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1

miR-181b Promotes hepatic stellate cells proliferation by targeting p27 and is elevated in the serum of cirrhosis patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181a and miR-181b, especially, miR-181b could be induced by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) in hepatic stellate cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181b could promote HSC-T6 cell proliferation by directly targeting the negative cell regulator-p27 in HSC-T6 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-181b was identified as potential serum diagnostic marker for liver cirrhosis patients. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs, as a kind of negative gene regulators, were demonstrated to be involved in many types of diseases. In this study, we found that transforming growth factor-beta 1 could induce the expression of miR-181a and miR-181b, and miR-181b increased in the much higher folds than miR-181a. Because of the important role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in HSC activation and liver cirrhosis, we investigate the effect of miR-181a and miR-181b on HSC proliferation. The results showed that miR-181b could promote HSC-T6 cell proliferation by regulating cell cycle. Further study showed p27, the cell cycle regulator, was the direct target of miR-181b in HSC-T6 cell. But miR-181a had no effects on HSC-T6 cell proliferation and cell cycle, and did not target p27. Interestingly, miR-181b is elevated significantly in serum of liver cirrhosis cases comparing to that of normal persons, whereas miR-181a expression was in the similar level with that of normal persons. These results suggested that miR-181b could be induced by TGF-{beta}1 and promote the growth of HSCs by directly targeting p27. The elevation of miR-181b in serum suggested that it may be potential diagnostic biomarkers for cirrhosis. As for miR-181a, it may work in TGF-{beta}1 pathway by a currently unknown mechanism.

Wang, Baocan [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li, Wenxi [China Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research Co. Ltd., Shanghai 201203 (China)] [China Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research Co. Ltd., Shanghai 201203 (China); Guo, Kun [Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200102 (China)] [Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200102 (China); Xiao, Yongtao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai 200092 (China)] [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yuqin, E-mail: wangvuqin00@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Fan, Jiangao, E-mail: fanjiangao@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Mi Tío Atahualpa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mi Tío Atahualpa Carvalho-Neto, Paulode. Mi Tio Atahualpa. México; Ed. Siglo XXI, 1972 Autor decarácter político-social. En Mi Tío Atahualpa, Carvalho-Neto

Cantú, Roberto

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mi Mente y la Raya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mester, Vo¡. xx. No. 1 (Spring, Mi Mentey Mi mente No Ante A ante encuentra el juicio el la textodesparrama se siente Mi mente Se enfrentan, trastornan Pero

Mester, [No author

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ne tak jsi mi pskal Kdyzs mi rucku stskal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ne tak Ne tak jsi mi pískal Kdyzs mi rucku stískal A pravils mi svarnás je A traz m peres, mé srdecko dres A pravís mi spatnás je Vybil jsi mn zuby Z mojí slicné huby A pravís mi starás je Vybod jsi mi oci Na lzecku v noci A pravís mi slepás je Not so This is not the song you whistled to me When you

Zapletal, Jindrich

5

miR-330 regulates the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells by targeting Cdc42  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? miR-330 was inversely correlated with Cdc42 in colorectal cancer cells. ? Elevated miR-330 suppressed cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. ? Elevated miR-330 mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown. ? Restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play important roles in the multistep process of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. However, the miRNA–mRNA regulatory network is far from being fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and the biological roles of miR-330 in colorectal cancer cells. Cdc42, one of the best characterized members of the Rho GTPase family, was found to be up-regulated in several types of human tumors including CRC and has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In the present study, we identified miR-330, as a potential regulator of Cdc42, was found to be inversely correlated with Cdc42 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-330 down-regulated Cdc42 expression at both protein and mRNA level, mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown in inhibiting proliferation, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cells, whereas restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. In addition, elevated expression of miR-330 could suppress the immediate downstream effectors of Cdc42 and inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in vivo. To sum up, our results establish a role of miR-330 in negatively regulating Cdc42 expression and colorectal cancer cell proliferation. They suggest that manipulating the expression level of Cdc42 by miR-330 has the potential to influence colorectal cancer progression.

Li, Yuefeng [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China)] [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Zhu, Xiaolan; Xu, Wenlin [The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China)] [The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Wang, Dongqing [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China)] [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Yan, Jinchuan, E-mail: jiangdalyf2009@126.com [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China)] [The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

Wang, Xiaojun [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)] [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ji [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Feng [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Lin, Yanting [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)] [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei [Department of Interventional Therapy, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Interventional Therapy, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Jiang, Jiaji, E-mail: jiang_jjcn@yahoo.com.cn [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)] [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences * SMITHSONIAN LATINO VIRTUAL MUSEUM (proprietary and open source) Games (standalone game quests in Unity 3D- Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Interactive Game Website (microsite for Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Delete text and place photo here. LVMinteractive.org/3dgames

Mathis, Wayne N.

8

Category:Detroit, MI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MI" MI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVHospital Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVHospital Detroit MI ... 62 KB SVLargeHotel Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Detroit M... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeOffice Detroit ... 63 KB SVMediumOffice Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMediumOffice Detroit... 58 KB SVMidriseApartment Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment Det... 62 KB SVOutPatient Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVOutPatient Detroit M... 63 KB SVPrimarySchool Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVPrimarySchool Detroi... 65 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Detroit MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura...

9

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

10

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

11

RFP - Ann Arbor, MI  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This request for proposals is on behalf of the City of Ann Arbor, MI which intends to purchase renewable energy certificates (RECs) for a portion of the their consumption. The City is interested in a purchase of 3,000 - 4,000 MWh per year for a contract length of one or two years. The City of Ann Arbor is also interested in options for additional customers (citizens and businesses in Ann Arbor) to participate in this purchase. The City, along with assistance from the vendor, will market an additional amount of RECs to other energy users in Ann Arbor, including large and small businesses, and residences. The City seeks marketing support from the vendor, and the ability of the vendor to offer such support will be an important consideration in choosing a vendor.

12

Datum Mi, 21.05 Mi, 23.07 Mi, 07.05 Mi, 25.06 Mi, 16.07 Prfer / Jahr/KW 21/14 30/14 19/14 26/14 29/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Datum Mi, 21.05 Mi, 23.07 Mi, 07.05 Mi, 25.06 Mi, 16.07 Prüfer / Jahr/KW 21/14 30/14 19/14 26/14 29 (TU Graz) 18:00 �bersicht baulicher Komponenten Zenz (TU Graz) 18:00 Mi, 15.10 Mi, 05.11 Mi, 17.12 Mi, 04.02 Mi, 03.12 42/14 45/14 51/14 06/15 49/14 2. Semester Maschinenbauwerkstoffe Mayrhuber (Verbund

13

MHK Technologies/Mi2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mi2 Mi2 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Mi2.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Mavi Innovations Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The turbines convert the kinetic energy of flowing water in tidal or river currents into clean and reliable power At the core of their technology lies a high efficiency turbine module consisting of a vertical axis rotor housed inside a duct Mooring Configuration Depending on the specific application the turbine modules can be either floating gravity mounted or integrated into existing civil infrastructures Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions Tidal and river sites with mean flows above 5 knots and depths over 8 meters are ideal locations for our turbine units

14

Datum Mi, 19.03 Mi, 21.05 Mi, 23.07 Mi, 07.05 Mi, 25.06 Mi, 16.07 Prfer / Jahr/KW 12/14 21/14 30/14 19/14 26/14 29/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Datum Mi, 19.03 Mi, 21.05 Mi, 23.07 Mi, 07.05 Mi, 25.06 Mi, 16.07 Prüfer / Jahr/KW 12/14 21/14 30 Komponenten Zenz (TU Graz) 18:00 Mi, 15.10 Mi, 05.11 Mi, 14.01 Mi, 17.12 Mi, 04.02 Mi, 03.12 42/14 45/14 03, Dichtsystem Zenz (TU Graz) 18:00 Mi, 15.04 Mi, 17.06 Mi, 11.03 Mi, 20.05 Mi, 24.06 Mi, 15.07 Mi, 25.03 Mi, 06

15

Determinants and impact of microvascular obstruction in successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Assessment by magnetic resonance imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microvascular obstruction (MVO) is an important and independent determinant of post-infarct remodeling. Fifty-two patients with a successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (MI) w...

Jan Bogaert; Maria Kalantzi; Frank E. Rademakers; Steven Dymarkowski…

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

17

College of Medicine MI Microbiology and Immunology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Medicine MI Microbiology and Immunology KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 MI 494G IMMUNOBIOLOGY. (3,immunogenetics,allergicreactions,tumorimmunologyandtransplantationimmunology.Prereq:BCH401G(maybetaken concurrently) and BIO 208 or BIO 308 or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 494G.) MI

MacAdam, Keith

18

miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

Zhang, Jie [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Zheng, Fangxia [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yu, Gang [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yin, Yanhua, E-mail: yinyanhuablk@163.com [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Lu, Qingyang [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carboloy Co - MI 12 Carboloy Co - MI 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carboloy Co. (MI.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric MI.12-1 Location: 11177 E. Eight Mile Road , Detroit , Michigan MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Evaluation Year: 1987-1991 MI.12-3 MI.12-4 MI.12-6 Site Operations: Turned-down the outer diameter of uranium metal slugs and conducted pilot plant scale operations for hot pressing uranium dioxide pellets into different solid shapes of fuel elements. MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed MI.12-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MI.12-2 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility

20

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov Columbia University Abstract miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’UTR of mRNA, inducing either mRNA degradation or mRNA silencing. The most characteristic properties of miRNA are their multi-targeting potential (one miRNA may target many genes). This high information content of miRNAs makes them very important factors in cell reprogramming. Since these are small molecules which can potentially pass through gap junctions, it is logical to consider their role in cell to cell communication. We hypothesized that miRNA transfer between cells is likely to occur under stress conditions. To test this hypothesis we developed a system designed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ppn. SoL Snow Deplh Observer Vis. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi. #12;..,- . M I~ · , \\f: ':'0 ll)A.\\I~S· Jb/ Ii I i. $".7~in. 0700 1300 1900 R.H. 24 hr. Mov. Clds. Clds. Clds.Sea L. - ! 0lU/l() .:. flOS-~ '/c. - mi. 30. Vis.Ppn. Sol. Snow Depth Observer a ~Sin. mi. J5 1111. mi.Q.O in. \\/ \\7_____~_____._._!O

Thompson, Anne

22

MI  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitio Inokuti Mitio Inokuti 1933-2009 Biographical sketch 1962 Ph. D., University of Tokyo 1962-63 Research Associate, Northwestern University 1963-65 Research Assocoate, Argonne National Laboratory 1965-73 Physicist, Argonne National Laboratory 1973-95 Senior Physicist, Argonne National Laboratory 1995-present Post-retirement research participant, Argonne National Laboratory 1969-70 Visiting Fellow, Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, University of Colorado and National Bureau of Standards 1980 NORDITA Guest Professor, Odense University 1996-present Visiting Scientist, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Munich 1999 Eminent Scientist, Institute for Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tokyo Fellow, American Physical Society Fellow, Institute of Physics (London)

23

miR-150 Down-Regulation Contributes to the Constitutive Type I Collagen Overexpression in Scleroderma Dermal Fibroblasts via the Induction of Integrin ?3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overexpression of integrins in dermal fibroblasts is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), but the mechanism is unknown. We evaluated the possibility that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of integrin ?3 in these cells. The miRNA expression profile was determined by miRNA PCR array and real-time PCR. Protein expression of integrin ?3 was determined by immunoblotting. In vivo detection of miRNA in paraffin section was performed by in situ hybridization. miR-150 expression was decreased in \\{SSc\\} fibroblasts both in vivo and in vitro. The transfection of miR-150 inhibitor into normal fibroblasts induced expression of integrin ?3, phosphorylated Smad3, and type I collagen, whereas forced overexpression of the miRNA resulted in their down-regulation in \\{SSc\\} fibroblasts. Treatment of \\{SSc\\} fibroblasts with 5-AdC revealed that miR-150 down-regulation in these cells is caused by DNA methylation. In addition, we found that miR-150 is detectable and quantitative in serum. Serum miR-150 levels were decreased in \\{SSc\\} patients, and the \\{SSc\\} patients with lower serum miR-150 levels tended to have more severe clinical manifestations. miR-150 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of \\{SSc\\} via overexpression of integrin ?3. Investigation of the regulatory mechanisms of tissue fibrosis by miR-150 could lead to development of new diagnostic tools and new treatments using miRNA.

Noritoshi Honda; Masatoshi Jinnin; Tomomi Kira-Etoh; Katsunari Makino; Ikko Kajihara; Takamitsu Makino; Satoshi Fukushima; Yuji Inoue; Yoshinobu Okamoto; Minoru Hasegawa; Manabu Fujimoto; Hironobu Ihn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adrian - MI 01 Adrian - MI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Adrian, MI Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Co. Special Metals Extrusion Plant Bridgeport Brass Company General Motors General Motors Company, Adrian MI.01-1 Location: 1450 East Beecher Street, Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. MI.01-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verifcation Surveys MI.01-4 MI.01-5 MI.01-8 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included MI.01-6 MI.01-7 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

25

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oliver Corp - MI 11 Oliver Corp - MI 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1 Location: 433 East Michigan Avenue , Battle Creek , Michigan MI.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 MI.11-4 Site Operations: Conducted production scale briquetting of green salt and magnesium blend under AEC license Nos. SNM-591, SUB-579, and C-3725. MI.11-1 MI.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed MI.11-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Green Salt (Uranium) MI.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MI.11-1 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC MI.11-4

26

Los busco y los encuentro en medio de mi alma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

y los encuentro en medio de mi alma Me buscándote por iré lade Georgia iré donde te donde mi corazón vio tus ojos más

García, Luis Miguel Vicente

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI)...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Energy Coalition (MI); Clean Fuels Ohio EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI); Clean Fuels Ohio 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

28

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MI.15-1 MI.15-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only MI.15-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to STAR CUTTER CORP.

29

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov 1 , M. Grad 2 , D. Attinger 2 and E.Hall 1 1 Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University DOE Grant: DEPS0208ER0820 Abstract: miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'UTR of mRNA, inducing either

30

ELEVATOR PITCH WORKSHEET Important Notes About Your Elevator Pitch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELEVATOR PITCH WORKSHEET Important Notes About Your Elevator Pitch: � Just as you customize your resume and cover letter to individual companies, your elevator pitch can also be customized to highlight your most relevant skills and experience for a situation. � Your elevator pitch should have the ability

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

31

oe oe oe oe oe Mi ye ma lel gvu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& & V ? c c c c Soprano Alto Tenor Bass q»¡¶ oe oe oe oe oe Mi ye ma lel gvu oe oe oe oe oe rot yis ra el o oe oe oe oe oe Mi ye ma lel o tan mi tan mi oe oe oe oe oe Mi ye ma lel o yim ne? yim ne tan mi oe oe oe oe oe Mi ye ma lel gvu w ah oe oe oe oe oe Hen be chol dor ya yim ne w rot

Setiawan, Hendra

32

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. (MI.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Velsicol Chemical Corp. MI.03-1 Location: St. Louis , Michigan MI.03-2 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.03-3 Site Operations: Rare earth processing facility. MI.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC survey MI.03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Rare Earths MI.03-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MI.03-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. MI.03-1 - DOE Letter; Mott to Farowe; Subject: Velsicol Chemical

33

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Michigan - MI 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Michigan - MI 08 Michigan - MI 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN (MI.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Ann Arbor , Michigan MI.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.08-2 Site Operations: Conducted research with a supersonic reflectroscope to detect flaws within a metal slug and developed methods for testing the adequacy of coatings which are applied to pieces of uranium metal. MI.08-1 MI.08-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited quantities of materials handled in a controlled environment MI.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal MI.08-1 MI.08-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

34

Category:Houghton-Lake, MI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Houghton-Lake, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Houghton-Lake, MI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVHospital Houghton-La... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Houghton-... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeOffice Houghton... 64 KB SVMediumOffice Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMediumOffice Houghto... 61 KB SVMidriseApartment Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment Hou... 65 KB SVOutPatient Houghton-Lake MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVOutPatient Houghton-...

35

2438 Biochemistry 1993, 32, 2438-2454 Lipid Headgroup and Acyl Chain Composition Modulate the MI-MI1 Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2438 Biochemistry 1993, 32, 2438-2454 Lipid Headgroup and Acyl Chain Composition Modulate the MI-MI (MI) to metarhodopsin I1 (MII) conformational transition as the trigger for an intracellular enzyme of the lipid headgroups wasvaried. The ratio of MII/MI produced in these recombinants by an actinic flash at 28

Brown, Michael F.

36

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Detrex Corp - MI 10 Detrex Corp - MI 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Detrex Corp. (MI.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to pickling/degreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to small quantity of material handled - There is no record of Detrex conducting work for the AEC MI.10-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal MI.10-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP

37

miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

Park, Jong-Kook [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Henry, Jon C. [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Jiang, Jinmai [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Esau, Christine [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States)] [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Gusev, Yuriy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)] [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lerner, Megan R. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Postier, Russell G. [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Brackett, Daniel J. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Schmittgen, Thomas D., E-mail: Schmittgen.2@osu.edu [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

miRNA Dysregulation in Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2013 American Association for Cancer Research. 15 November 2013 review-article Reviews miRNA Dysregulation in Breast Cancer Laoighse Mulrane Sharon F. McGee William...identified to incur increased risk of breast cancer in certain populations. In addition...

