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Sample records for mh 175w mh

  1. Seismic and hydroacoustic analysis relevant to MH370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stead, Richard J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-03

    The vicinity of the Indian Ocean is searched for open and readily available seismic and/or hydroacoustic stations that might have recorded a possible impact of MH370 with the ocean surface. Only three stations are identified: the IMS hydrophone arrays H01 and H08, and the Geoscope seismic station AIS. Analysis of the data from these stations shows an interesting arrival on H01 that has some interference from an Antarctic ice event, large amplitude repeating signals at H08 that obscure any possible arrivals, and large amplitude chaotic noise at AIS precludes any analysis at higher frequencies of interest. The results are therefore rather inconclusive but may point to a more southerly impact location within the overall Indian Ocean search region. The results would be more useful if they can be combined with any other data that are not readily available.

  2. COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES Jean by applying the LCA methodology to evaluate the environmental footprint of alkaline cells and Ni-MH batteries phase. Besides, the emphasis on rechargeable batteries is only justified from an environmental point

  3. MH-TRACE: MULTI-HOP TIME RESERVATION USING ADAPTIVE CONTROL FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    MH-TRACE: MULTI-HOP TIME RESERVATION USING ADAPTIVE CONTROL FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY Bulent Tavli, Rochester, NY 14627 Abstract- Multi-Hop Time Reservation Using Adaptive Control for Energy Efficiency (MH-TRACE) is a distributed MAC protocol for energy efficient real-time packet broadcasting in a multi-hop radio network

  4. MH Vignal-Expos CEA-CESTA, 25 Mars 2004-Modlisation et simulations numriques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vignal, Marie-Hélène

    se détend. « Quand le plasma atteint l'anode, un arc est créé. #12;MH Vignal- Exposé CEA-CESTA, 25 de plasma entre deux électrodes P. Crispel, P. Degond, C. Parzani, M. H. Vignal Laboratoire MIP, CNRS Vignal- Exposé CEA-CESTA, 25 Mars 2004- 4Diodes à forts courants (2) « Diode à forts courants E Plasma

  5. Magnetic soil properties in Ghana Jan M.H. Hendrickx*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Magnetic soil properties in Ghana Jan M.H. Hendrickx*a , J. Bruce J. Harrisona , Remke L. van Dama 87801, USA c Soil Research Institute, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Kwadaso, Germany ABSTRACT In this paper we present the results of a study of some soil magnetic properties in Ghana

  6. 1600 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2007 Solar Battery Chargers for NiMH Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    1600 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2007 Solar Battery Chargers for NiMH Batteries Florent Boico, Brad Lehman, Member, IEEE, and Khalil Shujaee Abstract--This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. First, it is shown that existing charge

  7. RVERSECTING BEM AfXELEEATOR WITH STORAGE RIXG Ddr Lichtenberg, R.G. Newton, M.H. Ross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    RVERSECTING BEM AfXELEEATOR WITH STORAGE RIXG Ddr Lichtenberg, R.G. Newton, M.H. Ross Indiana s attractive for reasons; f i r s t , much higher energies are obtained i n the center ef mass system than

  8. Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA fractions within a pool of low-density liquid metal (NaK) during gas injection inside a horizontal magnetic of this magnetic field should not influence the vapor movement once it is outside the pool it may have

  9. Maxim > App Notes > BATTERY MANAGEMENT INTERFACE CIRCUITS Keywords: USB, USB Charger, Li+ USB charger, Lithium Ion USB charger, NiMH USB charger, USB battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    charger, Lithium Ion USB charger, NiMH USB charger, USB battery charger, charging batteries from USB, and cabling. An overview of nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium battery technologies, charging methodsMaxim > App Notes > BATTERY MANAGEMENT INTERFACE CIRCUITS Keywords: USB, USB Charger, Li+ USB

  10. NLTE and LTE Lick indices for red giants from [M/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS spectral resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, C Ian; Layden, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [M/H], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely-metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, log(g)=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750 designate "Lick-XMP", that remain both detectable and significantly [M/H]-dependent down to [M/H] values of at least ~-5.0, and down to [M/H] ~ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved . For these nine, we study the depend...

  11. Bilayer Graphene Photon Detector J. Y. Yan, M.-H. Kim, J. A. Elle, A. B. Sushkov, G. S. Jenkins, H. M. Milchberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    Bilayer Graphene Photon Detector J. Y. Yan, M.-H. Kim, J. A. Elle, A. B. Sushkov, G. S. Jenkins, H in graphene suggests that "hot electrons" created by incident light can provide the basis for a fast graphene in a "dual-gated" structure. This new "bolometer" has ultralow noise, besting existing detectors

  12. Non-linear Dependence of L(B) on L(FIR) and M(H2) among Spiral Galaxies and Effects of Tidal Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Perea; A. del Olmo; L. Verdes-Montenegro; M. S. Yun

    1997-06-30

    Through the study of a carefully selected sample of isolated spiral galaxies, we have established that two important global physical quantities for tracing star forming activities, L(FIR) and M(H2), have non-linear dependence on another commonly cited global quantity L(B). Furthermore we show that simple power law relations can effectively describe these non-linear relations for spiral galaxies spanning four orders of magnitude in FIR and M(H2) and nearly three orders of magnitude in L(B). While the existence of non-linear dependence of M(H2) (assuming a constant CO-to-H2 conversion) and L(FIR) on optical luminosity L(B) has been previously noted in the literature, an improper normalization of simple scaling by L(B) has been commonly used in many previous studies to claim enhanced molecular gas content and induced activities among tidally interacting and other types of galaxies. We remove these non-linear effects using the template relations derived from the isolated galaxy sample and conclude that strongly interacting galaxies do not have enhanced molecular gas content, contrary to previous claims. With these non-linear relations among L(B), L(FIR) and M(H2) properly taken into account, we confirm again that the FIR emission and the star formation efficiency L(FIR)/M(H2) are indeed enhanced by tidal interactions. Virgo galaxies show the same level of M(H2) and L(FIR) as isolated galaxies. We do not find any evidence for enhanced star forming activity among barred galaxies.

