the image. The flow structure evolves in time and rapidly mixes as it moves from left to right on the image. Turbulent mixing has

  10. Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Supplemental Guidance Regarding Compensatory Time Off for Travel Questions and answers on issues that supplement the final regulations on compensatory time for travel issued by the Office of Personnel Management. In addition, a sample worksheet is attached to assist travelers in determining and documenting their travel time that may be credited for compensatory time for travel. This information will be

  11. Time-Off Awards Scale | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Time-Off Awards Scale Time-Off Awards Scale This chart is the departmental recommended time-off award scale and should be used unless another time-off award scale has been adopted by the servicing human resources office. PDF icon Time-Off Awards Scale Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Supervisory - Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and

  12. Neutron time-of-flight and emission time diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T. J.; Jimerson, J. L.; Berggren, R. R.; Faulkner, J. R.; Oertel, J. A.; Walsh, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current plans call for a system of current mode neutron detectors for the National Ignition Facility for extending the range of neutron yields below that of the neutron activation system, for ion-temperature measurements over a wide yield range, and for determining the average neutron emission time. The system will need to operate over a yield range of 10{sup 6} for the lowest-yield experiments to 10{sup 19} for high-yield ignited targets. The requirements will be satisfied using several detectors located at different distances from the target. This article presents a conceptual design for the NIF nToF system.

  13. Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Time-Based Electricity Rates Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates Time-based electricity programs encourage you to use energy when the demand is low by giving you a lower price for electricity during those times. Time-based electricity programs encourage you to use energy when the demand is low by giving you a lower price for electricity during those times. To help reduce their peak power demands and save money, many utilities are introducing programs that encourage their customers to use

  14. Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates Tips: Time-Based Electricity Rates Time-based electricity programs encourage you to use energy when the demand is low by giving you a lower price for electricity during those times. Time-based electricity programs encourage you to use energy when the demand is low by giving you a lower price for electricity during those times. To help reduce their peak power demands and save money, many utilities are introducing programs that encourage their customers to use

  15. New "Cool Roof Time Machine" Will Accelerate Cool Roof Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Cool Roof Time Machine" Will Accelerate Cool Roof Deployment New "Cool Roof Time Machine" Will Accelerate Cool Roof Deployment April 24, 2015 - 4:21pm Addthis Berkeley Lab...

  16. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation. Proper waveform...

  17. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow-up Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic...

  18. Out of time? Use scavenger queue on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Out of time? Use scavenger queue on Hopper Out of time? Use scavenger queue on Hopper September 18, 2015 by Katie Antypas NERSC is now allowing projects and users who have fewer...

  19. ARS 41-1072 Licensing Time Frames | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1-1072 Licensing Time Frames Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ARS 41-1072 Licensing Time FramesLegal Abstract...

  20. Nevada Application for Extensions of Time (Water Right) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extensions of Time (Water Right) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Nevada Application for Extensions of Time (Water Right) Form Type...

  1. Real-Time Quantitative Imaging of Failure Events in Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Quantitative Imaging of Failure Events in Materials Under Load at Temperatures Above 1,600 C Real-Time Quantitative Imaging of Failure Events in Materials Under Load at ...

  2. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  3. Time at the beginning (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time at the beginning Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time at the beginning You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This ...

  4. Time at the beginning (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time at the beginning Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time at the beginning Age consistency for the Universe today has been an important cosmological test. Even more ...

  5. Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos, on its way...

  6. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  7. Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactive Barrier | Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier PDF icon Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier More Documents & Publications Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello

  8. On timing properties of LYSO-based calorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Duarte, J.; Pena, C.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Trevor, J.; Xie, S.