Laoighse Mulrane; Sharon F. McGee; William M. Gallagher; Darran P. O'Connor

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

RECIPIENT:MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: SEP - Farm Audit Implementation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000052 DE-EE0000166 GFO-O000166-037 GOO Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

40

HSL HSL MI20 PACKAGE SPECIFICATION HSL 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSL HSL MI20 PACKAGE SPECIFICATION HSL 2007 1 SUMMARY Given an nÃ?n sparse matrix A and an n-vector z, HSL MI20 computes the vector x = Mz, where M is an algebraic multigrid (AMG) v allocatable dummy arguments and allocatable components of derived types. Remark: The development of HSL MI20

Silvester, David J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

miR-153 and miR-335, Ethanol Sensitive MicroRNAs, Control NSC/NPC Maturation during Fetal Brain Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is increasing through years. Previous research by Sathyan and his colleague has shown that only few miRNAs, miR-9, miR-21, miR-153, and miR-335, were able to mediate ethanol’s teratogenic effects through regulation neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC/NPC). However...

Tsai, Pai Chi

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Category:Traverse City, MI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, MI" City, MI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVHospital Traverse Ci... 63 KB SVLargeHotel Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Traverse ... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVLargeOffice Traverse... 64 KB SVMediumOffice Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMediumOffice Travers... 59 KB SVMidriseApartment Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment Tra... 64 KB SVOutPatient Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVOutPatient Traverse ... 64 KB SVPrimarySchool Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png SVPrimarySchool Traver... 65 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Traverse City MI Detroit Edison Co.png

43

Mi-Young Kim - Research Staff - FEERC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mi-Young Kim Mi-Young Kim Post Doctoral Research Associate (F) 865-946-1354 kimm@ornl.gov Professional Highlights Education Ph.D., Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 2008 Miyoung joined the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a post-doctoral researcher in 2010. She has worked at the Center for Development of Fine Chemicals and the Research Institute for Catalysis in Chonnam National University prior to joining the ORNL. Her research background is in heterogeneous catalysis and highly dispersed noble metal catalysts. She has extensive experience in characterizing catalysts using EXAFS, XPS, XRD, solid NMR and ESR. She is currently involved in automotive catalysis research with an emphasis on monolithic catalysts & materials relevant to lean NOx and cold start emissions controls

44

Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

company data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

46

Electron Cloud induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab Main Injector (MI) for the High Intensity Neutrinofor the Fermilab maininjector (MI) show the existence of amitance growth. The Fermilab MI is being considered for an

Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine; Grote, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electron Cloud induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) forrings. Results for the Fermilab maininjector (MI) show theem- mitance growth. The Fermilab MI is being considered for

Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine; Grote, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland J. L. Bamber 1 ,al. : A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland Howat, I. M.al. : A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland Fig. 3. (a)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

"Orgulloso de mi Caserío y de Quien Soy": Race, Place, and Space in Puerto Rican Reggaetón  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samponaro, Philip. ""Oye mi canto" ("Listen to My Song"):Báez, Jillian M. ""En mi imperio": Competing Discourses ofOrgulloso de mi Caserío y de Quien Soy”: Race, Place, and

Rivera, Petra Raquel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Members of the miRNA-200 Family Regulate Olfactory Neurogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly expressed in vertebrate neural tissues, but the contribution of specific miRNAs to the development and function of different neuronal populations is still largely unknown. We report that miRNAs ...

Choi, Philip S.

51

8232 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 35 / Tuesday, February 24, 2009 / Notices March 18, 6:30 p.m ....................... Rogers City, MI ............................. Presque Isle District Library, 181 East Erie Street, Rogers City, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.m ....................... Rogers City, MI ............................. Presque Isle District Library, 181 East Erie Street, Rogers City, MI 49779. March 19, 6:30 p.m ....................... Harrisville, MI ............................... Harrisville Courthouse, 106 North 5th Street, Harrisville, MI 48740. March 20, 2 p

52

The Role of miR-143 and miR-145 in the Invasion of Glioblastoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IM3 U87 and U87 IM3 cells were transfected with either FITC-labeled anti-miR-143, anti- miR-145, or a control LNA knockdown probe which binds nothing in the cell (Exiqon, Vedbaek, Denmark) at final concentration of 50nM using Lipofectamine 2000...

Ronck, Matthew K 1984-

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

I. El duelo de Requiem para (mi?) infancia RIO-plat-ENSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

El duelo I. de Réquiem para (mi? ) infância RIO-plat-ENSE "El duelo (de Réquiem para (mi? ) infancia RIO-plat-ENSE>

Pellarolo, Silvia

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

People Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Is NIF? How NIF Works Seven Wonders Beamline NIF Construction Who Works for NIF & PS? People Profiles Management Awards Honors Fellows Who Partners with NIF? FAQs Visit Us...

55

Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

company data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

56

Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

57

Mi Abuelo Camina La Tierra Con Nobleza y Paz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con nobleza y paz Se me fue mi Abuelo pero aun así me siguevalor valor para amarme a mí misma © 2014 Elizabeth GonzálezCárdenas valor para protegerme a mí misma valor para cambiar

González Cárdenas, Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Marysville, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

59

St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

60

Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

62

Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Marysville, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

63

Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

individual company data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

64

Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - No...

65

St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

company data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

66

St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

67

St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

data. Release Date: 1302015 Next Release Date: 2272015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Exports to...

68

Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1...

69

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14 Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MITTS-MERREL CO. (MI.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mitts & Merrell Co. MI.14-1 Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces on a small test scale during the mid-1950s. MI.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantity of materials handled MI.14-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium MI.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only MI.14-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

70

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Oxide MI.13-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only MI.13-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Baker-Perkins Co

71

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow Chemical Co - Midland - MI 06  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Midland - MI 06 Midland - MI 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow Chemical Co. - Midland (MI.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Midland , Michigan MI.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.06-2 Site Operations: Conducted development work for production of magnesium-thorium alloys. MI.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed site MI.06-1 MI.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium MI.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Dow Chemical Co. - Midland MI.06-1 - NRC Letter; R. G. Page to William E. Mott; Subject: List of contaminated or potentially contaminated sites; January 22, 1982;

72

miR-34a blocks osteoporosis and bone metastasis by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and Tgif2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a miR-34a precursor (pre-miR-34a) but enhanced by an antisense miR-34a inhibitor (anti-miR-34a), indicating that miR-34a regulation of bone resorption in mice ... -34a mimic can attenuate postmenopausal osteoporosis using an ovariectomy (OVX) mouse model and a chitosan (CH) nanoparticle vehicle. Reduction of uterine weight in all ovariectomized mice indicated effective ...

Jing Y. Krzeszinski; Wei Wei; HoangDinh Huynh; Zixue Jin; Xunde Wang; Tsung-Cheng Chang; Xian-Jin Xie; Lin He; Lingegowda S. Mangala; Gabriel Lopez-Berestein; Anil K. Sood; Joshua T. Mendell; Yihong Wan

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Mentee Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

74

Mentor Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

75

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - MI 0-03 Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action MI.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT MI.0-03-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Shafer; Subject: Information on

76

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow-Detroit Edison Project (MI.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. MI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at the site MI.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None MI.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): no Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Dow-Detroit Edison Project MI.0-02-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; S.Jones to the File; Subject:

77

Posizione Matricola Corso di Laurea Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 764721 I-INGEGNERIA MATEMATICA MI 110 05/11/1988  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

764721 I-INGEGNERIA MATEMATICA MI 110 05/11/1988 2 771099 I-INGEGNERIA BIOMEDICA MI 110 19/10/1987 3 783806 I-INGEGNERIA BIOMEDICA MI MI 110 19/05/1989 4 783463 I-INGEGNERIA BIOMEDICA MI MI 110 19/05/1989 5 769961 I-INGEGNERIA BIOMEDICA MI MI 110 10/01/1989 6 764825 I-INGEGNERIA MATEMATICA MI LC 110 22

78

Supplementary Table1. TE-derived miRNAs. ath-MIR414 MI0001425 chr1:25141119-25141226(-) ATCopia24I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Table1. TE-derived miRNAs. Namea Accnb Coordsc TEd Overlape ath-MIR414 MI0001425 chr1:25141119-25141226(-) ATCopia24I (LTR/Copia) 57.41 ath-MIR855 MI0005411 chr2:4681509-4681780(+) Athila4B_LTR (LTR/Gypsy) 100.00 ath-MIR416 MI0001427 chr2:7015602-7015681(+) Vandal1 (DNA/MuDR) 100.00 ath-MIR405a MI0001074 chr2

Jordan, King

79

REC Silicon formerly ASiMI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silicon formerly ASiMI Silicon formerly ASiMI Jump to: navigation, search Name REC Silicon (formerly ASiMI) Place Butte, Montana Zip 59750 Product Manufactures and sells polycrystalline silicon. Coordinates 47.838435°, -100.665669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.838435,"lon":-100.665669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Ground Motion Studies at NuMI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground motion can cause significant deterioration in the luminosity of a linear collider. Vibration of numerous focusing magnets causes continuous misalignments, which makes the beam emittance grow. For this reason, understanding the seismic vibration of all potential LC sites is essential and related efforts in many sites are ongoing. In this document we summarize the results from the studies specific to Fermilab grounds as requested by the LC project leader at FNAL, Shekhar Mishra in FY04-FY06. The Northwestern group focused on how the ground motion effects vary with depth. Knowledge of depth dependence of the seismic activity is needed in order to decide how deep the LC tunnel should be at sites like Fermilab. The measurements were made in the NuMI tunnel, see Figure 1. We take advantage of the fact that from the beginning to the end of the tunnel there is a height difference of about 350 ft and that there are about five different types of dolomite layers. The support received allowed to pay for three months of salary of Michal Szleper. During this period he worked a 100% of his time in this project. That include one week of preparation: 2.5 months of data taking and data analysis during the full period of the project in order to guarantee that we were recording high quality data. We extended our previous work and made more systematic measurements, which included detailed studies on stability of the vibration amplitudes at different depths over long periods of time. As a consequence, a better control and more efficient averaging out of the daytime variation effects were possible, and a better study of other time dependences before the actual depth dependence was obtained. Those initial measurements were made at the surface and are summarized in Figure 2. All measurements are made with equipment that we already had (two broadband seismometers KS200 from GEOTECH and DL-24 portable data recorder). The offline data analysis took advantage of the full Fourier spectra information and the noise was properly subtracted. The basic formalism is summarized if Figure 3. The second objective was to make a measurement deeper under ground (Target hall, Absorber hall and Minos hall - 150 ft to 350 ft), which previous studies did not cover. All results are summarized in Figure 3 and 4. The measurements were covering a frequency range between 0.1 to 50 Hz. The data was taken continuously for at least a period of two weeks in each of the locations. We concluded that the dependence on depth is weak, if any, for frequencies above 1 Hz and not visible at all at lower frequencies. Most of the attenuation (factor of about 2-3) and damping of ground motion that is due to cultural activity at the surface is not detectable once we are below 150 ft underground. Therefore, accelerator currently under consideration can be build at the depth and there is no need to go deeper underground is built at Fermi National Laboratory.

Mayda M. Velasco; Michal Szleper

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab is due to begin operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam of variable energy 2-20 GeV directed into the Earth at 58 mrad for short (~1 km) and long (~700-900 km) baseline experiments. Several aspects of the design are reviewed, as are potential upgrade requirements to the facility in the event a Proton Driver is built at Fermilab to enhance the neutrino flux.

Sacha E. Kopp

2004-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Just the Tip of the Iceberg: The Truncation of Mexican American Identity in My Family/Mi Familia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Huaco-Nuzman, Carmen. "Mi Familia/My Family." Review. AztlánAmerica. lowa City: Familia/Mi Familia. Dir. Gregory Nava.Saga Traces 'My My Family/Mi Familia. National Catholic

Serrato, Phillip

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Los Angeles of My Broken Heart: Pocha Mobility in México de mi corazón and Del otro lado del puente  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emilio García. “México de mi corazón. ” Historia documental372-373. Print. Films México de mi corazón (Dos mexicanas enPocha Mobility in México de mi corazón and Del otro lado del

Parades, Veronica

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Politically Escapist… or Engaged? History and Subversion in Leonardo Padura’s La novela de mi vida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

y ficción en La novela de mi vida: La historia como versiónPadura Fuentes: La novela de mi vida. Academic Detecting andin Leonardo Padura’s La novela de mi vida RUDYARD J. ALCOCER

Alcocer, Rudyard J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and Instructions...

86

Event Rates for Off Axis NuMI Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino interaction rates for experiments placed off axis in the NuMI beam are calculated. Primary proton beam energy is 120 GeV and four locations at 810 km from target and 6, 12, 30 and 40 km off axis are considered. This report is part of the Joint FNAL/BNL Future Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Study.

B. Viren

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

NEC Introduces New miSEAT TSS Technology Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEC Introduces New miSEAT TSS Technology Collaboration Social aspects keep people collaborative way. All of the touch technology is completely embedded in the surface featuring a full standard #12;Benefits: CLEAN UP - Much more easily cleaned than standard keyboard/mouse setups, germ free

Goldstein, Seth Copen

88

Comparative Genomic Discovery of miRNAs Grad et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Genomic Discovery of miRNAs Grad et al. Computational and Experimental Identification throughout the adult life cycle (Feinbaum and Ambros, 1999; Lee et al., 1993; Reinhart et al., 2000 al., 1993; Wightman et al., 1993; Reinhart et al., 2000; Slack et al., 2000). Both lin-4 and let-7

Church, George M.

89

Physics Potential of the Fermilab NuMI beamline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the physics potential of the NuMI beamline with a detector located 10 km off-axis at a distant site (810 km). We study the sensitivity to $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$ and to the CP-violating parameter $\\sin \\delta$ as well as the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy by exploiting the $\

Olga Mena; Stephen Parke

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Albert-Ludwigs-Universitt Freiburg 3 Mi Tag der Deutschen Einheit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Oktober 1 Mo 2 Di 3 Mi Tag der Deutschen Einheit 4 Do 5 Fr 6 Sa 7 So 8 Mo 9 Di 10 Mi 11 Do 12 Fr 13 Sa 14 So 15 Mo 16 Di 17 Mi 18 Do 19 Fr Erstsemesternachmittag 20 Sa 21 So 22 Mo Semesterbeginn WiSe 12/13 23 Di 24 Mi Eröffnung Akademisches Jahr 25 Do 26 Fr 27 Sa 28

Schindelhauer, Christian

92

1 Di Neujahr 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo Ostermontag 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Di Neujahr 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo Ostermontag 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 3 Do 3 So 3 So 3 Mi 4 Fr 4 Mo 4 Mo 4 Do 5 Sa 5 Di 5 Di 5 Fr 6 So 6 Mi 6 Mi 6 Sa 7 Mo 7 Do 7 Do 7 So 8 Di 8 Fr 8 Fr 8 Mo 9 Mi 9 Sa 9 Sa 9 Di 10 Do 10 So 10 So 10 Mi 11 Fr 11 Mo 11 Mo 11 Do 12 Sa 12 Di 12 Di 12 Fr 13 So 13 Mi 13 Mi Power

Grübel, Rudolf

93

Hematite spherules at Meridiani: Results from MI, Mini-TES, W. M. Calvin,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hematite spherules at Meridiani: Results from MI, Mini-TES, and Pancam W. M. Calvin,1 J. D on observations of hematite-bearing spherules at Meridiani Planum made using the Microscopic Imager (MI), Mini seen in MI, both Pancam and Mini-TES indices are highly variable based on the local surface

Glotch, Timothy D.

94

M2MI Service Discovery Middleware Framework Hans-Peter Bischof, Joel Varela Donado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M2MI Service Discovery Middleware Framework Hans-Peter Bischof, Joel Varela Donado Rochester.rit.edu Abstract. The Many-to-Many-Invocation (M2MI) Service Discovery Middleware Framework provides an API for publishing, providing, and using services in a serverless ad hoc network of devices imple- menting the M2MI

Bischof, Hans-Peter

95

Mi'kmaq Fisheries in Atlantic Canada: Traditions, Legal Decisions and Community Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mi'kmaq Fisheries in Atlantic Canada: Traditions, Legal Decisions and Community Management Chris Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract Historically, the Mi'kmaq, the indigenous people of Atlantic relationships and government policies. Today, recent court decisions upholding Mi'kmaq rights to the Atlantic

Charles, Anthony

96

UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE's Office UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE's Office UGA ID Number Last Name First MI Academic Term THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA APPLICATION TO MAKE LATE

Arnold, Jonathan

97

Lineare Algebra I (lehramtsbezogen) https://www.mi.fu-berlin.de/kvv/course.htm?cid=10310  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lineare Algebra I (lehramtsbezogen) https://www.mi.fu-berlin.de/kvv/course.htm?cid=10310 -- kein@math.fu-berlin.de http://page.mi.fu-berlin.de/gmziegler/ FU Berlin, Winter 2011/2012 0. Lineare Geometrie des n¨uhrung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mi, 19. Oktober 2. Feststellungstest

Ziegler, Günter M.