  13. zhang-mh-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rz machine | NationalSBL Workshop

  14. 4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocity and attenuation in liquid Fe-Ni-S, Science, 277, 219-221.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocityForschungsZentrum, Potsdam, Germany, 6-16. 4502. Blewett, D.T., P.G. Lucey, and B.R. Hawke, 1997, Clementine images., 132, 119-132. 4504. Yu, Z.-P., P.-S. Chu, and T. Schroeder, 1997, Predictive skills of seasonal

  15. mh-codecompare | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: The ManhattanCO2mfs NETL 2009

  16. Taylor, M.H. CV 1 MICHAEL H. TAYLOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Neotectonics of the Western Nepal Fault System: Implications for Himalayan strain-partitioning, revisions: 10.1130/B31168.1. 2. *Styron, R., Taylor, M., *Sundell, K., 2015, Accelerated extension of the Tibetan plateau driven by northward underthrusting of Indian crust, Nature Geoscience. Feb 1, doi:10

  17. MH4D Development Plasma Science and Innovation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics development ­ Variable resistivity, ohmic heating · Benchmarking ­ Screw pinch instability ­ Za magnetic field b.c. ­ Allow non-zero Etang.; Enormal=0 ­ Allow vnormal (density floor required) · Periodic than ,i i floor - , ( ),n n i i floor = + - ; ,i i floor = Atomic Physics Development Phase I #12

  18. Chemistry Publications 2007 1. Palmer, MH; Walker, IC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    interaction methods CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 2007, 340, 158-170 2. Leyva-Bailen, P; Powell, AV; Vaqueiro, P acid bases JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 2007, 127, 174309 4. Smith, KJ; Baillie, GS; Hyde, EI; Li, X

  19. Survey of the COCOON Project ? M.H. Scholl ?? , H.J. Schek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Marc H.

    ) beyond nested relational to object­oriented ones. Based upon the nested relational DBMS kernel DASDBS, we be characterized by the term evolution instead of revolution [SS91a], that is, the guideline has been to try with persistency and transactions. Rather, we have emphasized the preservation of established DBMS advantages

  20. A Free-Space Adaptive FMM-Based PDE Solver in Three M.H. Langston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zorin, Denis

    Courant Institute, New York University, New York 10012. Email: {harper on adaptive and/or unstructured grids, alternative approaches are necessary. We describe a direct high- order,greengard,dzorin}@cims.nyu.edu The work of M.H.L was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy CPES contract; the work of L

  1. he U.S. Coast Guard expects all of its Sikorsky Aircraft MH-60T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    ;2 VERTIFLITE May/June 2013 money by helping fleet managers buy parts more efficiently.The Coast Guard vibration

  2. Energy Efficient Architectures for Optical Networks Balagangadhar G. Bathula, Mohammed Alresheedi, Jaafar M.H Elmirghani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bathula, Balagangadhar G

    Energy Efficient Architectures for Optical Networks Balagangadhar G. Bathula, Mohammed Alresheedi of energy efficient strategies for optical networks is important, as they are the backbone networks off between the requests lost and energy efficiency. Anycasting is used in a number of scenarios where

  3. Radiative corrections to $M_h$ from three generations of Majorana neutrinos and sneutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinemeyer; J. Hernandez-Garcia; M. J. Herrero; X. Marcano; A. M. Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2015-07-31

    In this work we study the radiative corrections to the mass of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM from three generations of Majorana neutrinos and sneutrinos. The spectrum of the MSSM is augmented by three right handed neutrinos and their supersymmetric partners. A seesaw mechanism of type I is used to generate the physical neutrino masses and oscillations that we require to be in agreement with present neutrino data. We present a full one-loop computation of these Higgs mass corrections, and analyze in full detail their numerical size in terms of both the MSSM and the new (s)neutrino parameters. A critical discussion on the different possible renormalization schemes and their implications is included.

  4. LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

    1999-03-30

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

  5. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION G.T. Hong and M.H. Spritzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -scale conceptual design of SWPO system for Phase II development. · Perform system engineering evaluation to predict Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610-32405 #12;oxygen oxidant enables ready liquefaction of CO2. It may, in which the specific tasks are: Task 1: Pilot-Scale Preliminary Testing/Feasibility · Perform SWPO testing

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2nd Qtr 2010 Presentation _compressed tt mh.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N3 April 20115Second

  7. ELECTRON TRANSPORT AND SECONDARY EMISSION IN A SURFACE OF SOLAR CELL P. Degond, R. Talaalout, M.-H. Vignal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vignal, Marie-Hélène

    power demands. During the use of high voltage solar arrays, discharges mostly occur on the surface1 ELECTRON TRANSPORT AND SECONDARY EMISSION IN A SURFACE OF SOLAR CELL P. Degond, R. Talaalout, M 31062 Toulouse cedex 4 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 Abstract -- We study the primary discharge of a solar cell

  8. LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA); Fultz, Brent (Pasadena, CA); Bowman, Robert (La Mesa, CA); Surampudi, Subra Rao (Glendora, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Hightower, Adrian (Pasadena, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB.sub.(Z-Y) X.sub.(Y) is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB.sub.5 alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  9. Off-State Breakdown in Power pHEMTs: the Impact of the Source M.H. Somerville", J.A. del Alamo", and Paul Saunieri.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    simple. In Fig. 2 we plot typical BVm vs. VGSat ID=lmA/mm at both high and low temperatures. Vm reaches

  10. The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D.J. and Sherman, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49749 The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D in energy efficiency calculations and for compliance testing of duct systems. The DeltaQ test combines a model of the house and duct system with the results of house pressurization tests with the air handler

  11. MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR THE SPIRAL2 FACILITY M-H. Moscatello, C. Berthe, C. Jamet, G. Normand, GANIL, Caen, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and a superconducting linac. One of its specificities is to be designed to accelerate high power deuteron and heavy ion

  12. 5. WONG BUIILDING5. WONG BUIILDING5. WONG BUIILDING Opened in April 1997 in memory of M.H Wong, a McGill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    .ewb.ca Formula Hybrid SAE www.mcgill.ca/engineering/student/sao/studentdesign/ Formula SAE Race Car www.mcgill.ca/engineering Engineering. The Wong Building is home to: the Department of Materi- als Engineering, the Department of Chemical Engineering, the McGill Metals Processing Centre, the Materials Teach- ing Laboratory, a Materials

