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  1. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003 Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, ...

  2. PP-221 Detroit Edison Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Permit authorizing Detroit Edison Company to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada border. PDF icon PP-221 Detroit.pdf More ...

  3. Detroit Edison Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Detroit Edison Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies Project Description Detroit Edison will complete installation and begin an aggregated 1 MW Community Energy Storage (CES) System in their service territory at the Trinity Circuit in Michigan to demonstrate the potential of CES systems to strengthen grid reliability. The performance data of the CES devices and control systems under in-service operating conditions will be analyzed and used to identify gaps and facilitate how the

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. ...

  5. Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 - Preparation for Reactor Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindle, Danny [Sargent and Lundy Engineers, LLC, 55 E. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    This paper is intended to provide information about the ongoing decommissioning tasks at Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 plant, and in particular, the work being performed to prepare the reactor for removal and disposal. In 1972 Fermi 1 was shutdown and the fuel returned to the Atomic Energy Commission. By the end of 1975, a retirement plan was prepared, the bulk sodium removed, and the plant placed in a safe store condition. The plant systems were left isolated with the sodium containing systems inert with carbon dioxide in an attempt to form a carbonate layer, thus passivating the underlying reactive sodium. In 1996, Detroit Edison determined to evaluate the condition of the plant and to make recommendations in relation to the Fermi 1 future plans. At the end of 1997 approval was obtained to remove the bulk asbestos and residual alkali-metals (i.e., sodium and sodium potassium (NaK)). In 2000, full nuclear decommissioning of the plant was approved. To date, the bulk asbestos insulation has been removed, and the only NaK remaining is located in six capillary instrument tubes. The remaining sodium is contained within the reactor, two of the three primary loops, and miscellaneous removed pipes and equipment to be processed. The preferred method for removing or reacting sodium at Fermi 1 is by injecting superheated steam into a heated, nitrogen inert system. The byproducts of this reaction are caustic sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and heat. The decision was made to separate the three primary loops from the reactor for better control prior to processing each loop and the reactor separately. The first loop has already been processed. The main focus is now to process the reactor to allow removal and disposal of the Class C waste prior to the anticipated June 2008 closure of the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility located in South Carolina. Lessons learnt are summarized and concern: the realistic schedule and adherence to the schedule, time estimates, personnel accountability, back up or fill in work, work packages, condensation control, radiological contamination control, and organization of the waste stream.

  6. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  7. The Detroit Edison Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based in Detroit, Michigan. Overview Demonstrate the use and benefits of Community Energy Storage (CES) systems for utilities and test the ability to integrate secondary-use...

  8. DTE Energy Technologies With Detroit Edison Co. and Kinectrics Inc.: Distributed Resources Aggregation Modeling and Field Configuration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Summarizes the work of DTE Energy Technologies, Detroit Edison, and Kinectrics, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop distributed resources aggregation modeling and field configuration testing.

  9. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data. Release Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  10. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  11. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DERs, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

  12. Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Edison Status: Up Edison is a Cray XC30, with a peak performance of 2.57 petaflops/sec, 133,824 compute cores, 357 terabytes of memory, and 7.56 petabytes of disk. Updates and Status Find information on timeline, recent announcements and known issues Read More » Getting Started on Edison How to get running on Edison for first-time users. Read More » Configuration Details concerning Edison's hardware and software. Read More » Programming Find information on how to compile your

  13. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 8 11 2013 16 140 24 10 2014 188 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to

  14. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 14,901 11,501 10,925 7,671 2000's 6,171 405 1,948 2,514 1,117 0 0 81 753 21 2010's 79 19 0 165 188 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from

  15. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.75 2.51 2.43 2.51 2000's 3.82 9.34 3.56 5.96 6.27 -- -- 8.28 6.58 4.53 2010's 8.37 5.17 -- 4.44 5.26 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by

  16. Detroit, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detroit, Michigan: Energy Resources (Redirected from Detroit, MI) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.331427, -83.0457538 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Edison cabinets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison cabinets Edison cabinets Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:5

  18. Edison Dedication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Dedication Edison Dedication February 5, 2014 Last edited: 2014-02-14 16:38:06

  19. O:\\ELECTRIC\\DETROIT\\PP-230-2_ord.PDF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION COMPANY ORDER NO. PP-230-2 On December 8, 1998, the Detroit Edison Company (Detroit) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of ...

  20. Edison Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Hours Used 2015 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2014 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2013 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2015 Date Hours Used (in ...

  1. Edison FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison FAQ Edison FAQ Q. What are the major differences between Edison and Hopper? A. The default programming environment on Edison is based on the Intel compiler. Hopper's is based on the Portland Group (PGI) compilers. PGI compilers are not available on Edison. There is more memory per core. Edison has 2.67 GB per core rather than 1.3 GB per core on Hopper. On Edison you also have the option of using Intel's Hypterthreading technology which makes a physical core appears as two logical cores,

  2. Thomas Edison

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Known as "The Wizard of Menlo Park," Edison was an American inventor who developed the first commercially practical incandescent light bulb.

  3. Detroit Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes...

  4. Gratiot | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Detroit Edison Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Detroit Edison Location Breckenridge MI...

  5. Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Performance Performance on Edison October 10, 2013 Edison-system.pdf.jpg Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013 9:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. PDT Attendance: 121 (111 online, 10 local) Location...

  6. Getting Started on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Started Getting Started on Edison Before you can use or access Edison, you must have an active NERSC account and valid password. If you don't, see Accounts and Allocations. Edison...

  7. Choosing a Compiler on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Choosing a Compiler on Edison Choosing a Compiler on Edison Three different compilers are available on Edison. In this section we compare them using the benchmarks described above....

  8. NUG 2013: Training -- Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training -- Edison NUG 2013: Training -- Edison February 14, 2013 Edison Jeff3 Thursday, Feb. 14 - Training: Edison, NERSC's new Cray XC30 NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility 8:30 - Welcome 9:00 - Overview of Edison and the NERSC 7 Project - Richard Gerber, NERSC 9:30 - System Overview of the Cray XE30 - Nathan Wichmann, Cray Inc. 10:30 - Break 10:45 - Moving from Hopper (Cray XE6) to Edison (Cray XC30) - Zhengji Zhao, NERSC 11:15 - Performance Tricks and Tips on the Cray XC30 - Nathan Wichmann,

  9. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing NERSC Flips Switch on New Flagship Supercomputer January 31, 2014 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be dedicated in a ceremony held at the Department of

  10. Restoring Detroits Street Lighting System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    once completed in 2016. Table ES.1. Annual savings a from Detroit street lighting transition Annual Energy Savings (kWh) Annual Electric Cost Savings () Annual...

  11. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports » Edison Job Size Charts Edison Job Size Charts Fraction of Hours Used per Job Size Note: Interactive charts with current and past Cori and Edison data are now available on MyNERSC This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Fraction of Hours Used by Big Jobs This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison by jobs using 16,384 or more cores. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Last edited: 2016-04-21

  12. Detroit Workshop Highlights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video showing highlights from the ninth annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Development Workshop in Detroit.

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  14. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  15. Edison vs. Tesla

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2013-11-20

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  16. Edison vs. Tesla

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2014-01-07

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  17. Edison International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison International Place: Rosemead, California Zip: 91770 Product: Utility company and parent of SCE and Edison Mission Energy....

  18. Intel Compiler Peformance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peformance on Edison Intel Compiler Peformance on Edison These are the Intel optimization options we compared. The quotations are from the Intel compiler on-line man pages....

  19. Cray Compiler Peformance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Edison Cray Compiler Peformance on Edison Cray recommends using the default optimization (-O2) which is equivalent to the higher levels of optimization with other...

  20. City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit is offering financial assistance to commercial, institutional and public buildings in Detroit that install energy efficiency and ...

  1. Con Edison Energy Storage Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Con Edison Energy Storage Activities June 15, 2015 EIA Conference Con Edison Energy Storage (ES) 2 Presentation Overview * Introduction to Con Edison * Potential benefits of storage on our system * Unique urban challenges * Con Edison storage related activities * Going forward Con Edison: Overview 3 Customers Infrastructure Service Territory Electric 3.4 million One of the worlds largest underground electric systems All 5 boroughs of NYC and Westchester County Gas 1.1 million 4,333 miles of gas

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to picklingdegreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1...

  3. Logging in to Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so that the applications run on the Edison compute nodes. Accelerated X11 Performance NX is a freely available software package that greatly improves X11 performance over the...

  4. Edison's move has completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    completed January 8, 2016 by Richard Gerber We're pleased to announce that Edison is once again available to all NERSC users. The move from the NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility...

  5. Tesla vs. Edison

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This week on Energy.gov, we’re revisiting the storied rivalry between two of history’s most important energy-related inventors and engineers: Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla.

  6. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Deployment of Edison was made possible in part by funding from DOE's Office of Science and the DARPA High Productivity Computing Systems program. DOE's Office of Science is the ...

  7. Detroit Edison Company Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AMI Communication Systems Meter Communications Network Backhaul Communications Meter Data Management System Home Area Networks Customer Web Portal Access for 5,000 Customers 1,050...

  8. HPX on Babbage and Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPX on Babbage and Edison HPX on Babbage and Edison Edison and Babbage have a testbed version of HPX installed. To access files you need to be a member of repo m1881. Contact Alice Koniges (aekoniges@lbl.gov) for information and access. First we illustrate the Edison build, then the Babbage build. Accessing Edison ssh -Y username@edison.nersc.gov Retrieving the HPX sample files Make a directory for your work, for example in your home directory and cd into that directory. (Note that $SCRATCH is a

  9. Southern California Edison Interconnection Process Challenges

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Edison Interconnection Process Challenges Roger Salas P.E. Generation Interconnection Manager Southern California Edison Different Jurisdictional Tariffs Three ...

  10. SEP Success Story: Detroit Diesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This video features Detroit Diesel’s success with DOE’s Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) program. Daimler’s Detroit Diesel Corporation facility earned Platinum SEP certification in November 2015...

  11. Edison scratch files will be deleted on 11/30/2015 when Edison...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scratch files will be deleted on 11302015 when Edison moves Edison scratch files will be deleted on 11302015 when Edison moves November 15, 2015 by Zhengji Zhao Edison is...

  12. Serial Queue Available on Hopper and Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queue Available on Hopper and Edison Serial Queue Available on Hopper and Edison November 12, 2014 by Francesca Verdier The new serial queue on Hopper and Edison allows multiple...

  13. NuEdison | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NuEdison Jump to: navigation, search Name: NuEdison Place: San Jose, California Product: NuEdison has created a low-concentrator PV module that it says can increase the output of...

  14. Edison is Back and Faster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison is Back and Faster Edison is Back and Faster January 16, 2015 by Richard Gerber Edison's New Memory Edison is back, now with all 28,000 memory DIMs replaced and upclocked from 1600 MHz to 1866 MHz. (This is the memory speed, not the processor speed.) So, what will this mean to you? It's hard to predict exactly, but some codes will see a noticeable performance increase, which is good news for everyone. If you know that your code is memory bandwidth limited then your code could run up to 16

  15. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    275 43,690 50,347 50,439 46,981 37,528 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.69 4.26 3.10 4.04 5.36 2.91

  16. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 21 79 19 0 165 188 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.53 8.37 5.17 -- 4.44 5.26 1996...

  17. Consolidated Edison Solutions, Inc. ESCO Qualification Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheet Consolidated Edison Solutions, Inc. ESCO Qualification Sheet Document outlines the energy service company (ESCO) qualifications for ConEdison Solutions. PDF icon ces

  18. Metropolitan Edison Co (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edison Co (Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Metropolitan Edison Co Place: Pennsylvania Phone Number: 1-800-545-7741 Website: www.firstenergycorp.comconten Twitter:...

  19. Commonwealth Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edison Co (Redirected from ComED) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Commonwealth Edison Co Place: Illinois Service Territory: Illinois Phone Number: 1-800-334-7661 Website:...

  20. Ricardo Detroit Technical Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ricardo Detroit Technical Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ricardo Detroit Technical Center Place: Van Buren Township, Michigan Zip: 48111-1641 Sector: Services Product:...

  1. Detroit Auto Show 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detroit Auto Show 2012 Detroit Auto Show 2012 Addthis 1 of 10 Energy Secretary Steven Chu with Chrysler Chief Executive Sergio Marchionne. Image: Hantz Leger (Energy Department ...