98

miR156 and miR390 Regulate tasiRNA Accumulation and Developmental Timing in Physcomitrella patens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A miRNA and tasiRNA Regulatory Network Controlling Developmental Timing Review and synthesis of previously...a densely connected regulatory network (Figure 7A...the gametophyte body plan by either retarding...lineages. The tight regulatory network found in P...

Sung Hyun Cho; Ceyda Coruh; Michael J. Axtell

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hepatitis C virus and human miR-122: insights from the bench to the clinic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding \\{RNAs\\} that function as part of RNA-induced silencing complexes that repress the expression of target genes. Over the past few years, miRNAs have been found to mediate complex regulation of a wide variety of mammalian viral infections, including Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we focus on a highly abundant, liver-specific miRNA, miR-122. In a unique and unusual interaction, miR-122 binds to two sites in the 5? untranslated region (UTR) of the HCV genome and promotes viral RNA accumulation. We will discuss what has been learned about this important interaction to date, provide insights into how miR-122 is able to modulate HCV RNA accumulation, and how miR-122 might be exploited for antiviral intervention.

Joyce A Wilson; Selena M Sagan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Studies of muon-induced radioactivity at NuMI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The JASMIN Collaboration has studied the production of radionuclides by muons in the muon alcoves of the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. Samples of aluminum and copper are exposed to the muon field and counted on HpGe detectors when removed to determine their content of radioactive isotopes. We compare the results to MARS simulations and discuss the radiological implications for neutrino factories and muon colliders.

Boehnlein, David j.; Leveling, A.F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab; Iwamoto, Y.; Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, Hiroshi; /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., KURRI /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Shimizu, Tokyo /Tohoku U.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An investigation of the distribution of rainfall with elevation for selected stations in Ecuador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is labeled on the physical profile. 43 4000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Rainfall / I / \\ I I 82s r 9 (2) &000 %000 sgs ~ %000 0 Elevation (3) m Fig. 11. Cross-section 1, Esmeraldas-Tulcan. Cross-section Number 1, Figure 11, transects Northern... factors, ocean currents, mountains, and wind systems, affecting the rainfall is presented, The basic data for this study is the mean annual rainfall and the station elevation. The mean annual rain- fall was calculated for all stations having four...

Rumley, Glenn Bertham

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Safety Share Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walkways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3, 2010 3, 2010 Safety Share Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walkways Dick Donovan, of HS-70, informed the HSS VPP Committee about a recent safety incident he experienced while at an airport in Las Vegas. Dick tripped as he was getting off of the escalator. The incident made him consider the day-to-day hazards we take for granted. With this in mind, Dick made an effort to look around to find safety information about using elevators, escalators and moving walkways. Dick came across some useful safety information provided by the Otis Elevator Company. The web site below provides links to two good one-page reminders for safety on elevators, escalators, and moving walkways. http://www.otis.com/site/us/Pages/SafetyforAll.aspx Dick also found more interactive presentations on the same material, see website below. These

103

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

104

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

105

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

106

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

107

Posizione Matricola Corso di Laurea Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 765363 I-INGEGNERIA NUCLEARE MI BV 110 05/07/1988  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

765363 I-INGEGNERIA NUCLEARE MI BV 110 05/07/1988 2 766599 I-INGEGNERIA NUCLEARE MI 110 21/03/1988 3 764813 I-INGEGNERIA ELETTRICA MI 110 29/04/1987 4 765411 I-INGEGNERIA CHIMICA MI 110 23/05/1988 5 781546 NANOTECHNOLOGY MI 110 19/08/1989 6 778979 NANOTECHNOLOGY MI 110 21/05/1990 7 764495 I-INGEGNERIA NUCLEARE MI 110

108

User_TalentProfile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

109

Incidence and spread of insects from bucket elevator leg boots.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In commercial grain elevators and feed mills, the boot and pit areas contribute to commingling of insects with grain that moves through the elevator leg.… (more)

Tilley, Dennis Ray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

U-030: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated Privileges U-030: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated Privileges November 9, 2011 - 8:30am...

111

AGRADECIMIENTOS Quisiera agradecer a mi director de tesis Jos M Rodrguez Ibabe la  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRADECIMIENTOS Quisiera agradecer a mi director de tesis José Mª Rodríguez Ibabe la disposición y tener la cabeza sobre los hombros cuando la mía orbitaba, y a mi familia por estar siempre ahí. Quisiera dedicar esta Tesis a la memoria de Javier Urcola y a la de mi bisabuelo Saturio de Andrés. #12;vi ESKERRAK

Cambridge, University of

112

Stress-MI and domain studies in Co-based nanocrystalline ribbons Sandhya Dwevedi a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress-MI and domain studies in Co-based nanocrystalline ribbons Sandhya Dwevedi a , G on the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in melt-spun (Co1�xFex)89Zr7B4 [x¼0, 0.025, 0.05] and (Co0.88Fe0.12)78.4Nb2.6Si9B9Al in large MI. Magnetic domains were investigated in the ribbons through magnetic force microscopy. & 2011

McHenry, Michael E.

113

Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Elevance Renewable Sciences Inc Place Bolingbrook, Illinois Zip 60440 Sector Biofuels, Renewable Energy Product Illinois-based developer of biofuels and renewable chemicals from plant-based oils and animal fats. Coordinates 41.698175°, -88.081199° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.698175,"lon":-88.081199,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Emploi du temps Licence de Mathmatiques semestre 6 MA= parcours maths approfondies M= parcours maths MI= parcours math-info ( groupe C en LI2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M= parcours maths MI= parcours math-info ( groupe C en LI2) 08h00-09h30 09h45-11h15 11h30-13h00 13h15-14h45 15h00-16h30 16h45-18h15 lundi MA MA M M MI MI mardi MA Anglais MA M TD Histoire des Maths M 3.2 M MI Anglais MI mercredi MA TD Variable Complexe M 3.2 MA M M MI MI jeudi MA MA M M MI MI

Berger, Clemens

116

Posizione Matricola Corso di Laurea Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 782252 A-ARCHITETTURA MI BV 110 07/05/1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

782252 A-ARCHITETTURA MI BV 110 07/05/1989 2 766298 A-PIANIFICAZIONE URBANA E POLITICHE TERRITORIALI MI BV 110 20/04/1989 3 770229 A-PIANIFICAZIONE URBANA E POLITICHE TERRITORIALI MI 110 27/06/1988 4 767317 A-ARCHITETTURA MI 110 13/06/1988 5 765987 A-PIANIFICAZIONE URBANA E POLITICHE TERRITORIALI MI 110

117

Polyetheretherketone Membranes for Elevated Temperature PEMFCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elevated tempera- tures the long-term stability of the sulfonic acid membranes e.g., Nafion is poor of a hydrogen economy. However, a pure hydrogen economy has difficulties to overcome including storage enable reusing waste heat for domestic and industrial heating thereby improving overall efficiency

Weidner, John W.

118

Chronic stress elevates telomerase activity in rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chronic stress elevates telomerase activity in rats Annaliese K. Beery 1 * Jue Lin 2 Joshua...unpredictable stress on telomerase activity in male rats. Telomerase activity was 54 per cent higher in stressed rats than in controls, and associated with stress-related...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Noncanonical MicroRNA (miRNA) Biogenesis Gives Rise to Retroviral Mimics of Lymphoproliferative and Immunosuppressive Host miRNAs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biology and vectorology. IMPORTANCE Fundamental questions remain about which viruses...virus families utilize miRNAs remains a fundamental question. Furthermore, the functions...Luminoskan Ascent luminometer (Thermo Electronic). Students t-test was used to assess...

Rodney P. Kincaid; Yating Chen; Jennifer E. Cox; Axel Rethwilm; Christopher S. Sullivan

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Using SeDuMi 1.02, a MATLAB toolbox for optimization over symmetric cones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SeDuMi is an add-on for MATLAB, that lets you solve optimization problems with linear, quadratic and semidefiniteness constraints. It is possible to have complex valued data and variables in SeDuMi. Moreover, large scale optimization problems are solved efficiently, by exploiting sparsity. This paper describes how to work with this toolbox.

Jos F. Sturm

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Kandidatexjobb inom fysik Bjrn Cederstrm, bjorn@mi.physics.kth.se  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kandidatexjobb inom fysik VT 2014 Björn Cederström, bjorn@mi.physics.kth.se (avgående kontaktpersonGoLite project #12;Tack! Mer information: http://www.mi.physics.kth.se/web/teaching_kand_exjobb.htm 2013-09-25 12

Haviland, David

122

Detection of Novel Human MiRNAs Responding to X-ray Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sequences cloned from total small RNA pools. Novel miRNA candidates were iden- tified...expression) plus the third criterion (conservation), are regarded as adequate. The expression...miR408 are up-regulated in response to water deficit in Medicago truncatula. Planta......

Nan Ding; Xin Wu; Jinpeng He; Lei Chang; Wentao Hu; Wenjian Li; Jufang Wang; Tieshan Wang; Guangming Zhou

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Studies of Muon-Induced Radioactivity at NuMIRadioactivity at NuMI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of Muon-Induced Radioactivity at NuMIRadioactivity at NuMI David Boehnlein Fermi National JASMIN Experiment · JASMIN ­ Japanese & American Study of Muon Interactions and Neutron DetectionMuonMIprogress to study activation at the NuMI muon alcoves. July 24, 2009 NuFact09 - David Boehnlein 3NuFact09 - David

McDonald, Kirk

124

miR-155 Drives Telomere Fragility in Human Breast Cancer by Targeting TRF1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly increased frequency of telomere sister...telomere function drives central features...for each clinical variable and TRF1 expression...Figure 4. miR-155 drives alterations in telomere...Figure 5. miR-155 drives alterations in telomere...images 1 and 2. B, frequency of telomere fragility...

Roberto Dinami; Cristiana Ercolani; Eleonora Petti; Silvano Piazza; Yari Ciani; Rosanna Sestito; Andrea Sacconi; Francesca Biagioni; Carlos le Sage; Reuven Agami; Roberta Benetti; Marcella Mottolese; Claudio Schneider; Giovanni Blandino; and Stefan Schoeftner

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Organiza: Colaboran: CONCURSO "ESTA ES MI AUSTRIA, CUL ES LA TUYA?"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organiza: Colaboran: CONCURSO "ESTA ES MI AUSTRIA, ¿CUÁL ES LA TUYA?" BASES DE PARTICIPACI�N, y CIF nº. N0381025F, convoca el I Concurso de cortometrajes "Esta es mi Austria, ¿cuál es la tuya

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

126

Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3] I. Kourbanis, "e-Clotid MI Measurements", 26 Aug. 2007. [Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern:the F N A L Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made

Furman, M. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mobility of Tritium in Engineered and Earth Materials at the NuMI Facility, Fermilab: Progress report for work performed between June 13 and September 30, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the NuMI project, FERMILAB-TM-2009 and NuMI-B-279, Fermito NuMI beam tunnels, FERMILAB-TM-2083, Fermi Nationalprotection radiation safety, Fermilab report, July 2001.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Posizione Matricola Corso di Laurea Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 781330 I-GESTIONE DEL COSTRUITO MI 110 11/08/1988  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

781330 I-GESTIONE DEL COSTRUITO MI 110 11/08/1988 2 783933 I-GESTIONE DEL COSTRUITO MI BV 110 03/09/1987 3 766434 I-INGEGNERIA DEI SISTEMI EDILIZI MI 110 30/08/1988 4 761490 I-INGEGNERIA DEI SISTEMI EDILIZI MI 108 17/08/1989 5 776698 I-GESTIONE DEL COSTRUITO MI MI 106 02/05/1989 6 784798 I-INGEGNERIA DEI

129

Posizione Matricola Corso di Luarea magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 783525 I-INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA MI 110 10/04/1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

783525 I-INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA MI 110 10/04/1989 2 766724 I-INGEGNERIA ELETTRONICA MI 110 11/01/1989 3 752109 I-INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA MI 110 03/12/1984 4 783081 I-INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA MI BV 110 09/03/1989 5 783397 I-INGEGNERIA DELLE TELECOMUNICAZIONI MI 110 16/02/1988 6 750317 I-INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA MI

130

Posizione Matricola Corso di Laurea Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 783078 I-INGEGNERIA CIVILE MI CO 110 26/09/1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

783078 I-INGEGNERIA CIVILE MI CO 110 26/09/1989 2 783301 I-INGEGNERIA CIVILE MI 110 31/10/1989 3 767166 I-INGEGNERIA PER L'AMBIENTE E IL TERRITORIO MI 110 06/08/1988 4 784194 I-INGEGNERIA PER L'AMBIENTE E IL TERRITORIO MI 110 28/04/1989 5 783920 I-INGEGNERIA CIVILE MI MI 110 31/12/1989 6 782721 I-INGEGNERIA PER L

131

PIANO DI RIQUALIFICAZIONE AMBIENTALE E PAESAGGISTICA DEL TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) ­ BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA Impianto di costruito negli anni '70 per lo

Columbia University

132

Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

Nerenberg, Robert

134

LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 22, 1995 Dummy first body page  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 22, 1995 page 0 Dummy first body page #12;LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) September 22, 1995 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group Place 1 9:52.4 Ken:59.7 Derek DeBusschere mi

135

LBL RUNAROUND 3.00km (1.865mi) September 13, 1985 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL RUNAROUND 3.00km (1.865mi) September 13, 1985 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group Place 1 10 course record #12;LBL RUNAROUND 3.00km (1.865mi) September 13, 1985 page 2 Place Time Name Group Group-49 19 100 14:03.5 Joshua W. Burton mi) September 13, 1985 page 3

136

LBL RUNAROUND 3.00 km (1.865 mi) September 19, 1986 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL RUNAROUND 3.00 km (1.865 mi) September 19, 1986 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group Place 1 10 12:53.1 Alan Comnes mi) September 19, 1986 page 2.00 km (1.865 mi) September 19, 1986 page 3 Place Time Name Group Group Place 109 14:30.9 Lutgard

137

miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 18–24 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. • Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profiles Shea Mosby: Lighting the way for nuclear science discoveries By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications Photos by Richard Robinson, IRM-CAS Shea Mosby Cradling a heavy...

139

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

140

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-26-2013. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA markets wholesale electrical power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

142

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical...

143

Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(5):745-752. 9. Raver-Shapira N, Marciano E, Meiri E, Spector Y, Rosenfeld N, Mosk- ovits N, Bentwich Z, Oren M: Transcriptional activation of miR- 34a contributes to p53-mediated apoptosis. Mol Cell 2007, 26(5):731-743. 10. Bommer GT, Gerin I, Feng Y... is consistent with the observed ability of miR-34 to downregulate a program of genes promoting cell cycle progression [12]. miR-34a has been reported to be involved in p53-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer and pancreatic cancer [8,9]. Tazawa et al. provided...

Ji, Qing; Hao, Xinbao; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Min; DeSano, Jeffrey; Fan, Daiming; Xu, Liang

2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DISS. ETH NO. 20845 FUSION OF DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISS. ETH NO. 20845 FUSION OF DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS A dissertation submitted to ETH ZURICH.109 Fusion of Digital Elevation Models Charis Papasaika-Hanusch Copyright c 2012, Charis Papasaika-3-906467-96-2 i #12;Abstract Digital Elevations Models are one of the most important types of geodata

Giger, Christine

146

Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

Casadei, Diego

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

User's Guide for SeDuMi Interface 1.01: Solving LMI problems with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 2, 2001 ... particular, a major di culty is that control problems are formulated ... these potentialities will be integrated to SeDuMi Interface in the future, depending on ...... improve this document and make some publicity for your results.

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Lac Vieux Desert Tribe proposes to use funding to help with a current effort that is a collaboration of the Tribe with the Conservation Fund of Michigan, an effort that is funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The project will be conducting a feasibility study to determine the viability of using wood products from resources found on tribal lands. The study is dedicating a part of the effort to see the feasibility of providing a renewable energy source to the Tribe in the form of wood products and biomass fuels. NEPA

149

Boulder County - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boulder County - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) Boulder County - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) Boulder County - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Colorado Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount Residential: $500 - $25,000 Commercial: $1,000 - $150,000 Provider Elevations Credit Union The Elevations Energy Loan can be used to finance a wide variety of efficiency and renewable energy projects in homes and businesses. Homes and

150

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Examples of nighttime temperature inversions are shown in thermal infrared satellite images collected over the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. Temperature-elevation plots show the normal trend of temperature decrease with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear superimposed as opposite trends. Such inversions are common and they should

151

Sensitivity of the South Asian monsoon to elevated and non-elevated heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from cold and dry extratropical air or by providing a source of elevated heating. Here we show for the South Asian monsoon via a ``sensible-heat-driven air-pump''. In their proposed mech- anism, sensible, and suggests that monsoons respond most strongly to heat sources coincident with the thermal maximum. E levated

Kuang, Zhiming

152

Thermodynamics of a stochastic twin elevator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a single particle with two available energy levels, in contact with a classical (Maxwell-Boltzmann) or quantum (Bose-Einstein) heat bath. The particle can undergo transitions between the levels via thermal activation or deactivation. The energy levels are alternately raised at a given rate regardless of occupation by the particle, maintaining a fixed energy gap equal to ? between them. We explicitly calculate the work, heat, and entropy production rates. The efficiency in both the classical and the quantum case goes to a limit between 100 and 50% that depends on the relative rates of particle transitions and level elevation. In the classical problem we explicitly find the large deviation functions for heat, work, and internal energy.