  13. Configurable Process Models A Foundational F. Gottschalk, W.M.P. van der Aalst, and M.H. Jansen-Vullers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    and the Institute for Information Systems (IWi) of the Saarland University in a collaborative re- search project.d.aalst|m.h.jansen-vullers}@tm.tue.nl Abstract. Off-the-shelf packages such as SAP need to be configured to suit the requirements of an organization. Reference models support the configuration of these systems. Existing reference models use rather

  14. 1 Pending ISIS discretionary tasks Whenever you take data for any of the following tests, please email mh@ing.iac.es and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 Pending ISIS discretionary tasks Whenever you take data for any of the following tests, please always when ISIS in in use and if there is time. Please try to do this test especially if the ISIS slit temperature is below 8 degrees. You can check the temperature from the ISIS Mimic and ISIS fits headers. Set

  15. ABSTRACT : To 1992 o Borcherds eis gage mia na kathgora algbrwn Lie mh peperasmnhc distashc, tic genikeumnec lgebrec Kac-Moody. Autc oi lgebrec qoun pollc omoithtec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beligiannis, Apostolos

    , tic genikeumènec lgebrec Kac-Moody. Autèc oi lgebrec èqoun pollèc omoiìthtec me tic lgebrec Kac

  16. Formaldehyde as a Basis for Residential Ventilation Rates1 M.H. Sherman (MHSherman@lbl.gov) and A.T. Hodgson (ATHodgson@lbl.gov)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or objectionable exposures to indoor pollutants, while minimizing energy costs for conditioning incoming air Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building technology, State and Community@lbl.gov) and A.T. Hodgson (ATHodgson@lbl.gov) Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies

  17. Proceedings of the 2007 Winter Simulation Conference S. G. Henderson, B. Biller, M.-H. Hsieh, J. Shortle, J. D. Tew, and R. R. Barton, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cases, the cost of building and studying a model is a small fraction of the cost of experimenting building a model and finding consensus about the model's utility when we focus our attention locally with wind sheer during landing on a flight simulator than by going out and practicing real landings in wind

  18. Proceedings of the 2007 Winter Simulation Conference S. G. Henderson, B. Biller, M.-H. Hsieh, J. Shortle, J. D. Tew, and R. R. Barton, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    , Learning & Change, Leeds University Business School University of Nottingham Nottingham, NG8 1BB, UK University of Leeds Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK ABSTRACT Intelligent agents offer a new and exciting way of under traditional research methods (for a review, see Wall and Wood 2005). Significant research has been done

  19. Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2007-01-01

    of Generation Capacity in the MH Electricity Market In thegeneration capacity in the MH electricity market compared tocapacity in a potential wholesale electricity market in MH

  20. M.H. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B.C. Singer, Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches -LBNL Report Number 3978-E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office

  1. Computers M~h. Applic. Vol. 21, No. 10, pp. 39-52, 1991 0097-4943/91 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved Copyright(~ 1991 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Britain. All rights reserved Copyright(~ 1991 Pergamon Press plc SYMMETRY IN ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

  2. The KSTAR Tokamak * D.I. Choia, G.S. Leea, Jinchoon Kim", H.K. Parka, C.S. Changb, B.H. Choic, K. Kimd, M.H. Choe, G.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CKoreaAtomic Energy Research Institute dSamsungAdvanced Institute of Technology e for an attractive future energy source. Korea Basic Science Institute was designated as the lead organization in the project include Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

  3. Contra : A Code for Adiabatic Contraction of Dark Matter Halos Oleg Y. Gnedin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    is defined as mh(x) = (1- fb) Mh(x) Mh(1) , (4) where x r/Rvir, c Rvir/rs, and DM = 1 : Mh(x) = ln(1+cx)- cx 1+cx (5a) DM = 2 : Mh(x) = 3n,2n(cx)1/n (5b) DM = 3 : Mh(x) = (3-,cx) (5c) where n ndm, and (a

  4. Extensions to Metadata Languages for Environmental Primary Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBANEZ, LUIS M.

    2011-01-01

    and Ivanova, MH Global Environmental Governance: Options &certification as a global environmental governance tool:and Ivanova, MH Global Environmental Governance: Options &

  5. UCLA space-time area law model: A persuasive foundation for hadronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Chien, A; Chun, S; Hartfiel, B

    2007-01-01

    Abbiendi, I.G. Knowles, M.H. Seymour and L. Stanco, ComputerOdagiri, P. Richardson, M.H. Seymour and B.R. Webber, JHEP

  6. --MECH 505 (Section 201) --INDUSTRIAL and ENVIRONMENTAL ACOUSTICS AND VIBRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    -- MECH 505 (Section 201) -- INDUSTRIAL and ENVIRONMENTAL ACOUSTICS AND VIBRATION Instructor: Dr and Noise Control, Harris (MH and Sedgwick) Noise and Vibration Control Engineering, Beranek (MH and Sedgwick) "Noise Control: Principles and Practice" (MH) Shock and Vibration Handbook, Harris and Crede (MH

  7. Impact of Instructional Sensitivity on High-Stakes Achievement Test Items: A Comparison of Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jie

    2012-08-31

    .......................................................................................................................... 98 vii Comparison of MH Tests and LR Procedure .................................................................................. 98 How Sensitive Is Kansas Mathematics Interim Assessment... ............................................. 72 Table 9. Ranking of Sensitivity for LR and MH Methods ........................................................................ 73 Table 10. Background Information of Teachers...

