National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mi elevation profile

  1. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M.; Hosny, K.A.; Esmat, G.; Abdelaziz, A.I.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. •E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. •miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. •miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. •miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  2. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  3. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC MI OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  4. Real-time sub-<mi>Ĺ>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  5. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

  6. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Ă…kerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  7. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    03 Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. (MI.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Velsicol Chemical Corp. MI.03-1 Location: St. Louis , Michigan MI.03-2 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.03-3 Site Operations: Rare earth processing facility. MI.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC survey MI.03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive

  10. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–? (ER?) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ER? was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ER? in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. ?-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ER?-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPAR?, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that ?-estradiol/ER? signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor suppressor that inhibits cell proliferation by targeting cyclin A2.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Michigan - MI 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Michigan - MI 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN (MI.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Ann Arbor , Michigan MI.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.08-2 Site Operations: Conducted research with a supersonic reflectroscope to detect flaws within a metal slug and developed methods for testing the adequacy of coatings which are applied to pieces of uranium metal. MI.08-1 MI.08-3 Site Disposition:

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wolverine Tube Division (MI.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Wolverine Tube Division of Calumet & Hecla Consolidated Copper Co. Star Tool Hermes Automotive Manufacturing Corporation MI.05-1 MI.05-2 Location: 1411 Central Avenue , Detroit , Michigan MI.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.05-2 Site Operations: 1943 - Conducted research and development of methods for spinning

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Adrian - MI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Adrian, MI Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Co. Special Metals Extrusion Plant Bridgeport Brass Company General Motors General Motors Company, Adrian MI.01-1 Location: 1450 East Beecher Street, Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. MI.01-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s):

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carboloy Co - MI 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carboloy Co. (MI.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric MI.12-1 Location: 11177 E. Eight Mile Road , Detroit , Michigan MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Evaluation Year: 1987-1991 MI.12-3 MI.12-4 MI.12-6 Site Operations: Turned-down the outer diameter of uranium metal slugs and conducted pilot plant scale operations for hot pressing uranium dioxide pellets

  15. Temperature-profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  16. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oliver Corp - MI 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1 Location: 433 East Michigan Avenue , Battle Creek , Michigan MI.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 MI.11-4 Site Operations: Conducted production scale briquetting of green salt and magnesium blend under AEC license Nos. SNM-591, SUB-579, and C-3725. MI.11-1 MI.11-3 Site

  18. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Naval Ordnance - MI 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naval Ordnance - MI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE NAVAL ORDNANCE (MI.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.02-2 Site Operations: Worked under contract with the Albuquerque Operations Office. No indication that radioactive material was involved under the contract. MI.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication radioactive

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Detrex Corp - MI 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Detrex Corp. (MI.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to pickling/degreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to small quantity of material handled - There is no

  1. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  2. Elevance Pilot-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Elevance biorefinery uses catalyst technology to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable, natural oils.

  3. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow Chemical Co - Midland - MI 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midland - MI 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow Chemical Co. - Midland (MI.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Midland , Michigan MI.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.06-2 Site Operations: Conducted development work for production of magnesium-thorium alloys. MI.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed site MI.06-1 MI.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- General Motors Co - Flint - MI 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Motors Co - Flint - MI 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GENERAL MOTORS CO. (MI.07 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: A.C. Spark Plug Dort Highway Plant MI.07-1 MI.07-2 Location: Flint , Michigan MI.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.07-3 Site Operations: Processed thorium oxide, uranium oxide, and beryllium oxide into crucibles for the Chicago Area. MI.07-3 MI.07-4 MI.07-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  6. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 ... PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment ...

  7. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  8. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMI-MINOS Neutrino Logo NuMI Beamline and MINOS Experiment Neutrino Logo The MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beamline Fermilab Logo MINOS Experiment Links â—Š MINOS for the Public â—Š Scientific Results â—Š MINOS at Work â—Š NuMI at Work â—Š MINOS+ Experiment Fermilab Neutrino Links â—Š Neutrino FAQ â—Š MINOS Underground Areas at Fermilab â—Š PPD Intensity Frontier Dept Back to - - - â—Š Fermilab at Work â—Š Fermilab Home the MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine MINOS collaborators assembling the

  9. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  10. Boulder County- Elevations Energy Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elevations Credit Union has partnered with Boulder County and the City/County of Denver to offer this full-suite of services. Both EnergySmart and the Denver Energy Challenge help residents and b...

  11. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the miR-200c/141 CpG island is closely linked to their inappropriate silencing in cancer cells. Since the miR-200c cluster plays a significant role in EMT, our results suggest an important role for DNA methylation in the control of phenotypic conversions in normal cells.

  12. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. • Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  13. Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc Place: Bolingbrook, Illinois Zip: 60440 Sector: Biofuels, Renewable Energy...

  14. People Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People Profiles Featured Profile Hye-Sook Park Pursuing a challenging-and rewarding-career Read More » Tanza Lewis Tanza Lewis Jamie King Jamie King Lisa Burrows Lisa Burrows Jeremy Huckins Jeremy Huckins Ibo Matthews Ibo Matthews Peter Thelin Peter Thelin Susanna Reyes Susana Reyes Jerry Britten Jerry Britten Reggie Drachenberg Reggie Drachenberg Beth Dzenitis Beth Dzenitis Rebecca Dylla-Spears Rebecca Dylla-Spears John Heebner John Heebner Terry Land Terry Land Zhi Liao Zhi Liao Roark Marsh

  15. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data. Release Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  16. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REVERE COPPER AND BRASS CO. ( MI.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Revere Copper and Brass MI.04-1 Location: 5851 West Jefferson Street , Detroit , Michigan MI.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.04-2 Site Operations: Extrusion of tuballoy rods, myrnalloy rods and beryllium shapes in the 1940s. MI.04-3 MI.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MITTS-MERREL CO. (MI.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mitts & Merrell Co. MI.14-1 Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces on a small test scale during the mid-1950s. MI.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantity of

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow-Detroit Edison Project (MI.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. MI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at the site MI.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No

  2. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xi’an 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. •We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. •We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. •These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  3. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI LNG Exports to All Countries

  4. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama State Energy Profile Alabama Quick Facts In 2013, Alabama ranked 17th in the nation in the number of producing natural gas wells. Mobile, Alabama was the fourth-largest seaport for exporting U.S. coal in 2013. Coking coal used in the steelmaking process accounted for 82% of total exported coal. The three reactors at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in Limestone County, Alabama have a combined generating capacity of 3,310 megawatts, second in capacity only to Arizona's Palo Verde plant.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amex Specialty Metal Corp (MI.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Coldwater , Michigan MI.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-01-1 Site Operations: No indication that AMEX performed work for MED or AEC activities. Originally included on FUSRAP list due to fact that AMEX purchased milling equipment from a company that had done uranium milling.

  6. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  7. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and Instructions...

  8. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  10. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  11. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Post-translational Modifications at Single-cell Resolution. Citation Details...

  12. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations Related Campaigns ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night...

  14. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  15. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  16. Non-canonical microRNAs miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation in Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Choi, Michael Y.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) lacking non-canonical miRNAs proliferate slower. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 are two non-canonical miRNAs expressed in ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 targets p57 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-702 targets p21 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are known to contribute significantly to stem cell phenotype by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Most of our knowledge of microRNAs comes from the study of canonical microRNAs that require two sequential cleavages by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer and Dicer to generate mature products. In contrast, non-canonical microRNAs bypass the cleavage by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer within the nucleus but still require cytoplasmic cleavage by Dicer. The function of non-canonical microRNAs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains obscure. It has been hypothesized that non-canonical microRNAs have important roles in ESCs based upon the phenotypes of ESC lines that lack these specific classes of microRNAs; Dicer-deficient ESCs lacking both canonical and non-canonical microRNAs have much more severe proliferation defect than Dgcr8-deficient ESCs lacking only canonical microRNAs. Using these cell lines, we identified two non-canonical microRNAs, miR-320 and miR-702, that promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs by releasing them from G1 arrest. This is accomplished by targeting the 3 Prime -untranslated regions of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and p21 and thereby inhibiting their expression. This is the first report of the crucial role of non-canonical microRNAs in ESCs.

  17. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. • CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. • miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. • CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  18. Profiling Your Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling Your Application Profiling Your Application Introduction By quantifying the performance of your application on present-day architectures, you will be better able to prioritize, plan, and implement code changes that will enable good performance on Cori. Here, we provide general background on application profiling, as well as links to resources and tools available at NERSC to assist you in this effort. Background Of the platforms available at NERSC, we recommend profiling on Edison and

  19. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 18–24 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. • Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted. The 2-story, 2,745-ft2 home has 2.5 inches of closed-cell spray foam in the 2x4 wall cavities, plus 1-inch of rigid exterior foam; a

  1. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  2. Fermilab Today | University Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Profiles Archive Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO More than 2,000 scientists worldwide work with Fermilab. In the United States, about 1,300 scientists from institutions in 36 states rely on Fermilab for their research, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. These profiles, published in Fermilab Today, spotlight the critical role of universities in particle physics research. We'd love to profile your

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric...

  10. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  11. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  12. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  13. Traction sheave elevator, hoisting unit and machine space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hakala, Harri (Hyvinkaa, FI); Mustalahti, Jorma (Hyvinkaa, FI); Aulanko, Esko (Kerava, FI)

    2000-01-01

    Traction sheave elevator consisting of an elevator car moving along elevator guide rails, a counterweight moving along counterweight guide rails, a set of hoisting ropes (3) on which the elevator car and counterweight are suspended, and a drive machine unit (6) driving a traction sheave (7) acting on the hoisting ropes (3) and placed in the elevator shaft. The drive machine unit (6) is of a flat construction. A wall of the elevator shaft is provided with a machine space with its open side facing towards the shaft, the essential parts of the drive machine unit (6) being placed in the space. The hoisting unit (9) of the traction sheave elevator consists of a substantially discoidal drive machine unit (6) and an instrument panel (8) mounted on the frame (20) of the hoisting unit.

  14. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang; Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 ; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Jian; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3′UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric...

  12. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-ÎşB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  13. Strontium sorption on hematite at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasyova, O.N.; Ivanova, L.I.; Lakshtanov, L.Z.; Loevgren, L.

    1999-12-15

    Acid-base reactions and surface complexation of Sr(II) at the hematite/water interface have been studied by means of potentiometric titrations at three different temperatures: 25, 50, and 75 C. Equilibrium measurements were performed in 0.1 M NaCl. In the evaluation of equilibrium models for the acid-base reactions and complexation reactions in the three-component system H{sup +} -({triple{underscore}bond}FeOH)-Sr{sup 2+}, the constant capacitance model was applied. During the titrations with Sr, aliquots of the suspension were sampled at in several points. The aqueous concentrations of Sr were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Treatment of data included tests for formation of both inner-sphere and outer-sphere complexes of different stoichiometric composition. The proposed equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes of inner sphere type: {triple{underscore}bond}FeOHSr{sup 2+} and {triple{underscore}bond}FeOSrOH. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H and {Delta}S were evaluated. The combined effect of a decrease in pH{sub pzc} with increasing temperature and positive enthalpies of surface complex formation favors adsorption of Sr at elevated temperatures.