  2. Edison's Desk Blog | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison's Desk Curious about researchers' minds? Here, you'll find reflections on new discoveries, with random variation to keep things interesting. Keep Up with Us Subscribe Home > Invention > Edison's Desk Recent Tags electrical engineering Electrical Technologies & Systems electricity unimpossible edison invention thomas edison accelerometer experiment vibration brilliant factory industrial internet Employee Events Alternative Energy Recent Authors Christine Surrette Jeffrey Sullivan

  3. New Features of the Edison XC30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Features of the Edison XC30 New Features of the Edison XC30 While the Edison and Hopper systems have similar programming environments and software, there are some key architectural differences between the two systems. This page describes those differences. Compute nodes Edison and Hopper both have a total of 24 cores on each compute node. Edison, like Hopper, has two sockets on each compute node, but instead of four "NUMA" memory domains, Edison has only two. Edison uses Intel

  4. Intel Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intel Compiler Performance on Edison Intel Compiler Performance on Edison These are the Intel optimization options we compared. The quotations are from the Intel compiler on-line man pages. Intel Compiler Options Tested -fast This "maximizes speed across the entire program". It is a very high level of optimization and includes interprocedural optimization across different source files. It increases compilation time significantly, and occasionally compiles will fail with this option

  5. Cray Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cray Compiler Performance on Edison Cray Compiler Performance on Edison Cray recommends using the default optimization (-O2) which is equivalent to the higher levels of optimization with other compilers. In addition, the -O3 and -Ofp3 options can improve performance on some codes. These are the Cray optimization options we compared. The quotations are from the Cray compiler on-line man pages. Cray compiler options tested default This is the default level of optimization provided by the compiler

  6. Edison's Desk Blog | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison vs. Tesla Edison vs. Tesla Edison vs. Tesla Meet the Inventors Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison Thomas A. Edison in his "Invention Factory," 1901. | Photo courtesy of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Some surprising facts about one of the most prolific inventors in U.S. history -- Thomas Edison. Top 11 Things You Didn't Know About Nikola Tesla Nikola Tesla in or around 1890, when the inventor was in his mid-30s. | Photo is in the

  7. Edison vs. Tesla | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Edison vs. Tesla Edison vs. Tesla Edison vs. Tesla Meet the Inventors Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison Thomas A. Edison in his "Invention Factory," 1901. | Photo courtesy of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Some surprising facts about one of the most prolific inventors in U.S. history -- Thomas Edison. Top 11 Things You Didn't Know About Nikola Tesla Nikola Tesla in or around 1890, when the inventor was in his mid-30s. | Photo is in the

  8. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Joined the Challenge: February 2013 Headquarters: Rosemead, CA Charging Location: Rosemead, CA Domestic Employees: 13,000 Southern California Edison (SCE) installed 49 Level 2 Electric Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSEs) at various locations between 2010-2012 for both employee and fleet charging. In early 2013, SCE began a

  9. HopperToEdison.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving from Hopper (Cray XE6) to Edison (Cray XC30) --- 1 --- NUG 2 013, F ebruary 2 5, 2 013 Edison-NERSC Newest HPC Machine * Easy to use - Edison p rogramming e nvironment i s r emarkably s imilar t o t hat o f Hopper * Supports a rich set of produc=on so?ware applica=ons, libraries, a nd t ools n eeded b y t he e n=re N ERSC w orkload - A r obust s et o f p rogramming l anguages, m odels - A r ich s et o f h ighly o p=mized l ibraries, t ools a nd a pplica=ons - Community a nd p

  10. Edison Queues and Scheduling Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Edison Queues and Scheduling Policies Users submit jobs to a partition and wait in line until nodes become available to run a job. NERSC's queue structures are intended to be fair and to allow jobs of various sizes to run efficiently. Note that the intended use of each system differs. Edison's purpose is to run large jobs, so the queue policy significantly favors large jobs using more than 682 nodes. If your workload requires smaller jobs (using less than 682 nodes), we

  11. Edison is Back and Faster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is Back and Faster Edison is Back and Faster January 17, 2015 by Richard Gerber Edison is Back and Faster Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date May 2016 April 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 April 2015 March 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013

  12. Gnu Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gnu Compiler Performance on Edison Gnu Compiler Performance on Edison By default, the Gnu compilers do not provide any optimization. These are the Gnu optimization options we compared. The quotations are from the gcc compiler on-line man page. Gnu compiler options tested -O3 -ffast-math In addition to the -O3 optimizations, this performs optimizations at the expense of an exact implementation of IEEE or ISO rules/specifications for math functions. -O3 This is the highest numerical level of

  13. Heritage Garden | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Detroit Edison Location Garden MI Coordinates 45.776334, -86.5527241 Show Map Loading...

  14. TEXT-ALTERNATIVE VERSION: DETROIT WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mayor Mike Duggan, City of Detroit: The DOE has just been an outstanding partner, and I'm really glad to be welcoming you here at this time. So welcome to Detroit.

  15. Edison Phase I Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Phase I Hours Used Edison Phase I Hours Used Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 06/23/2013 0.226 88.6 06/22/2013 0.239 93.9 06/21/2013 0.248 97.1 06/20/2013 0.240 94.0 06/19/2013 0.233 91.3 06/18/2013 0.245 96.0 06/17/2013 0.251 98.4 06/16/2013 0.243 95.3 06/15/2013 0.245 95.9 06/14/2013 0.246 96.5 06/13/2013 0.240 94.1 06/12/2013 0.128 50.4 06/11/2013 0.215 84.5 06/10/2013 0.225 88.4 06/09/2013 0.228 89.6

  16. Edison scratch files will be deleted on 11/30/2015 when Edison moves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scratch files will be deleted on 11/30/2015 when Edison moves Edison scratch files will be deleted on 11/30/2015 when Edison moves November 15, 2015 by Zhengji Zhao Edison is scheduled to be powered off at 7:00am PST on November 30, 2015 to move to our new CRT building. We expect Edison to be offline for up to six weeks. During the move Edison's scratch file systems will be reformatted and all data will be removed. ALL files on the /scratch1, /scratch2, and /scratch3 file systems WILL BE

  17. Review of consolidated Edison`s integrated resource bidding program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Baldick, R.; Milne, A.

    1993-07-01

    Competitive bidding has emerged as the dominant method for procuring new resources by US utilities. In New York, the Public Service Commission (NYPSC) ordered the state`s seven investor-owned utilities to develop bidding programs to acquire supply and DSM resource options. Utilities were allowed significant discretion in program design in order to encourage experimentation. Competitive bidding programs pose formidable policy, design, and management challenges for utilities and their regulators. Yet, there have been few detailed case studies of bidding programs, particularly of those utilities that take on the additional challenge of having supply and DSM resources compete head-to-head for a designated block of capacity. To address that need, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the bidding programs of two utilities that tested the integrated ``all-sources`` approach. This study focuses primarily on Consolidated Edison Company of New York`s (Con Edison) bidding program; an earlier report discusses our review of Niagara Mohawk`s program (Goldman et al 1992). We reviewed relevant Commission decisions, utility filings and signed contracts, interviewed utility and regulatory staff, surveyed DSM bidders and a selected sample of DSM non-bidders, and analyzed the bid evaluation system used in ranking bids based on detailed scoring information on individual bids provided by Con Edison.

  18. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

  19. Serial Queue Available on Hopper and Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queue Available on Hopper and Edison Serial Queue Available on Hopper and Edison November 12, 2014 by Francesca Verdier The new serial queue on Hopper and Edison allows multiple serial jobs from different users to share a compute node. it is implemented via Cray's Cluster Compatibility Mode and uses wrapper commands such as qsub.serial. See Serial Queue on the Crays. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date May 2016 April 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September

  20. Phase-1 of NERSC's Cray Edison System Has Arrived

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase-1 of NERSC's Cray Edison System Has Arrived Phase-1 of NERSC's Cray Edison System Has Arrived November 28, 2012 by Francesca Verdier Phase-1 of the new Edison system, a Cray...

  1. EA-157 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc EA-157 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc Order authorizing Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc to export electric...

  2. Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 June 4, 2013 by Francesca Verdier The Edison Phase II system arrives at NERSC in...

  3. All Users Now Enabled on Edison Phase 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users Now Enabled on Edison Phase 2 All Users Now Enabled on Edison Phase 2 August 30, 2013 by Francesca Verdier All user accounts have been enabled on the second phase of Edison,...

  4. SunEdison | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Science & Technology Partnership Year 2008 SunEdison is a company located in Beltsville, MD....

  5. SunEdison Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    headquartered in Beltsville, Maryland, was founded in 2003. Sunedison develops, finances, operates and monitors solar plants worldwide.3 SunEdison is responsible for...

  6. New Features of the Edison XC30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aries provides a higher bandwidth, lower latency interconnect than Gemini, and should ... Users can request access to scratch3 via a web form. Edison uses Cray Sonexion lustre ...

  7. Edison Welding Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Welding Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison Welding Institute Address: 1250 Arthur E. Adams Drive Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43221-3585 Sector: Efficiency, Services...

  8. Consolidated Edison Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consolidated Edison Inc Place: New York, New York Zip: 10003 Product: A regulated utility providing electric, gas, and steam service to NYC...

  9. Edison Solar & Wind Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison Solar & Wind Ltd Address: 11 E. Church St, 57 Place: Milan, Ohio Zip: 44846 Sector: Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy...

  10. Performance comparison between Edison and Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance comparison between Edison and Hopper Performance comparison between Edison and Hopper Edison compute node memory was upgraded to 1866 MHz from 1600 MHz on Jan 16, 2015. We rerun the SSP applications in dedicted or semi-dedicated mode on Edison again, and have observed 2-9% of increase in performance with the NERSC 6 application benchmark. The table below is the updated performance data: Application CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Concurrency 240 1024 2048 1024 2048 8192

  11. Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC November 27, 2012 Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Phase 1 of NERSC's newest supercomputer, named Edison, was delivered on November 27, 2012. The architecture is a Cray XC30 ("Cascade") and it will be installed in two phases. When it is fully installed in 2013, Edison will have a peak performance of more than 2 petaflops (1015 floating point operations per second). The integrated storage system will have more

  12. SunEdison LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Beltsville, Maryland Zip: 20705 Sector: Solar Product: Maryland-based provider of financial and installation solutions for solar projects. References: SunEdison...

  13. Cori Phase 1 for Edison Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users Cori Phase 1 for Edison Users Running jobs on Cori is similar to running jobs on Edison except for the processor, memory, and batch scheduler. Cori uses a new batch scheduler, SLURM. Edison used Torque/Moab batch scheduler until Nov 30, 2015. Cori Phase 1 has a total of 1630 compute nodes, 32 cores per node, each node has two sockets, each socket is populated with a 16-core Intel "Haswell" processor at 2.3 GHz. Edison has a total of 24 cores per node, each node has two sockets,

  14. PP-228 Edison Sault Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Permit authorizing Edison Sault Electric Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-228 Edison Sault ...

  15. Edison Mission Marktg & Trdg Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edison Mission Marktg & Trdg Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison Mission Marktg & Trdg Inc Place: Massachusetts References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  16. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 Website:...

  17. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (New Hampshire) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-888-210-8899 Website:...

  18. EA-178-B Edison Mission Marketing & Trading, Inc | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order authorizing Edison Mission Marketing & Trading, Inc to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-178-B Edison Mission Marketing & Trading, Inc More Documents & ...

  19. Southern California Edison Company SCE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern California Edison Company SCE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern California Edison Company (SCE) Place: Rosemead, California Zip: 91770 Sector: Renewable Energy...

  20. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reg. 47328 Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Regulatory Burden ... In the RFI, the Department of Energy (DOE) is asking for ... More Documents & Publications Edison Electric Institute ...

  1. Detroit Street Lighting Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2015restoring-detroit.pdf More Documents & Publications LED Roadway Lighting OCTOBER 2015 POSTINGS Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final ...

  2. Detroit, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detroit, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.331427, -83.0457538 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  3. City of Detroit Lakes, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lakes, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Detroit Lakes Place: Minnesota Website: www.ci.detroit-lakes.mn.usmai Facebook: https:...

  4. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for February...

  5. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for May 2008. Monthly...

  6. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date...

  7. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for November...

  8. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date...

  9. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2015-10-21

    The City of Detroit is undertaking a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to light-emitting diode (LED). Detroit’s well-publicized financial troubles over the last several years have added many hurdles and constraints to this process. Strategies to overcome these issues have largely been successful, but have also brought some mixed results. This document provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far.

  10. Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PGI and Pathscale are not installed. Gnu and Cray use Cray libsci for math library routines, but Intel uses Intel's MKL math library (add "- mklcluster" as an LDFLAG). ...

  11. Edison_Overview-NUG2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Deputy Group Lead Edison Overview --- 1 --- February 1 4, 2 013 Edison Phase I is Here! --- 2 --- From a U ser P erspec0ve E dison i s v ery s imilar t o H opper! Edison Addresses the NERSC Workload Needs 3 Characteris5c Descrip5on Comment Processor Intel I vy B ridge (Phase 1 : S andy B ridge) Fast, c uFng---edge, c ommodity processor Node Dual---socket, 6 4 G B 1 866 M Hz m emory Large m emory p er n ode Excellent m emory b andwidth Interconnect Cray A ries, d ragonfly t opology

  12. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: the Customer Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, J.

    2003-10-10

    DOE's mission under the Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability (DEER) Program is to strengthen America's electric energy infrastructure and provide utilities and consumers with a greater array of energy-efficient technology choices for generating, transmitting, distributing, storing, and managing demand for electric power and thermal energy. DOE recognizes that distributed energy technologies can help accomplish this mission. Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the potential energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention has been the desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and other potential impacts on the distribution system. It is important to assess the costs and benefits of DE to consumers and distribution system companies. DOE commissioned this study to assess the costs and benefits of DE technologies to consumers and to better understand the effect of DE on the grid. Current central power generation units vent more waste heat (energy) than the entire transportation sector consumes and this wasted thermal energy is projected to grow by 45% within the next 20 years. Consumer investment in technologies that increase power generation efficiency is a key element of the DOE Energy Efficiency program. The program aims to increase overall cycle efficiency from 30% to 70% within 20 years as well. DOE wants to determine the impact of DE in several small areas within cities across the U.S. Ann Arbor, Michigan, was chosen as the city for this case study. Ann Arbor has electric and gas rates that can substantially affect the market penetration of DE. This case study analysis was intended to: (1) Determine what DE market penetration can realistically be expected, based on consumer investment in combined heat and power systems (CHP) and the effect of utility applied demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate and quantify the impact on the distribution utility feeder from the perspective of customer ownership of the DE equipment. (3) Determine the distribution feeder limits and the impact DE may have on future growth. For the case study, the Gas Technology Institute analyzed a single 16-megawatt grid feeder circuit in Ann Arbor, Michigan to determine whether there are economic incentives to use small distributed power generation systems that would offset the need to increase grid circuit capacity. Increasing circuit capacity would enable the circuit to meet consumer's energy demands at all times, but it would not improve the circuit's utilization factor. The analysis spans 12 years, to a planning horizon of 2015. By 2015, the demand for power is expected to exceed the grid circuit capacity for a significant portion of the year. The analysis was to determine whether economically acceptable implementation of customer-owned DE systems would reduce the peak power demands enough to forestall the need to upgrade the capacity of the grid circuit. The analysis was based on economics and gave no financial credit for improved power reliability or mitigation of environmental impacts. Before this study was completed, the utility expanded the capacity of the circuit to 22 MW. Although this expansion will enable the circuit to meet foreseeable increases in peak demand, it also will significantly decrease the circuit's overall utilization factor. The study revealed that DE penetration on the selected feeder is not expected to forestall the need to upgrade the grid circuit capacity unless interconnection barriers are removed. Currently, a variety of technical, business practice, and regulatory barriers discourage DE interconnection in the US market.

  13. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study to assess the costs and benefits of distributed energy (DE) technologies to consumers and to better understand the effect of DE on the grid.

  14. Tesla vs. Edison | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    two of history's most important energy-related inventors and engineers: Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. Check back each day to learn more about their lives, their inventions and...

  15. Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced Nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) battery technology. Vastly out-lasting the 7...

  16. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: New York Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 or 1-800-316-8011 Website: www.conedsolutions.comHome.as Twitter: https:twitter.comConEdSolutions...