  8. Klymak, J.M., S. Legg, M.H. Alford, M. Buijsman, R. Pinkel, and J.D. Nash. 2012. The direct breaking of internal waves at steep topography. Oceanography 25(2):150159, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The direct breaking of internal waves at steep topography. Oceanography 25(2):150­159, http://dx.doi.org/10 in Oceanography, Volume 25, Number 2, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2012 by The Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  9. Understanding low-energy magnetic excitations and hydrogen bonding in VOHPO4 J. Cao,1 J. T. Haraldsen,2 S. Brown,1 J. L. Musfeldt,1 J. R. Thompson,2,3 S. Zvyagin,4 J. Krzystek,5 M.-H. Whangbo,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianming

    Understanding low-energy magnetic excitations and hydrogen bonding in VOHPO4· 1 2H2O J. Cao,1 J. T, and we identify the low-energy phonons that likely facilitate this coupling. The spin-gap values-temperature redshift of VuO and HuO related modes demonstrates enhanced low-temperature hydrogen bonding. The low

  10. Characterization and Simulation of ECBM: History Matching of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    the capacity of storing CO2 because of the absorptive properties of coal. Numerical reservoir simulation models/8/2010 #12;Pittsburgh Coal Seam 12/8/2010 WVU PNGE 6 #12;Upper Freeport Coal Seam 12/8/2010 WVU PNGE 7 #12 state. 12/8/2010 WVU PNGE 8 #12;MH18 MH20 12/8/2010 9 MH11 MH5 Upper Freeport Coal Seam Production

  11. メタンハイドレート資源開発研究コンソーシアム 平成23年度事業報告 平成24年度事業計画 (概要) MH21プロジェクトリーダー 増田 昌敬

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions |discussedo_2o_3n_091812.xlsxCoal_Budget_Fact_Sheet.pdf More+ +Offshore

  12. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finsterle, S.

    2014-01-01

    pore-space for reservoir characterization. AAPG Bull. , 79 (Holtz, M.H. , Reservoir characterization apply- ing residualways, such as reservoir characterization (Xiao and Jones,

  13. SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2013-01-01

    the potential use of geothermal energy for power generation47. Boldizsar, T. , 1970, "Geothermal energy production fromCoast Geopressure Geothermal Energy Conference, M.H. Dorfman

  14. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Germantown Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner...

  15. The Stelai of Mycenae Grave Circles A and B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1997-01-01

    This study catalogues the sculpted tombstones (stelai) from the MH III/LH I Shaft Graves at Mycenae, Greece, and draws attention to their iconography, technique, and effect.

  16. ??????????????????????...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    First Offshore MH Production Test Takami Kawamoto JOGMEC June 7, 2013 1 To conduct studies to establish the technological platform for commercialization of methane...

  17. Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2007-01-01

    NPC), and the National Hydro Power Corporation (NHPC). Theseis unlikely that the hydro power projects in MH state willthermal power plants, hydro power plants face a constraint

  18. Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2007-01-01

    Large Quantities of Electricity Demand for AgriculturalLarge Size of the Market Electricity demand for agriculturalconstraints, and electricity demand in MH state to simulate

  19. Why Should Markedness Constraints be Relative? -- Four Case Studies in Tone Sandhi Directionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Te-hsin

    2009-01-01

    Liu, Te-hsin (In prep. ) Dalian Tone Sandhi: the EmergenceHou 1980) LM, MH, HL Dalian (Liu, in prep. ) HL, LH, HLH

  20. Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropical evergreen broad leaf forest and pine woodland trees of the Florida Everglades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tim J.; Luton, Corene D.; Santiago, Louis S.; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    127:445– Zimmermann MH (1978) Hydraulic architecture of someÁ South Florida Á Hydraulic conductivity Á PhotosyntheticArgentina Introduction Plant hydraulic characteristics have

  1. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    PEMFC)..MH NPS NREL NYC O&M PAFC PEMFC PG&E PQ PQR PSB alternatingMembrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) PEMFCs have low operating

  2. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    PEMFC) ..MH NPS NREL NYC O&M PAFC PEMFC PG&E PQ PQR PSB alternatingMembrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) PEMFCs have low operating

  3. Probiotics' effects on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    plot showing the effect of probiotics on the occurrence ofMH, Stobberingh EE, Verbon A: Probiotics versus antibioticbeneficial effects of probiotics: prevention and management

  4. Cleats where free gas exists Pores in matrix where gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    matrix VL PL GascontentV(P) Pressure 1 2 VL Langmuir isotherm #12;#12;0 100 Date Production rate 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Gasrate(scf/day) 12 10 8 6 4 2 ×103 ×103 1/14/2004 5/28/2005 10/10/2006 2/22/2008 7/6/2009 11/18/2010 4/1/2012 8/14/2013 MH11 MH5 MH20 MH18 Date Production rate 8/1/2004 2/17/2005 9

  5. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy National Science Foundation Contracts CHE and ACI National Institute of Health Contract P20 MH60975 A2 National Institute of Mental Health and National Science...

  6. PUBLICSEMINAR RSVP online by Wednesday 15 July 2015 at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National University On 17 July 2014, Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over Ukraine while in Ukraine between pro-Russian forces and the forces of the Ukrainian government. Attribution of blame to the MH17 air disaster in Ukraine which included the deployment of personnel to the Ukraine from a wide

  7. Publications of Martin H. Escardo, last updated November 27, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escardó, Martín

    . [3] M.H. Escard´o, A. Jung, and T. Streicher, editors. Special issue in hon- our of Klaus Keimel's 65(2):117­124, 2003. 2002 References [1] A. Bauer, M.H. Escard´o, and A. Simpson. Comparing functional paradigms

  8. Biomedical research efforts are becoming increas-ingly reliant on the interoperability of autonomous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    the informatics requirements for such a framework and describes the architecture and implementation of a prototype SBIR grant R44-MH61277-02, NIH Human Brain Project grant MH/DC023210, and National Library of Medicine to build a wide range of applica- tions for clinicians, researchers, and educators. As estimated

  9. M. KOVA^I^, B. [ARLER: GENETIC PROGRAMMING AND SOFT-ANNEALING PRODUCTIVITY GENETIC PROGRAMMING AND SOFT-ANNEALING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    in the soft-annealing process. The data (222 samples covering 24 different steel grades) on a furnace conveyor increased (from the furnace conveyor speed 3.2 m/h to 7 m/h). Keywords: steel, soft annealing, furnaceM. KOVA^I^, B. [ARLER: GENETIC PROGRAMMING AND SOFT-ANNEALING PRODUCTIVITY GENETIC PROGRAMMING

  10. Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot Alg`ebre Annee 2007-08 M1 mathematiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merel, Loïc - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    ¦§i ¡¥ ¼ E¸ °5° ¾¤Eh°Q«E%ªEºV¦§¤E¥6 m¥¥b¤h%ªE¦§h¾« o¢¤h °y m¦®T¦ m¦§h ¡ib5 ¡r¤h³¥ Ãæf¾° Ë 5°¹ m¥«h º