Niraj Kumar; Christian Van den Broeck; Massimiliano Esposito; Katja Lindenberg

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qiu, Yongming, E-mail: qiuzhoub@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China) [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China); Mao, Qing, E-mail: maoq@netease.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China) [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

154

MiR-145 regulates PAK4 via the MAPK pathway and exhibits an antitumor effect in human colon cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 played an important role in inhibiting cell growth by directly targeting PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 may function as tumor suppressors. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of numerous cellular events; accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play a key role in a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer. Down-regulated expression of miR-145 has been reported in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. The molecular mechanisms underlying miR-145 and the regulation of colon carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the levels of miR-145 in human colon cancer cells using qRT-PCR and found markedly decreased levels compared to normal epithelial cells. We identified PAK4 as a novel target of miR-145 using informatics screening. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4 and that its abundance is inversely associated with miR-145 expression in colon cancer cells; we confirmed this relationship using the luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, restoration of miR-145 by mimics in SW620 cells significantly attenuated cell growth in vitro, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by siRNA mediated knockdown of PAK4. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that miR-145 downregulates P-ERK expression by targeting PAK4 and leads to inhibition of tumor growth.

Wang, Zhigang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xiaoping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China); Yang, Zhili; Du, Hangxiang; Wu, Zhenqian; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Qi, E-mail: zhengqi1957@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Noncanonical MicroRNA (miRNA) Biogenesis Gives Rise to Retroviral Mimics of Lymphoproliferative and Immunosuppressive Host miRNAs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...METHODS See Text S1 in the supplemental material for full details...in the study. Cell lines. HeLa, HEK293, and...The human B-cell line GM19240 was obtained...Data Set-S2 in the supplemental material for complete...Generation of stable cell lines expressing SFVagm-miR-S6S7...

Rodney P. Kincaid; Yating Chen; Jennifer E. Cox; Axel Rethwilm; Christopher S. Sullivan

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

157

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

158

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

159

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

160

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

162

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

163

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

164

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

165

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

166

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

167

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

168

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

169

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

170

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

171

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

172

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

173

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

174

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

175

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

176

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

177

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

178

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

180

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

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181

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

182

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

183

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

184

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

186

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

203

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

205

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

206

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

207

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

208

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

209

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

210

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

211

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

212

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

214

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

216

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

217

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

218

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

219

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

220

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

222

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

223

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

224

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

225

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

226

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

227

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

228

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

229

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

230

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

231

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

232

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

233

Profiling for Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and profiling are critical words in our everyday conversations in the office where I work, in our engagements with clients, and in our teaching. Both words apply equally well to all aspec...

Ron Crisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

235

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

236

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

237

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

238

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

239

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

240

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

242

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

243

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

244

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

245

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

246

Sirt2 suppresses glioma cell growth through targeting NF-?B–miR-21 axis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Sirt2 expression is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. •Sirt2 regresses glioma cell growth and colony formation via inducing apoptosis. •miR-21 is essential for the functions of Sirt2 in glioma cells. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 to decrease miR-21 expression. -- Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases that regulate numerous cellular processes including aging, DNA repair, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions. The roles of sirtuin family members are widely studied in carcinogenesis. However, their roles in glioma remain unclear. Here we report that Sir2 was under expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. We found that Sirt2 overexpression decreased cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. In addition, Sirt2 overexpression induced cellular apoptosis via up-regulating cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Sirt2 knockdown obtained opposing results. We showed that Sirt2 overexpression inhibited miR-21 expression, and Sirt2 was not sufficient to reduce cell proliferation and colony formation as well as to induce apoptosis when miR-21 was knocked down in glioma cells. Mechanically, we demonstrated that Sirt2 deacetylated p65 at K310 and blocked p65 binding to the promoter region of miR-21, thus regressing the transcription of miR-21. In summary, Sirt2 is critical in human glioma via NF-?B–miR-21 pathway and Sirt2 activator may serve as candidate drug for glioma therapy.

Li, Ya’nan; Dai, Dongwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Lu, Qiong; Fei, Mingyu [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Mengmeng [Department of Rheumatology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Rheumatology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Wu, Xi, E-mail: xiwuchh@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Determining Mountaintop Mining Locations in West Virginia Using Elevation Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining Mountaintop Mining Locations in West Virginia Using Elevation Datasets Danny Rowland Haskell Indian Nations University Image from: http://www.colorado.edu/geography/cartpro/cartography2/spring2006/syphers.../projects/westvirginia/whatis.htm Image from: http://washingtonindependent.com/49008/congress-takes-on-mountaintop-mining Mountaintop Mining Operation 2 Elevation datasets: NED & SRTM West Virginia NED SRTM Elevation Change Over ~30 Year Period 20021970’s SRTM Subtracted from...

Rowland, Danny

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 11, 1996 Dummy first body page  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 11, 1996 page 0 Dummy first body page #12;LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 11, 1996 page 1 Place Time Name Group Group Place 1 9:35.6 Place Time Name Group Group Place #12;LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 11, 1996 page 2

249

Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

Jordan, E.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Elevated Temperature Ion Implantation: A New Direction for Surface Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of commercial alloys were investigated to study the effectiveness of elevated temperature nitrogen ion PSII implantation in creating engineered surfaces having superior properties. These included several...

F. J. Worzala; J. R. Conrad; R. A. Dodd; M. Madapura; K. Sridharan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO 2 on Geothermal Energy Production Principal Investigator Susan Carroll Lawrence Livermore National Lab Track Name May 18-20, 2010 This presentation...

252

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the...

253

Single-molecule modeling of mRNA degradation by miRNA: Lessons from data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental results on the effect of miRNA on the decay of its target mRNA have been analyzed against a previously hypothesized single molecule degradation pathway. According to that hypothesis, the silencing complex (miRISC) first interacts with its target mRNA and then recruits the protein complexes associated with NOT1 and PAN3 to trigger deadenylation (and subsequent degradation) of the target mRNA. Our analysis of the experimental decay patterns allowed us to refine the structure of the degradation pathways at the single molecule level. Surprisingly, we found that if the previously hypothesized network was correct, only about 7% of the target mRNA would be regulated by the miRNA mechanism, which is inconsistent with the available knowledge. Based on systematic data analysis, we propose the alternative hypothesis that NOT1 interacts with miRISC before binding to the target mRNA. Moreover, we show that when miRISC binds alone to the target mRNA, the mRNA is degraded more slowly, probably through a ...

Sin, Celine; Valleriani, Angelo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Single-molecule modeling of mRNA degradation by miRNA: Lessons from data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental results on the effect of miRNA on the decay of its target mRNA have been analyzed against a previously hypothesized single molecule degradation pathway. According to that hypothesis, the silencing complex (miRISC) first interacts with its target mRNA and then recruits the protein complexes associated with NOT1 and PAN3 to trigger deadenylation (and subsequent degradation) of the target mRNA. Our analysis of the experimental decay patterns allowed us to refine the structure of the degradation pathways at the single molecule level. Surprisingly, we found that if the previously hypothesized network was correct, only about 7% of the target mRNA would be regulated by the miRNA mechanism, which is inconsistent with the available knowledge. Based on systematic data analysis, we propose the alternative hypothesis that NOT1 interacts with miRISC before binding to the target mRNA. Moreover, we show that when miRISC binds alone to the target mRNA, the mRNA is degraded more slowly, probably through a deadenylation-independent pathway. The new biochemical pathway we propose both fits the data and paves the way for new experimental work to identify new interactions.

Celine Sin; Davide Chiarugi; Angelo Valleriani

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.

256

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

257

APPENDIX A: SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL As we see in Fig. 2, the hub of the algorithm is the M matrix. Matrix element Mi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Matrix element Mi j represents the best way to fold the prefixes s[1..i] and t[1..j] given that i and j are paired. Mi j = min Mi-1 j-1 + NN(i, j), (A1a) tstack(i - 1, j - 1) + Ginit + GAU/GU (i, j), (A1b) Mi-2 j-1 + NN (i, j, i - 2, j - 1) + Gbulge, (A1c) Mi-1 j-2 + NN (i, j, i - 1, j - 2) + Gbulge, (A1d) Mi-2

Aalberts, Daniel P.

258

U-030: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated 30: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated Privileges U-030: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated Privileges November 9, 2011 - 8:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache Tomcat Lets Untrusted Web Applications Gain Elevated Privileges. PLATFORM: Apache Tomcat 7.0.0-7.0.21. ABSTRACT: An untrusted web application can access Manager application functions. reference LINKS: Apache Tomcat 7.x vulnerabilities SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026295 CVE-2011-3376 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A local user (application) can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local web application (that is not trusted) can access Manager application functions without being marked as privileged. This can be exploited to obtain

259

City and County of Denver - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City and County of Denver - Elevations Energy Loans Program City and County of Denver - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) City and County of Denver - Elevations Energy Loans Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Colorado Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount Residential: $500 - $25,000 Commercial: $1,000 - $150,000 Provider Elevations Credit Union The Elevations Energy Loan can be used to finance a wide variety of efficiency and renewable energy projects in homes and businesses. Homes and

260

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

262

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

263

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

264

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

265

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

266

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

267

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

268

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

269

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

270

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

271

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

272

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

273

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

274

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

275

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

276

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

277

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

278

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

279

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

280

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

282

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

283

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

284

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

285

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

286

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

287

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

288

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

289

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

290

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

292

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

293

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

294

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

295

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

296

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

297

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

298

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

299

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

300

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

302

miR326 Maturation Is Crucial for VEGF-C–Driven Cortactin Expression and Esophageal Cancer Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acts as a tumor-suppressive miRNA in brain tumors and may prevent chemoresistance...microRNAs in squamous cell carcinoma of human head and neck and the esophagus: miR-205...notch and has therapeutic potential against brain tumors.J Neurosci 2009;29:15161-8...

Chih-Chen Hong; Pai-Sheng Chen; Jean Chiou; Ching-Feng Chiu; Ching-Yao Yang; Michael Hsiao; Yi-Wen Chang; Yang-Hao Yu; Mien-Chie Hung; Nai-Wen Hsu; Shine-Gwo Shiah; Nan-Yung Hsu; Jen-Liang Su

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

Kleinfeld, David

304

E-MiLi: Energy-Minimizing Idle Listening in Wireless Networks Xinyu Zhang and Kang G. Shin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

}@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT WiFi interface is known to be a primary energy consumer in mo- bile devices, and idle listeningE-MiLi: Energy-Minimizing Idle Listening in Wireless Networks Xinyu Zhang and Kang G. Shin with PSM enabled. To remedy this problem, we propose E-MiLi (Energy-Minimizing idle Listening) that re

Shihada, Basem

305

IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha upregulate angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors on cardiac fibroblasts and are associated with increased AT(1) density in the post-MI heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT 1 density in the post-MI heart Devorah Gurantz a , Randypost-myocardial infarction (MI) cardiac remodeling. The Angnon-myocytes in the post- MI heart. We have shown that pro-

Gurantz, D; Cowling, R T; Varki, N; Frikovsky, E; Moore, C D; Greenberg, Barry H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Los Estados Unidos como idea, estación y destino en el imaginario latinoamericano. Reseña de "Sam no es mi tío: Veinticuatro crónicas migrantes y un sueño americano" de Diego Fonseca y Aileen El-Kadi, eds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aileen El-Kadi, eds. Sam no es mi tío: Veinticuatro crónicasen la lectura de Sam no es mi tío. Veinticuatro crónicasuna antología como Sam no es mi tío nos indica que el ámbito

Corona, Ignacio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A plasma signature of human mitochondrial disease revealed through metabolic profiling of spent media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A plasma signature of human mitochondrial disease revealed through metabolic profiling of spent culture with analysis of patient plasma to identify disease biomarkers. First, we applied global metabolic-defined metabolites in human plasma to discover that creatine is reproducibly elevated in two independent cohorts

Mootha, Vamsi K.

308

Elevated temperature testing of gaskets for bolted flanged connections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bolted flanged connections are especially prone to leakage when operating at elevated temperatures. In 1986--87, the API Subcommittee on Pressure Vessels, Piping and Tanks expressed a need for gasket performance data and technical formulations to permit the design of gasket systems for high temperature service. The objective was to gain initial understanding of flange behavior, gasket deformation and leakage behavior under simulated elevated temperature service conditions. Experience gained through the previous PVRC-funded elevated temperature test programs as well as companion non-PVRC-funded programs has raised a number of basic questions which would be best answered in the context of a PVRC-supported effort. This Report summarizes the results obtained for four different topics covered in PVRC Grant No. 90-1, namely: (A) verify experimentally the extrapolated long term elevated temperature good performance of compressed asbestos reinforced sheet materials on which are based the MTI guidelines; (B) study the effect of creep/relaxation of flexible graphite sheet materials at elevated temperature on the tightness of a joint in which the gasket deflection remains practically constant; (C) study the effect of the gas medium and pressure on the tightness performance at elevated temperature of graphite filled spiral wound gaskets with and without internal rings; (D) establish correlations between the weight loss of elastomer sheet gasket materials during aging at elevated temperature, and changes in their mechanical properties (tensile strength and relaxation) as well as the variations of their tightness performance.

Derenne, M.; Marchand, L.; Bazergui, A. (Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Ecole Polytechnique); Payne, J.R. (J. Payne Associates, Long Valley, NJ (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IFN-?). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-?B signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-?B was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-? and IFN-? was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-?B inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

311

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

06) 06) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division, Financial

312

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

313

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

314

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

Tokarz, R.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Academic Staff ESS Coversheet Candidate Name (Last, First, M.I.) Banner ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rev. 6/14 Academic Staff ESS Coversheet Candidate Name (Last, First, M.I.) Banner ID Primary School Initial WSU appointment date Length of ESS-track service (in years & months) Academic Services Officer Archivist Initial WSU rank Dates off ESS-track/Reason Extens Prgm Coordinator Financial Aid Officer Date

VandeVord, Pamela

316

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration...

317

Measuring and mi-ga-ng impact of offshore oil development on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and mi-ga-ng impact of offshore oil development on seabirds and other effects are concentrated in the offshore ­ vicinity of the oil field J. 2001. Seabirds at risk around offshore oil pla=orms in the north

Jones, Ian L.

318

Director of Dissertation Committees (Ph.D.) 1. Tian Mi, University of Connecticut (June 2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Director of Dissertation Committees (Ph.D.) 1. Tian Mi, University of Connecticut (June 2013) 2. Samir A. Mohamed Elsayed, University of Connecticut (June 2013) 3. Rania Kilany, University of Connecticut (June 2013) 4. Hieu Dinh, University of Connecticut (August 2012) 5. Vamsi Kundeti, University

Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

319

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

320

SAE 1983 Transactions, Paper No. 830200, pp. 1.810-1.816 International Congress & Exposition, Detroit, Mi., Feb. 28-March 4, 1983  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Detroit, Mi., Feb. 28- March 4, 1983 #12;SAE 1983 Transactions, Paper No. 830200, pp. 1.810-1.816 International Congress & Exposition, Detroit, Mi., Feb. 28- March 4, 1983 #12;SAE 1983 Transactions, Paper No. 830200, pp. 1.810-1.816 International Congress & Exposition, Detroit, Mi., Feb. 28- March 4, 1983 Fig. 2

Radcliffe, Clark J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercElevators SPElectrtyUsePercElevators Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Elevators Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.125907012528 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 7.93251470469 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0177143892458 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1.06750770532 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.461813811056 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.11704275811 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.237557009519 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1.64859225677 +

322

Water chemistry of high elevation Colorado wilderness lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High elevation alpine and subalpine Rocky Mountain lakes in Colorado and southeastern Wyoming were examined to determine ... of the state. In contrast the north-western most lakes are significantly more dilute th...

Robert C. Musselman; William L. Slauson

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Structural Reliability of Bridges Elevated with Steel Pedestals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overheight vehicle impact to bridge decks is a major problem in the transportation networks in the United States. An important factor that causes this problem is inadequate vertical clearance of bridges. Using steel pedestals to elevate bridge decks...