    2015-04-23

    We present test beam studies and results on the timing performance and characterization of the time resolution of Lutetium–Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO)-based calorimeters. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for a particular design. Additionally, we discuss precision timing calorimetry as a tool for the mitigation of physics object performance degradation effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen at the Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014 PDF icon Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology More Documents & Publications 3D Site Response using NLSSI Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Initiative Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for

  10. Beam Time Request - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron Institute /

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University Beam-Time Request Information about scheduling beam-time: HOURLY RATE: Contact Henry Clark, 979-845-1411 or clark@comp.tamu.edu MINIMUM BILLING: There is an eight hour minimum billing, after that you are billed for time used including tuning time. CANCELLATION POLICY: If you schedule cyclotron time and need to cancel at a later date, you must notify Henry Clark two weeks prior to the start date to avoid the cancellation fee. The fee is in the amount of one half of

  11. Piercing 'The Illusion of Time' | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Piercing 'The Illusion of Time' Piercing 'The Illusion of Time' November 8, 2011 - 5:43pm Addthis <a href="http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/fabric-of-cosmos.html#fabric-time"> "The Illusion of Time"</a> is the second installment in the PBS Nova series, "The Fabric of the Cosmos." | Image courtesy of PBS "The Illusion of Time" is the second installment in the PBS Nova series, "The Fabric of the Cosmos." | Image courtesy of PBS

  12. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, J.A.; Krueger, F.P.

    1987-10-05

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events. 5 figs.

  13. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, John A.; Krueger, Frederick P.

    1988-09-20

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events.

  14. Characterizing and Mitigating Work Time Inflation in Task Parallel Programs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olivier, Stephen L.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Schulz, Martin; Prins, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Task parallelism raises the level of abstraction in shared memory parallel programming to simplify the development of complex applications. However, task parallel applications can exhibit poor performance due to thread idleness, scheduling overheads, and work time inflation – additional time spent by threads in a multithreaded computation beyond the time required to perform the same work in a sequential computation. We identify the contributions of each factor to lost efficiency in various task parallel OpenMP applications and diagnose the causes of work time inflation in those applications. Increased data access latency can cause significant work time inflation in NUMAmore » systems. Our locality framework for task parallel OpenMP programs mitigates this cause of work time inflation. Our extensions to the Qthreads library demonstrate that locality-aware scheduling can improve performance up to 3X compared to the Intel OpenMP task scheduler.« less

  15. System and method for time synchronization in a wireless network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonia, Patrick S. (Maplewood, MN); Kolavennu, Soumitri N. (Blaine, MN); Mahasenan, Arun V. (Kerala, IN); Budampati, Ramakrishna S. (Maple Grove, MN)

    2010-03-30

    A system includes multiple wireless nodes forming a cluster in a wireless network, where each wireless node is configured to communicate and exchange data wirelessly based on a clock. One of the wireless nodes is configured to operate as a cluster master. Each of the other wireless nodes is configured to (i) receive time synchronization information from a parent node, (ii) adjust its clock based on the received time synchronization information, and (iii) broadcast time synchronization information based on the time synchronization information received by that wireless node. The time synchronization information received by each of the other wireless nodes is based on time synchronization information provided by the cluster master so that the other wireless nodes substantially synchronize their clocks with the clock of the cluster master.

  16. Continuous-time quantum walks on star graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salimi, S.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, we investigate continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs. It is shown that quantum central limit theorem for a continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs for N-fold star power graph, which are invariant under the quantum component of adjacency matrix, converges to continuous-time quantum walk on K{sub 2} graphs (complete graph with two vertices) and the probability of observing walk tends to the uniform distribution.

  17. ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge Requests for Time Due February 14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requests for Time Due February 14 ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge Requests for Time Due February 14 November 17, 2011 by Francesca Verdier The ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) program is open to scientists from the research community in national laboratories, academia and industry. This program allocates time at NERSC and the Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne and Oak Ridge. Areas of interest are: Advancing the clean energy agenda. Understanding the environmental impacts of

  18. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Precision timing measurements for high energy photons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Precision timing measurements for high energy photons Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter

  19. Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Three-dimensional helium (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo: Three-dimensional helium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo: Three-dimensional helium Here the recently proposed time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo method is applied to three dimensional para- and ortho-helium atoms subjected to an external electromagnetic field with amplitude sufficient

  20. Analysis and prediction of aperiodic hydrodynamic oscillatory time series

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by feed-forward neural networks, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analysis and prediction of aperiodic hydrodynamic oscillatory time series by feed-forward neural networks, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis and prediction of aperiodic hydrodynamic oscillatory time series by feed-forward neural networks, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor Forecasting of aperiodic time