  17. Commonwealth Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commonwealth Edison Co Place: Illinois Service Territory: Illinois Phone Number: 1-800-334-7661 Website: www.comed.comPagesdefault.as Twitter: https:twitter.comComEd Facebook:...

  18. Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades Secretary Moniz Applauds Detroit's LED Street Lighting Upgrades June 16, 2014 - 10:46am Addthis Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz visited Detroit on May 22, 2014, to mark the city's progress installing energy-efficient LED streetlights in an update of its largely broken public lighting system, speaking at the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program. Like so many cities across the country, Detroit is

  19. SmartBuildings Detroit Commercial Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SmartBuildings Detroit Commercial Case Study, a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  20. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,465 2,693 3,676 3,988 3,357 3,437 765 3,916 4,318 4,473 4,851 4,752 2012 5,562 5,372 5,253 3,745 3,354 2,811 2,935 3,822...

  1. SunEdison Israel Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Israel Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SunEdison Israel Ltd Place: Israel Product: Israel-based subsidiary of project developer SunEdison in the Israeli market, with 15%...

  2. The Potomac Edison Co (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Potomac Edison Co Place: Maryland Twitter: @PotomacEdison Outage Map: outages.firstenergycorp.commd References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

  3. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Maryland Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 or 1-888-320-8991 or...

  4. Edison Training: Programming, Debugging, and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Connection and Slides BerkeleyGW2014 Performance Tuning and Functional Debugging for Xeon Phi New User Training: 10/30/2014 OpenMP and Vectorization Cray Reveal Tool New User Training User Forum on Data-Intensive Computing New User (@NUG 2014) BerkeleyGW2013 Edison Performance New User Training HPC Using GPUs Getting Started at NERSC Training -- Edison Getting Started at NERSC NERSC Training at SC12 Effective Use of Compilers Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Object-Oriented

  5. Detroit Diesel verifies $37 million in energy savings with SEP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This video features Detroit Diesel’s success with DOE’s Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) program. Daimler’s Detroit Diesel Corporation facility earned Platinum SEP certification in November 2015...

  6. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-06 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-06-01...

  7. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Detroit for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-08 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-08-01...

  8. DOE Publishes Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion DOE Publishes Report on Detroit's Street Lighting Conversion October 7, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has released a new report on the comprehensive street lighting restoration currently being undertaken by the City of Detroit, which includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to LED. Entitled Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System, the report provides an objective review of the

  9. Thomas Edison's Legacy for Young Engineers | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas Edison's Legacy: In the Eyes of an Edison Engineer Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Thomas Edison's Legacy: In the Eyes of an Edison Engineer Kimberly Hammer 2016.02.12 Yesterday would have been Thomas Edison's 169th Birthday. In honor of his birthday, February 11 is also known as National

  10. WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? Who said it, Nikola Tesla or Thomas Edison? Test your knowledge of these two important energy inventors with our downloadable quote quiz cards. Four cards feature a quote only; the corresponding cards reveal the answer. Want to learn more about Tesla and Edison? Check out our top things you didn't know about Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Learn the history of the light bulb -- from incandescent to LED -- in our interactive timeline.

  11. WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? Who said it, Nikola Tesla or Thomas Edison? Test your knowledge of these two important energy inventors with our downloadable quote quiz cards. Four cards feature a quote only; the corresponding cards reveal the answer. Want to learn more about Tesla and Edison? Check out our top things you didn't know about Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Learn the history of the light bulb -- from incandescent to LED -- in our interactive timeline.

  12. Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison November 18, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Thomas A. Edison in his "Invention ...

  13. NERSC's newest supercomputer, a Cray XC30 named "Edison," is...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sec bandwidth Peak Performance 2.4 PFsec Global Network Bandwidth (BW) > 11 TBsec Node Memory BW > 100 GBs NERSC's user were productive immediately due to Edison's stability...

  14. Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 June 4, 2013 by Francesca Verdier The Edison Phase II system arrives at NERSC in June, and will boost the Phase I core count by more than a factor of 10. In order to integrate the new components and upgrade existing ones, the entire Edison system will be unavailable for about one month beginning June 24. This includes the login nodes and the scratch file system. Please plan your work accordingly.

  15. Edison Material Technology Center EMTEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Material Technology Center EMTEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison Material Technology Center (EMTEC) Place: Dayton, Ohio Zip: 45420 Product: String representation "A...

  16. Southern California Edison Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Southern California Edison Company Country United States Headquarters Location Rosemead, California Recovery Act Funding...

  17. Edison moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations now Edison moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations now November 10, 2015 by Katie Antypas Dear NERSC...

  18. C++11 header files appear missing on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C++11 header files appear missing on Edison C++11 header files appear missing on Edison December 3, 2014 by Scott French, NERSC USG Status: Reported to Cray (801693), Workaround available When using the default Intel compiler environment on Edison to compile C++11 code (-std=c++11), it appears that the associated header files cannot be found: edison03:~ > CC -std=c++11 test.cxx -o test.x test.cxx(2): catastrophic error: cannot open source file "chrono" #include <chrono> ^

  19. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: (914) 286-7000 Website: www.conedsolutions.com Twitter: @ConEdSolutions Facebook: https:www.facebook.comconedsolutions...

  20. Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...

  1. Case Study - Con Edison Smart Grid Investment Grant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New York City with more reliable and affordable power, Con Edison is upgrading its distribution system to reduce the frequency and duration of outages and improve power quality. ...

  2. QER - Comment of Edison Electric Institute (EEI) 2 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Please find the Second Set of Comments of the Edison Electric Institute on the Quadrennial Energy ... More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of Powder River Energy ...

  3. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE). ... 5-29-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 ...

  4. EA-157-A Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Order authorizing Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-157-A Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc More Documents &...

  5. Daimler's Detroit Diesel Plant Earns Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Daimler's Detroit facility has found a winning formula," said Mark Johnson, Director of DOE's Advanced Manufacturing Office. "Their systematic approach has cut energy intensity ...

  6. Detroit Beach, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detroit Beach, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9311563, -83.3268753 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  7. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    January 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  8. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  9. Stoney Corners II (REpower) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Traverse City Light & PowerDetroit Edison Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209, -85.275 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Edison is back to production in the new facility building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    back to production in the new facility building Edison is back to production in the new facility building January 4, 2016 Edison is back online after about 5 weeks of downtime to move to a new facility building, Wang Hall, at the main Berkeley campus. The following are the changes: Edison's batch system is now Slurm. All your old job scripts (for Torque/Moab) will not work anymore. Please visit our Running Jobs page to learn how to run job scripts under Slurm. If you need help with migrating

  11. Edison-IO-CUG2014-paper-Zhao

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance on Cray XC30 Zhengji Zhao 1) , Doug Petesch 2) , David Knaak 2) , and Tina Declerck 1) 1) National Energy Research Scientific Center, Berkeley, CA 2) Cray, Inc., St. Paul, MN Email: {zzhao, tmdeclerck}@lbl.gov; {dpetesch, knaak}@cray.com Abstract-Edison is NERSC's newest petascale Cray XC30 system. Edison has three Lustre file systems deploying the Cray Sonexion storage systems. During the Edison acceptance test period, we measured the system I/O performance on a dedicated system

  12. Edison moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations now!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations now! Edison moving, Hopper retiring in December. Use your allocations now! November 10, 2015 by Katie Antypas Dear NERSC Users, This year is full of changes for NERSC. We are moving to a new facility and bringing a new system, Cori online. Edison will be taken offline to move to our new home on November 30th and Hopper will be retired on December 15th. While Cori Phase 1 is coming online now, with Edison, our largest system offline, the

  13. EA-169 Commonwealth Edison Company | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PDF icon EA-169 Commonwealth Edison Company More Documents & Publications EA-220-A NRG Power Marketing, Inc EA-122-A Dynegy Power Marketing, Inc EA-196-A Minnesota Power, Sales

  14. Edison vs. Tesla: Toasting a Rivalry That Drove Innovation |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the quotes in a single PDF document. Whether you're on TeamTesla or TeamEdison, we hope you enjoyed learning more about these fascinating inventors -- and how their work still...

  15. Edison, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey. 1 Registered Energy Companies in Edison, New Jersey Apex Technology BioEnergy of America BioEnergy of America Inc Dome Tech World...

  16. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) offers incentives to Maryland residential customers who are interested in upgrading to more energy efficient appliances and HVACsystems. Rebates are available on...

  17. SunEdison First Reserve JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: SunEdison & First Reserve JV Sector: Solar Product: US-based joint venture that plans to acquire and develop solar projects in the US, Italy, Spain and...

  18. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Delaware) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Delaware Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 or 1-888-320-8991 or 1-800-316-8011 or 1-888-210-8899 Website: www.conedsolutions.comHome.as Twitter:...

  19. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Pennsylvania Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 or 1-888-320-8991 or 1-800-316-8011 Website: www.conedsolutions.comContact Twitter: https:...

  20. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Texas Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 Website: www.conedsolutions.comHome.as Twitter: @ConEdSolutions Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  1. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: New Jersey Website: www.conedsolutions.comHome.as Outage Hotline: 888-320-8891 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  2. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: (781) 203-2700 Website: www.conedsolutions.comHome.as Twitter: @ConEdSolutions Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  3. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: District of Columbia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4191 This article is a...

  4. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Illinois Phone Number: 1-888-210-8899 Website: www.conedsolutions.comResiden Twitter: @ConEdSolutions Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  5. C++11 header files appear missing on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > CC -stdc++11 test.cxx -o test.x test.cxx(2): catastrophic error: cannot open source file "chrono" include compilation aborted for test.cxx (code 4) edison03:...

  6. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) The Edison Electric Institute ... Department of Energy (DOE). PDF icon Reg review - DOE RFI - EEI cmts 2-3-12.pdf More Documents & Publications EEI ...

  7. EA-416 Consolidated Edison Energy, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-416 Consolidated Edison Energy, Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 244 - Dec. 21, 2015 EA-388 TEC Energy Inc.

  8. Remarks of President Barack Obama at Southern California Edison Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technical Center | Department of Energy of President Barack Obama at Southern California Edison Electric Vehicle Technical Center Remarks of President Barack Obama at Southern California Edison Electric Vehicle Technical Center March 19, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Remarks of President Barack Obama - As Prepared for Delivery Pomona, California Thursday, March 19, 2009 It is good to be back in California. It's always nice to get out of Washington for a little while and recharge your

  9. Daimler's Detroit Diesel Plant Earns Superior Energy Performance, Saves

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    $37M | Department of Energy Daimler's Detroit Diesel Plant Earns Superior Energy Performance, Saves $37M Daimler's Detroit Diesel Plant Earns Superior Energy Performance, Saves $37M March 9, 2016 - 10:51am Addthis sep-1_original.png Daimler's Detroit Diesel Corporation facility has earned Platinum certification in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)) program. The facility used a rigorous energy management system to meet the ISO 50001 standard and

  10. VIDEO: Who Was the Better Inventor, Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Who Was the Better Inventor, Tesla or Edison? VIDEO: Who Was the Better Inventor, Tesla or Edison? November 20, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis "Who was the better inventor, Edison or Tesla, and why?" In this video, we explore the famous rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Matty Greene Matty Greene Former Videographer As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we're exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola

  11. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

  12. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

  13. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

  14. City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

  15. Southern California Edison`s approach to improving office energy use among its customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duvall-Ward, J.

    1995-12-01

    Southern California Edison (SCE) has 500,000 commercial/industrial/agriculturaI customers and 3.6 million residential customers. As part of a continuing effort to develop programs which encourage customers to use energy-efficient technology, SCE began exploring ways to improve office energy use by its customers. The utility examined the type of equipment it should pursue with the customers, the potential energy savings, and the percent of influence SCE thought it could have on the customer. The program was implemented on August 2, 1994.

  16. NOTES AND COMMENTS REVERE COPPER AR! BRASS DETROIT, MICHIGAN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * .t-* . * * - -. _ _ ,.. .I AIT. 4 NOTES AND COMMENTS REVERE COPPER AR! BRASS DETROIT, MICHIGAN A preliminary (screening) survey was conducted in several areas of the Revere Copper and Brass Facility, 5851 W. Jefferson Street, Detroit, Michigan. The survey was conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group on April 22, 1981. The Survey Group, consisting of W. Smith, R. Mundis, K. Flynn (all of ANI), and E. Jascewsky (DOE-CH) met on site with J. Evans (Safety Engineer), D. Tratt (Asst.

  17. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K; Kingston, Tim

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

  18. Edison is scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11302015 Edison is scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11302015 October 29, 2015 Edison is scheduled to be powered...

  19. If you can not login to Edison while you can login to Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    If you can not login to Edison while you can login to Hopper If you can not login to Edison while you can login to Hopper July 21, 2015 Some users, who use a later version of...

  20. All users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I All users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I March 5, 2013 by Francesca Verdier All user accounts have been...

  1. FirstEnergy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power, West Penn Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Honeywell Website http:www.firstenergycorp.comenergyefficiencypennsylvaniaindex.html Funding Source Pennsylvania Electric Company (Penelec), Metropolitan Edison Company...

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-484-1754, Detroit Fire Fighters, Detroit, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters on behalf of the Detroit Fire Fighters Association, Detroit, Michigan, a health hazard evaluation was made of respiratory symptoms and skin irritation in fire fighters involved in a large fire and explosion at a warehouse. Over 200 fire fighters from fire-fighting organizations in three communities were involved in the incident. Site runoff water contained chlordane and malathion in low parts per million; other samples were negative. Nose and throat irritation, cough, and shortness of breath were experienced by a large proportion of fire fighters following the fire, and in 14, 15, and 17 percent, respectively, symptoms persisted over 2 months. Symptoms were significantly associated with time spent at the scene and time spent in heavy smoke. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 14 cases, ten due to obstructive lung disease, three to restrictive lung disease, and one to a combination. The authors conclude that better protective equipment is needed for fire fighters at chemical fires. Recommendations include development of a hazardous-materials response team, and implementation of a routine medical surveillance program.