  14. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  15. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canad

  16. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  17. Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear superimposed as opposite trends. Such inversions are common and they should be taken into account, along with the...

  18. Low profile thermite igniter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1991-03-05

    A thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration...

  20. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  1. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3 Prime -UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8

  9. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  10. Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Thermodynamic Responses to Uncertainty in Aerosol Extinction Profiles For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Aerosol radiative effects are of great importance for climate simulations over South Asia. For quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are often compared with observations. These comparisons have revealed large AOD underestimation and

  11. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  12. LANL Data Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Profile 2012-2013 Total: 10,407 Quick Facts FY2013 Operating Budget ..... $1.95 billion Operating costs 54% NNSA Weapons Programs 12% Work for other agencies 10% Nonproliferation programs 9% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs Workforce Demographics Average Age: 46 67% male, 33% female 45% ethnic minorities 67% university degrees -28% undergraduate degrees -17% graduate degrees -22% PhD degrees Capital/Construction

  13. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  14. High-<mi>Tmi>c> superconductivity at the interface between the <mi>CaCuO>2 and <mi>SrTiO>3 insulating oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Castro, D.; Cantoni, C.; Ridolfi, F.; Aruta, C.; Tebano, A.; Yang, N.; Balestrino, G.

    2015-09-28

    At interfaces between complex oxides it is possible to generate electronic systems with unusual electronic properties, which are not present in the isolated oxides. One important example is the appearance of superconductivity at the interface between insulating oxides, although, until now, with very low Tc. We report the occurrence of high Tc superconductivity in the bilayer CaCuO2/SrTiO3, where both the constituent oxides are insulating. In order to obtain a superconducting state, the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface must be realized between the Ca plane of CaCuO2 and the TiO2 plane of SrTiO3. Only in this case can oxygen ions be incorporated in the interface Ca plane, acting as apical oxygen for Cu and providing holes to the CuO2 planes. In addition, a detailed hole doping spatial profile can be obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at the O K edge, clearly showing that the (super)conductivity is confined to about 1–2 CaCuO2 unit cells close to the interface with SrTiO3. The results obtained for the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface can be extended to multilayered high Tc cuprates, contributing to explaining the dependence of Tc on the number of CuO2 planes in these systems.

  15. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Chen, Chien-Jen; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li; Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ? We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ? LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ? Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  16. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ctrtyUsePercElevators" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.125907012528 + Sweden Building...

  17. City and County of Denver- Elevations Energy Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elevations Credit Union has partnered with Boulder County and the City/County of Denver to offer this full-suite of services. Both EnergySmart and the Denver Energy Challenge help residents and b...

  18. Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850sup 0C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of catalysis of coal ...

  19. Profile Interface Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allowsmore » semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.« less

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric utilities 2,205 39 IPP & CHP 179 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,496,822 49 Electric utilities 5,851,727 39 IPP & CHP 645,095 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,202 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,043 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,768 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric utilities 20,668 12 IPP & CHP 7,242 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 113,325,986 12 Electric utilities 92,740,582 8 IPP & CHP 20,585,405 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 23,716 31 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,416 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 55,342 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2 Electric utilities 28,165 4 IPP & CHP 45,607 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 200,077,115 5 Electric utilities 78,407,643 14 IPP & CHP 121,669,472 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,109 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 96,842 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,323 13 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric utilities 10,238 28 IPP & CHP 4,531 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,937,436 28 Electric utilities 42,508,826 25 IPP & CHP 10,428,610 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 40,012 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 49,623 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,387 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 27 Nitrogen

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35 Electric utilities 152 46 IPP & CHP 8,617 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,610,789 38 Electric utilities 50,273 45 IPP & CHP 35,560,516 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,512 45 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,372 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,726 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 47 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46 Electric utilities 102 47 IPP & CHP 3,144 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,760,861 47 Electric utilities 25,986 47 IPP & CHP 7,734,875 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,241 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,585 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,722 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 40 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,852 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 65,852 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 148 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 49 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric utilities 50,967 1 IPP & CHP 7,813 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 222,398,924 3 Electric utilities 202,527,297 1 IPP & CHP 19,871,627 18 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 117,797 12 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 88,345 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,431 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 34

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric utilities 28,875 2 IPP & CHP 9,335 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 120,953,734 10 Electric utilities 107,082,884 4 IPP & CHP 13,870,850 26 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 123,735 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 55,462 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,812 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 20

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric utilities 1,821 40 IPP & CHP 937 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,267,052 45 Electric utilities 5,748,256 40 IPP & CHP 4,518,796 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 20,710 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 25,416 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,428 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 5 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric utilities 5,269 35 IPP & CHP 39,681 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 203,004,919 4 Electric utilities 11,571,734 35 IPP & CHP 191,433,185 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 203,951 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 63,358 11 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 97,812 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 21 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric utilities 23,309 8 IPP & CHP 3,888 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 110,403,477 13 Electric utilities 96,047,678 7 IPP & CHP 14,355,799 23 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 273,718 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 121,681 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 98,895 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 2 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities 12,092 21 IPP & CHP 3,837 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,670,757 27 Electric utilities 41,932,708 26 IPP & CHP 14,738,048 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 106,879 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,657 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,175 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.8 6 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric utilities 11,593 24 IPP & CHP 2,501 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 48,472,581 32 Electric utilities 39,808,763 28 IPP & CHP 8,663,819 32 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,027 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 30,860 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,125 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Nitrogen

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric utilities 19,599 16 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 89,741,021 18 Electric utilities 89,098,127 11 IPP & CHP 642,894 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 190,782 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 87,201 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,304 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 4 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15 Electric utilities 17,297 17 IPP & CHP 8,931 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 102,010,177 15 Electric utilities 56,226,016 17 IPP & CHP 45,784,161 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 122,578 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 82,286 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 58,274 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 16

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric utilities 14 49 IPP & CHP 4,485 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 14,030,038 44 Electric utilities 597 49 IPP & CHP 14,029,441 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,365 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,607 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,675 45 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 23 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric utilities 85 48 IPP & CHP 12,254 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,850,812 37 Electric utilities 30,205 46 IPP & CHP 35,820,607 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,539 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,995 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 18,950 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 17 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32 Electric utilities 969 42 IPP & CHP 12,709 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,885,021 40 Electric utilities 611,320 44 IPP & CHP 32,273,700 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,339 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,150 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14,735 38 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric utilities 22,148 9 IPP & CHP 7,981 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 105,417,801 14 Electric utilities 83,171,310 13 IPP & CHP 22,246,490 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 237,091 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 86,058 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,193 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric utilities 11,901 22 IPP & CHP 3,858 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 51,296,988 31 Electric utilities 41,155,904 27 IPP & CHP 10,141,084 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 35,625 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 36,972 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 29,255 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28 Electric utilities 12,842 20 IPP & CHP 2,719 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,810,264 29 Electric utilities 45,413,403 23 IPP & CHP 7,396,861 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 87,718 17 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 24,490 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 22,633 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 9

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric utilities 20,562 15 IPP & CHP 1,239 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 91,626,593 17 Electric utilities 89,217,205 10 IPP & CHP 2,409,387 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 157,488 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 78,033 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 78,344 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 8 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities 2,568 38 IPP & CHP 3,761 27 Net generation (megawatthours) 27,687,326 41 Electric utilities 7,361,898 38 IPP & CHP 20,325,428 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 16,865 36 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,789 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,951 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 31 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities 7,911 30 IPP & CHP 538 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,104,628 34 Electric utilities 35,170,167 30 IPP & CHP 1,934,461 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 66,884 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 31,505 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,043 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 7 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric utilities 7,915 29 IPP & CHP 2,737 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,443,874 35 Electric utilities 27,888,008 34 IPP & CHP 8,555,866 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 7,436 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 16,438 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,690 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 43 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,452 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 64,750,942 24 Electric utilities -122,674 50 IPP & CHP 64,873,616 6 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,196 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,299 40 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,789 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric utilities 5,912 33 IPP & CHP 2,026 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,870,965 36 Electric utilities 29,833,095 33 IPP & CHP 6,037,870 37 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,735 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 59,055 16 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,535 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric utilities 10,736 26 IPP & CHP 29,182 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 136,116,830 8 Electric utilities 33,860,490 31 IPP & CHP 102,256,340 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,947 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,824 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,456 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 41 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779 11 IPP & CHP 11,703 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,284,189 7 Electric utilities 88,763,825 12 IPP & CHP 48,520,364 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 346,873 2 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 102,526 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 102,466 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.1 1 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric utilities 16,951 18 IPP & CHP 6,349 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 73,673,680 22 Electric utilities 53,348,841 18 IPP & CHP 20,324,839 17 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 80,418 19 Nitrogen oxide 57,024 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 46,268 19 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 19

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric utilities 455 44 IPP & CHP 42,584 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 226,785,630 2 Electric utilities 1,105,740 42 IPP & CHP 225,679,890 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 276,851 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 151,148 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,729 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 15 Nitrogen

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,802 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,246,807 50 Electric utilities 10,659 48 IPP & CHP 6,236,148 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,271 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,161 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,838 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 44 Nitrogen

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric utilities 21,039 10 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 95,249,894 16 Electric utilities 91,795,732 9 IPP & CHP 3,454,162 44 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 47,671 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,035 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 28,809 30 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric utilities 20,635 13 IPP & CHP 690 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,651,619 19 Electric utilities 75,988,871 15 IPP & CHP 3,662,748 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 86,204 18 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,189 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,118 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 19 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric utilities 28,705 3 IPP & CHP 80,879 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 433,380,166 1 Electric utilities 96,131,888 6 IPP & CHP 337,248,278 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 383,728 1 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 228,695 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 257,465 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 25 Nitrogen Oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669 32 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 42,516,751 33 Electric utilities 39,526,881 29 IPP & CHP 2,989,870 45 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,670 32 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 62,296 13 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,699 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric utilities 329 45 IPP & CHP 925 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,884,910 48 Electric utilities 872,238 43 IPP & CHP 6,012,672 38 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 792 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric utilities 20,601 14 IPP & CHP 4,227 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 76,896,565 20 Electric utilities 63,724,860 16 IPP & CHP 13,171,706 28 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,077 21 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,706 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 34,686 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 26 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24 Electric utilities 10,625 27 IPP & CHP 5,657 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 75,863,067 21 Electric utilities 46,351,104 22 IPP & CHP 29,511,963 13 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 93,888 15 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 60,229 14 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 68,862 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric utilities 13,358 19 IPP & CHP 3,984 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,962,792 23 Electric utilities 47,027,455 20 IPP & CHP 18,935,337 19 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 108,306 13 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 44,114 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,686 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 10 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  10. Compare Gene Profiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore » environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  11. Environmental profile of Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    The social, cultural, physical, and economic dimensions of Paraguay's environment are analyzed to identify main environmental features and problems and to recommend specific actions. The environmental profile presents an overview of Paraguay's ethno-historic and anthropological background, present-day society, and the impact of pollution. Descriptions are presented of: the legal and institutional aspects of environmental policy; the structure and performance of the economy, with focus on the primary and energy sectors; physical resources (climate, geological, mineral, soil, and water resources); and biological resources (vegetation, wild animal life, protected areas, and fish resources).