  11. Nanomaterials for Fuel cells, Batteries, and Supercapacitors Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Indranath

    Nanomaterials for Fuel cells, Batteries, and Supercapacitors Flow Batteries 1. Shao Y, X Wang, MH storage in vanadium redox flow batteries." Journal of Power Sources 195(13):4375-4379. 2. Shao Y, MH nanotube electrodes for redox flow batteries." Electrochemistry Communications 11(10):2064-2067. doi:10

  12. Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk and cost compared to distributed reformate-FCPS (see Energy Station Concept discussion) Fuel cell,600 psi) PSA w/ cH2 (100 psi) Fl MH (dry) Fl MH (slurry) Volume,m3 Storage Purification 760 Primary Energy_PT_DOE_D0021_H2&FC_MERIT_REVIEW_MAY2003 1 Introduction Energy Station Concept The hydrogen "Energy Station

  13. Review: Besedotvorni tematski blok na petnajstem mednarodnem slvisti?nem kongresu v Minsku (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorši?, Ines; Breznik, Irena Stramlji?

    2014-06-26

    ; NRPXQLNDFLMH#17;#3; .RW#3; MH#3; XJRWRYLOD#15;#3; LPD#3; OHNVLNDOQD#3; NUHD-­ WLYQRVW#3;Y#3;WRYUVWQLK#3;EHVHGLOLK#3;SUHGYVHP#3; VWLOLVWLþQR#3;YORJR#3; LQ#3; XþLQNXMH#3; ]ODVWL#3; KX-­ PRUQR#3;DOL#3;LURQLþQR#17; 5XVLQMD#3;*DOLQD#3;3#17;#3;1HãþLPHQNR#3; #11...; JD#3; RGUDåDMR#3; WYRUMHQNH#3;Y#3;MH]LNX#3;PHGLMHY#15;#3;]ODVWL#3;Y#3;SX-­ EOLFLVWLþQLK#3; LQ#3; RJODVQLK#3; EHVHGLOLK#17;#3;.RW#3; XJRWDYOMD#3;$UL]DQNRYVND#3;MH#3;IHQRPHQ#3;SX-­ EOLFLVWLþQHJD#3; MH]LND#3; LQ#3; MH]LND#3; RJODVRY#3; — 111 — 2FHQH#15;#3...

  14. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-23679 Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors September 2014 MH Lee E ER Eisenhauer SD Saurey EA Cordova BD Lee EC Golovich KE Parker #12;#12;PNNL-23679 Characterization of Biofilm

  15. April 10, 2012 Student author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ) Bakhoum+ , E.G. and M.H. Cheng. 2011. Novel electric microphone. IEEE Sensors Journal. 11(4): 988.R. Johnson, T.H. Balon+ , and P.J. Moynihan+ . 2011. Demonstration and evaluation of a retrofit urea

  16. Grammar, Epistemics and Action: An epistemic analysis of talk about the self and others

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    not -> with it all. ->> ?mh[hhh Is 'e: feeding alright? [Example 2.23 Heritage N: =°hhh Dz he ‘av ‘iz own apa:rt [r you workin’ for. 2 B: °hhh Well I’m working through the

  17. VBA-0060- In the Matter of Robert Burd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On November 16, 2001, BWXT Pantex, as successor to Mason & Hanger Corporation (M&H) (collectively referred to as “the contractor”), filed an appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD)...

  18. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Systems Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC V3T 0A3, Canada h replacing nickelemetal hydride (NiMH) batteries. More recently, the strategy of electrifying vehicles

  19. A. M. Sastry B. E. Layton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, Ann Marie

    X. Cheng A. M. Sastry B. E. Layton Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics for production of posi- tive electrodes for NiMH nickel-metal hydride batteries are comprised of two or more

  20. Precision Electroweak Parameters and the Higgs Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Marciano

    2000-03-17

    The status of various precisely measured electroweak parameters is reviewed. Natural relations among them are shown to constrain the Higgs mass, m_H, via quantum loop effects to relatively low values. A comparison with direct Higgs searches is made.

  1. Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M.H. ; Washington U., St. Louis Delaware U. Hawaii U. Caltech, JPL Hawaii U. NASA, Goddard Minnesota U. Hawaii U. Ohio State U. Hawaii U. Caltech, JPL SLAC...

  2. Characterization Studies of Materials and Devices used for Electrochemical Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Membreno, Daniel Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abbasi MH (2008) Silica aerogel; synthesis, properties andwith EPD [11, 12]. Carbon aerogels 70-150 F/g [13] haveporosity, high surface area aerogels. The range of possible

  3. V-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Button, M.R. Anders, M. L. Gorelik, M.H. Urin, and S. Shlomo, Phys. Rev. C 88, 021301(R) (2013). Astrophysical reaction rate for 17 F(p,) 18 Ne from the transfer reaction...

  4. Park City/ANS 1 EVOLVE LITHIUM TRAY THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Park City/ANS 1 EVOLVE LITHIUM TRAY THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS M.H. Anderson, J.G. Murphy, M is viable, thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed on the outboard liquid lithium blanket trays. Various

  5. Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

  6. Acceptance of repeat population-based voluntary counseling and testing for HIV in rural Malawi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Calverton, Maryland, USA: ORC Macro, 2006. 5. Bateganya MH,Office (NSO) [Malawi] and ORC Macro. Malawi Demographic andCalverton, Maryland: NSO and ORC Macro, 2005. 17. Boerma JT,

  7. The proteasome distinguishes between heterotypic and homotypic lysine-11 linked polyubiquitin chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grice, Guinevere L.; Lobb, Ian T.; Weekes, Michael P.; Gygi, Steven P.; Antrobus, Robin; Nathan, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ., Sommer, T., Fushman, D., and Glickman, M.H. (2014). Disassembly of Lys11- and mixed-linkage polyubiquitin conjugates provide insights into function of proteasomal deubiquitinases Rpn11 and Ubp6. The Journal of biological chemistry. Matsumoto, M...