  3. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) | Department of Energy 6 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting these comments in response to the above-referenced request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE). PDF icon Reg review - DOE RFI - EEI cmts 2-3-12.pdf More Documents & Publications EEI Comments in response to DOE regulatory review RFI, 76

  4. Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) | Department of Energy Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting these comments in response to the above-referenced request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE). In the RFI, DOE is again asking for information on ways to streamline and to reduce the burden imposed by its

  5. Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Thomas Alva Edison Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison November 18, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Thomas A. Edison in his "Invention Factory," 1901. | Photo courtesy of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Thomas A. Edison in his "Invention Factory," 1901. | Photo courtesy of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs EDISON

  6. Edison - A New Cray Supercomputer Advances Discovery at NERSC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dosanjh, Sudip; Parkinson, Dula; Yelick, Kathy; Trebotich, David; Broughton, Jeff; Antypas, Katie; Lukic, Zarija, Borrill, Julian; Draney, Brent; Chen, Jackie

    2014-06-06

    When a supercomputing center installs a new system, users are invited to make heavy use of the computer as part of the rigorous testing. In this video, find out what top scientists have discovered using Edison, a Cray XC30 supercomputer, and how NERSC's newest supercomputer will accelerate their future research.

  7. Edison - A New Cray Supercomputer Advances Discovery at NERSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosanjh, Sudip; Parkinson, Dula; Yelick, Kathy; Trebotich, David; Broughton, Jeff; Antypas, Katie; Lukic, Zarija, Borrill, Julian; Draney, Brent; Chen, Jackie

    2014-02-06

    When a supercomputing center installs a new system, users are invited to make heavy use of the computer as part of the rigorous testing. In this video, find out what top scientists have discovered using Edison, a Cray XC30 supercomputer, and how NERSC's newest supercomputer will accelerate their future research.

  8. Michigan's 13th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Michigan's 13th congressional district Detroit Edison Company Smart Grid Project The Detroit Edison Company Smart Grid Demonstration...

  9. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Photo of Ambient Solar Thermal Collector The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a laboratory in Edison, New Jersey that is the site of an alternative energy project. It uses a super ambient solar thermal collector or solar hot water pre-heater for shower facilities in the lab. Initial investment: $14,448 Payback period: 12 years Cost savings: $1,237/year Energy savings:

  10. Edison vs. Tesla: The Battle of the Energy Inventors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Battle of the Energy Inventors Edison vs. Tesla: The Battle of the Energy Inventors November 21, 2013 - 2:36pm Addthis Our panel of experts answers your questions about two of the greatest energy inventors, Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Who was the better inventor: Thomas Edison or Nikola Tesla? Vote now for your favorite energy inventor. Join the conversation on

  11. Edison is scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11/30/2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11/30/2015 Edison is scheduled to move to a new facility building on 11/30/2015 October 29, 2015 Edison is scheduled to be powered off at 7:00 am PST on November 30, 2015, for the move to the new CRT building. We expect Edison to be offline for up to six weeks. Here is a breakdown of the move and how it will impact users: - At 00:01 PST (midnight) on November 30, 2015, Edison queues will be turned off. Any jobs running at that time will be killed,

  12. Microsoft Word - SoCal Edison OE0000201 Fact Sheet May 20 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 2014 Southern California Edison Company Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project Project ... the effectiveness of lithium-ion battery and smart inverter technologies to ...

  13. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy company Potomac Edison offers rebates to eligible commercial, industrial, governmental, and institutional customers in Maryland service territory who are interested in upgrading to...

  14. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.36 2.55 2.26 2.30 2000's 3.74 4.57 3.03 5.47 6.47 8.12 7.61 6.88 8.37 4.01 2010's 4.69 4.26 3.10 4.04 5.36 2.91

  15. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.72 4.58 4.22 4.51 4.66 4.73 4.55 4.45 4.19 3.92 3.79 3.60 2012 3.14 2.95 2.61 2.33 2.50 2.62 3.08 3.12 2.99 3.41 4.13 3.90 2013 4.04 3.67 3.96 4.42 4.42 4.26 4.02 3.84 3.90 3.89 3.79 4.34 2014 5.67 10.21 7.89 4.89 4.93 4.86 4.44 4.06 4.14 4.11 4.20 4.16 2015 3.38 3.80 3.19 2.77 2.78 2.94 2.97 3.07 2.91 2.71 2.22 2.24 2016 2.50 2.25

  16. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 30,410 31,080 24,908 25,049 2000's 36,007 35,644 7,431 19,737 40,030 40,255 22,156 22,904 27,220 43,980 2010's 44,275 43,690 50,347 50,439 46,981 37,528

  17. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,465 2,693 3,676 3,988 3,357 3,437 765 3,916 4,318 4,473 4,851 4,752 2012 5,562 5,372 5,253 3,745 3,354 2,811 2,935 3,822 4,015 4,113 4,636 4,728 2013 4,791 4,331 4,801 3,571 4,430 3,769 3,933 4,131 3,885 2,862 3,886 4,945 2014 4,042 4,259 4,171 3,540 3,852 4,008 3,643 3,461 3,414 4,013 3,800 4,779 2015 3,753 2,420 4,176 2,416 2,035 1,911 2,624 2,674 4,755 4,944 3,048 2,773 2016 2,881 2,701

  18. The cce/8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The cce8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison The cce8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison July 1, 2014 You may run into the following...

  19. All users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I All users now enabled on the new Cray XC30, Edison Phase I March 5, 2013 by Francesca Verdier All user accounts have been enabled on the first phase of Edison, NERSC's newest HPC resource, a Cray XC30. The system was installed last December and is currently in the pre-production phase, a time when NERSC users are given access to the machine, and also when NERSC and Cray staff are still making improvements to the system. Users are invited to

  20. Performance of the Southern California Edison Company Stirling dish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, C.W.; Stone, K.W.

    1993-10-01

    McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) and United Stirling AB of Sweden (USAB) formed a joint venture in 1982 to develop and produce a Stirling dish solar generating system. In this report, the six year development and testing program continued by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) is described. Each Stirling dish module consists of a sun tracking dish concentrator developed by the MDAC and a Stirling engine driven power conversion unit (PCU) developed by USAB. The Stirling dish system demonstrated twice the peak and daily solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of any other system then under development. This system continues to set the performance standard for solar to electric systems being developed in the early 1990`s. Test data are presented and used to estimate the performance of a commercial system.

  1. Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

    2011-06-01

    This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

  2. Using Hybrid MPI and OpenMP on Hopper and Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aprun -n 16 -N 2 -S 1 -d 12 a.out Please refer to sample batch scripts for running hybrid MPIOpenMP jobs on the Edison Example Batch Scripts webpage. Notice the different...

  3. Energy Department and Edison Electric Institute Sign Agreement to Advance Electric Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz signed a Memorandum of Understanding between the Department and the Edison Electric Institute, strengthening collaborative action to accelerate plug-in electric vehicle and charging infrastructure deployment.

  4. FirstEnergy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to help meet the goals established in Pennsylvania's Act 129, FirstEnergy's Pennsylvania companies (MetEdison, Penelec, and Penn Power) are providing energy efficiency incentives for a...

  5. CDT 15.09 is availalbe as a non-default version on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 is availalbe as a non-default version on Edison CDT 15.09 is availalbe as a non-default version on Edison October 20, 2015 The Cray Developer Toolkit (CDT) 15.09 was made available on Edison on 10/20/2015 as a non-default version. The following are the latest versions avaiblle on Edison: atp/1.8.3 chapel/1.12.0 cray-ccdb/1.0.7 cray-ga/5.3.0.3 cray-hdf5/1.8.14 cray-hdf5-parallel/1.8.14 cray-lgdb/2.4.5 cray-libsci/13.2.0 cray-mpich/7.2.5 cray-netcdf/4.3.3.1 cray-netcdf-hdf5parallel/4.3.3.1

  6. Beyond Tesla and Edison: Other Luminaries from the Age of Electricity |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Beyond Tesla and Edison: Other Luminaries from the Age of Electricity Beyond Tesla and Edison: Other Luminaries from the Age of Electricity November 25, 2013 - 1:30pm Addthis Electricity pioneer Charles Proteus Steinmetz (center in light-colored suit) poses with Albert Einstein (immediate left) and other inventors at the RCA Brunswick, New Jersey, wireless station in 1921. | Photo courtesy of Franklin Township Public Library Archive. Electricity pioneer Charles Proteus

  7. CDT 15.12 was set to default on Edison on 12/23/2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 was set to default on Edison on 12/23/2015 CDT 15.12 was set to default on Edison on 12/23/2015 December 30, 2015 The Cray Developer Toolkit (CDT) 15.12 was set to default on 12/23/2015. The following software versions are now new default on Edison: craype/2.5.0 cray-ccdb/1.0.7 cray-ga/5.3.0.4 cray-hdf5-parallel/1.8.14 cray-hdf5/1.8.14 cray-lgdb/2.4.5 cray-libsci/13.3.0 cray-mpich-abi/7.3.0 cray-mpich/7.3.0 cray-netcdf-hdf5parallel/4.3.3.1 cray-netcdf/4.3.3.1 cray-parallel-netcdf/1.6.1

  8. CDT 16.01 was set to default on Edison on 2/3/2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.01 was set to default on Edison on 2/3/2016 CDT 16.01 was set to default on Edison on 2/3/2016 February 3, 2016 by Zhengji Zhao The Cray Developer Toolkit (CDT) 16.01 was set to default on 2/3/2016. The following software versions are new default on Edison: craype/2.5.1 cray-ga/5.3.0.5 cray-hdf5/1.8.16 cray-hdf5-parallel/1.8.16 cray-mpich/7.3.1 cray-mpich-abi/7.3.1 cray-shmem/7.3.1 craypkg-gen/1.3.3 cce/8.4.3 The intel compiler default was not changed, it is still intel/15.0.1.133. A new

  9. Rotary engine design: Analysis and developments; Proceedings of the International Congress and Exposition, Detroit, MI, Feb. 27-Mar. 3, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the development status of Wankel cycle rotary engine design discusses stratified-charge rotary engine features, techniques for noise and vibration reduction in rotary engines, testing methods for insulated rotary engine components, cyclic combustion variation in rotary engines, and a combustion model for homogeneous charge natural gas rotary engines. Also discussed are fuel-air mixing and distribution in a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine, the 'rotary-vee' engine design concept, strain measurements in a rotary engine housing, and a comparison of computed and measured pressure in a premixed-charge natural gas-fueled rotary engine.

  10. Edison vs. Tesla: Toasting a Rivalry That Drove Innovation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Toasting a Rivalry That Drove Innovation Edison vs. Tesla: Toasting a Rivalry That Drove Innovation November 22, 2013 - 2:16pm Addthis 1 of 8 Image: Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. 2 of 8 Image: Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. 3 of 8 Image: Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. 4 of 8 Image: Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. 5 of 8 Image: Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. 6 of

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: DTE Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DTE Energy Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: DTE Energy Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: DTE Energy Joined the Challenge: March 2013 Headquarters: Detroit, MI Charging Locations: Ann Arbor, MI; Belleville, MI; Bloomfield Township, MI; Clinton Township, MI; Clinton Township, MI; Detroit, MI; Detroit, MI; Detroit, MI; Detroit, MI Domestic Employees: 10,000 DTE Energy seeks to be a premier, full-service, energy and energy-technology company providing solutions to meet the needs of 21st

  12. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  13. SunEdison Photovoltaic Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-302

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.

    2012-09-01

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with SunEdison to monitor and analyze the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems as they relate to grid integration. Initially this project will examine the performance of PV systems with respect to evaluating the benefits and impacts on the electric power grid.

  14. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  15. Coal-water-slurry autoignition in a high-speed Detroit diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W. III.; Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    Autoignition of coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel in a two-stroke engine operating at 1900 RPM has been achieved. A Pump-Line-Nozzle (PLN) injection system, delivering 400mm{sup 3} injection of CWS, was installed in one modified cylinder of a Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) 8V-149TI engine, while the other seven cylinders remained configured for diesel fuel. Coal Combustion was sustained by maintaining high gas and surface temperatures with a combination of hot residual gases, warm inlet air admission, ceramic insulated components and increased compression ratio. The coal-fueled cylinder generated 85kW indicated power (80 percent of rated power), and lower NO{sub x} levels with a combustion efficiency of 99.2 percent. 6 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-376

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration View All Maps Addthis

    Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation Cooperative Research and Development Final Report CRADA Number: CRD-10-376 NREL Technical Contact: Barry Mather CRADA Report NREL/TP-5D00-64556 July 2015 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency

  17. Distributed Energy Alternative to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingston, Tim; Kelly, John

    2008-08-01

    The nation's power grid, specifically the New York region, faces burgeoning energy demand and suffers from congested corridors and aging equipment that cost New York consumers millions of dollars. Compounding the problem is high-density buildup in urban areas that limits available space to expand grid capacity. Coincidently, these urban areas are precisely where additional power is required. DER in this study refers to combined heat and power (CHP) technology, which simultaneously generates heat and electricity at or near the point where the energy will be consumed. There are multiple CHP options available that, combined with a portfolio of other building energy efficiency (EE) strategies, can help achieve a more efficient supply-demand balance than what the grid can currently provide. As an alternative to expanding grid capacity, CHP and EE strategies can be deployed in a flexible manner at virtually any point on the grid to relieve load. What's more, utilities and customers can install them in a variety of potentially profitable applications that are more environmentally friendly. Under the auspices of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory representing the Office of Electricity of the U.S. Department of Energy, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) conducted this study in cooperation with Consolidated Edison to help broaden the market penetration of EE and DER. This study provides realistic load models and identifies the impacts that EE and DER can have on the electrical distribution grid; specifically within the current economic and regulatory environment of a high load growth area of New York City called Hudson Yards in Midtown Manhattan. These models can be used to guide new policies that improve market penetration of appropriate CHP and EE technologies in new buildings. The following load modeling scenarios were investigated: (1) Baseline: All buildings are built per the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (No CHP applied and no EE above the code); (2) Current Policy: This is a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario that incorporates some EE and DER based on market potential in the current economic and regulatory environment; (3) Modified Rate 14RA: This economic strategy is meant to decrease CHP payback by removing the contract demand from, and adding the delivery charge to the Con Edison Standby Rate PSC2, SC14-RA; (4) Carbon Trade at $20/metric tonne (mt): This policy establishes a robust carbon trading system in NY that would allow building owners to see the carbon reduction resulting from CHP and EE.

  18. Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  19. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

  20. The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

    2000-06-19

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

  1. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive

  3. Nature and Origin of the Cuprate Pseudogap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through HTSC cable. That same year, three 400-foot HTSC cables were installed for Detroit Edison at the Frisbie Substation that could deliver 100 million watts of power....