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP 1,530 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,186,128 43 Electric utilities 9,600,216 36 IPP & CHP 5,585,912 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,565 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 7,627 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,942 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 37 Nitrogen

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,662 27 Electric utilities 10,973 25 IPP & CHP 4,689 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 59,895,515 26 Electric utilities 43,254,167 24 IPP & CHP 16,641,348 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 17,511 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,803 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 9,500 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 39 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP 629 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,108,887 46 Electric utilities 8,030,545 37 IPP & CHP 2,078,342 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 15,347 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 11,430 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,228 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.0 12

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    United States Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,060,064 Electric utilities 616,799 IPP & CHP 443,264 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,065,964,067 Electric utilities 2,388,058,409 IPP & CHP 1,677,905,658 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,978,753 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,411,564 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,172,355 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 Nitrogen Oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP 3,586 28 Net generation (megawatthours) 114,172,916 11 Electric utilities 100,013,661 5 IPP & CHP 14,159,255 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,259 39 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 17,975 38 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,543 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 46

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,381 37 Electric utilities 7,279 31 IPP & CHP 1,102 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,483,065 30 Electric utilities 48,089,178 19 IPP & CHP 4,393,887 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 49,587 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 55,615 19 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 50,687 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 24 Nitrogen Oxide

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,786 29 Electric utilities 11,559 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,322,492 25 Electric utilities 46,547,772 21 IPP & CHP 13,774,720 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 88,811 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 45,896 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,346 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 13 Nitrogen

  20. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed <mi>Yb>2<mi>Ti>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7, as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  1. Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission « Prev Next » Title: Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission Some previous studies have demonstrated that single

  2. Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission « Prev Next » Title: Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission × You are accessing a document from the Department of

  3. Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet File Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template ...

  4. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  5. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  6. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870; BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Lee, Sun Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  7. Performance of MOV Stem Lubricants at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWall, Kevin George; Nitzel, Michael Everett; Watkins, John Clifford

    2001-07-01

    This paper documents the results of recent tests sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These tests address the effectiveness of the lubricant used on the threaded portion of the valve stem, where the stem nut turns on the stem. Recent testing indicates that an elevated temperature environment can lead to significant increases in the friction coefficient at the stem/stem-nut interface. Most valve actuator qualification tests are performed at room temperature. Similarly, in-service tests are run at ambient plant temperatures, usually 70 to 100°F. Since design conditions can lead to valve operating temperatures in the 200 to 300°F range, it is important to know whether a temperature-induced increase in friction at the stem/stem-nut interface will prevent the required operation of critical valves. Lubricant aging is another phenomenon that might have deleterious effects on the thrust output of a valve actuator. Laboratory experience and field experience both indicate that after long periods in elevated temperature environments, the lubricants may lose their lubrication qualities. The scope of the current test program includes testing of five different lubricants on four different valve stems. Pending completion of the testing, results of the tests conducted using two of the four stems are discussed. The test series included collection of baseline data at room temperature, single step temperature tests where the temperature of the test setup was elevated directly to 250°F, and step testing where the temperature was elevated in steps to 130, 190, and 250°F, then returned to 70°F. All greases tested showed evidence of physical change after elevated temperature tests. Except for one particular lubricant, all of the greases tested showed increased coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures. Numerous other preliminary conclusions are presented. Recommendations for future research in the area of aged valve stem lubricant performance at elevated temperatures are also presented.

  8. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0

  17. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic Efficiency PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic ...

  2. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, ZhengHua; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  3. Search Women@Energy Profiles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Search the Women@Energy profiles to learn more about how to get into STEM, inspired by STEM, or find a STEM career.

  4. Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. [Evaluation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of 20 compounds at 850/sup 0/C] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. [Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850/sup 0/C] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. [Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850/sup 0/C] Authors: Haynes, W.P. ; Neilson, H. [1] ; Field, J.H. + Show Author Affiliations (US Bur. Mines, Pittsburgh, PA) Publication Date: 1971-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 5238924

  5. Steel Energy and Environmental Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-08-01

    Major steelmaking processes (from ironmaking through fabrication and forming) and their associated energy requirements have been profiled in this 2001 report (PDF 582 KB). This profile by Energetics, Inc. also describes the waste streams generated by each process and estimates annual emissions of CO2 and criteria pollutants.

  6. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, 2014 Model Home, Midland, MI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cobblestone Homes 2014 Model Home Midland, MI DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e ) l.CoNTRACTIDCODE ~ . . U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7.

  9. Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical impact of CO2on geothermal energy production by: analyzing the geochemistry of existing geothermal fields with elevated natural CO2; measuring realistic rock-water rates for geothermal systems using laboratory and field-based experiments to simulate production scale impacts.

  10. Evidence for Stratospheric Downwelling Associated with High-Elevation Topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finkel, R

    2009-01-28

    The continued presence of elevated chlorine-36 in Sierra Nevada streams is commonly interpreted as residual nuclear fallout, but this prolonged storage contradicts accepted hydrologic models, which indicate much less short-term groundwater storage. Our hypothesis is that the chlorine-36 source is stratospheric downwelling during high-intensity storms by measuring beryllium-7 and -10, sodium-22, and chlorium-36 in precipitation, lake, and soil samples. These nuclides are produced in abundance in the stratosphere and, except for chlorine-36, did not occur as nuclear fallout. This project will either substantially change hydrologic models or reveal an unrecognized pathway for stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Either result will have substantial scientific impact. The test of the hypothesis is straightforward. If stratospheric downwelling occurs to the extent indicated by observed Sierran chlorine-36 levels, it should be detectable by elevated levels of beryllium-7 and -10, sodium-22, and chlorine-36 in storm precipitation. Samples will be collected from an established array of sampling locations. If elevated levels of these nuclides are not found, it would cast severe doubt on the hypothesis. In this case, Sierran hydrologic models will have to take into account high levels of long-term groundwater storage. If elevated levels of these nuclides are found in Sierran precipitation, it could only be from stratospheric input, both because nuclear fallout is no longer occurring and because beryllium-7 and -10 and sodium-22 are not produced by atmospheric nuclear tests.

  11. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1980-06-16

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a beam of coherent light of two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency constantly greater than the other by a fixed amount to produce a difference frequency with a constant phase to be used as a reference, and splitting the beam into its two components. The separate components are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object to be tested for smoothness while the face of the object is rotated on an axis normal to one point, thereby passing the other component over a circular track on the face of the object. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a reflected frequency difference of a phase proportional to the difference in path length of one component reflected from one point to the other component reflected from the other point. The phase of the reflected frequency difference is compared with the reference phase to produce a signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track with respect to the fixed point at the center, thereby to produce a signal that is plotted as a profile of the surface along the circular track. The phase detector includes a quarter-wave plate to convert the components of the reference beam into circularly polarized components, a half-wave plate to shift the phase of the circularly polarized components, and a polarizer to produce a signal of a shifted phase for comparison with the phase of the frequency difference of the reflected components detected through a second polarizer. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360/sup 0/ range.

  12. Tool 0.2: Value Brief Elevator Speech | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Value Brief Elevator Speech Tool 0.2: Value Brief Elevator Speech Tool 0.2: Value Brief Elevator Speech from the Introduction to Community Energy Strategic Planning. File Tool 0.2: Value Brief Elevator Speech More Documents & Publications Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Introduction CESP Tool 2.2: Stakeholder Invite

  13. Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

  14. LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    background News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Activity Reports The Pulse User Program Headlines News & Media dotline LANSCE Profiles Kurt Schoenberg: Steering LANSCE for the Future Kurt Schoenberg Kurt Schoenberg, LANSCE User Facility Director and Los Alamos National Laboratory Deputy Associate Director retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory on October 1, 2015. Over the past decade, Kurt has been integral in creating opportunities for LANSCE and the neutron community through the

  15. JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  17. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore » species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  18. miR-206 is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell proliferation through the up-regulation of cyclinD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Tian, Ye; Li, Juan; Lu, Binbin; Sun, Ming; Zou, Yanfen; Kong, Rong; Luo, Yanhong; Shi, Yongguo; Wang, Keming; Ji, Guozhong

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: ? miR-206 was downexpressed in tumor samples compared with matched normal samples. ? Enhanced expression of miR-206 could inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro. ? Luciferase confirmed miR-206 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting cyclinD2. ? A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 in breast cancer was found. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs act as important gene regulators in human genomes, and their aberrant expression is linked to many malignancies. Aberrant expression of miR-206 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in breast cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the relative expression levels of miR-206 in breast cancer and normal breast tissues. Lower expression of miR-206 in breast cancer tissues was associated with larger tumour size and a more advanced clinical stage. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-206 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth by blocking the G1/S transition and suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, implying that miR-206 functions as a tumour suppressor in the progression of breast cancer. Interestingly, Luciferase assays first revealed that miR-206 inhibited cyclinD2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3?-untranslated region of cyclinD2 mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-206 reduced cyclinD2 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 expression was noted in breast cancer tissues. Altogether, our results identify a crucial tumour suppressive role of miR-206 in the progression of breast cancer, at least partly via up-regulation of the expression of cyclinD2, and suggest that miR-206 might be a candidate prognostic predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for breast cancer patients.

  19. PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs While Increasing Durability PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module ...

  20. PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module Quality Assurance ...

  1. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  2. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  3. Soot surface temperature measurements in pure and diluted flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry Yelverton, T.L.; Roberts, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Campus Box 7910, North Carolina State University, 3211 Broughton Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Soot surface temperature was measured in laminar jet diffusion flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures. The soot surface temperature was measured in flames at one, two, four, and eight atmospheres with both pure and diluted (using helium, argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide individually) ethylene fuels with a calibrated two-color soot pyrometry technique. These two dimensional temperature profiles of the soot aid in the analysis and understanding of soot production, leading to possible methods for reducing soot emission. Each flame investigated was at its smoke point, i.e., at the fuel flow rate where the overall soot production and oxidation rates are equal. The smoke point was chosen because it was desirable to have similar soot loadings for each flame. A second set of measurements were also taken where the fuel flow rate was held constant to compare with earlier work. These measurements show that overall flame temperature decreases with increasing pressure, with increasing pressure the position of peak temperature shifts to the tip of the flame, and the temperatures measured were approximately 10% lower than those calculated assuming equilibrium and neglecting radiation. (author)

  4. V-115: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-115: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges March 20, 2013 - 12:08am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs...

  5. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  6. DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook Evaluation of a New Multi-Frequency Microwave Radiometer for Measuring the Vertical Distribution of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Cloud Liquid Water Prepared by James C. Liljegren Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory December 4, 2002 For the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program 2 Table of Contents Abstract

  7. MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

    1980-12-01

    A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

  8. Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toto, Tami; Jensen, Michael

    2014-11-13

    The sonde-adjust VAP produces data that corrects documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers - the resolution of the instrument - to fractions of a percent. This profile is then used to calculate the dry bias corrected field. The final correction fixes a time-lag problem and uses the dry-bias field as input into the algorithm. In addition to dry bias, solar heating is another correction that is encompassed in the final corrected relative humidity field. Additional corrections were made to soundings at the extended facility sites (S0*) as necessary: Corrected erroneous surface elevation (and up through rest of height of sounding), for S03, S04 and S05. Corrected erroneous surface pressure at Chanute (S02).