  8. High Visibility Enforcement Programs: California’s State and University Traffic Safety Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Jill F; Kan, Irene; Cadet, Akilah; Rauch, Sharleen; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Office of Inspector General. March 25, 2008, Report no. MH-Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Transportation emphasized the need for state annual plans and reports

  9. 10 Questions for a Bioenergy Expert: Melinda Hamilton | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    tool in the lab? MH: For me, it's still the microscope. I'm a microbiologist at heart and there are so many cool microscopes now. The microscope still does it for me. Q:...

  10. A postsource decay study of bradykinin by Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Xiaona

    1996-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins. Fragmentation reactions of the protonated analyte molecule, [M+H]+ ions...

  11. arXiv:hep-ph/0208209v313Dec2002 FERMILAB-Pub-02/114-T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    as the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. Low-energy supersymmetry provides a natural electroweak symmetry breaking. Assuming that mhSM energies) Higgs boson. Alternatively, strong breaking of electroweak symmetry is accomplished by new strong

  12. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    B. , and Gan, G. 1998 “Heat Recovery with Low Pressure LossSherman, M.H. 2003. “Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes. ”1998. “Field Survey of Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems. ”

  13. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Foundation ContractACI-9624034 and ACI 9982251, National Institutes of Health Contract P20MH60975-06A2","12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE...

  14. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Foundation Contracts CHE-0205170 and ACI 9624034, National Institute of Health Contract P20 MH60975-06A2. National Institute of Mental Health and National Science...

  15. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    hydrates in subsea sediments where the major challenge comes from implemen- tation of solubility, and mod- eling methane hydrate evolution in subsea sediments (MH). Coalbed methane is a form of natural

  16. The Transport of Heavy Metals by the Mississippi River and Their Fate in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trefry, John Harold

    1977-01-01

    , 1976) show that particulate Fe, Al, Mh, Ni, Co, Cr and V concentrations in several large rivers (Amazon, Congo, Ganges, Mekong and Orinoco) approxi­ mate crustal abundance values whereas Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were generally much higher...

  17. li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the aidato- olaveelaollprooe8e,hM baeaan&ledout andwrieqna far upnroor8 design.- . . Workme Laitiatsdonthlr Contra& onMaroh1, 1022mdmu mh&lad to be qom@ted on...

  18. Technological assessment and evaluation of high power batteries and their commercial values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Seh Kiat

    2006-01-01

    Lithium Ion (Li-ion) battery technology has the potential to compete with the more matured Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) battery technology in the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) energy storage market as it has higher specific ...

  19. VBX-0060- In the Matter of Robert Burd

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 16, 2001, BWXT Pantex, as successor to Mason & Hanger Corporation (M&H) (collectively referred to as “the contractor”), filed an appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD)...

  20. Marine reserve effects on fishery profit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Crow; Kendall, Bruce E.; Gaines, Steven; Siegel, David A.; Costello, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    the problem of sitting marine reserves. Bull. Mar. Sci. ,2005). Science and society: marine reserve design for theD.A. & Carr, M.H. (2005). Marine reserves exploit population

  1. Qh Qwh Qrh+:= Qwh 2.07 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    4 × kW hr= Savings in A/C electricity and Energy Cost savings: Ec Qc SEER := Ec 3.641 10 3 × kW hr= Mc Ec Cc:= Mc 364.123 USD= Mh Qh Ch:= Mh 3.384 10 3 × USD= TOTAL COST SAVING at current low energy.84 10 3 × ft 2 = a b c 1.053 10 6 × ft 3 = Fuel-energy savings by improving thermal insulationd Heating

  2. The Role of M(W) in Precision Studies of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Degrassi; P. Gambino; M. Passera; A. Sirlin

    1997-11-28

    Recent calculations have significantly decreased the scheme and residual scale dependence of basic radiative corrections of the Standard Electroweak Model. This leads to a theoretically accurate prediction of the W-boson mass M(W), as well as a reduced upper bound for the Higgs boson mass M(H). The implications of a precise M(W) measurement on the M(H) estimate are emphasized.

  3. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  4. Evaluation of subtropical and tropical quality protein maize hybrids in Texas for agronomic performance, resistance to aflatoxin and quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatnagar, Sandeep

    2001-01-01

    ), (CML 186 X CML 142) and ([CML 142 X CML 150] X CML 176. Among the yellow hybrids (CMSQ 983010 CLQ-6601 x CML172), ([CML 161 X G26Qc18MH134-4-#-3-#-#-#-B-B-B] X DO 940Y) and (G26Qc18MH134-4-3-#-#-#-#-2-B-B X CML 161) showed promising results....

  5. SUSY phenomenology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Bo

    2004-11-15

    enters in the L-R mixing in the stop (mass)2 matrix and a?ects the values of the stop masses. We ?nd for mh > 111 GeV (i.e. the 114 GeV experimental bound), that tan ? > 7 for A0 = 0, and tan ? > 5 for A0 = ?4m1=2. At higher mh the bound on tan ? is more...

  6. Updated Combination of Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the D0 Experiment in 9.7 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-02

    Searches for standard model Higgs boson production at the D0 experiment in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (m_H) in the range 100Higgs boson. In absence of a significant excess above the background expectation, 95% confidence level upper limits are set on the production cross section for a standard model Higgs boson. The upper limits are found to be a factor of 2.11 (0.73) times the predicted standard model cross section for m_H=115 (165) GeV. Under the background-only hypothesis, the corresponding expected limit is 1.46 (0.72) times the standard model prediction. At the same confidence level, these analyses exclude a standard model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 159<m_H<170 GeV, while the a priori expected exclusion is 156<mH<173 GeV. In the range 120<mH<140 GeV, the data exhibit an excess over the background prediction of approximately two Gaussian standard deviations.