  4. Nature and Origin of the Cuprate Pseudogap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Copenhagen, Denmark, began receiving electricity through HTSC cable. That same year, three 400-foot HTSC cables were installed for Detroit Edison at the Frisbie Substation...

  5. Customer Impact Evaluation for the 2009 Southern California Edison Participating Load Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, William; Bodmann, Shawn; Young, Paul; Eto, Joseph H.; Laundergan, Jeremy

    2010-05-28

    The 2009 Participating Load Pilot Customer Impact Evaluation provides evidence that short duration demand response events which cycle off air conditioners for less than thirty minutes in a hot, dry environment do not lead to a significant degradation in the comfort level of residents participating in the program. This was investigated using: (1) Analysis of interval temperature data collected from inside residences of select program participants; and (2) Direct and indirect customer feedback from surveys designed and implemented by Southern California Edison at the conclusion of the program season. There were 100 indoor temperature monitors that were acquired by LBNL for this study that transmitted temperature readings at least once per hour with corresponding timestamps during the program season, June-October, 2009. Recorded temperatures were transferred from the onsite telemetry devices to a mesh network, stored, and then delivered to KEMA for analysis. Following an extensive data quality review, temperature increases during each of the thirty demand response test events were calculated for each device. The results are as follows: (1) Even for tests taking place during outside temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, over 85 percent of the devices measured less than a 0.5 degree Fahrenheit temperature increase indoors during the duration of the event. (2) For the increases that were observed, none was more than 5 degrees and it was extremely rare for increases to be more than 2 degrees. At the end of the testing season SCE and KEMA designed and conducted a survey of the a facilities and public works managers and approximately 100 customers feedback survey to assess the extent the PLP events were noticed or disrupted the comfort level of participants. While only a small sampling of 3 managers and 16 customer surveys were completed, their responses indicate: (1) No customer reported even a moderate level of discomfort from the cycling-off of their air conditioners during test events; and (2) Very few customers noticed any of the thirty events at all. The results of this study suggest that the impacts on comfort from short-duration interruptions of air-conditioners, even in very hot climates, are for the most part very modest, if they are even noticed at all. Still, we should expect that these impacts will increase with longer interruptions of air-conditioning. By the same token, we should also expect that they will be less significant in cooler climates.

  6. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a noticeable reaction layer. T-111 was found to have a small reaction layer at the interface with deposited Hastelloy X. Mar M-247 had a reaction layer larger than T-111. Hastelloy X joined well with a substrate of the same alloy, and throughout the experiments was found to have a density of {approx}99%, based on metallographic observations of porosity in the deposit. Of the three joining methods tested, inertial welding of bar stock appears to be the most mature at this time. MPW may be an attractive alternative due to the potential for high bond integrity, similar to that seen in explosion bonding. However, all three joining methods used in this work will require adaptation in order to join piping and tubing. Further investigations into the change in mechanical properties of these joints with time, temperature, irradiation, and the use of interlayers between the two materials must also be performed.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1...

  8. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

  9. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: General Motors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Motors Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: General Motors Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: General Motors Joined the Challenge: January 2013 Headquarters: Detroit, MI Charging Locations: Detroit, MI; Warren, MI; Milford, MI; Hamtramck, MI; Pontiac, MI; Bay City, MI; Lake Orion, MI; Flint, MI; Saginaw, MI; Grand Rapids, MI; Trenton, MI; Torrance, CA; Palo Alto, CA; Thousand Oaks, CA; N. Hollywood, CA; Glendale, CA; Santa Fe Springs, CA; Ardsley, NY; Lockport, NY; Rochester, NY;

  11. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - Referred to DoD for action MI.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT MI.0-03-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Shafer; Subject: Information on various DOD Sites

  13. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-Kook; Henry, Jon C.; Jiang, Jinmai; Esau, Christine; Gusev, Yuriy; Lerner, Megan R.; Postier, Russell G.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  14. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  15. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  16. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-05-06

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  17. Cori and Edison Queues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... All jobs in the queue are eligible, except * User held jobs, priority value is 0. - Dependency jobs, priority value is not 0, but do not age * Limits and policies enforced to ...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. ...

  19. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    NuMI-MINOS Neutrino Logo NuMI Beamline and MINOS Experiment Neutrino Logo The MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beamline Fermilab Logo MINOS Experiment Links ◊ MINOS for the Public ◊ Scientific Results ◊ MINOS at Work ◊ NuMI at Work ◊ MINOS+ Experiment Fermilab Neutrino Links ◊ Neutrino FAQ ◊ MINOS Underground Areas at Fermilab ◊ PPD Intensity Frontier Dept Back to - - - ◊ Fermilab at Work ◊ Fermilab Home the MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine MINOS collaborators assembling the

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Division of Calumet & Hecla Consolidated Copper Co. Star Tool Hermes Automotive Manufacturing Corporation MI.05-1 MI.05-2 Location: 1411 Central Avenue , Detroit , Michigan...

  1. LBNL: Architecture 2030 District Program and Small Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley City of San Jose - San Jose, CA - Arizona State University - Phoenix, AZ - Emerging 2030 Districts - Ann Arbor, MI; Detroit, MI; San Antonio, TX; Ithaca, ...

  2. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the miR-200c/141 CpG island is closely linked to their inappropriate silencing in cancer cells. Since the miR-200c cluster plays a significant role in EMT, our results suggest an important role for DNA methylation in the control of phenotypic conversions in normal cells.

  3. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  4. Glacial Energy Holdings (Michigan) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    218-7415 or 1-888-452-2425 Website: www.glacialenergy.commichigan Outage Hotline: Detroit Edison: 313-235-1300 -- Consumers Energy: 800-805-0490 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  5. International Electricity Trade - Open Access | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calpine Power Services, Inc. (PDF 230 KB) Consumers Energy Company (PDF 168 KB) Consumers Energy Company and Detroit Edison (PDF 388 KB) Hydro-Quebec and H.Q. Energy Services (PDF ...

  6. OAS-M-05-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION COMPANY ORDER NO. PP-230-1 I. BACKGROUND On September 26, 2000, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Order No. PP-230 granting a Presidential permit to International Transmission Company (ITC) and, coincidently, rescinding Presidential Permit PP-221 that DOE issued to The Detroit Edison Company (Detroit Edison) on April 27, 2000. Presidential Permit PP-230 granted to ITC the authority for construction,

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  8. Demonstration of natural gas reburn for NO{sub x} emissions reduction at Ohio Edison Company`s cyclone-fired Niles Plant Unit Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borio, R.W.; Lewis, R.D.; Koucky, R.W.; Lookman, A.A.; Manos, M.G.; Corfman, D.W.; Waddingham, A.L.; Johnson, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    Electric utility power plants account for about one-third of the NO{sub x} and two-thirds of the SO{sub 2} emissions in the US cyclone-fired boilers, while representing about 9% of the US coal-fired generating capacity, emit about 14% of the NO{sub x} produced by coal-fired utility boilers. Given this background, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Gas Research Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, and the Ohio Coal Development Office sponsored a program led by ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) to demonstrate reburning on a cyclone-fired boiler. Ohio Edison provided Unit No. 1 at their Niles Station for the reburn demonstration along with financial assistance. The Niles Unit No. 1 reburn system was started up in September 1990. This reburn program was the first full-scale reburn system demonstration in the US. This report describes work performed during the program. The work included a review of reburn technology, aerodynamic flow model testing of reburn system design concepts, design and construction of the reburn system, parametric performance testing, long-term load dispatch testing, and boiler tube wall thickness monitoring. The report also contains a description of the Niles No. 1 host unit, a discussion of conclusions and recommendations derived from the program, tabulation of data from parametric and long-term tests, and appendices which contain additional tabulated test results.

  9. miR-17 inhibitor suppressed osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis via increasing PTEN expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yong; Luo, Ling-hui; Li, Shuai; Yang, Cao

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-17 was increased in OS tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell proliferation. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell migration and invasion. • PTEN was a target of miR-17. • miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we investigated the role of miR-17 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). miR-17 was frequently increased in OS tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of miR-17 in OS cell lines substantially suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was identified as a target of miR-17, and ectopic expression of miR-17 inhibited PTEN by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Expression of miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. Together, these findings indicate that miR-17 acts as an oncogenic miRNA and may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS, suggesting miR-17 as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of OS.

  10. MiR-218 Mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis: Perspectives and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ying-fei; Zhang, Li; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Fu, Wei-ming; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2015-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As a highly conserved miRNA across a variety of species, microRNA-218 (miR-218) was found to play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and progression. A group of evidence has demonstrated that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting many oncogenes related to proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. In this review, we provide a complex overview of miR-218, including its regulatory mechanisms, known functions in cancer and future challenges as a potential therapeutic target in human cancers. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently down regulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.

  11. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  12. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 04/29/2016 Next Release Date: 05/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI LNG Exports to All Countries

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces ... Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium MI.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amex Specialty Metal Corp (MI.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Coldwater , Michigan MI.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-01-1 Site Operations: No indication that AMEX performed work for MED or AEC activities. Originally included on FUSRAP list due to fact that AMEX purchased milling equipment from a company that had done uranium milling.

  15. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  16. Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Edison) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place Place: New York, New York Zip: 10003 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.coned.com Coordinates: 40.7341329,...

  17. Gnu Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -O3 -ffast-math In addition to the -O3 optimizations, this performs optimizations at the expense of an exact implementation of IEEE or ISO rulesspecifications for math functions. ...

  18. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 16, 2016 - 10:38am Addthis Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. | Footage courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RES Americas. Kelly Yaker National Renewable Energy Laboratory How does it work? Researchers at NREL teamed with industry to study the flight patterns of two eagles. The data will help the companies develop systems to detect birds and prevent collisions with

  19. Cray Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of compliance to the IEEE floating point standards. -O3 -hfp3 See above. -haggress (Fortran only). "Internal compiler tables are expanded to accommodate larger loop bodies."...

  20. Quick Start for Edison Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    codes compiled using the wrappers will run on the compute nodes. Basic Example For Fortran source code use ftn % ftn -fast -o example.x example.f90 For C source code use cc %...

  1. Intel Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optimization options we compared. The quotations are from the Intel compiler on-line man pages. Intel Compiler Options Tested -fast This "maximizes speed across the entire...

  2. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between CO2, rocks and the minute, saline-filled pores through which the gas migrates. ... Combustion, whether in automobile engines or power plants, accounts for about 85 percent ...

  3. Your First Program on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successfully log in you will land in your HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi....

  4. Choosing a Compiler on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You October 28, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Lieko Earle, Ph.D. Senior Engineer, Residential Buildings, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bethany Sparn,

  5. Gnu Compiler Peformance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from the gcc compiler on-line man page. Gnu compiler options tested -O3 -ffast-math In addition to the -O3 optimizations, this performs optimizations at the expense of an...

  6. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  7. Analyses Guided Optimization of Wide Range and High Efficiency Turbocharger Compressor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  8. Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  9. Sources of UHC and CO in Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  10. Vehicular Thermoelectrics: The New Green Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  11. Impact of Biodiesel Metals on the Performance and Durability of DOC and DPF Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  12. Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  13. Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September ...

  14. An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Coupled Engine and Aftertreatment System Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September ...

  15. Validation of a Small Engine Based Procedure for Studying Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Engine Friction Reduction and Durable Design Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September ...

  16. AVL Powertrain Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    successadvisor.html AVL Powertrain Engineering is a company located in Detroit, MI. References "AVL" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  17. General Motors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motors Jump to: navigation, search Name: General Motors Place: Detroit, MI Website: www.generalmotors.com References: General Motors1 Information About Partnership with NREL...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  19. An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  20. High-Efficiency Engine Technologies Session Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  1. Partial-Flow Diesel Particulate Filter of Sintered Metal Fiber Fleece

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  2. A Novel Split-Cycle Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  3. Two in One: SCR on Filter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  4. SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  5. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with Closed-Loop Exhaust By-Pass System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  6. Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  7. Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  8. Heavy-Duty Powertrain DevelopmentCurrent Status and Future Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  9. Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  10. The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  11. Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chemical Technologies, a small business in Detroit, MI. | Energy Department photo Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman meets with owners and workers at Diversified Chemical ...

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  13. Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  14. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  15. Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  16. Progress toward Development of a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  17. Organic Rankine Cycle Turbine for Exhaust Energy Recovery in a Heavy Truck Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  18. Modeling Combustion Control for High Power Diesel Mode Switching

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  19. Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for Diesel PM Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  20. DTE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Link to project description http:www.intelligentutility.comarticle1101energy-storage-nrel DTE is a company located in Detroit, MI. References "DTE Energy"...

  1. Validation of a Small Engine Based Procedure for Studying Performance of Engine Lube Oils, Ionic Liquids as Lubricants and/or Lubricant Additives, Opportunities for Engine Friction Reduction and Durable Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  2. High Efficient Clean Combustion for SuperTruck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  3. Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies and Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  4. Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring fuel quality on electronically fuel injected engines.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  5. Multi-Strategy Diesel After-Treatment Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  6. A Simple Approach of Tuning Catalytic Activity of MFI-Zeolites for Low-Temperature SCR of NOx

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  7. An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled Engine and Aftertreatment System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  8. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  10. A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  11. Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  12. Load Expansion of Stoichiometric HCCI Using Spark Assist and Hydraulic Valve Actuation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  13. Liquid Propane Injection Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  14. Performance of a High Speed Indirect Injection Diesel Engine with Poultry Fat Bio-Diesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  15. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  16. A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines (UM- lead, MIT, UCB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  17. Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrative analyses of miRNA and proteomics identify potential biological pathways associated with onset of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin rat model To determine miRNAs and

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  19. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  20. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Mingchen; Geng, Yiwei; Lu, Peng; Xi, Ying; Wei, Sidong; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia; Ma, Wang

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells.

  1. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Post-translational Modifications at Single-cell Resolution. Citation Details...