Bisadi, Vahid 1980-

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering College of Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Dec. 2003 #12;Notes on Neutron Depth Profiling J. Kenneth Shultis December 2003 1 Introduction The purpose of neutron depth profiling

Shultis, J. Kenneth

325

Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Missouri and Texas. Several of these elevators are using oil additives on a regular basis. In addition to grain samples, operating data such as equipment capacities, operating hours and volume of grain handled were obtained. The grain samples were... in Missouri and Texas. Several of these elevators are using oil additives on a regular basis. In addition to grain samples, operating data such as equipment capacities, operating hours and volume of grain handled were obtained. The grain samples were...

Goforth, Kerry James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined...

327

Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

175 pounds of nitrogen, 80 pounds of phosphorus, and 80 pounds of potassium. Potassium is generally not needed in the High Plains, although many growers apply it. Texas Crop Profile P O T A T O E S E-19 3-00 Prepared by Kent D. Hall, Rodney L. Holloway..., following drag-off or after potato plants have fully emerged. Controls weeds by disrupting growth process during germination. Does not control established weeds. State Contacts Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Emploi du temps Licence de Mathmatiques semestre 6 MA= parcours maths approfondies M= parcours maths MI= parcours math-info ( groupe A en LI2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M= parcours maths MI= parcours math-info ( groupe A en LI2) 08h00-09h30 09h45-11h15 11h30-13h00 13h15-14h45 15h00-16h30 16h45-18h15 lundi MA MA M Anglais* M MI TP Programmation C PV202 MI mardi MA Anglais MA M TD Histoire des Maths M 3.2 M MI TP Projet Scientifique PV214 MI mercredi MA TD Variable

Parusinski, Adam

329

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

330

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

331

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

332

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

333

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

334

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

335

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

336

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

337

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

338

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

339

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

340

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

Crews, Stephen

342

Performance of MOV Stem Lubricants at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the results of recent tests sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These tests address the effectiveness of the lubricant used on the threaded portion of the valve stem, where the stem nut turns on the stem. Recent testing indicates that an elevated temperature environment can lead to significant increases in the friction coefficient at the stem/stem-nut interface. Most valve actuator qualification tests are performed at room temperature. Similarly, in-service tests are run at ambient plant temperatures, usually 70 to 100°F. Since design conditions can lead to valve operating temperatures in the 200 to 300°F range, it is important to know whether a temperature-induced increase in friction at the stem/stem-nut interface will prevent the required operation of critical valves. Lubricant aging is another phenomenon that might have deleterious effects on the thrust output of a valve actuator. Laboratory experience and field experience both indicate that after long periods in elevated temperature environments, the lubricants may lose their lubrication qualities. The scope of the current test program includes testing of five different lubricants on four different valve stems. Pending completion of the testing, results of the tests conducted using two of the four stems are discussed. The test series included collection of baseline data at room temperature, single step temperature tests where the temperature of the test setup was elevated directly to 250°F, and step testing where the temperature was elevated in steps to 130, 190, and 250°F, then returned to 70°F. All greases tested showed evidence of physical change after elevated temperature tests. Except for one particular lubricant, all of the greases tested showed increased coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures. Numerous other preliminary conclusions are presented. Recommendations for future research in the area of aged valve stem lubricant performance at elevated temperatures are also presented.

DeWall, Kevin George; Nitzel, Michael Everett; Watkins, John Clifford

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A deep-water approximation of the Stokes drift velocity profile is explored as an alternative to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profile investigated relies on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, namely, the ...

Øyvind Breivik; Peter A. E. M. Janssen; Jean-Raymond Bidlot

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001b.htm06/07/2004 13:02:41 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001d.htm06/07/2004 13:02:52 #12;5 Year

345

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0029.htm06/07/2004 13:01:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_002d.htm06/07/2004 13:01:34 #12;5 Year

346

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0067.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_006b.htm06/07/2004 13:04:46 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

347

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0079.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_007b.htm06/07/2004 13:05:59 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

348

Rangeland -- Plant responses to elevated CO sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several broad conclusions which can be drawn from the work that was accomplished during the first 3-year phase of the study is described. In prairie ecosystems dominated by C{sub 4} grasses, it is likely that elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} will increase ecosystem level productivity, with a greater increase in belowground productivity. The increased productivity will primarily result from increased water use efficiency due to the anti-transpirant action of CO{sub 2}. Fumigation chambers are directly confounded with elevated CO{sub 2} effects, in that both reduce evapotranspiration. The reduced evapotranspiration of the fumigation chamber is primarily through reduced wind speeds and reduced radiation. In very dry years, fumigation chamber effects are negligible, but in years with normal precipitation, chamber effects and elevated CO{sub 2} effects are essentially equal with respect to reduced evapotranspiration effects. Increased production under elevated CO{sub 2} results in reduced nitrogen concentration in the herbage and increased fiber concentrations. Consequently, digestibility of the herbage is reduced, and microbial degradation of surface litter and soil organic matter is slowed. On the negative side, ruminant productivity will likely be reduced substantially, but increased carbon storage in the soil may buffer against future rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Tallgrass prairie will not likely change greatly in botanical composition, since the C{sub 4} dominants responded to elevated CO{sub 2} more than the C{sub 3} subdominants.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Grain quality impacts of prohibiting recombination recirculation dust at export grain elevators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . 58 Figure A9 ? PSD OF BIN CORN DUST FROM ELEVATOR 7. Figure A10 - PSD OF R/R CORN DUST FROM ELEVATOR 7. Figure A11 - PSD OF INBOUND WHEAT FOR ELEVATOR 5. Figure A12 ? PSD OF OUTBOUND WHEAT FOR ELEVATOR 5. . . . Figure A13 - PSD OF MIXED BIN DUST... the mesh. TABLE 3, MASS FRACTION OF CORN DUSTS LESS THAN 100 MICRONS DETERMINED BY WET SIEVING. Sample % less than 100 mierons Elev 3 R/R Dust Elev 4 Bin Dust Elev 7 Bin Dust Elev 7 R/R Dust 61. 215. 4 32. 3 E 1. 5 59. 0+1. 4 90. 6 10. 9 22...

Spillmann, Daryl Drew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MI.pdf MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 310 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Michigan External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:16, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:16, 27 December 2010 1,275 × 1,650 (310 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

352

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

MI54 I MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e ) l.CoNTRACTIDCODE ~ . . U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6 ) CODE I - - - - U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, TX 79120 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 1 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code)

353

1 Mo 1 Do 1 Sa 1 Di 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo 1 Mi 1 Sa 1 Mo 1 Do 1 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 So 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 2 Do 2 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mo 1 Do 1 Sa 1 Di 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo 1 Mi 1 Sa 1 Mo 1 Do 1 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 So 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 2 Do 2 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 Mo 3 Mi 3 Sa 3 Mo 3 Do 3 So 3 So 3 Mi 3 Fr 3 Mo 3 Mi 3 Sa 3 Di 4 Do 4 So 4 Di 4 Fr 4 Mo 4 Mo 4 Do 4 Sa 4 Di 4 Do P StAU4 So 4 Mi 5 Fr 5 Mo 5 Mi 5 Sa 5 Di 5 Di 5 Fr 5 So 5 Mi 5 Fr 5 Mo

Mayberry, Marty

354

Downregulation of miR-497 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by targeting HDGF in non-small cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •MiR-497 is down-regulated in NSCLC cells and tissues. •MiR-497 inhibits NSCLC cell growth in vitro. •HDGF is a target gene of miR-497. •MiR-497 inhibits NSCLC cell growth by downregulating HDGF. •miR-497 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the development of various cancers. MiRNA-497 functions as a tumor-suppressor that is downregulated in several malignancies; however, its role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been examined in detail. Here, we showed that miR-497 is downregulated in NSCLC tumors and cell lines and its ectopic expression significantly inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation. Integrated analysis identified HDGF as a downstream target of miR-497, and the downregulation of HDGF by miR-497 overexpression confirmed their association. Rescue experiments showed that the inhibitory effect of miR-497 on cell proliferation and colony formation is predominantly mediated by the modulation of HDGF levels. Furthermore, tumor samples from NSCLC patients showed an inverse relationship between miR-497 and HDGF levels, and ectopic expression of miR-497 significantly inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis in a SCID mouse xenograft model. Our results suggest that miR-497 may serve as a biomarker in NSCLC, and the modulation of its activity may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC patients.

Zhao, Wen-yan [Department of Medical Oncology, Jiamusi Tumor Hospital, Jiamusi 154007 (China)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Jiamusi Tumor Hospital, Jiamusi 154007 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Medical Oncology, The Third Affliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China)] [Department of Medical Oncology, The Third Affliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); An, Zhong-jun; Shi, Chang-guo; Zhu, Guang-ai; Wang, Bin; Lu, Ming-yan; Pan, Chang-kun [Department of Medical Oncology, Jiamusi Tumor Hospital, Jiamusi 154007 (China)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Jiamusi Tumor Hospital, Jiamusi 154007 (China); Chen, Peng, E-mail: chenpengdoc@126.com [Lung Cancer Medicine Department, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Lung Cancer Medicine Department, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China)

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

A Sequence Polymorphism in miR-608 Predicts Recurrence after Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CI) P c miR-608 rs4919510 0.496 0.00001 0.00001 CC 410 0.18 0.03 1.00 (Reference) 1.00 (Reference) GC 859 0.22 0.02 1.48 (1.01-2.08) 1.53 (1.07-2.18) GG 396 0.31 0.04 2.11 (1.45-3.19) 2...

Jian Zheng; Jieqiong Deng; Mang Xiao; Lei Yang; Liyuan Zhang; Yonghe You; Min Hu; Na Li; Hongchun Wu; Wei Li; Jiachun Lu; Yifeng Zhou

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

JASON GEATHERS 2013 Huron Pkwy Apt. 2, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 | 803-308-0946 | jgeather@umich.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-308-0946 | jgeather@umich.edu EDUCATION University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI M PRESENTATIONS AND POSTERS Refereed Conference or Symposium Proceedings "A Method Correlation" Student presentation at the Materials Science and Technology Conference

Daly, Samantha

357

Modeling and life prediction methodology for titanium matrix composites subjected to mission profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are being evaluated as structural materials for elevated temperature applications in future generation hypersonic vehicles. In such applications, TMC components are subjected to complex thermomechanical loading profiles at various elevated temperatures. Therefore, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing, using a simulated mission profile, is essential for evaluation and development of life prediction methodologies. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to evaluate the TMF response of the [0/90]{sub 2s} SCS-6/TIMETAL-21S subjected to a generic hypersonic flight profile and its portions with a temperature ranging from {minus}130 to 816 C. It was found that the composite modulus, prior to rapid degradation, had consistent values for all the profiles tested. The accumulated minimum strain was also found to be the same for all the profiles tested. A micromechanics-based analysis was used to predict the stress-strain response of the laminate and of the constituents in each ply during thermomechanical loading conditions by using only constituent properties as input. The fiber was modeled as elastic with transverse orthotropic and temperature-dependent properties. The matrix was modeled using a thermoviscoplastic constitutive relationship. In the analysis, the composite modulus degradation was assumed to result from matrix cracking and was modeled by reducing the matrix modulus. Fatigue lives of the composite subjected to the complex generic hypersonic flight profiles were well correlated using the predicted stress in 0{degree} fibers.

Mirdamadi, M. [Analytical Services and Materials Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Johnson, W.S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Florida Billboards Elevate Renewable Energy Education | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Billboards Elevate Renewable Energy Education Florida Billboards Elevate Renewable Energy Education Florida Billboards Elevate Renewable Energy Education July 9, 2010 - 10:26am Addthis A wind turbine tops a Lamar Advertising billboard in Pensacola, Florida | Photo courtesy of Karena Cawthon A wind turbine tops a Lamar Advertising billboard in Pensacola, Florida | Photo courtesy of Karena Cawthon Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE Drivers along the Florida stretches of I-10, I-110, I-75 and other highways will soon see more than advertising messages on roadside signs. Lamar Advertising is converting almost 1500 of its Florida billboards to renewable energy devices. Solar panels and wind turbines will top the displays. The company hopes to communicate the value of renewable energy to millions

359

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information Name: ____________________________________ Address) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Work Experience: List most recent job first Employer/Company Name _______________________________________________________________ Reference: Name and telephone _____________________________________________ Employer/Company Name

Mather, Patrick T.

360

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical impact of CO2on geothermal energy production by: analyzing the geochemistry of existing geothermal fields with elevated natural CO2; measuring realistic rock-water rates for geothermal systems using laboratory and field-based experiments to simulate production scale impacts.

363

Elevated Fis Expression Enhances Recombinant Protein Production in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevated Fis Expression Enhances Recombinant Protein Production in Escherichia coli Richard Richins is discussed. A small DNA bending protein, Fis, which has been shown to activate rRNA syn- thesis upon a nutrient upshift, was overexpressed in E. coli strain W3110 carrying vector pUCR1. Overexpres- sion of Fis

Chen, Wilfred

364

Elevated Production of Active Oxygen in Bloom's Syndrome Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A23187, active oxygen production was elevated in BS cell...formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine, active oxy gen production was found to be increased...through their excessive production (6) or through a deficiency...result in high levels of hydrogen peroxide. Without a...cells. Materials and Methods Cell Lines. The EBV-transformed...

Thomas Nicotera; Kuldip Thusu; and Paresh Dandona

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NEST-SITESELECTIONAND NESTINGSUCCESSOF CAVITY-NESTINGBIRDSIN HIGH ELEVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST-SITESELECTIONAND NESTINGSUCCESSOF CAVITY-NESTINGBIRDSIN HIGH ELEVATION FORESTDRAINAGES that characterized successful and unsuccessful nest sites, nest sites vs. random sites, and differences among coexisting species of cavity- nesting birds for 356 nests in central Arizona. Live and, more commonly, dead

Martin, Thomas E.

366

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise. Science, 321, 1340; DOI:in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approachof ice sheets to sea-level rise. Bibliography Alcamo, J. et

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce independent assessments of the state of polar iceproduce these predictions account for thermal expansion, changes in non-polar glaciers and ice

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004b.htm06/07/2004 12:57:08 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004d.htm06/07/2004 12:57:19 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

371

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008b.htm06/07/2004 12:51:21 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008d.htm06/07/2004 12:51:31 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

372

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010b.htm06/07/2004 10:57:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010d.htm06/07/2004 12:40:15 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

373

Modeling and life prediction methodology for Titanium Matrix Composites subjected to mission profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium matrix composites (TMC) are being evaluated as structural materials for elevated temperature applications in future generation hypersonic vehicles. In such applications, TMC components are subjected to complex thermomechanical loading profiles at various elevated temperatures. Therefore, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing, using a simulated mission profile, is essential for evaluation and development of life prediction methodologies. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to evaluate the TMF response of the (0/90)2s SCS-6/Timetal-21S subjected to a generic hypersonic flight profile and its portions with a temperature ranging from -130 C to 816 C. It was found that the composite modulus, prior to rapid degradation, had consistent values for all the profiles tested. A micromechanics based analysis was used to predict the stress-strain response of the laminate and of the constituents in each ply during thermomechanical loading conditions by using only constituent properties as input. The fiber was modeled as elastic with transverse orthotropic and temperature dependent properties. The matrix was modeled using a thermoviscoplastic constitutive relation. In the analysis, the composite modulus degradation was assumed to result from matrix cracking and was modeled by reducing the matrix modulus. Fatigue lives of the composite subjected to the complex generic hypersonic flight profile were well correlated using the predicted stress in 0 degree fibers.

Mirdamadi, M.; Johnson, W.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Suppression of Wnt signaling by the miR-29 family is mediated by demethylation of WIF-1 in non-small-cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Dnmt3A and Dnmt3B are involved in the down-regulation of WIF-1 expression in non-small-cell lung cancer. •MiR-29 family members could restore WIF-1 expression through demethylation. •MiR-29s suppress Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway and inhibit tumor growth. •The expression of miR-29a and miR-29b could be regulated partially in a positive feedback loop. -- Abstract: Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) silencing induced by promoter hypermethylation is a common mechanism of aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the activity of regulators associated with the methylation of the WIF-1 gene remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of three DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B) in the expression of WIF-1. The three DNMTs were up-regulated in NSCLC tumor tissues and suppression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B restored the expression of WIF-1 in NSCLC cells. The miR-29 family (miR-29a, -29b, and -29c), which negatively regulates DNMT3A and DNMT3B, was examined in association with the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. A positive correlation between the expression of WIF-1 and that of MiR-29s was observed in NSCLC tissues. Methylation-specific PCR and Western blotting indicated that miR-29s positively regulate WIF-1 expression by inhibiting the methylation of its promoter. Furthermore, miR-29 overexpression downregulated ?-catenin expression, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The expression of miR-29a and miR-29b was partially regulated by DNMT3A and DNMT3B in a positive feedback loop. Taken together, our findings show that miR-29s suppress the Wnt signaling pathway through demethylation of WIF-1 in NSCLC.