  9. Profiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p rogram e xecu?on * Useful to first calibrate with a well---understood code on t he s ame p laorm ( e.g. STREAM) * Can h elp d etermine w hether y our c ode i s a t l east...

  10. Microelectromechanical apparatus for elevating and tilting a platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Samuel Lee (Albuquerque, NM); McWhorter, Paul Jackson (Albuquerque, NM); Rodgers, Murray Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-04-08

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which has a platform that can be elevated above a substrate and tilted at an arbitrary angle using a plurality of flexible members which support the platform and control its movement. Each flexible member is further controlled by one or more MEM actuators which act to bend the flexible member. The MEM actuators can be electrostatic comb actuators or vertical zip actuators, or a combination thereof. The MEM apparatus can include a mirror coating to form a programmable mirror for redirecting or switching one or more light beams for use in a projection display. The MEM apparatus with the mirror coating also has applications for switching light beams between optical fibers for use in a local area fiber optic network, or for use in fiber optic telecommunications or data communications systems.

  11. Microelectromechanical apparatus for elevating and tilting a platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Samuel Lee; McWhorter, Paul Jackson; Rodgers, Murray Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2004-07-06

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which has a platform that can be elevated above a substrate and tilted at an arbitrary angle using a plurality of flexible members which support the platform and control its movement. Each flexible member is further controlled by one or more MEM actuators which act to bend the flexible member. The MEM actuators can be electrostatic comb actuators or vertical zip actuators, or a combination thereof. The MEM apparatus can include a mirror coating to form a programmable mirror for redirecting or switching one or more light beams for use in a projection display. The MEM apparatus with-the mirror coating also has applications for switching light beams between optical fibers for use in a local area fiber optic network, or for use in fiber optic telecommunications or data communications systems.

  12. LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Neutron Science Center lansce.lanl.gov lansce-user-office@lanl.gov phone: 505.665.1010 mesa header Beam Status Accelerator Ops (Internal) Operating Schedule Long Range Operating Schedule User Resources User Agreements Proposals Visit Registration Schedules Experiment Reports User Satisfaction Survey Reviews Users User Office User Program LANSCE User Group Rosen Scholar Rosen Prize News & Multimedia News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Seminars Activity Reports The Pulse User

  13. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  14. State Electricity Profiles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profiles Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: State Electricity Profiles Abstract On this website, the U.S. Energy Information...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation 2000.09.01 - 2001.03.31 Lead Scientist : James Liljegren For data sets, see below. Abstract The microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) is a new 12-channel radiometer developed by Radiometrics Corporation for measuring vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and

  16. IT Project Management Profile | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Management Profile IT Project Management Profile This is a form that must be completed to initiate the assessment of a Project Manager to determine the level of qualification PDF icon IT Project Management Profile More Documents & Publications IT Project Management Profile FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) Systems and Professional Development - David Brown, Director, Systems & Professional Development, OAPM

  17. IT Project Management Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Management Profile IT Project Management Profile This form lists positions/experience and training relating to project management; include other positions/experience or training if relevant PDF icon IT Project Management Profile More Documents & Publications IT Project Management Profile FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) Systems and Professional Development - David Brown, Director, Systems & Professional Development, OAPM

  18. Mentee Profile Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services » Learning and Workforce Development » Workforce Development » Leadership Development » DOE Mentoring Program » Mentee Profile Form Mentee Profile Form The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentors from which to choose the most appropriate match. PDF icon Mentee Profile Form More Documents & Publications Mentor Profile Form Tools for the Mentor Tools for the Mentee Benefits Executive Resources Learning and Workforce

  19. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  20. Stable Spheromaks with Profile Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T K; Jayakumar, R

    2008-01-29

    A spheromak equilibrium with zero edge current is shown to be stable to both ideal MHD and tearing modes that normally produce Taylor relaxation in gun-injected spheromaks. This stable equilibrium differs from the stable Taylor state in that the current density j falls to zero at the wall. Estimates indicate that this current profile could be sustained by non-inductive current drive at acceptable power levels. Stability is determined using the NIMROD code for linear stability analysis. Non-linear NIMROD calculations with non-inductive current drive could point the way to improved fusion reactors.

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great

  2. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  3. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  4. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana; Wilson,Cathy

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  5. U-094: EMC Documentum Content Server Lets Local Administrative Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EMC Documentum Content Server contains a privilege elevation vulnerability that may allow an unauthorized user to obtain highest administrative privileges on the system.

  6. T-608: HP Virtual Server Environment Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Virtual Server Environment for Windows. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to elevate privileges.

  7. US nuclear warhead facility profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, T.B.; Arkin, W.A.; Norris, R.S.; Hoenig, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    US Nuclear Warhead Facility Profiles is the third volume of the Nuclear Weapons Databook, a series published by the Natural Resources Defense Council. This volume reviews the different facilities in the US nuclear warhead complex. Because of the linkage between nuclear energy and nuclear weapons, the authors cover not only those facilities associated mainly with nuclear power research, but also those well known for weapons development. They are: the Argonne National Laboratory; the Hanford Reservation; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the Pantex plant; the Los Alamos Test Site; the Rocky Flats plant; the Sandia National Laboratories; and a host of others. Information on each facility is organized into a standard format that makes the book easy to use. The reader will find precise information ranging from a facility's address to its mission, management, establishment, budget, and staff. An additional, more in-depth presentation covers the activities and technical process of each facility. Maps, pictures, and figures complement the text.

  8. Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in ... Title: Erratum: "Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in ...

  9. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  10. gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Automatic Performance Collection (AutoPerf) Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with 50% Efficient Solar Cells PROJECT PROFILE: Enabling High Concentration Photovoltaics with 50% Efficient Solar Cells Funding ...

  12. Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Project Profile: Forecasting and ... energy technologies based on estimates of future rates of progress and adoption. ...

  13. TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende Department of CIS, University of Oregon, Advanced Computing Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory sameer@cs.uoregon.edu...

  14. Plant Energy Profiler | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance » Plant Energy Profiler Plant Energy Profiler April 17, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis The Plant Energy Profiler, or PEP, is an online software tool provided by the U.S. Department of Energy to help industrial plant managers in the United States identify how energy is being purchased and consumed at their plant and identify potential energy and cost savings. PEP is designed so that the users can complete a plant profile in about an hour. PEP provides users with a customized,

  15. Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatti, Sami; Kleiner, Matthias

    2007-04-07

    The paper shows some investigation results about the production of straight and curved lightweight profiles for lightweight structures and presents their benefits as well as their manufacturing potential for present and future lightweight construction. A strong emphasis is placed on the manufacturing of straight and bent profiles by means of sheet metal bending of innovative products, such as tailor rolled blanks and tailored tubes, and the manufacturing of straight and curved profiles by the innovative procedures curved profile extrusion and composite extrusion, developed at the Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL) of the University of Dortmund.

  16. PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid Development of Disruptive Photovoltaic Technologies Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot ...

  17. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO 2 and O 3 on Paper Birch ( Betula papyrifera ): Reproductive Fitness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Darbah, Joseph N. T.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Nelson, Neil; Oksanen, Elina; Vaapavuori, Elina; Karnosky, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 and tropospheric O 3 are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO 3 and O 3 for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO 2 increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O 3 increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little floweringmore » has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO 2 had significant positive effect on birch catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO 2 increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO 2 concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination), while the opposite was true of elevated O 3 (elevated O 3 decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%). Under elevated CO 2 , plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO 2 , while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O 3 . Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO 2 and O 3 can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.« less

  18. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO2and O3on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera): Reproductive Fitness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Darbah, Joseph N. T.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Nelson, Neil; Oksanen, Elina; Vaapavuori, Elina; Karnosky, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2and tropospheric O3are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO3and O3for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO2increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O3increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little flowering has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO2had significant positive effect on birchmore »catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO2increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO2concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination), while the opposite was true of elevated O3(elevated O3decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%). Under elevated CO2, plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO2, while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O3. Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO2and O3can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.« less

  19. Profiles in garbage glass containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-09-01

    Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to color brown, green, or blue bottles. Sixty percent of the glass used in the US is clear (flint) and one-fourth is brown (amber). Almost half of the green bottles are imported wind and beer bottles. Other glass products include flat glass such as windows; fiberglass insulation; and glassware. These products use different manufacturing processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only container glass. Glass bottles are commonly collected in curb-side programs. Losses due to breakage and the abrasiveness of glass during collection and processing offset their low collection and processing costs. Breakage solutions include installation of interior baffles or nets in the collection trucks, special glass-only truck compartments, and limiting the number of times glass is transferred after collection before final processing. Ten states require deposits on glass bottles for beer and soft drinks and related items.

  20. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdin, C.T.

    1991-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  1. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Night Experiment govCampaignsARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment Campaign Links PECAN Website Science Plan ARM PECAN Backgrounder News & Press ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations 2015.06.01, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Support for the Plains Elevated

  3. SU-E-J-121: Measuring Prompt Gamma Emission Profiles with a Multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mackin, D; Beddar, S MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zheng, Y Procure Proton Therapy Center,...

  4. U-068:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Linux Kernel SGIO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 6) Red Hat...

  5. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center

  6. Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 26, 2017 Title: Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State Authors: Lim, A. ; Foulkes, W. M. C. ; Horsfield, A. P. ; Mason, D. R. ; Schleife, A. ; Draeger, E. W. ; Correa, A. A. Publication Date: 2016-01-27 OSTI Identifier: 1236285 Grant/Contract

  7. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. U-128: VMware ESX/ESXi Buffer Overflow and Null Pointer Dereference Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in VMware ESX. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system.

  9. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  10. Natural gas annual 1992: Supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The data for the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement : Company Profiles are taken from Form EIA-176, (open quotes) Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition (close quotes). Other sources include industry literature and corporate annual reports to shareholders. The companies appearing in this report are major interstate natural gas pipeline companies, large distribution companies, or combination companies with both pipeline and distribution operations. The report contains profiles of 45 corporate families. The profiles describe briefly each company, where it operates, and any important issues that the company faces. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the 45 large companies profiled.

  11. load profile | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: applicationzip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data...

  12. Bootstrap performance profiles in stochastic algorithms assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Lino; Espírito Santo, Isabel A.C.P.; Oliveira, Pedro

    2015-03-10

    Optimization with stochastic algorithms has become a relevant research field. Due to its stochastic nature, its assessment is not straightforward and involves integrating accuracy and precision. Performance profiles for the mean do not show the trade-off between accuracy and precision, and parametric stochastic profiles require strong distributional assumptions and are limited to the mean performance for a large number of runs. In this work, bootstrap performance profiles are used to compare stochastic algorithms for different statistics. This technique allows the estimation of the sampling distribution of almost any statistic even with small samples. Multiple comparison profiles are presented for more than two algorithms. The advantages and drawbacks of each assessment methodology are discussed.