  2. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  3. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  4. Non-canonical microRNAs miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation in Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Choi, Michael Y.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) lacking non-canonical miRNAs proliferate slower. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 are two non-canonical miRNAs expressed in ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 targets p57 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-702 targets p21 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are known to contribute significantly to stem cell phenotype by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Most of our knowledge of microRNAs comes from the study of canonical microRNAs that require two sequential cleavages by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer and Dicer to generate mature products. In contrast, non-canonical microRNAs bypass the cleavage by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer within the nucleus but still require cytoplasmic cleavage by Dicer. The function of non-canonical microRNAs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains obscure. It has been hypothesized that non-canonical microRNAs have important roles in ESCs based upon the phenotypes of ESC lines that lack these specific classes of microRNAs; Dicer-deficient ESCs lacking both canonical and non-canonical microRNAs have much more severe proliferation defect than Dgcr8-deficient ESCs lacking only canonical microRNAs. Using these cell lines, we identified two non-canonical microRNAs, miR-320 and miR-702, that promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs by releasing them from G1 arrest. This is accomplished by targeting the 3 Prime -untranslated regions of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and p21 and thereby inhibiting their expression. This is the first report of the crucial role of non-canonical microRNAs in ESCs.

  5. NuMI proton kicker extraction magnet termination resistor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Jensen, C.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The temperature stability of the kicker magnet termination resistor assembly directly affects the field flatness and amplitude stability. Comprehensive thermal enhancements were made to the existing Main Injector resistor assembly design to satisfy NuMI performance specifications. Additionally, a fluid-processing system utilizing Fluorinert{reg_sign} FC-77 high-voltage dielectric was built to precisely control the setpoint temperature of the resistor assembly from 70 to 120F, required to maintain constant resistance during changing operational modes. The Fluorinert{reg_sign} must be continually processed to remove hazardous breakdown products caused by radiation exposure to prevent chemical attack of system components. Design details of the termination resistor assembly and Fluorinert{reg_sign} processing system are described. Early performance results will be presented.

  6. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 1824 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Naval Ordnance...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.02-2 Site Operations: Worked under...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted. The 2-story, 2,745-ft2 home has 2.5 inches of closed-cell spray foam in the 2x4 wall cavities, plus 1-inch of rigid exterior foam; a

  9. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  10. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  11. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 23 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

  12. miR-214 promotes the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma cells through direct suppression of LZTS1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhengyu; Wang, Tao

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • miR-214 is upregulated in human OS tissues and inversely correlated with LZTS1 expression. • miR-214 directly targets LZTS1 by binding to its 3′-UTR. • miR-214 promotes OS cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. • Overexpression of LZTS1 reverses miR-214-induced proliferation and invasion of OS cells. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that miR-214 functions either as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor in various human cancer types. The role of this microRNA in osteosarcoma (OS) is presently unclear. Here, we demonstrated that miR-214 is frequently upregulated in OS specimens, compared with noncancerous bone tissues. Bioinformatics analysis further revealed leucine zipper, putative tumor suppressor 1 (LZTS1) as a potential target of miR-214. Expression patterns of miR-214 were inversely correlated with those of LZTS1 mRNA and protein in OS tissues. Data from reporter assays showed that miR-214 directly binds to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of LZTS1 mRNA and suppresses expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. In functional assays, miR-214 promoted OS cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth in nude mice, which could be reversed by overexpression of LZTS1. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence that miR-214 functions as an onco-miRNA in OS, and its oncogenic effects are mediated chiefly through downregulation of LZTS1.

  13. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang; Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 ; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Jian; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3′UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  14. Roles of miRNAs in microcystin-LR-induced Sertoli cell toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Cong; Qiu, Xuefeng; Benson, Mikael; Yin, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei; and others

    2015-08-15

    Microcystin (MC)-LR, a cyclic heptapeptide, is a potent reproductive system toxin. To understand the molecular mechanisms of MC-induced reproductive system cytotoxicity, we evaluated global changes of miRNA and mRNA expression in mouse Sertoli cells following MC-LR treatment. Our results revealed that the exposure to MC-LR resulted in an altered miRNA expression profile that might be responsible for the modulation of mRNA expression. Bio-functional analysis indicated that the altered genes were involved in specific cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation. Target gene analysis suggested that junction injury in Sertoli cells exposed to MC-LR might be mediated by miRNAs through the regulation of the Sertoli cell-Sertoli cell pathway. Collectively, these findings may enhance our understanding on the modes of action of MC-LR on mouse Sertoli cells as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of MC-LR on the male reproductive system. - Highlights: • miRNAs were altered in Sertoli cells exposed to MC-LR. • Alerted genes were involved in different cell functions including the cell morphology. • MC-LR adversely affected Sertoli cell junction formation through the regulating miRNAs.

  15. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor suppressor that inhibits cell proliferation by targeting cyclin A2.

  16. miR-208-3p promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion through regulating ARID2 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Peng; Wu, Dingguo; You, Yu; Sun, Jing; Lu, Lele; Tan, Jiaxing; Bie, Ping

    2015-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. miRNA dysregulation plays a causal role in cancer progression. In this study, miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed ARID2 expression. As a result, ARID2 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was decreased. In vitro, miR-208-3p down-regulation and ARID2 over-expression elicited similar inhibitory effects on HCC cell proliferation and invasion. In vivo test results revealed that miR-208-3p down-regulation inhibited HCC tumorigenesis in Hep3B cells. Moreover, ARID2 was possibly a downstream element of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1)/miR-208-3p/ARID2 regulatory pathway. These findings suggested that miR-208-3p up-regulation is associated with HCC cell progression and may provide a new target for liver cancer treatment. - Highlights: • miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed the expression of ARID2 in HCC. • miR-208-3p contributed to HCC cell progression both in vitro and in vivo. • Over-expression of ARID2 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. • Restoration of ARID2 partly reversed the the effect of miR-208-3p down-regulation on HCC cells. • Newly regulatory pathway: miR-208-3p mediated the repression of ARID2 by TGFβ1 in HCC cells.

  17. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  18. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 04/29/2016 Next Release Date: 05/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI Natural Gas Exports

  19. PP-230-1 International Transmission Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 International Transmission Company PP-230-1 International Transmission Company Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Electric Company, Limited to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-230-1 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications PP-230-2 International Transmission Company PP-230 International Transmission Company PP-221 Detroit Edison Company

  20. MicroRNAs expression in ox-LDL treated HUVECs: MiR-365 modulates apoptosis and Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Bing; Xiao, Bo; Liang, Desheng; Xia, Jian; Li, Ye; Yang, Huan

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} We evaluated the role of miRNAs in ox-LDL induced apoptosis in ECs. {yields} We found 4 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated miRNAs in apoptotic ECs. {yields} Target genes of the dysregulated miRNAs regulate ECs apoptosis and atherosclerosis. {yields} MiR-365 promotes ECs apoptosis via suppressing Bcl-2 expression. {yields} MiR-365 inhibitor alleviates ECs apoptosis induced by ox-LDL. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is thought to play a critical role in atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. However, whether miRNAs are associated with ox-LDL induced apoptosis and their effect on ECs is still unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated potential miRNAs and their involvement in ECs apoptosis in response to ox-LDL stimulation. Microarray and qRT-PCR analysis performed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to ox-LDL identified 15 differentially expressed (4 up- and 11 down-regulated) miRNAs. Web-based query tools were utilized to predict the target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, and the potential target genes were classified into different function categories with the gene ontology (GO) term and KEGG pathway annotation. In particular, bioinformatics analysis suggested that anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) is a target gene of miR-365, an apoptomir up-regulated by ox-LDL stimulation in HUVECs. We further showed that transfection of miR-365 inhibitor partly restored Bcl-2 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, leading to a reduction of ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. Taken together, our findings indicate that miRNAs participate in ox-LDL-mediated apoptosis in HUVECs. MiR-365 potentiates ox-LDL-induced ECs apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2, suggesting potential novel therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis.

  1. MiRNA-125a-5p inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation by targeting TAZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Jian; Xiao, Gelei; Peng, Gang; Liu, Dingyang; Wang, Zeyou; Liao, Yiwei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Minghua; Yuan, Xianrui

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of miR-125a-5p is inversely correlated with that of TAZ in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p represses TAZ expression in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p directly targets the 3′ UTR of TAZ mRNA and promotes its degradation. • MiR-125a-5p represses CTGF and survivin via TAZ, and inhibits glioma cell growth. • MiR-125a-5p inhibits the stem cell features of HFU-251 MG cells. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor due to the resistance to conventional therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. TAZ, an important mediator of the Hippo pathway, was found to be up-regulated in diverse cancers, including in GBM, and plays important roles in tumor initiation and progression. However, little is known about the regulation of TAZ expression in tumors. In this study, we found that miR-125a-5p is an important regulator of TAZ in glioma cells by directly targeting the TAZ 3′ UTR. MiR-125a-5p levels are inversely correlated with that of TAZ in normal astrocytes and a panel of glioma cell lines. MiR-125a-5p represses the expression of TAZ target genes, including CTGF and survivin, and inhibits cell proliferation and induces the differentiation of GBM cells; whereas over-expression of TAZ rescues the effects of miR-125a-5p. This study revealed a mechanism for TAZ deregulation in glioma cells, and also demonstrated a tumor suppressor role of miR-125a-5p in glioblastoma cells.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration...

  3. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  4. Ohio Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    174,005.268 1,756,721.78 857,740 2008-05 58,031.851 501,583.581 764,643 51,857.975 462,709.821 93,157 42,617.218 645,150.186 770 152,507.044 1,609,443.588 858,570 2008-04...

  5. Edison SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA Place: Milan, Italy Zip: 20121 Sector: Hydro, Wind energy Product: Independent power producer with approximately 9,300MW of hydro, fossil fuel and wind generation assets....

  6. PROJECT PROFILE: Commonwealth Edison Company (SHINES) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Microgrid-Integrated Solar-Storage Technology (MISST) project will address availability and variability issues inherent in solar photovoltaic (PV) technology by utilizing smart ...

  7. HPX - 5 on Edison, Cori and Babbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to ... Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technology (CREST) at Indiana University for petascaleexascale computing. Building ...

  8. PP-228_Edison_Sault.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  9. Performance comparison between Edison and Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 application benchmark. The table below is the updated performance data: Application CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Concurrency 240 1024 2048 1024 2048 8192 1024...

  10. ConEdison Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: White Plains, New York Zip: 10604 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: conedisonsolutions.com Coordinates:...

  11. Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center serves more than 6,000 scientists at national laboratories and universities researching a wide range of problems in combustion, climate modeling, fusion energy, materials...

  12. Edison's Desk Blog | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Munich, Germany Niskayuna, USA Oklahoma City, USA Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Shanghai, China Tirat Carmel, Israel Nicole Vidro 2015.09.30 Seeing A Factory As Never Before With 3D...

  13. Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications EIS-0200-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Nevada National Security Site Performance Assessment Updates for New Waste Streams EA-1793: Final Environmental ...

  14. Edison Innovation Green Growth Fund Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to be considered for funding, applicants must submit an Eligibility Intake Form. For additional details please see the program website, which contains the program solicitation, applicati...

  15. Southern California Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a" "Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  16. Tesla vs. Edison | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by: Random | Alphabetical | Rating (High to Low) | Rating (Low to High) Nikola Tesla Inventor 435 likes Nikola Tesla was born in the Austrian Empire (now Croatia) but moved to the...

  17. Southern California Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.facebook.comsce Outage Hotline: 1-800-611-1911 Outage Map: www.sce.comwpsportalhomeou Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.sce.comwps...

  18. The Toledo Edison Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    217,791.124 274,173 19,458.646 178,628.326 37,943 21,228.715 298,939.763 214 65,584.132 695,359.213 312,330 2009-01 30,750.547 271,856.223 274,203 29,606.894 269,010.146...

  19. EDISON (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comments Cancel Submit Categories: Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Smart Meter and AMI...

  20. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3 Prime -UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  1. Loss of expression of miR-335 is implicated in hepatic stellate cell migration and activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chao; Wu, Chao-Qun; Zhang, Zong-Qi; Yao, Ding-Kang; Zhu, Liang

    2011-07-15

    Activation and migration of resident stellate cells (HSCs) within the hepatic space of Disse play an important role in hepatic fibrosis, which accounts for the increased numbers of activated HSCs in areas of inflammation during hepatic fibrosis. Currently, microRNAs have been found to play essential roles in HSC differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, fat accumulation and collagen production. However, little is known about microRNA mediated HSC activation and migration. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of quiescent HSCs, partially activated HSCs and fully activated HSCs were compared in pairs. Gene ontology (GO) and GO-Map network analysis indicated that the activation of HSCs was regulated by microRNAs. Among them miR-335 was confirmed to be significantly reduced during HSC activation by qRT-PCR, and restoring expression of miR-335 inhibited HSC migration and reduced {alpha}-SMA and collagen type I. Previous study revealed that tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein involved in cell migration, might be a target of miR-335. Therefore, we further studied the TNC expression in miR-335 over-expressed HSCs. Our data showed that exogenous TNC could enhance HSC migration in vitro and miR-335 restoration resulted in a significant inhibition of TNC expression. These results demonstrated that miR-335 restoration inhibited HSC migration, at least in part, via downregulating the TNC expression.

  2. EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Production Facilities near Detroit, MI | Department of Energy 0: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production Facilities near Detroit, MI EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production Facilities near Detroit, MI April 1, 2010 EA-1690: Final Environmental Assessment For a Loan and Grant to A123 Systems, Inc., for Vertically Integrated Mass Production of Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Batteries April 20, 2010 EA-1690: Finding of No

  3. Detroit Public Lighting Department - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PublicLightingEnergyWis... Expiration Date 11302012 State Michigan Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Light Fixtures: 2-130 Lighting Controls: 0.10-65...

  4. Clean Cities: Detroit Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation; the Olkonorei Integrated Pastoralist Survival Program in Tanzania, Africa; and as an instructor at the Japanese Ministry of Education in Imadate, Japan. He has...