  7. The extent of computation in Malament-Hogarth spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. D. Welch

    2006-09-10

    We analyse the extent of possible computations following Hogarth in Malament-Hogarth (MH) spacetimes, and Etesi and N\\'emeti in the special subclass containing rotating Kerr black holes. Hogarth had shown that any arithmetic statement could be resolved in a suitable MH spacetime. Etesi and Nemeti had shown that some \\forall \\exists relations on natural numbers which are neither universal nor co-universal, can be decided in Kerr spacetimes, and had asked specifically as to the extent of computational limits there. The purpose of this note is to address this question, and further show that MH spacetimes can compute far beyond the arithmetic: effectively Borel statements (so hyperarithmetic in second order number theory, or the structure of analysis) can likewise be resolved: Theorem A. If H is any hyperarithmetic predicate on integers, then there is an MH spacetime in which any query ? n \\in H ? can be computed. In one sense this is best possible, as there is an upper bound to computational ability in any spacetime which is thus a universal constant of the space-time M. Theorem C. Assuming the (modest and standard) requirement that space-time manifolds be paracompact and Hausdorff, for any MH spacetime M there will be a countable ordinal upper bound, w(M), on the complexity of questions in the Borel hierarchy resolvable in it.

  8. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  9. Idilic?ni prostori kot drugi prostori v pripovedni prozi Pavline Pajk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steger, Jožica ?eh

    2014-06-25

    ;VUDPRYDOD#17;#3;.RW#3;Y]JRMQL#3;NRUHNWLY#3;VH#3;QDWR#3;SRMDYL#3;PDWHULQR#3; SLVPR#15;#3;Y#3;NDWHUHP#3;ML#3;OH#16;WD#3;SUHG#3;VPUWMR#3;QDURþD#15;#3;QDM#3;YDUXMH#3;GHYLãNR#3;OHSRWR#15;#3;NDU#3;MH#3; XEHVHGHQR#3;V#3;SULVSRGRER#3;RVXWH#3;URåH#29;#3;ª'HYLãND#3...#3; YDãNLK#3;HNVLVWHQF#17;#3;.RW#3;SURVWRUVNR#16;VWDWLþQL#3;NRQVWUXNW#3;MH#3;GRELOD#3;SRPHPEQR#3;PHVWR#3; Y#3;SRHWLþQHP#3;UHDOL]PX#3;#20;#28;#17;#3;VWROHWMD#15;#3;NMHU#3;MH#3;XSRUDEOMHQD#3;WXGL#3;NRW#3;PHGLM#3;GUXåEHQH#3; NULWLNH#3;#11;'HOEUFN#3;#20...

  10. Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, I. S.; Sherman, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    ,” To be publicshed ASHRAE Trans. Sherman, M.H. and Matson, N.E “Residential Ventilation and Energy Characteristics,” ASHRAE Trans. 103(1), 1997, [LBNL- 39036]. Sherman M. H., “Over-ventilating in Hot, Humid Climates”, IAQ Applications, 7(1) pp. 1-4 ASHRAE, 2006...a. Sherman M. H. , “House Need to Breathe…Right?” Fine Homebuilding, April/May 2006; pp. 64-69, LBL Report 54496. Sherman M.H, Matson N.E. , “Air Tightness in New U.S. Housing” Proc. 22 nd AIVC Conference, Air Infiltration and Ventilation...

  11. Efficient Implementation of Multiuser Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Ralf R.

    , . . . , (HkHH k )M hk} Subspace basis J {hk, (HHH )hk, . . . , (HHH )M hk} Multistage detectors Basis I bMS,k = M m=0 wk,mhH k (HkHH k )m y Basis J bMS,k = M m=0 wk,mhH k (HHH )m y k : user of interest hk of the Subspace: Joint versus Individual Projection 5 Projection: Basis J M-th Stage1st Stage hH 1 hH 1 HH HHH H h

  12. Secondary ion emission from “super-efficient” events: prospects for surface mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickman, Richard Dale

    2004-09-30

    -1 Total secondary ion yields for the Ph molecular ion (M-H)- on a per atom basis as a function of the energy per atom of the Aunm+ projectiles, n = 1 to 4, m=1,2?????? 53 5-2 Secondary ion multiplicity report for 23 keV Au4+ bombardment of a... phenylalanine target??????... 54 xii FIGURE age 5-3 Secondary ion yields for the Ph molecular ion (M-H)- on a per atom basis as a function of the energy per atom of the Aunm+ projectiles, n = 1 to 4, m=1,2 from one-ion detection events...

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of antiferromagnetism in manganous fluoride and some isomorphous compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Richard Ames

    1952-01-01

    Preparation................... E. Experimental Procedure................ V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS....................... A. MhFg. B. FeF2* C. NEUTR D. ODITR E. Mh02? VI. CONCLUSION . . VII. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE I. SUMMARY... susceptibilities of MnF2 c 7 and Mn02 have been determined by Griff el and Stout, and Bizette and Tsai. H^. Bizette and B. Tsai, Comptes rendus 209* 205 (1939)* H^. Bizette and B. Tsai, Comptes rendus 212, 119 (19^ 1)? Si. Bizette, Ann de Phys. 1, 295 (19^ -6...

  14. Genetic Structure of Mennonite Populations of Kansas and Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Michael H.; Dykes, Dale D.; Polesky, H. F.

    1989-08-01

    congregation. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 64(3):289-296. DEVOR, E.J., M. MCGUE, M.H. CRAWFORD, AND P.M. LIN 1986a Transmissible and nontransmissible components of anthropometric variation in the Alexanderwohl Mennonites. I. Description and familial correlation. Am.... J. Phys. Anthropol. 69( 1 ):71—82. DEVOR, E.J., M. MCGUE, M.H. CRAWFORD, AND P.M. LIN 1986b Transmissible and nontransmissible components of anthropometric variation in the Alexanderwohl Mennonites. II. Resolution by path analysis. Am. J. Phys...

  15. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebras (VI) --Vacuum representation of Heisenberg algebra--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Omori; Yoshiaki Maeda; Naoya Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka

    2012-04-25

    The Weyl algebra (W_{2m}[h]; *) is the algebra generated by u=(u_1,...,u_m,v_1,.....,v_m) over C with the fundamental commutation relation [u_i,v_j]=-ih\\delta_{ij}, where h is a positive constant. The Heisenberg algebra (\\Cal H_{2m}[nu];*) is the algebra given by regarding the scalar parameter h in the Weyl algebra W_{2m}[h] to be a generator nu which commutes with all others.