  13. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  14. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  15. PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University Funding Opportunity: CSP: APOLLO SunShot Subprogram: CSP Location: Boston, MA Amount Awarded: $1,150,000 Awardee Cost Share: $390,864 Boston University Logo.png The Boston University project under CSP: Apollo will use laboratory-scale electrodynamic-screen self-cleaning solar technology with heliostat mirrors and parabolic troughs in large scale solar plants. The objective is to reduce both the need to clean mirrors with water

  16. PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Efficiency | Department of Energy PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic Efficiency PROJECT PROFILE: Correlative Electronic Spectroscopies for Increasing Photovoltaic Efficiency Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $2,000,000 Recombination limits open-circuit voltages in thin film photovoltaic (PV) devices to 60-65% of the thermodynamic

  17. PROJECT PROFILE: Dartmouth College | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Dartmouth College PROJECT PROFILE: Dartmouth College Funding Opportunity: CSP: APOLLO SunShot Subprogram: CSP Location: Hanover, NH Amount Awarded: $656,831 Awardee Cost Share: $173,020 Dartmouth Logo.png This project will develop large-scale, reliable coating technologies that facilitate vacuum-free, high-efficiency, low-cost CSP systems. The coating will be applied to Norwich Technology's vacuum-free SunTrap CSP receiver systems for prototype demonstration, achieving a thermal

  18. Debugging & Profiling | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debugging & Profiling Allinea DDT Core File Settings Determining Memory Use Using VNC with a Debugger bgq_stack gdb Coreprocessor Runjob termination TotalView Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Debugging & Profiling Initial setups Core file settings - this page contains some environment

  19. State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages (interactive) Summary Uranium & nuclear fuel Nuclear power plants Spent nuclear fuel International All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ See all Nuclear Reports State Nuclear Profiles Data for 2010 (See also State Electricity Profiles) | Release

  20. Forest Products Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Industry Profile Forest Products Industry Profile Wood and paper products meet the everyday needs of consumers and businesses. They provide materials essential for communication, education, packaging, construction, shelter, sanitation, and protection. The U.S. forest products industry is based on a renewable and sustainable raw material: wood. It practices recovery and recycling in its operations. Its forests help the global carbon balance by taking up carbon dioxide from the

  1. Chemicals Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemicals Industry Profile Chemicals Industry Profile Chemical products are essential to the production of a myriad of manufactured products. More than 96% of all manufactured goods are directly touched by the chemicals industry.1 The industry greatly influences our safe water supply, food, shelter, clothing, health care, computer technology, transportation, and almost every other facet of modern life. Economic The United States is the top chemical producer in the world, accounting for nearly

  2. Steel Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Industry Profile Steel Industry Profile The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of manufacturing, construction, transportation, and various consumer products. Traditionally valued for its strength, steel has also become the most recycled material.1 About two-thirds of the steel produced in the United States in 2008 was made from scrap.2 Steelmaking facilities use one of two processes. In the integrated steelmaking process, iron

  3. Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Under DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, the Office of Acquisition and Project Management (OAPM) must perform a Performance Baseline External Independent Review (EIR) prior to Critical Decision (CD) 2, and a Construction/Execution Readiness EIR for all Major System projects prior to CD-3. The EIR Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) discuss all elements of EIRs including review

  4. ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting Industry PDF icon profile.pdf More...

  5. LopezPersonalProfile.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LopezPersonalProfile.pdf LopezPersonalProfile.pdf PDF icon LopezPersonalProfile.pdf More Documents & Publications Wattman_bio.pdf FAQS Reference Guide - Aviation Manager FAQS Reference Guide - Aviation Safety Officer

  6. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  7. Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profiles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    featuredproductscsa-country-profiles Country: Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Grenada, Mexico, Peru Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Agriculture, country profiles,...

  8. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in...

  9. Pharmacologic Profile of the Adnectin BMS-962476, a Small Protein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pharmacologic Profile of the Adnectin BMS-962476, a Small Protein Biologic Alternative to ... Title: Pharmacologic Profile of the Adnectin BMS-962476, a Small Protein Biologic ...

  10. Category:Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electrical Profiling Configurations page? For...

  11. Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride Thermochemical Storage Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride Thermochemical Storage ...

  12. Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermochemical Storage with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermochemical Storage with Redox-Stable Perovskites for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermochemical Storage with ...

  13. Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Load Profiling (WELP) Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool AgencyCompany Organization: California Public...

  14. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy...

  15. Category:Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques page? For...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Williams_Profilers.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2835-MHz Profiler Status of Profiler and Surface Data Sets for TWPICE Christopher.R.Williams@noaa.gov - University of Colorado at Boulder and NOAA Earth Science Research...

  17. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye...

  18. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...

  19. Resonances in Coupled <mi>πmi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>ηK> Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  20. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  1. DC 12m telescope. Preliminary calculations. Investigation of elevation axis position.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guarino, V. J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-18

    This paper examines some simple calculations of a 2D model of a telescope in order to understand how different design parameters affect the design. For the design of a telescope it is assumed that they need a design that minimizes deflections of the dish and also minimizes the size of the motors and torques needed to rotate in elevation. A common belief is that a lighter dish and minimum counterweight is desirable. However, these calculations show this is not necessarily true. The torque needed for rotation depends on the moment of inertia and if the telescope is balanced about the elevation axis. A light dish with no CW requires that the elevation axis be several meters in front of the dish (8-9m) in order to be balanced. This is not practical from a structural point of view. If the elevation axis is only 2m in front of the dish and there is no counterweight then the telescope will be unbalanced and the toruqes required will be very high - much higher than the torques needed only to overcome inertia. A heavy dish though can act as its own counterweight and the elevation axis only has to be 2-3m in front of the dish in order to achieve a balanced telescope. Also the struts that support the camera from the dish place a load on the dish which will put a bending moment on the dish. This bending moment will deform the dish and require it to be stiffer. A counterweight structure performs two functions. First, it allows the telescope to be balanced about the elevation axis. Second, it applies a force on the dish that opposes the forces from the camera struts, thereby reducing the bending moment and deformations of the dish.

  2. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  3. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  4. Apparatuses and methods of determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Michael L.; Keller, Paul Edwin; Amaya, Ivan A.

    2015-06-16

    A method of, and apparatus for, determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load, wherein the person's use of a device at a first time is monitored so as to set a baseline signature. Then, at a later time, the person's use of the device is monitored to determine the person's performance at the second time, as represented by a performance signature. This performance signature can then be compared against the baseline signature to predict whether the person is experiencing an elevated cognitive load.

  5. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Wilson, S.W.

    1982-07-29

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The computer acceleration can then be used to correct the sensed inclination.

  6. Suspended Solids Profiler Shop Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-19

    The Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) Instrument is planned to be installed in the AZ-101 tank to measure suspended solids concentrations during mixer pump testing. The SSP sensor uses a reflectance measurement principle to determine the suspended solids concentrations. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the SSP operate properly.

  7. Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

  8. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, Donald J. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, Stephen W. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The acceleration can then be used by the computer to correct the sensed inclination.

  9. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  10. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  11. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Posttranslational Modifications at Single-Cell Resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    Cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, andmore »flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  12. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  13. T-601: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in the Windows Kernel. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can trigger a use-after free or null pointer dereference to execute arbitrary commands on the target system with kernel level privileges.

  14. Elevated voltage level I{sub DDQ} failure testing of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righter, A.W.

    1996-05-21

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC`s is eliminated by I{sub DDQ} testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip. 4 figs.

  15. Elevated voltage level I.sub.DDQ failure testing of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righter, Alan W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC's is eliminated by I.sub.DDQ testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip.

  16. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  17. U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges, Inject SQL Commands, and Spoof Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote authenticated user can gain elevated privileges. A remote authenticated user can inject SQL commands. A remote user can spoof connections in certain cases.

  18. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  19. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  20. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., George W. (Tijeras, NM); Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  1. Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing Abengoa logo Abengoa Solar, under the Solar Manufacturing Technology (SolarMat) program, will be investigating the use of an automotive-style high-rate fabrication and automated assembly techniques to achieve a substantial reduction in the deployment cost of their new SpaceTube advanced large aperture parabolic trough collector. Approach Abengoa is developing

  2. PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $999,999 Tandem cell architectures present a path toward higher module efficiencies over single junction designs. This project will develop a gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) on silicon mechanically stacked voltage-matched

  3. PROJECT PROFILE: Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives PROJECT PROFILE: Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM SunShot Award Amount: $89,000 This project is focused on independent stakeholder engagement activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratory relating to photovoltaic (PV) outreach at the national and international level. APPROACH The International

  4. DIAGNOSIS OF EQUILIBRIUM MAGNETIC PROFILES, CURRENT TRANSPORT,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DIAGNOSIS OF EQUILIBRIUM MAGNETIC PROFILES, CURRENT TRANSPORT, AND INTERNAL STRUCTURES IN A REVERSED-FIELD PINCH USING ELECTRON TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS by Eli Parke A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Physics) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON 2014 Date of final oral examination: 08/01/14 The dissertation is approved by the following members of the Final Oral Committee: Daniel J. Den Hartog, Research Professor, Physics

  5. Apparatus for laser beam profile measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, N.P.; Gettemy, D.J.

    1985-01-30

    Apparatus for measuring the spatial intensity profile of the output beam from a continuous-wave laser oscillator. The rapid and repetitive passing of a small aperture through the otherwise totally blocked output beam of the laser under investigation provides an easily interpretable, real-time measure of the intensity characteristics thereof when detected by a single detector and the signal generated thereby displayed on an oscilloscope synthronized to the motion of the aperture.

  6. Advanced interferometric profile measurements through refractive media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koev, Stephan T.; Ghodssi, Reza [MEMS Sensors and Actuators Laboratory (MSAL), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Optical profilers are valuable tools for the characterization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs). They use phase sifting interferometry (PSI) or vertical scanning interferometry to measure the topography of microscale structures with nanometer resolution. However, for many emerging MEMS applications, the sample needs to be imaged while placed in a liquid or in a package with a glass window. The increased refractive index of the transparent medium degrades the interference image contrast and prevents any measurement of the sample. We report on the modification of a Veeco NT1100 optical profiler to enable PSI measurements through refractive media. This approach can be applied to any other optical profiler with PSI capability. The modification consists in replacing the original illumination source with a custom-built narrow linewidth source, which increases the coherence length of the light and the contrast of the interference image. We present measurements taken with the modified configuration on samples covered with 3 mm water or 500 {mu}m glass, and we compare them to measurements of uncovered samples. We show that the measurement precision is only slightly reduced by the water and glass, and that it is still sufficiently high for typical MEMS applications. The described method can be readily used for measuring through other types and thicknesses of refractive materials.

  7. The H? profiles of Be shell stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silaj, J.; Jones, C. E.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Tycner, C.

    2014-11-01

    A new set of theoretical H? emission line profiles of Be stars has been computed using the code BERAY, which solves the transfer equation along a series of rays passing through the star+disk system, representing an improved treatment over earlier work done by the authors. The new profiles were compared with the previous work, and general trends (such as line profile shapes and correlations between line equivalent widths as a function of initial density ?{sub 0} and power law index n) were recovered. Additionally, BERAY was employed to model the spectra of eight well-known Be shell stars. Some degeneracy was found in the choice of model parameters, highlighting the need to employ alternate observables to constrain the models. However, the inclination angle of the model seemed relatively insensitive to the choices of other parameters, and we show that, with our models, only a very small range of inclination angles can adequately reproduce the observations. Five of our eight targets were found to have inclination angles of 70° or higher, and two more were found to have inclination angles of 67° and 65°. The observation of one target—4 Aquilae—could only be reproduced by models created at an inclination angle of approximately 45°.