  5. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation shares how to determine and later communicate the value of replication. PDF icon Determine and Communicate the Value of Replication (July 26, 2011) More Documents & Publications Sell Management on Replication and Build a Network Having Plant Management Announce "the Prize", July 14, 2010 "Just do it (replicate)" with Plans, Tools, and Resources

    tip sheet discusses a method for determining the cost of compressed air at industrial plants. COMPRESSED AIR TIP

  6. UCRL-MI-224010 ARM-06-012 ARM's Support for GCM Improvement: A White Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MI-224010 ARM-06-012 ARM's Support for GCM Improvement: A White Paper Stephen A. Klein, Anthony Del Genio August 25, 2006 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

  7. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  8. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870; BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Lee, Sun Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  9. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  10. miR-502 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppressing phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Suling; Li, Fang; Chai, Haiyun; Tao, Xin; Wang, Haili; Ji, Aifang

    2015-08-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we demonstrated that miR-502 significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of HCC cells were induced by miR-502. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit gamma (PIK3CG) was identified as a direct downstream target of miR-502 in HCC cells. Notably, overexpression of PIK3CG reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-502 in HCC cells. Our findings suggest that miR-502 functions as a tumor suppressor in HCC via inhibition of PI3KCG, supporting its utility as a promising therapeutic gene target for this tumor type. - Highlights: • miR-502 suppresses HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. • miR-502 regulates cell cycle and apoptosis in HCC cells. • PIK3CG is a direct target of miR-502. • miR-502 and PIK3CG expression patterns are inversely correlated in HCC tissues.

  11. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-01-31

    The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of compliance with all performance objectives. Tier II results indicate that the long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is protective of human health and the environment. The Area 5 RWMS is located in one of the least populated and most arid regions of the U.S. Site characterization data indicate that infiltration of precipitation below the plant root zone at 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) ceased 10,000 to 15,000 y ago. The site is not expected to have a groundwater pathway as long as the current arid climate persists. The national security mission of the NNSS and the location of the Area 5 RWMS within the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit require that access controls and land use restrictions be maintained indefinitely. PA modeling results for 10,000 to 60,000 y also indicate that the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is acceptable for near-surface disposal. The mean resident air pathway annual total effective dose (TED), the resident all-pathways annual TED, and the acute drilling TED are less than their performance objectives for 10,000 y after closure. The mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density exceeds the performance objective at 4,200 y, but this is due to waste already disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and is only slightly affected by disposal of the CEUSP 233U. The peak resident all-pathways annual TED from CEUSP key radionuclides occurs at 48,000 y and is less than the 0.25 millisievert performance objective. Disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in a typical SLB trench slightly increases PA results. Increasing the depth was found to eliminate any impacts of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream. Containers could not be shown to have any significant impact on performance due to the long half-life of the waste stream and a lack of data for pitting corrosion rates of stainless steel in soil. The results of the SA indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in the SLB units at the Area 5 RWMS. The long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream disposed in the near surface is protective of human health and the environment. The waste stream is recommended for disposal without conditions.

  12. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, ZhengHua; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  13. Combustion and Emissions Performance of Dual-Fuel Gasoline and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-06curran.pdf More Documents ...

  14. A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-20kim.pdf More Documents & ...

  15. Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-08narula.pdf More Documents ...

  16. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-05harold.pdf More Documents ...

  17. Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-03flot.pdf More Documents & ...

  18. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-01stephenson.pdf More ...

  19. Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-07klyza.pdf More Documents ...

  20. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inventors: Cai, Wayne W. ; Kang, Bongsu ; Tan, Chin-An Issue Date: 2013-04-02 OSTI Identifier: 1083924 Assignee: GM Global Technology Operations LLC (Detroit, MI) DOEEE Patent ...

  1. Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10moore.pdf More ...

  2. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  3. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e ) l.CoNTRACTIDCODE ~ . . U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7.

  4. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  5. Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

  6. miR-206 is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell proliferation through the up-regulation of cyclinD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Tian, Ye; Li, Juan; Lu, Binbin; Sun, Ming; Zou, Yanfen; Kong, Rong; Luo, Yanhong; Shi, Yongguo; Wang, Keming; Ji, Guozhong

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: ? miR-206 was downexpressed in tumor samples compared with matched normal samples. ? Enhanced expression of miR-206 could inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro. ? Luciferase confirmed miR-206 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting cyclinD2. ? A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 in breast cancer was found. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs act as important gene regulators in human genomes, and their aberrant expression is linked to many malignancies. Aberrant expression of miR-206 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in breast cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the relative expression levels of miR-206 in breast cancer and normal breast tissues. Lower expression of miR-206 in breast cancer tissues was associated with larger tumour size and a more advanced clinical stage. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-206 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth by blocking the G1/S transition and suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, implying that miR-206 functions as a tumour suppressor in the progression of breast cancer. Interestingly, Luciferase assays first revealed that miR-206 inhibited cyclinD2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3?-untranslated region of cyclinD2 mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-206 reduced cyclinD2 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 expression was noted in breast cancer tissues. Altogether, our results identify a crucial tumour suppressive role of miR-206 in the progression of breast cancer, at least partly via up-regulation of the expression of cyclinD2, and suggest that miR-206 might be a candidate prognostic predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for breast cancer patients.

  7. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  8. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  9. Fact Sheet: Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Energy Storage for Grid Support (August 2013) | Department of Energy Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies - Community Energy Storage for Grid Support (August 2013) Fact Sheet: Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies - Community Energy Storage for Grid Support (August 2013) Detroit Edison (DTE) will design, build, and demonstrate Community Energy Storage (CES) systems in their service territory. The CES is designed to improve electricity service to

  10. Analysis of the hydraulic data from the MI fracture zone at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davey, A.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Landsfeld, M.; Mensch, A.; Martel, S.J.

    1989-10-01

    One of the major problems in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely confined to a poorly connected network of fractures. In order to overcome some of this problem, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has been developing a new type of fracture hydrology model called an equivalent discontinuum model. In this model the authors represent the discontinuous nature of the problem through flow on a partially filled lattice. A key component in constructing an equivalent discontinuum model from this lattice is removing some of the conductive elements such that the system is partially connected in the same manner as the fracture network. This is done through a statistical inverse technique called simulated annealing. The fracture network model is annealed by continually modifying a base model, or template such that the modified systems behave more and more like the observed system. In order to see how the simulated annealing algorithm works, the authors have developed a series of synthetic real cases. In these cases, the real system is completely known so that the results of annealing to steady state data can be evaluated absolutely. The effect of the starting configuration has been studied by varying the percent of conducting elements in the initial configuration. Results have shown that the final configurations converge to about the same percentage of conducting elements. An example using Nagra field data from the Migration Experiment (MI) at Grimsel Rock Laboratory in Switzerland is also analyzed. 24 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  12. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  13. Phase-1 of NERSC's Cray Edison System Has Arrived

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the dirty limit (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Phase diagram of Josephson junction between s and s ± superconductors in the dirty limit Title: Phase diagram of Josephson junction between s and s ± superconductors in the dirty limit Authors: Koshelev, A. E. Publication Date: 2012-12-05 OSTI Identifier: 1102475 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 21; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher:

  14. Energy Department and Edison Electric Institute Sign Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    enhances the kinds of private-public partnerships needed to remain at the forefront of ... spoke about the importance of stakeholder collaboration to realize the goals of ...

  15. Edison-IO-CUG2014-presentation-final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1) , Doug Petesch 2) , David Knaak 2) , and Tina Declerck 1)! ! 1) NERSC! 2) Cray, Inc! Cray User Group Meting! May 7, 2014 I/O Performance on Cray XC30 Acknowledgement * Mark S wan a t C ray f or t he L MT d ata e xtrac5ons * Steve Luzmoor, P atrick F arrell a t C ray w ho h elped r esolving t he bug 8 09189. * Marcus P etschlies, a N ERSC u ser, f or p roviding I OBUF t est d ata with a Q LUA c ode. * Harvey W asserman a t N ERSC f or v aluable d iscussion a nd h elp * Shane C anon a t N ERSC,

  16. Edison is back to production in the new facility building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...Moab) will not work anymore. Please visit our Running Jobs page to learn how to run job scripts under Slurm. If you need help with migrating your workflow from TorqueMoab to ...

  17. Edison Innovation Clean Energy Manufacturing Fund- Grants and Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The total amount of available funding is capped at a maximum of $3.3 million per project. A minimum 50% cash match of total project costs is required to be from non-state derived matching funds. ...

  18. Southern California Edison Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is based in Rosemead, California. Overview Deploy and evaluate an 8 MW utility-scale lithium-ion battery technology to improve grid performance and aid in the integration of wind...

  19. Joint comments of consumers energy company and the detriot edison...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. 99-1 Joint Motion to Intervene of Northern States Power Company (Minnesota) et al. on the Proposed Open Access Requirements

  20. RFIRegReviewComments_EdisonElectricInstitute_03212011.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tools | Department of Energy RFI Seeks Feedback on Third-party Maintenance Strategy for AMO's Software Tools RFI Seeks Feedback on Third-party Maintenance Strategy for AMO's Software Tools July 28, 2014 - 12:19pm Addthis The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) would like to understand the market opportunities for enhancing and expanding certain industrial system software tools and related assets (including training curriculum and written technical resources). Currently, these tools and

  1. Learning About Power Electronics in the Edison Program | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DCDC converters (buck and boost), and the applications of power electronics (wind, solar, appliances, etc.). As an Electrical Engineer, though not one who has focused on...

  2. Metropolitan Edison Company SEF Grants (FirstEnergy Territory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Examples of projects funded in the past are available on the program web site, along with details of the grant guidelines.

  3. Comments of the Edison Electric Institute Quadrennial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for non-compliance, and at worst reliability failures can cause harm to property and even human life. Once a transmission project has been approved, constructed, and put into...

  4. Richard Gerber! Acting NERSC User Services Group Lead Edison...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    req.: 275 cfm Size: 2.125 in x 12.95 in x 33.5 in Weight: <40 lbm Card Edge Stiffener (2) FPGA 52V-12V Bus Converter (2) Tolopia QPDC 0 PCIe G en3 ConnecQons Cray XC30 Compute...

  5. The Potomac Edison Co (West Virginia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    61,480.028 1,907 15,103.312 238,878.526 130,616 2008-07 9,233.924 127,521.651 112,607 4,249.605 72,841.202 15,866 3,006.637 65,638.003 1,906 16,490.166 266,000.856 130,379...

  6. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Municipal and Street Lighting Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (Potomac Edision) offers several incentives for non-residential and municipal customers to upgrade traffic signals, pedestrian signals, street lights to more efficient  fixtures. The...

  7. Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cyber security, reduces electricity demand and peak energy use, and increases reliability and energy efficiency. The system will include renewable energy generation, grid...

  8. EA-416 Consolidated Edison Energy (CN).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  9. Metropolitan Edison Company SEF Loans (FirstEnergy Territory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    grid supply; projects involving the development of a sustainable energy technology (e.g., solar panel manufacturing); businesses that use renewable energy in the operation of a...

  10. Case Study - Con Edison Smart Grid Investment Grant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Case Studies by System Case Studies by System Case studies document the energy savings achieved by large manufacturing companies using AMO's software tools, other technical publications, and best practices. Case studies are available below for the following systems: Steam, Process Heating, Compressed Air, Motor, Pump, Fan, and Plant Wide. Case studies are also available for Combined Heat & Power. Plant-Wide Case Studies Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases

  11. Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND ) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 180,424 829,996 2,282,842 177,132 1,007,995 393,452 2,556 15,772 240 104 656 5 360,216 1,854,419 2,676,539 2009-02...

  12. Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    smart-grid project will deploy a wide-range of grid-related technologies, including automation, monitoring and two-way communications, to make the electric grid function more...

  13. Remarks of President Barack Obama at Southern California Edison...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... here in California - in part by making investments in areas critical to our long-term growth. And that is the forward-thinking purpose of the budget I have submitted to Congress. ...

  14. Edison vs. Tesla: The Battle of the Energy Inventors | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The event will be moderated by Peter Gardett, founding editor of Breaking Energy. Gardett has spent more than a decade covering all areas of the energy industry and along the way, ...

  15. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CFL Fixture: 25 Screw-In CFL Fixture: 1 LED Exit Sign: 25 Lighting Controls: 25sensor Standard Lighting T8T5 Fixtures (Replacements): 10 - 65fixture Permanent Delamping...

  16. Edison-PhaseI-Science-and-usage.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    55 u sers compiled; 577 u sers r an jobs DARPA M ission P artners running 0 10 20 30 40 ... NuclearPhysics --- 7 --- Fair s hare w eight: ( 315 - 6 24) * DARPA: 2 5% * NERSC: 7 ...

  17. All Users Now Enabled on Edison Phase 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All State & Local Solution Center Resources All State & Local Solution Center Resources The State and Local Solution Center provides information on tools, resources, and best practices to help state and local governments plan for and implement clean energy projects. Use the table below to view all our resources and filter by action area, tag, and resource type. To learn more about the Solution Center resources and tools, download the Resource Guide. The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency

  18. The not so new electric car -- Step child of Detroit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lough, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    In the first decade of the 20th century, gas and electric vehicles were in a head to head battle. Actually until after 1915, electric trucks dominated the urban scene. At this time it was not only commercial concerns who preferred electric`s but women too, for they were clean, easy to start and drive, and you know something--they still are! In lacking the foresight to develop electric car technology the US has created a global monster. Urban sprawl, suburbs, malls, pollution on a global scale, and an infrastructure which is not going to give up market share without a fight.

  19. A Look Inside the Detroit Auto Show | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the power of a 563-horsepower V-8 engine and a dual inertial flywheel system to ... building energy efficiency Among other biofuel vehicles, Swedish Biogas had their ...

  20. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Detroit Economic Club -- As Prepared...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This includes jobs directly connected to the industry like manufacturing, engineering, and sales, as well as other jobs that benefit when workers spend their paychecks buying food ...

  1. Microsoft Word - Sandalow Detroit National Summit Speech 6-17...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As Ed Montgomery, President Obama's Director for Recovery of Auto Communities and Workers, has said, "behind the 'facts and figures' of the economic downturn and the auto crisis ...

  2. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  4. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen J.T.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.

  5. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumbling, Deana

    2008-04-02

    Each of the 20 1-kg sample bags of Paducah soil will be sampled using a multi-increment (MI) strategy. These MI samples will be analyzed for total PCBs by the Abraxis PCB-HC kit. Processed soil samples will also be pooled to create sufficient volume for analysis for PAHs and PCB Aroclors by the ERT-Edison laboratory. Methanol extracts from Abraxis extractions will be analyzed by the ERT-Edison lab, the Abraxis lab, and the XDS laboratory for TEQ analytes.