Tan, Min [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wu, Junjie, E-mail: wujunjiesh@126.com [Department of Pneumology, Changhai Hospital of Shanghai, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China) [Department of Pneumology, Changhai Hospital of Shanghai, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Cai, Yong, E-mail: dryongcai@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200433 (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thyroid hormone negatively regulates CDX2 and SOAT2 mRNA expression via induction of miRNA-181d in hepatic cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Thyroid hormone induces miR-181d expression in human hepatic cells and mouse livers. •Thyroid hormone downregulates CDX2 and SOAT2 (or ACAT2) via miR-181d. •miR-181d reduces cholesterol output from human hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) regulate transcription of many metabolic genes in the liver through its nuclear receptors (TRs). Although the molecular mechanisms for positive regulation of hepatic genes by TH are well understood, much less is known about TH-mediated negative regulation. Recently, several nuclear hormone receptors were shown to downregulate gene expression via miRNAs. To further examine the potential role of miRNAs in TH-mediated negative regulation, we used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNAs that were directly regulated by TH in a human hepatic cell line. In our screen, we discovered that miRNA-181d is a novel hepatic miRNA that was regulated by TH in hepatic cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, we identified and characterized two novel TH-regulated target genes that were downstream of miR-181d signaling: caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) and sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2 or ACAT2). CDX2, a known positive regulator of hepatocyte differentiation, was regulated by miR-181d and directly activated SOAT2 gene expression. Since SOAT2 is an enzyme that generates cholesteryl esters that are packaged into lipoproteins, our results suggest miR-181d plays a significant role in the negative regulation of key metabolic genes by TH in the liver.

Yap, Chui Sun; Sinha, Rohit Anthony [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore)] [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore); Ota, Sho; Katsuki, Masahito [Department of Molecular Endocrinology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Endocrinology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Yen, Paul Michael, E-mail: paul.yen@duke-nus.edu.sg [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities Income Breakdown Expenditure Breakdown http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005b.htm06/07/2004 13:00:29 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005c.htm06

377

Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Large Liquid Argon TPC for Off-axis NuMI Neutrino Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ICARUS collaboration has shown the power of the liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) technique to image events with bubble-chamber-like quality. I will describe a proposed long-baseline {nu}e appearance experiment utilizing a large ({>=} 15 kton1) LArTPC placed off-axis of Fermilab's NuMI {nu}{mu} beam. The total LArTPC program as it presently stands, which includes a number of smaller R and D projects designed to examine the key design issues, will be outlined.

Menary, Scott [York University, Toronto (Canada)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Adrenaline promotes cell proliferation and increases chemoresistance in colon cancer HT29 cells through induction of miR-155  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline increases colon cancer cell proliferation and its resistance to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline activates NF{kappa}B in a dose dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway contributes to cell proliferation and resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Recently, catecholamines have been described as being involved in the regulation of cancer genesis and progression. Here, we reported that adrenaline increased the cell proliferation and decreased the cisplatin induced apoptosis in HT29 cells. Further study found that adrenaline increased miR-155 expression in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner. HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 had a higher cell growth rate and more resistance to cisplatin induced apoptosis. In contrast, HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 inhibitor displayed decreased cell proliferation and sensitivity to cisplatin induced cell death. In summary, our study here revealed that adrenaline-NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway at least partially contributes to the psychological stress induced proliferation and chemoresistance in HT29 cells, shedding light on increasing the therapeutic strategies of cancer chemotherapy.

Pu, Jun [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China); Bai, Danna [Department of Cardiology, 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China)] [Department of Cardiology, 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China); Yang, Xia [Department of Teaching and Medical Administration, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China)] [Department of Teaching and Medical Administration, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China); Lu, Xiaozhao [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China)] [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China); Xu, Lijuan, E-mail: 13609296272@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China)] [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China); Lu, Jianguo, E-mail: lujianguo029@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710038 (China)

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu [National Sun Yat-Sen University-Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering, No.70, Lien-Hai Rd., Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

382

Waste management of a microemulsion using elevated temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elevated temperatures reduced NAPL-saturated fraction of a treated SPME waste effluent. As temperature increased, aqueous fraction of the separated SPME increased to 0.96 at 90°C. Composite volume samples had optimal separation at 75°C, where >95% of NAPL mass partitioned into the organic phase; while in first pore volume samples, it decreased with increasing temperature after 70°C. Increasing temperature of composite volume samples increased surfactant partitioning into the organic phase; in first pore volume samples, it was evenly divided into both phases. Increased temperatures reduced COD of aqueous phases >75%. Overall, elevated temperatures reduced volume of NAPL-saturated solution by 96%.

Clayton J. Clark II

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE REPORT Epping, New Hampshire April 14, 2007 #12;TABLE ............................................................................................. 21 6. Community Services, Facilities and Utilities........................................................................................................................... 38 1. Natural Resources & Environment 2. Communication 3. Infrastructure & Public Safety 4

New Hampshire, University of

385

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys 10.1073/pnas.0603953103 Nick Zagorski As one of the great contributors to modern genetics...the forensic sciences. That achievement alone is worthy of merit, contributing to Jeffreys' receiving three high distinctions...

Nick Zagorski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Neuropsychological Profile of Stuttering Children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive profile of stuttering children. A sample of 290 children was ... classified as stutterers. In general, performance in stuttering children was similar to the ...

Alfredo Ardila; Mónica Rosselli…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy Consumption Profile for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha.............................................................................................318 12.2 Energy Harvesting ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12

Langendoen, Koen

388

Vibration of Tethered Microstructure Profilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although loosely tethered turbulence profilers have many advantages, they are prone to resonant vibrations at frequencies in the dissipation range when they are falling rapidly or when the tether is strummed. Using the Advanced Microstructure ...

Jack B. Miller; M. C. Gregg; Vernon W. Miller; Gordon L. Welsh

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

390

Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

T-601: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-601: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges April 13, 2011 - 5:12am Addthis...

392

Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration on Leaf Structure of Brassica Juncea under Water Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Study on the effect of elevated CO2 concentration on leaf structure of Brassica juncea L. cv. Bio-141 (95) under moisture stress revealed, that CO2 elevated to 600 ?mol mol?1 increased the length of epidermal cel...

D.C. Uprety; N. Dwivedi; R. Mohan; G. Paswan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Estimating ocean wave directional spreading from an Eulerian surface elevation time history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an Eulerian surface elevation time history T. A. A. Adcock * P. H. Taylor...st-peters.oxon.org ). Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford...information available is the time history of free surface elevation at a single...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute st-segment elevation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of age on treatment and outcomes in ST-elevation myocardial infarction Summary: , Armstrong PW, et al. Acute coronary care in the elderly, part II: ST-segment-elevation...

395

Estimated impacts of climate warming on California’s high-elevation hydropower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on high elevation hydropower generation in California’sCalifornia’s high-elevation hydropower Kaveh Madani · Jay R.Abstract California’s hydropower system is composed of high

Madani, Kaveh; Lund, Jay R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Elevation in Exhaled Nitric Oxide Predicts for Radiation Pneumonitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis is a major toxicity after thoracic radiotherapy (RT), with no method available to accurately predict the individual risk. This was a prospective study to evaluate exhaled nitric oxide as a predictive biomarker for radiation pneumonitis in esophageal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 34 patients prescribed neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer were enrolled in the present trial. Each patient underwent respiratory surveys and exhaled nitric oxide (NO) measurements before, at the end of, and 1 to 2 months after completing RT. Pneumonitis toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The demographics, dosimetric factors, and exhaled NO levels were evaluated for correlation with symptomatic patients (scores {>=}2). Results: Of the 34 patients, 28 were evaluable. All had received 50.4 Gy RT with concurrent chemotherapy. The pneumonitis toxicity score was Grade 3 for 1, Grade 2 for 3, Grade 1 for 7, and Grade 0 for 17. The dosimetric factors were not predictive of symptoms. The mean exhaled NO level measured before, at completion, and at restaging was 17.3 {+-} 8.5 (range, 5.5-36.7), 16.0 {+-} 14.2 (range, 5.8-67.7), and 14.7 {+-} 6.2 (range, 5.5-28.0) parts per billion, respectively. The ratio of exhaled NO at the end of RT vs. before treatment was 3.4 (range, 1.7-6.7) for the symptomatic and 0.8 (range, 0.3-1.3) for the asymptomatic (p = .0017) patients. The elevation in exhaled NO preceded the peak symptoms by 33 days (range, 21-50). The interval to peak symptoms was inversely related to the exhaled NO elevation. Conclusions: Elevations in exhaled NO at the end of RT was found to predict for radiation pneumonitis symptoms.

Guerrero, Thomas, E-mail: tguerrero@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Martinez, Josue [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); McCurdy, Matthew R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Wolski, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary Francis [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

Schilling, Anne

398

Maintaining optimum fluorescent lamp performance under elevated temperature conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new technique for optimizing fluorescent lamp performance under elevated temperature conditions. This approach uses a thermo-electric Peltier device to produce a localized cold spot temperature of approximately 40/sup 0/C, allowing the lamps to maintain maximum light output and efficacy independent of prevailing ambient temperatures inside a luminaire. Experimental data show that a 20% increase in light output and a 10% increase in efficacy over typical lamp performance in a warm fixture environment can be obtained using this device. Only 0.25 watts must be supplied to the Peltier device to produce these results.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Clark, T.A.; Verderber, R.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

400

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

miR-206 is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell proliferation through the up-regulation of cyclinD2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? miR-206 was downexpressed in tumor samples compared with matched normal samples. ? Enhanced expression of miR-206 could inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro. ? Luciferase confirmed miR-206 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting cyclinD2. ? A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 in breast cancer was found. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs act as important gene regulators in human genomes, and their aberrant expression is linked to many malignancies. Aberrant expression of miR-206 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in breast cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the relative expression levels of miR-206 in breast cancer and normal breast tissues. Lower expression of miR-206 in breast cancer tissues was associated with larger tumour size and a more advanced clinical stage. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-206 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth by blocking the G1/S transition and suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, implying that miR-206 functions as a tumour suppressor in the progression of breast cancer. Interestingly, Luciferase assays first revealed that miR-206 inhibited cyclinD2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3?-untranslated region of cyclinD2 mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-206 reduced cyclinD2 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 expression was noted in breast cancer tissues. Altogether, our results identify a crucial tumour suppressive role of miR-206 in the progression of breast cancer, at least partly via up-regulation of the expression of cyclinD2, and suggest that miR-206 might be a candidate prognostic predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for breast cancer patients.

Zhou, Jing, E-mail: zhougjing9888@163.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Tian, Ye, E-mail: tianye2010077@163.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Affiliated Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, Anhui (China)] [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Affiliated Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, Anhui (China); Li, Juan, E-mail: 402310848@163.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lu, Binbin, E-mail: lubin1976@163.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Sun, Ming, E-mail: 422825636@qq.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Zou, Yanfen, E-mail: 569111165@qq.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Kong, Rong, E-mail: 31815857@qq.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Luo, Yanhong, E-mail: 252376737@qq.com [School of Pharmacy, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [School of Pharmacy, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Yongguo, E-mail: 12071018@qq.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Keming, E-mail: Tianyr1@163.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Ji, Guozhong, E-mail: 252376737@qq.com [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

White Pine Blister Rust in High-Elevation White Pines: Screening for Simply-Inherited,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Pine Blister Rust in High-Elevation White Pines: Screening for Simply________________ Recent concern about survival and recovery of high- elevation white pine ecosystems has returned white rust- resistance mechanisms in high-elevation white pines, including whitebark (Pinus albicaulis

403

gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the Blue Gene Enabling Profiling Collecting Profile Information Profiling Threaded Applications Using gprof Routine Level Flat Profile Line Level Flat Profile Call Graph Analysis Routine Execution Count List Annotated Source Listing Issues in Interpreting Profile Data Profiling Concepts Programs in Memory

404

Functional profiling of microRNAs in stallions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in eukaryotic genomes and are thought to be critically involved in many biological processes. While the functions of sperm miRNAs in equine...

Wang, Aaron Stephen

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

Search for the disappearance of muon antineutrinos in the NuMI neutrino beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report constraints on antineutrino oscillation parameters that were obtained by using the two MINOS detectors to measure the 7% muon antineutrino component of the NuMI neutrino beam. In the Far Detector, we select 130 events in the charged-current muon antineutrino sample, compared to a prediction of 136.4{+-}11.7(stat){sub -8.9}{sup +10.2}(syst) events under the assumption |{Delta}m{sup 2}|=2.32x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}(2{theta})=1.0. Assuming no oscillations occur at the Near Detector baseline, a fit to the two-flavor oscillation approximation constrains |{Delta}m{sup 2}|<3.37x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level with sin{sup 2}(2{theta})=1.0.

Adamson, P.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Moore, C. D.; Pahlka, R.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rebel, B.; Sharma, R.; Torretta, D.; Zwaska, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Carbohydrate Polymers j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / c a r b p o l Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures R.S. Atalla a , M.F. Crowley b , M.E. Himmel b , R.H. Atalla a,c,∗ a Cellulose Sciences International, Madison, WI, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, United States c University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 August 2012 Received in revised form 4 June 2013 Accepted 7 June 2013 Available online 15 June 2013 Keywords: Transformation Irreversible Celluloses Elevated Temperatures Native Accessibility Aggregation a b s t r a c t Current research, basic and applied, assumes that observed recalcitrance of celluloses is an inherent

407

INFLUENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON INSECT DENSITIES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels is profoundly altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from approximately 280 to 370 {micro}l l{sup -1} in 2004, and it is expected to exceed 550 {micro}l l{sup -1} by 2050. Tropospheric ozone has risen even more rapidly than CO{sub 2} and average summer concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere are expected to continue to increase by 0.5-2.5% per year over the next 30 years. Although elevated CO{sub 2} stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, ozone (O{sub 3}) is deleterious. In addition to directly affecting the physiology and productivity of crops, increased concentrations of tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are predicted to lower the nutritional quality of leaves, which has the potential to increase herbivory as insects eat more to meet their nutritional demands. We tested the hypothesis that changes in tropospheric chemistry affect the relationship between plants and insect herbivores by changing leaf quality. The susceptibility to herbivory of soybean grown in elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} was examined using free air gas concentration enrichment (SoyFACE). FACE technology has the advantage that plants are cultivated under realistic field conditions with no unwanted alteration of microclimate or artificial constraints on the insect community.

DELUCIA, E.; DERMODY, O.; O'NEILL, B.; ALDEA, M.; HAMILTON, J.; ZANGERL, A.; ROGER, A.; BERENBAUM, M.

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

625 E. Liberty St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 615-8230 graham.umich.edu November 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

625 E. Liberty St. · Ann Arbor, MI 48104 · (734) 615-8230 · graham.umich.edu November 2013. This project's technical analysis, stakeholder engagement, and proposed approaches to minimize negative impacts of the pitfalls encountered in other states. The project recognizes that natural gas extraction pressures

Kamat, Vineet R.

409

SAE 2007 World Congress, April 16-19, 2007, Detroit, MI Paper Number 2007-01-1102  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAE 2007 World Congress, April 16-19, 2007, Detroit, MI Paper Number 2007-01-1102 Map Matching Horvitz Microsoft Research Copyright © 2007 SAE International ABSTRACT Map matching determines which road towers, and combinations of these. Although we concentrate on pure GPS data in this paper, our algorithm

Krumm, John

410

To cite this document: Fernandez, Mayra and Barroso, Benot and Meyer, Michel and Meyer, Xuan Mi and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To cite this document: Fernandez, Mayra and Barroso, Benoît and Meyer, Michel and Meyer, Xuan Mi and modelling M. F. Fernandeza,b,c,d,e , B. Barrosoe , X. M. Meyera* , M. Meyera , M.-V. Le Lannb,c , G. Le

Mailhes, Corinne

411

MiSer: An Optimal Low-Energy Transmission Strategy for IEEE 802.11a/h  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at appropriate moments to save battery energy. An alternative way to conserve energy is to apply TPC (Trans- mitMiSer: An Optimal Low-Energy Transmission Strategy for IEEE 802.11a/h Daji Qiao+ Sunghyun Choi the energy consumption by wireless communication de- vices is perhaps the most important issue in the widely

Qiao, Daji

412

Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1 , W-sodium content radioactive waste borosilicate glass buried in a loamy soil (glass K-26) and in an open testing. INTRODUCTION Vitrification of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) is attracting great interest

Sheffield, University of

413

Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Central Appalachia: Coal industry profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central Appalachia, the most complex and diverse coal-producing region in the United States, is also the principal source of very low sulfur coal in the East. This report provides detailed profiles of companies and facilities responsible for about 90% of the area's production, conveying a unique view of the aggregate industry as well as its many parts.