  8. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  9. T-567: Linux Kernel Buffer Overflow in ldm_frag_add() May Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A local user may be able to obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A physically local user can connect a storage device with a specially crafted LDM partition table to trigger a buffer overflow in the ldm_frag_add() function in 'fs/partitions/ldm.c' and potentially execute arbitrary code with elevated privileges.

  10. Widget:CrunchBaseProfile | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    logo from CrunchBase, if available. For example: Widget:CrunchBaseProfile|nameGoogle No CrunchBase profile. Create one now Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  11. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  12. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam ontomore » the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.« less

  13. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Daniel L.Y.; Sanjayan, Jay G. Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800 deg. C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  15. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria ?-oxidation. -- Highlights: ? Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ? Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ? Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ? Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  16. Profiles in Leadership: David Mohler, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coal and Carbon Management | Department of Energy Profiles in Leadership: David Mohler, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal and Carbon Management Profiles in Leadership: David Mohler, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal and Carbon Management August 6, 2015 - 8:58am Addthis Profiles in Leadership: David Mohler, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal and Carbon Management Profiles in Leadership is a series of interviews with senior executives in the Office of Fossil Energy (FE).

  17. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California: California Industries of the Future Program | Department of Energy Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program PDF icon cpi_profile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007) ITP Petroleum

  18. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design

  19. Foster-Glocester Regional School District (Rhode Island) - Financing Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-12-01

    This document is an EnergySmart Schools Financing Profile of Foster-Glocester Regional School District in Rhode Island

  20. Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004 Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004 In this 2004 report, three sectors were identified as promising combined heat and power (CHP) sectors: chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals. Sector profiles are based on a literature search, review of recent CHP activity in those sectors, and telephone interviews with customer representatives in each sector. PDF icon sector_profiles.pdf More Documents &

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Degradation Assessment of Fielded CIGS Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Assessment of Fielded CIGS Photovoltaic Module Technologies PROJECT PROFILE: Degradation Assessment of Fielded CIGS Photovoltaic Module Technologies Funding ...

  2. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  3. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01

    Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on: stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

  4. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  5. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-23

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

  6. Industrial Technologies Funding Profile by Subprogram

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Profile by Subprogram (dollars in thousands) FY 2008 Current Appropriation a FY 2009 Original Appropriation FY 2009 Additional Appropriation FY 2010 Request Industrial Technologies Industries of the Future (Specific) 10,969 15,575 - 12,627 Industries of the Future (Crosscutting - Including Inventions and Innovations) 52,223 74,425 - 87,373 Efficiency of Information and Communications Technology and Standards - - 50,000 - Total, Industrial Technologies 63,192 90,000 50,000 100,000 Public

  7. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  8. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

  9. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  10. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. • IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  11. Microsoft Word - NNSS Profile Instructions- Rev 0 02-27-12-Final...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of approval status will be provided. Approved profiles shall be reevaluated by the generator annually, and the profile amended as needed. Profiles must be changed if the...

  12. Tracking Elevated Pollution Layers with a Newly Developed Hyperspectral Sun/Sky Spectrometer (4STAR): Results from the TCAP 2012 and 2013 Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Johnson, Roy R.; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Wilson, Jacqueline M.

    2014-03-16

    Total columnar amounts of water vapor, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are derived from a newly developed, hyperspectral airborne sun-sky spectrometer (4STAR) for the first time during the two intensive phases of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in summer 2012 and winter 2013 aboard the DOE G-1 aircraft. We compare results with coincident measurements. We find 0.045 g/cm2 (4.2%) negative bias and 0.28 g/cm2 (26.3%) root-mean-square (RMS) difference in water vapor layer comparison with in-situ hygrometer, and an overall RMS difference of 1.28 g/m3 (38%) water vapor amount in profile by profile comparisons, with differences distributed evenly around zero in most cases. The RMS differences for O3 values average to 3%, with a 1% negative bias for 4STAR compared with the spaceborne Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) along the aircraft flight-track for 14 flights during both TCAP phases. Ground-based comparisons with the Pandora spectrometer system at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland showed excellent agreement between the instruments for both O3 and NO2, further emphasizing 4STAR’s new capabilities. During the summer phase, we have succeeded in identifying variations in elevated pollution layers corresponding to urban pollution outflow and transported biomass burning. This was done using clustering analysis of the retrieved products (e.g. Ĺngstrom exponent, NO2 and columnar water vapor), and was confirmed by aerosol type identification by HSRL2 aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft. These newly demonstrated 4STAR capabilities are expected to be instrumental in improving our understanding of atmospheric composition variability and aerosol-trace-gas interactions; they open new horizons and opportunities in airborne sunphotometry.

  13. Thermal Profiling of Residential Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, A; Rajagopal, R

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for informing targeted demand-response (DR) and marketing programs that focus on the temperature-sensitive part of residential electricity demand. Our methodology uses data that is becoming readily available at utility companies-hourly energy consumption readings collected from "smart" electricity meters, as well as hourly temperature readings. To decompose individual consumption into a thermal-sensitive part and a base load (non-thermally-sensitive), we propose a model of temperature response that is based on thermal regimes, i.e., unobserved decisions of consumers to use their heating or cooling appliances. We use this model to extract useful benchmarks that compose thermal profiles of individual users, i.e., terse characterizations of the statistics of these users' temperature-sensitive consumption. We present example profiles generated using our model on real consumers, and show its performance on a large sample of residential users. This knowledge may, in turn, inform the DR program by allowing scarce operational and marketing budgets to be spent on the right users-those whose influencing will yield highest energy reductions-at the right time. We show that such segmentation and targeting of users may offer savings exceeding 100% of a random strategy.

  14. Simulation of in-core neutron noise measurements for axial void profile reconstruction in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykin, V.; Pazsit, I.

    2012-07-01

    A possibility to reconstruct the axial void profile from the simulated in-core neutron noise which is caused by density fluctuations in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) heated channel is considered. For this purpose, a self-contained model of the two-phase flow regime is constructed which has quantitatively and qualitatively similar properties to those observed in real BWRs. The model is subsequently used to simulate the signals of neutron detectors induced by the corresponding perturbations in the flow density. The bubbles are generated randomly in both space and time using Monte-Carlo techniques. The axial distribution of the bubble production is chosen such that the mean axial void fraction and void velocity follow the actual values of BWRs. The induced neutron noise signals are calculated and then processed by the standard signal analysis methods such as Auto-Power Spectral Density (APSD) and Cross-Power Spectral Density (CPSD). Two methods for axial void and velocity profiles reconstruction are discussed: the first one is based on the change of the break frequency of the neutron auto-power spectrum with axial core elevation, while the second refers to the estimation of transit times of propagating steam fluctuations between different axial detector positions. This paper summarizes the principles of the model and presents a numerical testing of the qualitative applicability to estimate the required parameters for the reconstruction of the void fraction profile from the neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  15. Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hungate, Bruce

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes a synthesis project of a long-term global change experiment conducted at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, investigating how increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) influences the functioning of a fire-dominated scrub-oak ecosystem. The experiment began in 1996 and ended in 2007. Results presented here summarize the effects of elevated CO2 on plant growth, soil processes, carbon and nutrient cycling, and other responses. Products include archived data from the experiment, as well as six publications in the peer-reviewed literature.

  16. Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment J.H. Tylczak* 1 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, USA joseph.tylczak@netl.doe.gov Abstract This paper reports on the results of a study that compares the erosion-corrosion behavior of a variety of alloys (Fe- 2ÂĽCr 1Mo, 304 SS, 310 SS, Incoloy 800, Haynes 230 and a Fe 3 Al) in a combustion environment. Advanced coal combustion environments, with higher temperatures, are driving

  17. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  18. T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Red Hat Directory Server. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A local user can cause denial of service conditions.

  19. An introduction to the concept of profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogel, G.; Doll, D.

    1997-09-01

    There has been limited general acceptance of lubricant analysis as a predictive maintenance tool in industry as compared to say vibration monitoring. There is perhaps a perception within industry that Lubricant analysis has failed to deliver on some of the promises that it has made. However, when one looks at so called benchmark programs that exhibit the practices of industry leaders, and measures the achievements of such programs there is no doubt that if applied correctly that lubricant analysis is an invaluable tool in the development of an advanced approach to maintenance. There are many issues which create a successful lubricant analysis program, one of which is the appropriate use of existing technologies to ensure optimum value in the implementation of a program. This paper introduces the concept of Profiles as a framework for the effective utilization of the correct lubricant analysis technologies.

  20. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  1. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-13

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 is the sixteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 25 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. The data are presented in the context of key energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing strategies of corporate development and measuring the apparent success of current ongoing operations.

  2. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. The main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET. © 2015 authors. Published by the American Physical Society.

  3. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

  4. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatŕ, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  5. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-15

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. Thus, the main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET.

  6. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619), dated November 9, 1978

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95- 619), dated November 9, 1978. The following is MI's legislative mandate. PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment of Office of Minority Economic Impact -- Title II of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131 - - 7139) is amended by adding at the end thereof

  7. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  8. Elevated temperature load-order effects on austenitic steel life predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, E.O.

    1989-03-01

    The design of nuclear pressure vessel components may typically involve a few hundred or more cyclic thermal loadings of various levels coupled with steady mechanical loads. Ordering of these loading events may not be detailed in the design specification. Thermal loading usually implies plastic deformation, and elevated temperature design must consider creep deformation and damage. Plastic creep solutions are history dependent. Even if some ordering is given in a design specification, practical cost considerations of inelastic analysis may impose a need to group transients. The analyst is frequently faced with the task of showing that his choice of load sequence in an elevated temperature design analysis is a conservative one. In facing such a task, the inelastic strain accumulation and creep-fatigue interaction criteria of the ASME N-47 (ASME 1986) Code Case usually govern. An effort associated with the Fast Flux Test Facility was to study the effects of load ordering the light of these criteria. The effects of a seismic disturbance were included. An additional interest was the effect of the alpha reset hardening modification (Corum, 1987), which prevents undue drift of the yield surface. An effect of reverse plasticity on subsequent creep, the beta effect, was also used. About two hundred inelastic analyses of a thin cylinder were carried out. The scope of work reported in this paper includes a study by J. Phillips (Phillips, 1982), extended with damage calculations. 4 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Recovery Act Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles Recovery Act Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles DOE is partnering with regional and local utilities and co-ops across the Nation to improve the reliability of the grid and helping communities recover faster when disruptions occur. Case studies profiling some of the SGIG and SGDP grant recipients and the impact of the funding are available below for downloading. For more information about how funds from

  10. DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS Dark-matter-dominated cluster-scale halos act as an important cosmological probe and provide a key testing ground for structure formation theory. Focusing on their mass profiles, we have carried out (gravity-only) simulations of the concordance {Lambda}CDM cosmology,

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection () | SciTech Connect : Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America research on HVAC air filter sizing that prompted a change in the California

  12. ARM - PI Product - Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsTropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al.,

  13. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance | Department of Energy Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance This Building America Innovations profile describes the concept for the U.S. Department of Energy

  14. Profiles in Leadership: Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Petroleum Reserves Profiles in Leadership: Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Petroleum Reserves August 17, 2015 - 1:34pm Addthis Profiles in Leadership: Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Petroleum Reserves Profiles in Leadership is a series of interviews with senior executives in the Office of Fossil Energy (FE). In this edition we caught up with Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for

  15. Profiles in Leadership: Christopher Smith, Assistant Secretary for Fossil

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy | Department of Energy Christopher Smith, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Profiles in Leadership: Christopher Smith, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy July 15, 2015 - 8:19am Addthis Profiles in Leadership: Christopher Smith, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy This is the first issue of Profiles in Leadership, a series of interviews with senior executives in the Office of Fossil Energy (FE). In this edition we talk to Christopher Smith, Assistant Secretary for Fossil

  16. PROJECT PROFILE: Cook County Department of Environmental Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cook County Department of Environmental Control (Solar Market Pathways) PROJECT PROFILE: ... models and best practices to guide other projects in the region and the country. ...