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total To Brazil Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Canada Eastport, ID Calais, ME Detroit, MI Marysville, MI Port Huron, MI Crosby, ND Portal, ND Sault St. Marie, MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Miami, FL Total To Brazil Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Canada Eastport, ID Calais, ME Detroit, MI Marysville, MI Port Huron, MI Crosby, ND Portal, ND Sault St. Marie, MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX

  8. U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total To Brazil Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Canada Eastport, ID Calais, ME Detroit, MI Marysville, MI Port Huron, MI Crosby, ND Portal, ND Sault St. Marie, MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX

  9. U.S. Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Miami, FL Total To Brazil Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Canada Eastport, ID Calais, ME Detroit, MI Marysville, MI Port Huron, MI Crosby, ND Portal, ND Sault St. Marie, MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX

  10. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M.; Hosny, K.A.; Esmat, G.; Abdelaziz, A.I.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  11. Resonances in Coupled <mimi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>ηK> Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  12. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  13. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Posttranslational Modifications at Single-Cell Resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    Cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, andmoreflow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cells physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.less

  14. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  15. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  16. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Donald C Cook Unit 1, Unit 2","2,069","15,646",52.8,"Indiana Michigan Power Co" "Fermi Unit 2","1,085","7,738",26.1,"Detroit Edison Co" "Palisades Unit

  17. Enhancing Heat Recovery for Thermoelectric Devices | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_szybist2.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems Microstructural Evolution of EGR Cooler Deposits Hydrocarbon and Deposit Morphology Effects on EGR Cooler Deposit Stability and Removal

  18. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  19. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  20. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619), dated November 9, 1978

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95- 619), dated November 9, 1978. The following is MI's legislative mandate. PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment of Office of Minority Economic Impact -- Title II of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131 - - 7139) is amended by adding at the

  1. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  2. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between HM and MS bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between MS in [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between HCu in [HCuSH]{sup ?} to quite strong covalent bonding between HAu in [HAuSH]{sup ?}, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  3. Improved Measurement of the <mi>?>?<mi mathvariant='normal'>emi>?> Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1: Insights into the metabolic versatility of a gram-positive sulfate- and metal-reducing bacterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Otwell, Anne E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, the proteomes of the metabolically versatile and poorly characterized Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 were compared across four cultivation conditions including sulfate reduction, soluble Fe(III) reduction, insoluble Fe(III) reduction, and pyruvate fermentation. Collectively across conditions, we observed at high confidence ~38% of genome-encoded proteins. Here, we focus on proteins that display significant differential abundance on conditions tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first full-proteome study focused on a Gram-positive organism cultivated either on sulfate or metal-reducing conditions. Several proteins with uncharacterized function encoded within heterodisulfide reductase (hdr)-containing loci were upregulated on either sulfatemore » (Dred_0633-4, Dred_0689-90, and Dred_1325-30) or Fe(III)-citrate-reducing conditions (Dred_0432-3 and Dred_1778-84). Two of these hdr-containing loci display homology to recently described flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) pathways (Dred_1325-30 and Dred_1778-84). Additionally, we propose that a cluster of proteins, which is homologous to a described FBEB lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) complex, is performing lactate oxidation in D. reducens (Dred_0367-9). Analysis of the putative sulfate reduction machinery in D. reducens revealed that most of these proteins are constitutively expressed across cultivation conditions tested. In addition, peptides from the single multiheme c-type cytochrome (MHC) in the genome were exclusively observed on the insoluble Fe(III) condition, suggesting that this MHC may play a role in reduction of insoluble metals.« less

  5. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Schneider Electric | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Schneider Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Schneider Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Schneider Electric Joined the Challenge: March 2013 Headquarters: Palatine, IL Charging Locations: Cedar Rapids, IA; Palatine, IL; O'Fallon, MO; Des Plaines, IL; Knightdale, NC; West Kingston, RI; North Andover, MA; Billerica, MA; Nashville, TN; LaVergne, TN; Smryna, TN; Clovis, CA; Costa Mesa, CA; Carrollton, TX; Seneca, SC; Lexington, KY; Detroit, MI Domestic Employees:

  7. DOE Announces $52.5 Million Solicitation for Basic Hydrogen Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supporting President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative | Department of Energy $52.5 Million Solicitation for Basic Hydrogen Research Supporting President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative DOE Announces $52.5 Million Solicitation for Basic Hydrogen Research Supporting President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative April 6, 2006 - 10:13am Addthis DETROIT, MI -SecretaryBodman announced a three-year, $52.5 million solicitation to support new innovations in hydrogen technology. The solicitation, to

  8. DOE Recognizes Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders DOE Recognizes Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders September 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis DETROIT, MI - The U.S. Department of Energy and Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm joined with over 300 industry, state, and federal leaders to recognize industrial efficiency leaders and plot a course to accelerate industrial energy efficiency in the Midwest. As part of the Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Exchange that began last night and continued today,

  9. Influence of Mild Hybridization on Performance and emission in a

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4-Cylinder, In-Line Common Rail Diesel Engine | Department of Energy the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_cisternino.pdf More Documents & Publications AVTA: Quantifying the Effects of Idle Stop Systems on Fuel Economy The Role Of IC Engines In Future Energy Use Meeting the CO2 Challenge DEER 2002

  10. Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System: (1) Tractive Effort (T sub ew) of Vehicle Road Wheel/Track Sprocket | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-11_mekari.pdf More Documents & Publications Power & Energyfrom an Army Ground Vehicle Perspective Truck Duty Cycle and Performance Data Collection and Analysis Program WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical

  11. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-13_som.pdf More Documents & Publications Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: CFD Simulations and Experiments to Determine the Feasibility of Various Alternate Fuels

  12. Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction | Department of Energy Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_powell.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals-Cast

  13. On-Road PM Mass Emission Measured with OBS-TRPM | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-14_wei.pdf More Documents & Publications Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for Diesel PM Reduction Investigation of Direct Injection Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements.

  14. Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline Engine |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-09_parks.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

  15. Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_meisner.pdf More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM

  16. Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Particulate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Filter Loading and Regeneration | Department of Energy Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_sappok.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for Advanced Low-Pressure Drop Systems to Reduce Engine Fuel Consumption Development of Radio Frequency Diesel

  17. Analysis of Piston Heat Flux for Highly Complex Piston Shapes | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-10_lee.pdf More Documents & Publications Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics The Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Engine Alternative: Performance and Emissions Results in a Medium-Duty Application Challenging Conventional Wisdom: A Clean and Highly Efficient Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke

  18. Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Emission Treatment Catalyst | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-08_narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies of Oxidation Catalyst for Diesel Engine Emission Treatment Catalysts via First Principles Catalysts via First Principles

  19. Development of Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-04_fujii.pdf More Documents & Publications Impact of Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea SCR System Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate

  20. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-05_harold.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Coupled LNT/SCR

  1. Development of a Thermal Enhancer ’ for Combined Partial Range Burning and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrocarbon Dosing | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-10_ramsbottom.pdf More Documents & Publications EHRS Impact on Engine Warm-up and Fuel Economy Diesel Particulate Filter: A Success for Faurecia Exhaust Systems Combination of Diesel fuel system architectures and Ceria-based fuel-borne catalysts for improvement and simplification of the Diesel

  2. Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using Advanced

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Valvetrain | Department of Energy Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_moore.pdf More Documents & Publications E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized GDi, VCR and Variable Valvetrain Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines (UM - lead, MIT, UCB)

  3. Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Carbon | Department of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-14_strzelec.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot

  4. Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf PDF icon EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf More Documents & Publications Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 Combustion | Department of Energy

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-06_jacobs.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel's Enabling

  5. Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-13_park.pdf More Documents & Publications Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally Intermingled Rod-like Grains Unique Hardware and Software Data Acquisition and Processing Solutions in a Small Engine Test Cell for Enhanced Kinetic Engine Modeling Accuracy A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate

  6. Evaluation of Variable Compression Ratio on Energy Efficiency | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon p-16_szybist.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency VCR Engine with Variable Valve Actuation and New Supercharging Technology The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal Efficiency in an HCCI Engine Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High

  7. Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_styles.pdf More Documents & Publications Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling The Impact of PM and HC on EGR Cooler Fouling EGR Cooler Fouling - Visualization of Deposition and Removal Mechanis

  8. QER - Comment of Edison Electric Institute (EEI) 1 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Community Outreach » Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board tours a waste disposal cell test site Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board tours a waste disposal cell test site The Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) provides informed, independent advice and recommendations to DOE regarding environmental restoration, waste management, future land use, risk assessment, cleanup technologies, and related

  9. First Energy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power, West Penn Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up to 500. Applications...

  10. Joint comments of consumers energy company and the detriot edison company

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States | Department of Energy on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and State Corporation

  11. Southern California Edison Comments on Proposed 216(h) Regulation.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  12. FirstEnergy (Mon Power & Potomac Edison)- Business Lighting Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy's commercial, industrial, and governmental customers are eligible to participate in the Business Lighting Incentive Program. This program provides a performance-based rebate for energ...

  13. Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About Thomas Alva Edison | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    use energy today. Support your favorite with the hashtags teamedison and teamtesla on social media, or cast your vote on our website. And be sure to submit questions about the...

  14. FirstEnergy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power, West Penn Power)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First Energy as a parent company administers the energy efficiency program for Metropolitan Edition (Met-Ed), Pennsylvania Electric (Penelec), Pennsylvania Power (Penn Power), and West Penn Power. ...

  15. CDT 15.05 was set to default on Edison on 5/20/2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.5.3.0 cray-shmem7.2.1 cray-tpsl1.4.4 cray-trilinos11.12.1.2 craype2.3.1 craypkg-gen1.3.1 fftw3.3.4.2 papi5.4.0.1 perftools-lite6.2.3 perftools6.2.3 stat2.1.0.2 The...

  16. CDT 15.12 was set to default on Edison on 12/23/2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7.3.0 cray-tpsl-641.5.2 cray-tpsl1.5.2 cray-trilinos11.12.1.5 craype2.5.0 craypkg-gen1.3.2 fftw3.3.4.6 iobuf2.0.6 papi5.4.1.3 parallel-netcdf1.3.1 perftools-lite6.3.1...

  17. CDT 15.09 is availalbe as a non-default version on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cray-petsc-643.6.1.0 cray-petsc-complex3.6.1.0 cray-petsc-complex-643.6.1.0 craypkg-gen1.3.2 cray-shmem7.2.5 cray-tpsl1.5.2 cray-tpsl-641.5.2 cray-trilinos11.12.1.5 fftw...

  18. Resonant <mi>?+?>?<mi>?+?>0 amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceo, Ral A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  19. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute The Edison Electric ...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit is offering financial assistance to commercial, institutional and...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit is offering financial assistance to commercial,...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Windows, CustomOthers pending approval, LED Lighting City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit...

  4. Onset of radial flow in <mi>p+p> collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7 TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.

  5. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Michigan ...

  6. MI_07-5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. Secretary Abraham Announces Energy Department "What's Next" Expo to be Held in Detroit Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DEARBORN, MICH. – Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham announced today that the Department of Energy’s 3rd annual “What’s Next” Expo will be held in the Detroitarea.

  8. Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in Detroit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small businesses are the engine of our economy, employing half of all workers in America and creating two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. And as this economy recovers and small businesses rebound — they're helping revive communities across the country.

  9. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in <mi>Au+Au> collisions at <mi>s mathvariant='italic'>Nmi>N>=200 <mi>GeV>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0 GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).

  10. Cross section for <mi>b><mi>b>¯ production via dielectrons in <mi>d> + Au collisions at <mi>smi><mi>Nmi>N>=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  11. Measurement of differential <mi>J/ψ> production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in <mi>pmi> +  mathvariant='normal'>Pbmi> collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. 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A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poddar, S.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p+Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8

  12. NERSC Systems Photos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Photos NERSC Systems Photos cori panorama 1997x723 Cori (panorama) Cori closeup Cori (crop) Cori longshot Cori (wide shot) Edison Edison Edison headon Edison Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:48

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    203,150 217,576 210,704 221,613 260,767 241,275 1997-2016 From Canada 203,066 217,493 210,632 221,550 260,708 241,205 1973-2016 Eastport, ID 55,153 57,967 52,610 59,365 60,176 56,199 2011-2016 Calais, ME 972 1,165 1,361 3,215 8,292 5,395 2011-2016 Detroit, MI 2011-2014 Crosby, ND 6 7 10 9 1 2014-2016 Marysville, MI 57 61 501 182 321 147 2011-2016 St. Clair, MI 404 1,394 498 1,334 764 1,152 2011-2016 Noyes, MN 21,232 19,202 20,100 18,124 18,509 16,654 2011-2016 Warroad, MN 246 307 378 474 552 536

  14. Search for proton decay via <mi>p>?<mi>?K>+ using 260 <mi>kilotonyear> data of Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Yokozawa, T.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K.?P.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J.?L.; Stone, J.?L.; Sulak, L.?R.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W.?R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M.?B.; Sobel, H.?W.; Ganezer, K.?S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W.?E.; Jang, J.?S.; Kim, J.?Y.; Lim, I.?T.; Albert, J.?B.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.?W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J.?G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S.?N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A.?T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C.?K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Takeuchi, J.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S.?B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Obayashi, Y.; Vagins, M.?R.; Chen, S.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R.?J.

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  15. Lattice dynamics of <mi>BaFe>2<mi>X>3(<mi>X= mathvariant='normal'>Smi>,<mi>Se>) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovi?, Z. V.; ?epanovi?, M.; Lazarevi?, N.; Opa?i?, M.; Radonji?, M. M.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by the lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.

  16. Southern California Edison Grid Integration Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-376

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, Barry

    2015-07-09

    The objective of this project is to use field verification to improve DOE’s ability to model and understand the impacts of, as well as develop solutions for, high penetration PV deployments in electrical utility distribution systems. The Participant will work with NREL to assess the existing distribution system at SCE facilities and assess adding additional PV systems into the electric power system.

  17. Two nucleon systems at <mi>mmi><mi>π>~450<mi>MeV> from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  18. Superconducting and magnetic properties of <mi>Sr>3<mi>Ir>4<mi>Sn>13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  19. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  20. Department of Energy to Invest Up To $30 Million to Accelerate Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Deployment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Department of Energy Up To $30 Million to Accelerate Development and Deployment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Department of Energy to Invest Up To $30 Million to Accelerate Development and Deployment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology January 17, 2008 - 10:38am Addthis DOE also partners with the State of Michigan and industry to advance vehicle technologies DETROIT, MI -U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)