McMahan, R.L.; Kendall, L.K. (Resource Data International, Inc., Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

416

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch Richard Latin, Professor of Plant Pathology Brown patch to algae and moss infestation. Even mild brown patch outbreaks can spoil the appearance of golf greens and perennial ryegrass) also may sustain damage from brown patch infection. Disease Characteristics and Symptom

417

MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Microelectromechanical apparatus for elevating and tilting a platform  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which has a platform that can be elevated above a substrate and tilted at an arbitrary angle using a plurality of flexible members which support the platform and control its movement. Each flexible member is further controlled by one or more MEM actuators which act to bend the flexible member. The MEM actuators can be electrostatic comb actuators or vertical zip actuators, or a combination thereof. The MEM apparatus can include a mirror coating to form a programmable mirror for redirecting or switching one or more light beams for use in a projection display. The MEM apparatus with the mirror coating also has applications for switching light beams between optical fibers for use in a local area fiber optic network, or for use in fiber optic telecommunications or data communications systems.

Miller, Samuel Lee (Albuquerque, NM); McWhorter, Paul Jackson (Albuquerque, NM); Rodgers, Murray Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

Friction Properties of Molybdenum Alloyed Steel at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-temperature properties of steel surface can be improved by molybdenum surface alloying. Molybdenzing was carried out on carbon steel in the multi-function double glow plasma surface alloying furnace. The friction and wear tests were conducted on a high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer under the temperature of 25 deg. C{approx}600 deg. C. The contents of alloy element varied with alloyed layer were detected by SEM attached with EDS. The molybdenized layer is composed of the deposited layer and diffused layer. The micro-hardness of alloyed layer decreases from HV650 on the top layer to HV240. The friction coefficient of molybdenized layer decreases from 0.5{approx}0.6 to 0.2{approx}0.3 and wear rate decreases by 20% at elevated temperature after molybdenizing.

Li Jianliang; Xiong Dangsheng [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210094 (China); Wu Hongyan [College of Math and Physics, Nanjing University of Information and Technology, Nanjing, 210044 (China)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Elastic constants of single crystal Hastelloy X at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An acoustic time of flight technique is described in detail for measuring the elastic constants of cubic single crystals that allows for the constants to be determined at elevated temperature. Although the overall technique is not new, various aspects of the present work may prove extremely useful to others interested in finding these values, especially for aerospace materials applications. Elastic constants were determined for the nickel based alloy, Hastelloy X from room temperature to 1,000 C. Accurate elastic constants were needed as part of an effort to predict both polycrystal mechanical properties and the nature of grain induced heterogeneous mechanical response. The increased accuracy of the acoustically determined constants resulted in up to a 15% change in the predicted stresses in individual grains. These results indicate that the use of elastic single crystal constants of pure nickel as an approximation for the constants of gas turbine single crystal alloys, which is often done today, is inaccurate.

Canistraro, H.A. [Univ. of Hartford, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Audio Engineering Technology; Jordan, E.H.; Shi Shixiang [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Favrow, L.H.; Reed, F.A. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Theory of indirect exciton photoluminescence in elevated quantum trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Inspired by an experiment of indirect excitons photoluminescence (PL) in elevated quantum trap (High et al., 2009), we theoretically investigate the energy relaxation and nonlinear interactions of indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. It is shown that, when increasing the laser power, the intensity reversion of two PL peaks is due to the phonon necklace effect. In addition, we use a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including attractive two-body, repulsive three-body interactions and the excitation power dependence of energy distribution to understand the exciton states. This model gives a natural account for the PL blue shift with the increase of the excitation power. This study thus provides an alternative way to understand the underlying physics of the exciton dynamics in coupled potential wells.

C.S. Liu; T.F. Xu; Y.H. Liu; X.L. Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Definition: Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Configurations Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical profiling is a DC resistivity survey which aims to trace lateral variations in the apparent resistivity structure of the subsurface. Traditionally, electrical profiling provides qualitative information of relative apparent resistivity values in order to detect anomalous geological features.[1] Also Known As Electrical mapping References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Electrical_Profiling_Configurations&oldid=596184" Category: Definitions

423

Simulations and Experiments on Modifying the q-Profile for Advanced Tokamak Discharges on Alcator C-Mod  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Experiments on and Experiments on Modifying the q-Profile for Advanced Tokamak Discharges on Alcator C-Mod C. E. Kessel 1 , A. E. Hubbard 2 P. Bonoli 2 , M. Greenwald, J. Ko 2 , Y. Lin 2 , R. Parker 2 , A. E. Schmidt 2 , S. Scott 1 , J. Snipes, D. Terry 2 , G. Wallace 2 , R. Wilson 1 , S. Wolfe 2 , S. Wukitch 2 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT APS Division of Plasma Physics, November 2007 Controlling the q-Profile in Alcator C-Mod * Lower Hybrid current drive provides a strong source of non- inductive current at large minor radius * ICRF provides central and off-axis heating * Cryopump provides density control * MSE/Faraday rotation provide current profile diagnostics * Goal is to produce 100% non-inductive plasma current with LHCD and bootstrap current * Goal is to elevate the safety factor and control the q-profile

424

IPM Profiling Tool at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IPM IPM IPM Description and Overview IPM is a portable profiling infrastructure which provide a high level report on the execution of a parallel job. IPM reports hardware counters data, MPI function timings, and memory usage. It provides a low overhead means to generate scaling studies or performance data for ERCAP submissions. When you run a job using the IPM module you will get a performance summary (see below) to stdout as well as a web accessible summary of all your IPM jobs. The two main objectives of IPM are ease-of-use and scalability in performance analysis. Usage % module load ipm On HPC architectures that support shared libraries that's all you need to do. Once the module is loaded you can run as you normally and get a performance profile once the job has successfully completed. You do not

425

Benchmarking optimization software with performance profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: We propose performance profiles -- probability distribution functions for a performance metric -- as a tool for benchmarking and comparing optimization ...

Elizabeth Dolan

426

Cancer incidence in areas with elevated levels of natural radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been reported that on reaching a certain level of cell damage the production of repair enzymes is triggered which decreases the chromosome aberrations. If this happens, prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation in areas with elevated levels of background radiation could decrease the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that there is an increased risk of cancer in healthy individuals with high levels of chromosomal aberrations. Studies performed in Nordic countries as well as Italy, showed that increased levels of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes can be used to predict cancer risk in humans. One may conclude that a dose of ionising radiation sufficient to produce a certain level of cell damage increases production of antioxidants and repair enzymes that decrease either the frequency of chromosome aberrations or the cancer risk. People in some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, receive an annual radiation dose from background radiation that is more than five times higher than the 20 mSv. Yr-1 that is permitted for radiation workers. Inhabitants of Ramsar have lived for many generations in these high background areas. If an annual radiation dose of a few hundred mSv is detrimental to health, causing genetic abnormalities or an increased risk of cancer, it should be evident in these people. The absorbed dose rate in some high background radiation areas of Ramsar is approximately 55-200 times higher than that of the average global dose rate. It has been reported that 3â??8% of all cancers are caused by current levels of ionising radiation. If this estimation were true, all the inhabitants of such an area with extraordinary elevated levels of natural radiation would have died of cancer. Our cytogenetic studies show no significant differences between people in the high background area compared to people in normal background areas. As there was no increased level of chromosome aberrations, it may be predicted that the cancer incidence is not higher than in the neighbouring areas with a normal background radiation level. Although there is not yet solid epidemiological information, most local physicians in Ramsar report anecdotally that there is no increase in the incidence rates of cancer or leukemia in their area. There are no data to indicate a significant increase of cancer incidence in other high background radiation areas (HBRAs). Furthermore, several studies show a significant decrease of cancer death rates in areas with high backgrounds. It can be concluded that prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation possibly triggers processes such as the production of antioxidants and repair enzymes, which decreases the frequency of chromosome aberrations and the cancer incidence rate.

S.M.J. Mortazavi; M. Ghiassi-Nejad; P.A. Karam; T. Ikushima; A. Niroomand-Rad; J.R. Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

W gamma production in hadronic collisions using the POWHEG+MiNLO method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We detail a calculation of W gamma production in hadronic collision, at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) QCD interfaced to a shower generator according to the POWHEG prescription supplemented with the MiNLO procedure. The fixed order result is matched to an interleaved QCD+QED parton shower, in such a way that the contribution arising from hadron fragmentation into photons is fully modeled. In general, our calculation illustrates a new approach to the fully exclusive simulation of prompt photon production processes accurate at the NLO level in QCD. We compare our predictions to those of the NLO program MCFM, which treats the fragmentation contribution in terms of photon fragmentation functions. We also perform comparisons to available LHC data at 7 TeV, for which we observe good agreement, and provide phenomenological results for physics studies of the W gamma production process at the Run II of the LHC. The new tool, which includes W leptonic decays and the contribution of anomalous gauge couplings, allows a fully exclusive, hadron-level description of the W gamma process, and is publicly available at the repository of the POWHEG BOX. Our approach can be easily adapted to deal with other relevant isolated photon production processes in hadronic collisions.

Luca Barze; Mauro Chiesa; Guido Montagna; Paolo Nason; Oreste Nicrosini; Fulvio Piccinini; Valeria Prosperi

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

A new 'Implicit correlation' method for cross-correlation sampling in MCNPX-PoliMi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo particle transport codes used to accurately model detector response are traditionally run in fully analog mode. Analog simulations of cross-correlation measurements with these codes are extremely time-consuming because the probability of correlated detection is extremely small, approximately equal to the product of the probabilities of a single detection in each detector. The new 'implicit correlation' method described here increases the number of correlation event scores thereby reducing variance and required computation times. The cost of the implicit correlation method is comparable to the cost of simulating single event detection for the lowest absolute detector efficiency in the problem. This method is especially useful in the nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards fields for simulating correlation measurements of shielded special nuclear material. The new method was implemented in MCNPX-PoliMi for neutron-neutron cross-correlations with a Cf-252 spontaneous fission source measured by two detectors of variable stand-offs. The method demonstrated good agreement with analog simulation results for multiple measurement geometries. Small differences between non-analog and analog cross-correlation distributions are attributed to known features of the specific problem simulated that will not be present in practical applications. (authors)

Marcath, M. J.; Larsen, E. W.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2104 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

W gamma production in hadronic collisions using the POWHEG+MiNLO method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We detail a calculation of W gamma production in hadronic collision, at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) QCD interfaced to a shower generator according to the POWHEG prescription supplemented with the MiNLO procedure. The fixed order result is matched to an interleaved QCD+QED parton shower, in such a way that the contribution arising from hadron fragmentation into photons is fully modeled. In general, our calculation illustrates a new approach to the fully exclusive simulation of prompt photon production processes accurate at the NLO level in QCD. We compare our predictions to those of the NLO program MCFM, which treats the fragmentation contribution in terms of photon fragmentation functions. We also perform comparisons to available LHC data at 7 TeV, for which we observe good agreement, and provide phenomenological results for physics studies of the W gamma production process at the Run II of the LHC. The new tool, which includes W leptonic decays and the contribution of anomalous gauge couplings, allows a full...

Barze, Luca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

W gamma production in hadronic collisions using the POWHEG+MiNLO method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We detail a calculation of W gamma production in hadronic collision, at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) QCD interfaced to a shower generator according to the POWHEG prescription supplemented with the MiNLO procedure. The fixed order result is matched to an interleaved QCD+QED parton shower, in such a way that the contribution arising from hadron fragmentation into photons is fully modeled. In general, our calculation illustrates a new approach to the fully exclusive simulation of prompt photon production processes accurate at the NLO level in QCD. We compare our predictions to those of the NLO program MCFM, which treats the fragmentation contribution in terms of photon fragmentation functions. We also perform comparisons to available LHC data at 7 TeV, for which we observe good agreement, and provide phenomenological results for physics studies of the W gamma production process at the Run II of the LHC. The new tool, which includes W leptonic decays and the contribution of anomalous gauge couplings, allows a fully exclusive, hadron-level description of the W gamma process, and is publicly available at the repository of the POWHEG BOX. Our approach can be easily adapted to deal with other relevant isolated photon production processes in hadronic collisions.

Luca Barze; Mauro Chiesa; Guido Montagna; Paolo Nason; Oreste Nicrosini; Fulvio Piccinini; Valeria Prosperi

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and elevated temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deformation behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, ...

Th. Nebel; D. Eifler

433

Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics in high elevation meadows: thresholds, resiliency and change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education, in press Exceedance of historic limit of dryness triggers hydrological tipping point in high elevation peatlands In preparation CONFERENCE POSTER

Arnold, Chelsea Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Spartina alterniflora response to fertilizer, planting dates, and elevation in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spartina alterniflora transplant response to 5 fertilizer rates, 2 planting dates, and different elevations was evaluated on sandy dredged material, Bolivar Peninsula, Texas in 1977. Survival, sh...

J. W. Webb; J. D. Dodd

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electrolysis of Water in a System with a Solid Polymer Electrolyte at Elevated Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water in a system with a solid polymer ... of the effect of elevated pressure on the electrolysis electrochemistry is proposed. A mathematical model and...

S. A. Grigor'ev; M. M. Khaliullin; N. V. Kuleshov…

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Coupled dynamics of a tower with an elevated wave tank. Part 1: Equations of motion and eigenoscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled dynamics of a tower with an elevated wave tank. Part 1: Equations of motion problem is derived to describe coupled dynamics of a tower with an elevated tank on the tower top, elevated tanks, Ritz'-Treftz method 1. INTRODUCTION Modeling the dynamic behavior of elevated liquid

437

EQPT: Ecological Quality Profiling Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EQPT uses"Habitat Value Units" to assess the ecological quality of selected areas. A Habitat Value Unit is equal to one unit area of pristine or desired habitat. The proximity of waste reduces the value of the habitat. The GIS uses a proximity-based iterative algorithm to aggregate similarly classified waste sites. A variable size buffering algorithm is then used to approximate the effects of the waste on the environmental quality of the surrounding areas. The user designated areas are analyzed, and the resulting quality profiles are presented quantitatively in tabular summaries and graphically as grids on vector base maps.

Tzemos, Spyridon (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sackschewsky, Michael R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bilyard, Gordon R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Texas Crop Profile: Sweet Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is between 120 to 135 days. Texas Crop Profile S W E E T P O T A T O E S E-22 3-00 Prepared by Rodney L. Holloway, Kent D. Hall and Dudley T. Smith 1 In collaboration with James V. Robinson, George Philley and Marvin Baker 2 1 Extension Specialist, Extension... Command will not. Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 rholloway@tamu.edu Kent D. Hall Extension Associate 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 kd-hall@tamu.edu Dudley Smith...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

J.M. Acaglione

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

Elevated CO2 affects shell dissolution rate but not calcification rate in a marine snail  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research articles 1001 60 69 70 Elevated CO2 affects shell dissolution rate but not calcification...authors contributed equally to this work. As CO2 levels increase in the atmosphere, so too...Although direct effects of moderately elevated CO2 in sea water may be of little consequence...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SERVICE LIFE OF A LANDFILL LINER SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SERVICE LIFE OF A LANDFILL LINER SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURES Timothy D. Stark, Ph and possible publication in the ASCE Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management April 14-Engineered-Components-ServiceLife-Submission_2.pdf #12;2 SERVICE LIFE OF LANDFILL LINER SYSTEMS SUBJECTED TO ELEVATED1 TEMPERATURES2 Timothy D

442

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption Study Report Benny ChunYin Chan University of British Columbia EECE 492 April 6th the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report April 2012 0 2012 Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report Benny CY Chan UBC

443

Climate Change Effects on High-Elevation Hydropower System in KAVEH MADANI LARIJANI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Climate Change Effects on High-Elevation Hydropower System in California By KAVEH MADANI LARIJANI ___________________________________________ Committee in Charge 2009 #12;ii Abstract The high-elevation hydropower system in California, composed of more than 150 hydropower plants and regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC

Lund, Jay R.

444

Stability Analysis for a Landfill Experiencing Elevated Temperatures Timothy D. Stark1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability Analysis for a Landfill Experiencing Elevated Temperatures Timothy D. Stark1 , F. ASCE, P and stability analyses for a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill experiencing elevated temperatures due wastes can be disposed of in MSW landfills because this waste is not categorized as hazardous under 40

445

Properties of random component of longitudinal road profile influenced by local obstacles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the statistical properties of the pure random component of longitudinal road profile. The individual obstacles were removed from the road profile by median filtering approach. A total of 25,830 test sections records from the long-term pavement performance (LTPP) programme were analysed. The differences between asphalt concrete (AC) and cement concrete (CC) wearing courses were outlined. The comparison was shown on statistics (mean, median, standard deviation values) and probability density functions (PDFs) of contemporary used road indices (international roughness index (IRI), road elevation variance, power spectrum density (PSD) parameters in one-, two- and three-wavelength bands, etc.). The simulation study revealed the marked influence of obstacles on the road indices. The spectral properties of the pure random part were quantified.