  17. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... TOP INNOVATIONS BUILDING AMERICA BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE Habitat affiliates across the country held "blitz builds" to construct homes for Gulf Coast ...

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selection This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America research on ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Building America; top ...

  19. PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot ...

  20. PROJECT PROFILE: Improving PV performance Estimates in the System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Component and System Reliability Metrics PROJECT PROFILE: Improving PV performance ... developed by Sandia into the widely-used Solar Advisor Model (SAM) software platform. ...

  1. Microsoft Word - Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microsoft Word - Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - ARRAAttachment12v1.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Energy Speech ...

  2. GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELD: PHYSICAL ORIGIN OF SERSIC PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-08-01

    While the Sersic profile family provides adequate fits for the surface brightness profiles of observed galaxies, its physical origin is unknown. We show that if the cosmological density field is seeded by random Gaussian fluctuations, as in the standard cold dark matter model, galaxies with steep central profiles have simultaneously extended envelopes of shallow profiles in the outskirts, whereas galaxies with shallow central profiles are accompanied by steep density profiles in the outskirts. These properties are in accord with those of the Sersic profile family. Moreover, galaxies with steep central profiles form their central regions in smaller denser subunits that possibly merge subsequently, which naturally leads to the formation of bulges. In contrast, galaxies with shallow central profiles form their central regions in a coherent fashion without significant substructure, a necessary condition for disk galaxy formation. Thus, the scenario is self-consistent with respect to the correlation between observed galaxy morphology and the Sersic index. We further predict that clusters of galaxies should display a similar trend, which should be verifiable observationally.

  3. Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic Incentives and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Incentives and Information Campaigns to Promote Solar Technology Diffusion through Data-Driven Behavior Modeling Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic ...

  4. Project Profile: An Emergent Model of Technology Adoption for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: An Emergent Model of Technology Adoption for Accelerating the Diffusion of Residential Solar PV Logos of the University of Texas at Austin, Frontier Associates, ...

  5. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007) Bandwidth Study U.S. Petroleum Refining ITP Petroleum Refining: Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry...

  6. Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

  7. Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal ...

  8. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Auburn University Profile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Auburn University Profile, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

  9. Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer Fluid Containment Materials Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer ...

  10. Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tower Receivers Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for ... Characterize the optical performance, material properties, and temperature stability. ...

  11. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Logos for The University of California, ...

  12. Project Profile: Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems Project Profile: Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt ...

  13. PROJECT PROFILE: Defining the Defect Chemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defining the Defect Chemistry and Structural Properties Required for 24%-Efficient CdTe Devices PROJECT PROFILE: Defining the Defect Chemistry and Structural Properties Required for ...

  14. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  15. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the...

  16. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

  17. Project Profile: Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical-CO2 Turbomachinery Components Project Profile: Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical-CO2 Turbomachinery Components ...

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America Solution Center PNNL set up the framework for the Building America Solution Center, a web tool connecting users to ...

  19. ARM - PI Product - AERIoe Thermodynamic Profile and Cloud Retrieval...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    estimation framework, so a full error covariance of the solution is provided for each retrieval. The information content in the AERI observations on the thermodynamic profiles...

  20. Profiling the local carrier concentration across a semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 11, 2016 Title: Profiling the local carrier concentration across a semiconductor quantum...

  1. Project Profile: Thermochemical Energy Storage for Stirling CSP...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage for Stirling CSP Systems Project Profile: Thermochemical Energy Storage for Stirling CSP Systems Pacific Northwest National Laboratory logo Pacific Northwest ...

  2. PROJECT PROFILE: High-resolution Investigations of Transport...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices PROJECT PROFILE: High-resolution Investigations of Transport Limiting Defects and Interfaces in Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices Funding ...

  3. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubásek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz; Vojt?ch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary ?-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 ?m and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62 alloy to the creep process in compression compared to AZ91 • Excellent thermal stability and creep resistance of the alloy WE 43 • Improved thermal stability and creep resistance in order WE43 > AJ62 >> AZ91.

  4. Assessment of Fluctuating Reservoir Elevations Using Hydraulic Models and Impacts to Larval Pacific Lamprey Rearing Habitat in the Bonneville Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-02-24

    This report presents the results of a modeling assessment of likely lamprey larval habitat that may be impacted by dewatering of the major tributary delta regions in the Bonneville Pool of the Columbia River. This assessment was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP). The goal of the study was to provide baseline data about how the regions of interest would potentially be impacted at three river flows (10, 50, and 90 percent exceedance flow) for four different forebay elevations at Bonneville Dam. Impacts of unsteady flows at The Dalles Dam and changing forebay elevation at Bonneville Dam for a 2-week period were also assessed. The area of dewatered regions was calculated by importing modeled data outputs into a GIS and then calculating the change in inundated area near tributary deltas for the four Bonneville forebay surface elevations. From the modeled output we determined that the overall change in area is less sensitive to elevations changes during higher river discharges. Changing the forebay elevation at Bonneville and the resulting impact to total dewatered regions was greater at the lowest modeled river flow (97 kcfs) and showed the greatest variation at the White Salmon/Hood River delta regions followed by the Wind, Klickitat and the Little White Salmon rivers. To understand how inundation might change on a daily and hourly basis. Unsteady flow models were run for a 2-week period in 2002 and compared to 2014. The water surface elevation in the upstream pool closely follows that of the Bonneville Dam forebay with rapid changes of 1 to 2-ft possible. The data shows that 2.5-ft variation in water surface elevation occurred during this period in 2002 and a 3.7-ft change occurred in 2014. The duration of these changes were highly variable and generally did not stay constant for more than a 5-hr period.

  5. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  6. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  7. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  8. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  9. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  10. Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

  11. The combined effects of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on crop systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.E.; Heagle, A.S.; Shafer, S.R.; Heck, W.W.

    1994-12-31

    Concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) in the troposphere have risen in the last century due to industrialization. Current levels of tropospheric O{sub 3} suppress growth of crops and other plants, and O{sub 3} concentrations may continue to rise with changes in global climate. On the other hand, projected increases in atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the next 50 to 100 years are expected to cause significant increases in growth of most species. Since elevated concentrations of these gases will co-occur, it is important to understand their joint action. Until recently, however, the combined effects of O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} have received little attention. Most publications on combined CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} effects have described experiments conducted in greenhouse or controlled-environment facilities. To date, data on responses of agricultural species to the combined gases have come from experiments with radish, tomato, white clover, tobacco, or wheat. In most cases, CO{sub 2} stimulated and O{sub 3} suppressed growth of the plant tissues studied, and CO{sub 2} usually attenuated development of O{sub 3}-induced visible injury. Some data have indicated a tendency for CO{sub 2}, in concentrations up to double the current ambient level, to attenuate effects of O{sub 3} on growth, but statistical analyses of such data often have not supported such a conclusion. In this paper, the results of a recent field experiment with soybean are reported, and the results are compared to other similar research with elevated atmospheric concentrations of both O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  12. Project Profile: Understanding the Evolution of Customer Motivations and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adoption Barriers in Residential Photovoltaics Markets | Department of Energy Soft Costs » Project Profile: Understanding the Evolution of Customer Motivations and Adoption Barriers in Residential Photovoltaics Markets Project Profile: Understanding the Evolution of Customer Motivations and Adoption Barriers in Residential Photovoltaics Markets Logos of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Arizona, the University of Michigan, the University of Colorado Boulder,

  13. Comprehensive metabolomic, lipidomic and microscopic profiling of Yarrowia

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lipolytica during lipid accumulation identifies targets for increased lipogenesis (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Comprehensive metabolomic, lipidomic and microscopic profiling of Yarrowia lipolytica during lipid accumulation identifies targets for increased lipogenesis « Prev Next » Title: Comprehensive metabolomic, lipidomic and microscopic profiling of Yarrowia lipolytica during lipid accumulation identifies targets for increased lipogenesis × You are accessing a document from the

  14. Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermochemical Storage | Department of Energy Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride Thermochemical Storage Project Profile: Engineering a Novel High Temperature Metal Hydride Thermochemical Storage PNNL Logo Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL), through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging Equilibrium Mechanisms for Engineering New Thermochemical Storage (CSP: ELEMENTS) funding program, is developing a concept for high energy density

  15. Project Profile: High Performance Reduction/Oxidation Metal Oxides for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermochemical Energy Storage | Department of Energy Project Profile: High Performance Reduction/Oxidation Metal Oxides for Thermochemical Energy Storage Project Profile: High Performance Reduction/Oxidation Metal Oxides for Thermochemical Energy Storage Sandia National Laboratory Logo Sandia National Lab (Sandia), through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging Equilibrium Mechanisms for Engineering New Thermochemical Storage (CSP: ELEMENTS) funding program, is systematically

  16. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam | Department of Energy Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam UCLA Logo The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging

  17. Microsoft Word - Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc Microsoft Word - Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - ARRAAttachment12v1.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Energy Speech 082508 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - DRAFT CRB Interview Guidance

  18. The PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 triad in human breast cancer: Functional link between elevated Sac3 phosphatase and enhanced proliferation of triple negative cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikonomov, Ognian C. Filios, Catherine Sbrissa, Diego Chen, Xuequn Shisheva, Assia

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •We assess PAS complex proteins and phosphoinositide levels in breast cancer cells. •Sac3 and ArPIKfyve are markedly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. •Sac3 silencing inhibits proliferation in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. •Phosphoinositide profiles are altered in breast cancer cells. •This is the first evidence linking high Sac3 with breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The phosphoinositide 5-kinase PIKfyve and 5-phosphatase Sac3 are scaffolded by ArPIKfyve in the PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 (PAS) regulatory complex to trigger a unique loop of PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} synthesis and turnover. Whereas the metabolizing enzymes of the other 3-phosphoinositides have already been implicated in breast cancer, the role of the PAS proteins and the PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} conversion is unknown. To begin elucidating their roles, in this study we monitored the endogenous levels of the PAS complex proteins in cell lines derived from hormone-receptor positive (MCF7 and T47D) or triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (BT20, BT549 and MDA-MB-231) as well as in MCF10A cells derived from non-tumorigenic mastectomy. We report profound upregulation of Sac3 and ArPIKfyve in the triple negative vs. hormone-sensitive breast cancer or non-tumorigenic cells, with BT cell lines showing the highest levels. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sac3, but not that of PIKfyve, significantly inhibited proliferation of BT20 and BT549 cells. In these cells, knockdown of ArPIKfyve had only a minor effect, consistent with a primary role for Sac3 in TNBC cell proliferation. Intriguingly, steady-state levels of PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} in BT20 and T47D cells were similar despite the 6-fold difference in Sac3 levels between these cell lines. However, steady-state levels of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P, both regulated by the PAS complex, were significantly reduced in BT20 vs. T47D or MCF10A cell lines, consistent with elevated Sac3 affecting directly or indirectly the homeostasis of these lipids in TNBC. Together, our results uncover an unexpected role for Sac3 phosphatase in TNBC cell proliferation. Database analyses, discussed herein, reinforce the involvement of Sac3 in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  19. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally,more » we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.« less

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring irradiated fuel profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.M.

    1980-03-27

    A new apparatus is used to substantially instantaneously obtain a profile of an object, for example a spent fuel assembly, which profile (when normalized) has unexpectedly been found to be substantially identical to the normalized profile of the burnup monitor Cs-137 obtained with a germanium detector. That profile can be used without normalization in a new method of identifying and monitoring in order to determine for example whether any of the fuel has been removed. Alternatively, two other new methods involve calibrating that profile so as to obtain a determination of fuel burnup (which is important for complying with safeguards requirements, for utilizing fuel to an optimal extent, and for storing spent fuel in a minimal amount of space).

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring irradiated fuel profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David M.

    1982-01-01

    A new apparatus is used to substantially instantaneously obtain a profile of an object, for example a spent fuel assembly, which profile (when normalized) has unexpectedly been found to be substantially identical to the normalized profile of the burnup monitor Cs-137 obtained with a germanium detector. That profile can be used without normalization in a new method of identifying and monitoring in order to determine for example whether any of the fuel has been removed. Alternatively, two other new methods involve calibrating that profile so as to obtain a determination of fuel burnup (which is important for complying with safeguards requirements, for utilizing fuel to an optimal extent, and for storing spent fuel in a minimal amount of space). Using either of these two methods of determining burnup, one can reduce the required measurement time significantly (by more than an order of magnitude) over existing methods, yet retain equal or only slightly reduced accuracy.

  2. Temperature elevation by HIFU in ex vivo porcine muscle: MRI measurement and simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A.; Hwang, San Chao; Chang, Hsu; Thiriet, Marc; Sheu, Tony W. H.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound is a rapidly developing medical technology with a large number of potential clinical applications. Computational model can play a pivotal role in the planning and optimization of the treatment based on the patient's image. Nonlinear propagation effects can significantly affect the temperature elevation and should be taken into account. In order to investigate the importance of nonlinear propagation effects, nonlinear Westervelt equation was solved. Weak nonlinear propagation effects were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the predicted and measured temperature elevations and lesion in a porcine muscle. Methods: The investigated single-element transducer has a focal length of 12 cm, an aperture of 8 cm, and frequency of 1.08 MHz. Porcine muscle was heated for 30 s by focused ultrasound transducer with an acoustic power in the range of 24–56 W. The theoretical model consists of nonlinear Westervelt equation with relaxation effects being taken into account and Pennes bioheat equation. Results: Excellent agreement between the measured and simulated temperature rises was found. For peak temperatures above 85–90 °C “preboiling” or cavitation activity appears and lesion distortion starts, causing small discrepancy between the measured and simulated temperature rises. From the measurements and simulations, it was shown that distortion of the lesion was caused by the “preboiling” activity. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that for peak temperatures below 85–90 °C numerical simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in three dimensions. Both temperature rise and lesion size can be well predicted. Due to nonlinear effect the temperature in the focal region can be increased compared with the linear case. The current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution is not sufficient. Due to the inevitable averaging the measured temperature can be 10–30 °C lower than the peak temperature. Computational fluid dynamics can provide additional important information that is lost using a state of the art MRI device.

  3. Getting Data Center Energy Management Started with Profiler Tools |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Getting Data Center Energy Management Started with Profiler Tools Getting Data Center Energy Management Started with Profiler Tools March 31, 2016 2:00PM to 3:00PM EDT Webinar will introduce the Data Center Profiler (DC Pro) Tools available to help data centers estimate power usage effectiveness (PUE) without submetering. DC Pro and the PUE Estimator are "early stage" scoping tools designed for data center owners and operators to diagnose how energy use is

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

    2012-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  5. Electrochemical and physical analysis of a Li-ion cell cycled at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Song, Xiangyun; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-06-21

    Laboratory-size LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/graphite lithium-ion pouch cells were cycled over 100 percent DOD at room temperature and 60 degrees C in order to investigate high-temperature degradation mechanisms of this important technology. Capacity fade for the cell was correlated with that for the individual components, using electrochemical analysis of the electrodes and other diagnostic techniques. The high-temperature cell lost 65 percent of its initial capacity after 140 cycles at 60 degrees C compared to only 4 percent loss for the cell cycled at room temperature. Cell ohmic impedance increased significantly with the elevated temperature cycling, resulting in some of loss of capacity at the C/2 rate. However, as determined with slow rate testing of the individual electrodes, the anode retained most of its original capacity, while the cathode lost 65 percent, even when cycled with a fresh source of lithium. Diagnostic evaluation of cell components including XRD, Raman, CSAFM and suggest capacity loss occurs primarily due to a rise in the impedance of the cathode, especially at the end-of-charge. The impedance rise may be caused in part by a loss of the conductive carbon at the surface of the cathode and/or by an organic film on the surface of the cathode that becomes non-ionically conductive at low lithium content.

  6. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, J.; Qi, X.; Souza, L.; Luo, Y.

    2015-10-20

    Nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive researches have been done to explore whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in plant and litter pools but not in soil pool. Thus, the basis of PNL occurrencemore »partially exists. However, CO2 enrichment also significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth over time was observed. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions. Moreover, our synthesis showed that CO2 enrichment increased soil ammonium (NH4+) but decreased nitrate (NO3-). The different responses of NH4+ and NO3-, and the consequent biological processes, may result in changes in soil microenvironment, community structures and above-belowground interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and the feedback to climate change.« less

  7. Investigation of Compton profiles of molecular methane and ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xiao-Li; Xu, Long-Quan; Kang, Xu; Liu, Ya-Wei; Ni, Dong-Dong; Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yang, Ke Ma, Yong-Peng; Yan, Shuai

    2015-02-28

    The Compton profiles of methane and ethane molecules have been determined at an incident photon energy of 20 keV based on the third generation synchrotron radiation, and the statistical accuracy of 0.2% is achieved near p{sub z} = 0. The density functional theory with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set was used to calculate the Compton profiles of methane and ethane. The present experimental Compton profiles are in better agreement with the theoretical calculations in the whole p{sub z} region than the previous experimental results, which indicates that the present experimental Compton profiles are accurate enough to serve as the benchmark data for methane and ethane molecules.

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Buried and Encapsulated Ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    In this innovation profile, CARB research shows HVAC ducts that are encapsulated in closed-cell spray foam and buried in blown insulation in a vented attic meet the code requirements for ducts in conditioned space.

  9. Woo-Sun Yang! NERSC User Services Group More Profiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Profiling Tools at NERSC --- 1 --- NUG Training February 2 5, 2 015 Overview * To p rovide a q uick s tart f or p rofiling t ools ( other than VTune) o n E dison - CrayPat *...

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Building America Solution Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile provides information about the Building America Solution Center created by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a web tool connecting users to thousands of pieces of building science information developed by DOE’s Building America research partners.

  11. Effects of q -profile structures on intrinsic torque reversals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on August 5, 2016 Title: Effects of q -profile ... become publicly available on August 5, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1088...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) 2000.03.01 - 2007.10.31 Lead...

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Quality Management System Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile describes quality management system tools that were customized for residential construction by BSC, IBACOS, and PHI, for use by builders, trades, and designers to help eliminate mistakes that would require high-cost rework.

  14. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Nortek Aquadopp Profiler | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Citadel-CTD, CTD-NH Citadel-CTD, CTD-NV Nortek Aquadopp Profiler Manufacturer: NortekUSA Measurement Category: Oceanographic Operating Environment: Underwater Version(s): Sensor...

  15. U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple OS X. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can obtain a password hash in certain cases. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can obtain password keystrokes.

  16. Profiled spectral lines generated in the field of Kerr superspinars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schee, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdenek E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz

    2013-04-01

    String Theory suggests existence of primordial Kerr superspinars, extremely compact objects with external spacetime described by the Kerr naked singularity geometry. The primordial Kerr superspinars have to be converted to a near-extreme black hole due to accretion, but they could survive to the era of highly redshifted quasars. We study the shape of the profiled spectral lines generated by radiating rings or the innermost parts of Keplerian discs orbiting the Kerr superspinars. Influence of the superspinar surface location on the profiled lines is also considered. We demonstrate strong difference of the character of the profiled lines generated by radiating rings for all values of the superspinar spin and all values of the inclination angles of the observer when compared to those generated in the field of Kerr black holes. For small and mediate inclination angles there are large quantitative differences in the extension and position of the lines. For large inclination angles even strong qualitative difference appears as the profiled lines have a clear doubled character. The smaller, redshifted region of the profiled line is related to the photons reaching the regions near the superspinar surface. Strong differences are obtained also for profiled lines generated by the innermost parts of Keplerian discs especially in the shape of the line. The influence of the superspinar surface location is reflected in the intermediate parts of the the profiled lines. The line profiles can give a clear signature of the presence of a Kerr superspinar and in principle enable estimates of its surface location since the signatures of the superspinar surface location are of different character as those corresponding to the presence of the black hole horizon.

  17. Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Baseload CSP Plants | Department of Energy Concentrating Solar Power » Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Terrafore logo Terrafore, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing novel encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) for use in thermal storage applications to significantly reduce the LCOE for baseload CSP plants. Approach Photo of

  18. Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is PV different? | Department of Energy Soft Costs » Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why is PV different? Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why is PV different? Logo of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The bar chart below the logo shows the cost reduction in photovoltaics compared to other energy-conversion technologies. PV is performing better than coal, natural gas, nuclear fusion, wind, and solar thermal

  19. Project Profile: Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diffusion of Solar Energy | Department of Energy Soft Costs » Project Profile: Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the Diffusion of Solar Energy Project Profile: Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the Diffusion of Solar Energy Logos of Yale University, New York University Stern School of Business, SmartPower, Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, and Solarize Connecticut. A line graph that highlights the social interactions for accelerating

  20. Project Profile: The Solar Foundation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: The Solar Foundation Project Profile: The Solar Foundation Funding Opportunity: Solar Powering America by Recognizing Communities (SPARC) SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Washington, DC SunShot Award Amount: $9,999,996 Awardee Cost Share: $271,190 The Solar Foundation will serve as the Technical Assistance Provider (TAP) for communities pursuing the Solar Powering America by Recognizing Communities (SPARC) designation. SPARC is currently accepting early technical