Peter Mucka; Oldrich Kropac

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges February 28, 2013 - 12:05am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: VSE 8.8 Patch 2 with Access Protection, including Self Protection, turned off ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in McAfee VirusScan Enterprise. REFERENCE LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletins ID: SB10038 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028209 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: When Access Protection has been disabled, a local user can gain full control of the target application IMPACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. SOLUTION: The vendor has issued a fix (8.8 Patch 2 with HF778101, 8.8 Patch 3)

447

U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated 2: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges, Inject SQL Commands, and Spoof Certificates U-112: PostgreSQL Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges, Inject SQL Commands, and Spoof Certificates February 28, 2012 - 8:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in PostgreSQL. PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 8.3.18, 8.4.11, 9.0.7, 9.1.3 ABSTRACT: A remote authenticated user can gain elevated privileges. A remote authenticated user can inject SQL commands. A remote user can spoof connections in certain cases. reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory Security Tracker ID 1026744 CVE-2012-0866 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: For trigger functions marked SECURITY DEFINER, a remote authenticated user can execute a trigger function and gain elevated privileges CVE-2012-0866.

448

U-068:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 8:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-068:Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges December 23, 2011 - 8:45am Addthis PROBLEM: Linux Kernel SG_IO ioctl Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server AUS (v. 6.2) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server EUS (v. 6.2.z) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 6) ABSTRACT: A local privileged user on the guest operating system can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. reference LINKS: Red Hat kernel security and bug fix update SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026453 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026454

449

T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated 3: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service February 23, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service. PLATFORM: Red Hat Directory Server v8 EL4, Red Hat Directory Server v8 EL5 ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Red Hat Directory Server. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. A remote user can send multiple simple paged search requests to cause the

450

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 1: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges February 28, 2013 - 12:05am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: VSE 8.8 Patch 2 with Access Protection, including Self Protection, turned off ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in McAfee VirusScan Enterprise. REFERENCE LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletins ID: SB10038 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028209 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: When Access Protection has been disabled, a local user can gain full control of the target application IMPACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. SOLUTION: The vendor has issued a fix (8.8 Patch 2 with HF778101, 8.8 Patch 3)

451

U-194: Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator Lets Local Users Gain 4: Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privledges U-194: Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privledges June 19, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges . PLATFORM: Version(s): 2.3 and prior versions Abstract: Users Gain Elevated Privileges reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027182 CVE-2012-0304 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system.The default installation of Symantec LiveUpdate Administrator installs files with full control privileges granted to the 'Everyone' group.A local user can exploit

452

U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain 0: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges November 17, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31; running Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS) prior to A.04.20.11.04_01 ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Support Center Document ID: c03089106 CVE-2011-4159 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026331 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP-UX System Administration Manager. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can gain full control of the target system.

453

U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

40: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain 40: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-040: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges November 17, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP-UX System Administration Manager Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31; running Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS) prior to A.04.20.11.04_01 ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. reference LINKS: HP Support Center Document ID: c03089106 CVE-2011-4159 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026331 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP-UX System Administration Manager. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A local user can gain full control of the target system.

454

ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentss-band-profiler govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

455

Warmth Elevating the Depths: Shallower Voids with Warm Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic "sub-web" inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the zobov algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the origami algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases, the initial-conditions smoothing increases, and the number of voids and subvoids is suppressed. Also, void density profiles change, their shapes become flatter inside the void radius, while edges of the voids remain unchanged. Also, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the sub-structures in be...

Yang, Lin F; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

457

Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Logos of the University of...

458

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System...

459

Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Thermoelectric Power Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power MIT logo The Rohsenow-Kendall Heat Transfer Lab at Massachusetts Institute of...

460

Plant Energy Profiler | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Profiler Pumping System Assessment Tool Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Steam System Modeler Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory sameer@cs.uoregon.edu Tuning and Analysis Utilities http:www.acl.lanl.govtau TAU Profiling Team Members (In alphabetical order) Peter...

462

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines, the premixed burn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, they must understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF) n-heptane and iso-octane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine like conditions in a high-pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments, and comparisons of experimentally measured and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690-1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed model.

Callahan, C V; Curran, H J; Dryer, F L; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Parent and Teacher Report: Comparing Results from the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated the similarities and differences between parent and teacher report on the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion (School Companion). METHOD. Using data gathered during ...

Clark, Jessica Saiter

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

464

Table 2 -Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN.7 Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2000 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 1999 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NC OH SD TX WI

Kammen, Daniel M.

465

Installation restoration program preliminary assessment/site inspection report. W.K. Kellogg, Battle Creek, MI. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection Report of Areas Of concern (AOC) A thru F at WK Kellogg, Battle Creek, MI. A Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection was performed on 6 AOC`s at WK Kellogg to confirm or deny the presence of contamination a the AOC`s. The AOC`s involved in this investigation include. AOC A, Waste Accumulation Area; AOC B, Motor Pool Drainage Ditch; AOC C, Fire Training Area South; AOC D, Fire Training Area West; AOC E, Old Hanger (Building 6900); AOC F, New Hanger (Building 6901). The recommendation is for AOC`s A and B continue to the RI/FS stage.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Response of tundra ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our past research shows that arctic tussock tundra responds to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with marked increases in net ecosystem carbon flux and photosynthetic rates. However, at ambient temperatures and nutrient availabilities, homeostatic adjustments result in net ecosystem flux rates dropping to those found a contemporary CO{sub 2} levels within three years. Evidence for ecosystem-level acclimation in the first season of elevated CO{sub 2} exposure was found in 1987. Photosynthetic rates of Eriophorum vaginatum, the dominant species, adjusts to elevated CO{sub 2} within three weeks. Past research also indicates other changes potentially important to ecosystem structure and function. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatment apparently delays senescence and increases the period of positive photosynthetic activity. Recent results from the 1987 field season verify the results obtained in the 1983--1986 field seasons: Elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in increased ecosystem-level flux rates. Regressions fitted to the seasonal flux rates indicate an apparent 10 d extension of positive CO{sub 2} uptake reflecting a delay of the onset of plant dormancy. This delay in senescence could increase the frost sensitivity of the system. Major end points proposed for this research include the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and the interaction of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with elevated soil temperature and increased nutrient availability on: (1) Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (2) Net photosynthetic rates; (3) Patterns and resource controls on homeostatic adjustment in the above processes to elevated CO{sub 2}; (4) Plant-nutrient status, litter quality, and forage quality; (5) Soil-nutrient status; (6) Plant-growth pattern and shoot demography.

Oechel, W.C.; Grulke, N.E.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

A framework for nonparametric profile monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Control charts have been widely used for monitoring the functional relationship between a response variable and some explanatory variable(s) (called profile) in various industrial applications. In this article, we propose an easy-to-implement framework ... Keywords: B-spline, Block bootstrap, Confidence band, Curve depth, Nonparametric profile monitoring

Shih-Chung Chuang; Ying-Chao Hung; Wen-Chi Tsai; Su-Fen Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Research profiling for `standardization and innovation'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the profiling of research papers on `standardization and innovation'--exploring major topics and arguments in this field. Drawing on 528 papers retrieved from the database, Web of Science, we employed trend, factor, and clustering ... Keywords: Bibliometrics, Clustering analysis, Innovation, Publication analysis, Research profiling, Standardization, Taxonomy

Dong Geun Choi; Heesang Lee; Tae-Kyung Sung

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be advanced--among patients, health care providers, and the community at large. This workA PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress

Hayes, Jane E.

471

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: Powgen uses a TOF profile function which is a variation on the standard profile function originally derived by VonDreele, Jorgensen and Windsor (VonDreele RB, Jorgensen JD and Windsor CG, "Rietveld Refinement with Spallation Neutron Powder Diffraction Data", J. Appl. Cryst. 15, 581 (1982). This function is implemented in GSAS (profile function 3, 4 & 5) and Fullprof NPROF 9 and is most applicable to diffractometers viewing ambient polyethylene or water moderators. The POWGEN diffractometer, however, views a poisoned cryogenic H 2 (liquid) moderator. The variation in peak shape and peak position with TOF (or d-spacing d) is calculated using a more complex function related to thermal and epithermal components of the neutron spectrum that was

472

T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 1: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges March 30, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in VMware. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. PLATFORM: VMware Workstation 6.5.5 and 7.1.3 and prior; VIX API for Linux 1.10.2 and prior ABSTRACT: The VMware vmrun utility is susceptible to a local privilege escalation in non-standard configurations. reference LINKS: VM Advisory ID:VMSA-2011-0006 Secunia Advisory: SA43885 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025270 CVE-2011-1126 VM Post IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A security issue has been reported in VMware Workstation, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to gain potentially escalated

473

U-092: Sudo Format String Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Sudo Format String Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 2: Sudo Format String Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-092: Sudo Format String Bug Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges January 31, 2012 - 5:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Sudo. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. PLATFORM: Linux (Any) Version(s): 1.8.0 - 1.8.3p1 ABSTRACT: A local user can supply a specially crafted command line argument to trigger a format string flaw and execute arbitrary commands on the target system with root privileges. reference LINKS: CVE-2012-0809 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026600 Vendor Site IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The vulnerability resides in the sudo_debug() function in 'src/sudo.c'. This can be exploited by local users, regardless of whether they are listed

474

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Elevators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elevators Elevators Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Elevators Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Elevators" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.139664804469 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 5.78356533453 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0116959064327 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.699648105982 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.192307692308 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0661775284132 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.163674492353 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 2.7497571546 +

475

T-601: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated 01: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-601: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges April 13, 2011 - 5:12am Addthis PROBLEM: Windows Kernel win32k.sys Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 with SP2 for Itanium-based Systems, Windows Vista Service Pack 1 and Windows Vista Service Pack 2, Windows Vista x64 Edition Service Pack 1 and Windows Vista x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2008 for 32-bit Systems and Windows Server 2008 for 32-bit Systems Service Pack 2*, Windows Server 2008 for x64-based Systems

476

T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain...

477

SHORT-TERM PRECIPITATION AND TEMPERATURE TRENDS ALONG AN ELEVATION GRADIENT IN NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As is true of many tropical regions, Northeastern Puerto Rico is an ecologically sensitive area with biological life that is highly elevation-dependent on precipitation and temperature. Climate change has the potential to increase the risk of ...

Ashley E. Van Beusekom; Grizelle González; Maria M. Rivera

478

Elevated Cancer Mortality in the Relatives of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2009 American Association for Cancer Research. November 2009 research-article Research Articles Elevated Cancer Mortality in the Relatives of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer Li Wang 1 Kieran A. Brune 2 Kala Visvanathan 1 3 Daniel Laheru 3 Joseph...

Li Wang; Kieran A. Brune; Kala Visvanathan; Daniel Laheru; Joseph Herman; Christoper Wolfgang; Richard Schulick; John L. Cameron; Michael Goggins; Ralph H. Hruban; Alison P. Klein

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Dynamic interaction analysis of a LIM train and elevated bridge system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional dynamic interaction model is developed for a LIM (linear induction motor) train and elevated bridge system, which is composed of a LIM-driven vehicle submodel and a finite element bridge su...

H. Xia; W. W. Guo; C. Y. Xia; Y. -L. Pi…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electronic structure of perovskite oxide surfaces at elevated temperatures and its correlation with oxygen reduction reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective is to understand the origin of the local oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity on the basis of the local electronic structure at the surface of transition metal oxides at elevated temperatures and in oxygen ...

Chen, Yan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mi elevation profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Systemic Elevation of PTEN Induces a Tumor-Suppressive Metabolic State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. PTEN elevation might therefore be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines ...

Garcia-Cao, Isabel

482

V-101: McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

McAfee VirusScan Enterprise Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: VSE 8.8 Patch 2 with Access Protection, including Self Protection, turned off ABSTRACT: A...

483

EAST COAST DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS Coastal Models Supporting our Nation's Needs through Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)-- University of Colorado at Boulder. The elevation modeling work, done in the Gulf Stream. These storms cause coastal flooding, coastal erosion, and high- gust winds. Each year

484

Carbon Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystems in Response to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Altered Nutrients Availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our results show that elevated CO2 led to enhanced photosynthetic carbon uptake and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production. DOC occupied larger percentage in total organic carbon production in high CO2 environment. N addition stimulated biomass...

Song, Chao

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute st-elevation myocardial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than ST-Segment Deviation Summary: with acute symptoms only ST elevation on the standard ECG is clinically considered to be indicative... have shown decreased HF-QRS in the...

486

Stress effect on magnetoimpedance (MI) in amorphous wires at GHz frequencies and application to stress-tunable microwave composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of tensile stress on magnetoimpedance (MI) in CoMnSiB amorphous wires at microwave frequencies (0.5-3 GHz) is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In the presence of the dc bias magnetic field of the order of the anisotropy field, the impedance shows very large and sensitive change when the wire is subjected to a tensile stress: 100% and 60% per 180 MPa for frequencies 500 MHz and 2.5 GHz, respectively. It is demonstrated that this behavior owes mainly to the directional change in the equilibrium magnetization caused by the applied stress and field, which agrees well with the theoretical results for the surface impedance. This stress effect on MI is proposed to use for creating microwave stress-tunable composite materials containing short magnetic wires. The analysis of the dielectric response from such materials shows that depending on the stress level in the material, the dispersion of the effective permittivity can be of a resonant or relaxation type with a considerable change in its values (up to 100% at 600 MPa). This media can be used for structural stress monitoring by microwave contrast imaging.

L. V. Panina; S. I. Sandacci; D. P. Makhnovskiy

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

487

Contracting Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rooe ZTA245.7 B873 r\\O. 1473 -.-_ LIBRARY B-1473 JUDe 1984 JUL 27 1984 Co Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Neville P. Clarke, Director, The Texas A&M University... ............................................................... 14 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ........................................................... 14 CONTRACTING RAIL FREIGHT-SERVICES FOR COUNTRY ELEVATORS IN THE TEXAS PANHANDLE Stephen Fuller Department of Agricultural Economics Texas Agricultural Experiment...

Fuller, Stephen

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Application of current unified viscoplastic constitutive models to Hastelloy X at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF CURRENT UNIFIED VISCOPLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODELS TO HASTELLOY X AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES A Thesis by LISA DIANE MCCREA Submi. tted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering, APPLICATION OF CURRENT UNIFIED VISCOPLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODELS TO HASTELLOY X AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES A Thesis by LISA DIANE MCCREA Approued...

McCrea, Lisa Diane

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Rhizodeposition-induced decomposition increases N availability to wild and cultivated wheat genotypes under elevated CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genotypes under elevated CO2 Marie-Anne de Graaff a,b,*, Chris Van Kessel a , Johan Six a a Department Available online 11 March 2009 Keywords: Elevated CO2 Rhizodeposition N mineralization 13 C 15 N Genotypes a b s t r a c t Elevated CO2 may increase nutrient availability in the rhizosphere bystimulating N

van Kessel, Chris

490

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

491

Will elevated carbon dioxide concentration amplify the benefits of nitrogen fixation in legumes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}] stimulates photosynthesis and increases carbon (C) supply in all C3 species. A sustained and maximal stimulation in productivity at elevated [CO{sub 2}] requires an enhanced nutrient supply to match the increase in C acquisition. The ability of legumes to exchange C for nitrogen (N) with their N{sub 2}-fixing symbionts has led to the hypothesis that legumes will have a competitive advantage over nonleguminous species when grown at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. On balance, evidence suggests that in managed systems, legumes are more responsive to elevated [CO{sub 2}] than other plants (e.g. Ainsworth and Long, 2005); however, in natural ecosystems, nutrient availability can limit the response of legumes to elevated [CO{sub 2}] (Hungate et al., 2004; van Groenigen et al., 2006). Here, we consider these observations, outline the mechanisms that underlie them, and examine recent work that advances our understanding of how legumes respond to growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. First we highlight the global importance of legumes and provide a brief overview of the symbiotic relationship.

Rogers, A.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Leakey, A. D. B.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

493

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

494

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

495

Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

496

Armstrong PepsiCo Teaming Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Armstrong International, Inc. Pepsi Beverages Company Armstrong International, Inc. Pepsi Beverages Company 816 Maple Street 1 Pepsi Way Three Rivers, MI 49093 Somers, NY 10589 Business: Steam, Air & Hot Water Utility Systems Business: Beverage Bottling Cam Spence Rob Turner Director of Global Food Markets Engineering Director 269-279-3149 914-767-7763 cam@armstronginternational.com Rob.Turner@pepsiamericas.com Armstrong's Complete Thermal Exchange (CTE) technology reduces natural gas consumed by Pepsi Americas by 37% and reduces CO 2 emissions by 4,125 tons/year Project Scope Using CTE technology, Armstrong designed, engineered, and turnkey installed Flo-Direct gas-fired hot water heating systems to complete can/bottle warmer optimizations on thirteen production lines at eight Pepsi facilities.

497

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

load profile | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: applicationzip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data...

499

Longitudinal profile of channels cut by springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple theory for the longitudinal profile of channels incised by groundwater flow. The aquifer surrounding the stream is represented in two dimensions through Darcy's law and the Dupuit approximation. The ...

Devauchelle, O.

500

Automatic program timing profiles with FTN4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a scheme for producing execution timing profiles of FORTRAN programs automatically is proposed with a recommendation to implement it as an option to the compiler. An experimental implementation on the LBL 7600 is also described. 1 figure.

Friedman, R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z