  16. Study of the Higgs Direct Reconstruction in ZH->qqH for ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Ono

    2009-07-14

    Precise measurement of the Higgs boson properties is an important issue of the International Linear Collider (ILC) experiment. We studied the accuracy of the Higgs mass reconstruction in the ZH->qqH multi-jet process with the Higgs mass of MH = 120 GeV at sqrt(s) = 250 GeV with the ILD detector model. In this study, we obtained the reconstructed Higgs mass of M_H = 120.79 +- 0.089 GeV and 5.3% measurement accuracy of the cross-section for ZH->qqbb with the integrated luminosity of L=250 fb^{-1} data samples.

  17. Determination of spin and CP of the Higgs boson from WBF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buszello, C P; Marquard, P

    114.4 GeV < mH < 246 GeV (95% C.L.) [1]. When the Higgs mass is above the Z pair threshold, it decays with a large branching fraction into Z bosons, that can be discovered in the “golden” ?+?+???? decay mode. As long as mH & 130 GeV the decay into four... qq ? qqH ? qqWW ? qq ?? ?? [4, 5, 6] have the largest discovery potential. In recent papers [8, 3] we discussed the possible determination of the spin/CP properties of the Higgs boson. To analyse these properties we introduced hypothetical couplings...

  18. Inventory and recent changes of small glaciers on the northeast margin of the Southern Patagonia Icefield, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Icefield, Argentina M.H. MASIOKAS,1 S. DELGADO,1 P. PITTE,1 E. BERTHIER,2 R. VILLALBA,1 P. SKVARCA,3 L, Argentina 2 LEGOS, CNRS, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France 3 Glaciarium, Museo del Hielo Patagónico, El Calafate, Santa Cruz, Argentina 4 Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Niigata

  19. Resources at METU Library Author Year Book Title METU Library Call No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasýrcý, Vasýf

    Resources at METU Library Author Year Book Title METU Library Call No. 1. Buskist, C. J. 2014 40 impact, and future trends LB1738 .T43 2013 3. Hunt, L.& Chalmers,D. (Eds) 2013 University teaching, faculty, trends BF637.C6 .C68 2012 19. Moss, M.H. 2012 Education and its discontents: Teaching

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 12, Tome 37, DCcembre 1976, page C6-333 G. WORTMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    nuclear reactor design, the properties of hydrides (as neutron moderator or reflector materials) have been widely investigated [6]. For the fusion reactor, serioustechno- logical problems [7] are connected-H systems which are stillin discussion. The thermodynamicbehaviour of M-H systems,the theory of the elastic

  1. Plant species loss decreases arthropod diversity and shifts trophic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    ,1 * Gregory M. Crutsinger,2 Kevin Gross,3 John Haarstad,4 Johannes M.H. Knops5 and David Tilman4 1. 2001; Balvanera et al. 2006; Crutsinger et al. 2006; Johnson et al. 2006), and whether the effects Ltd/CNRS #12;Hutchinson 1959; Southwood et al. 1979; Strong et al. 1984). Second, diverse plant

  2. Theory and Simulation of Friction and Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueser, Martin

    Theory and Simulation of Friction and Lubrication M.H. M¨user Department of Applied Mathematics and Simulation of Friction and Lubrication, Lect. Notes Phys. 704, 65­104 (2006) DOI 10.1007/3-540-35284-8 4 c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 4.2 Physics and Chemistry of Lubricant Additives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 References

  3. Optimization Neuroimaging'',

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

    Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C - PLS 1 = k 0 = k optimal k k = optimal k k £ £ 0 #12; Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C. Strother The Human Brain Project, P20 MH57180 ``Spatial

  4. A Fast Algorithm for Level Set Based Optimization Bing Song and Tony Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    of the un- derlying variational problem. Instead, we calculate the energy directly and check if the energy20 MH65166. 1 #12;cost or energy functional. This functional generally will depend on the fea- tures stability constraints. We simply test each point to check if the energy decreases or not when we change

  5. A Novel Routing Metric for Environmentally-Powered Sensors With Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    Aravind Kailas and Mary Ann Ingram School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Savannah, Georgia 31407-3039, USA Email, depending on is type (e.g. Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) or Lithium Ion Polymer) can have cycle life ranging

  6. 3/21/11 1:37 PMUntitled Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    -like power with battery-like energy," said Braun, a professor of materials science and engineering. "Most both." The performance of typical lithium-ion (Li-ion) or nickel metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable think of this the same way you do an internal combustion engine. You would just pull up to a charging

  7. WTERT-India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) ­ India, 89-B, NEERI Mumbai Zonal Lab, Worli, Mumbai, MH 400018, India In 2012, for the first time in the history of India, the country has seen to Energy in India" organized in Mumbai ­ August 23-24, 2012 can be found here. More information about

  8. Automated Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Arbiter-based PUF on FPGA using Programmable Delay Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    of Technology, Powai, Mumbai, MH 400076 Farinaz Koushanfar, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering al. 2002]. The physical properties of each device determine a specific mapping between a set of challenges (inputs) to a set of responses (outputs). Security protocols take advantage of the unique mappings

  9. Portable SD Recorder Product Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage is matched by six hours recording time from four AA Alkaline / Ni-MH batteries. Drag and drop file file transfer ­ 4 x AA Batteries, providing six hours recording (w/Alkaline 1450mAh batteries Speaker Standard level 450 mW/8 ohms General Power consumption Recording/Playback 4.2 W (DC) Battery life

  10. Directed evolution tools in bioproduct and bioprocess development 49 Chapter 3. Directed Evolution Tools in Bioproduct and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Directed evolution tools in bioproduct and bioprocess development 49 Chapter 3. Directed Evolution Tools in Bioproduct and Bioprocess Development Sheryl B. Rubin-Pitela , Catherine M-H. Chob , Wilfred process conditions and customize the reactions they catalyze. Directed evolution tools have been used

  11. Dirac Type Gauge Theories and the Mass of the Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Tolksdorf; Torsten Thumstaedter

    2007-06-03

    We discuss the mass of the (physical component of the) Higgs boson in one-loop and top-quark mass approximation. For this the minimal Standard Model is regarded as a specific (parameterized) gauge theory of Dirac type. It is shown that the latter formulation, in contrast to the usual description of the Standard Model, gives a definite value for the Higgs mass. The predicted value for the Higgs mass depends on the value addressed to the top mass m_T. We obtain m_H= 186 \\pm 8 GeV for m_T = 174 \\pm 3 GeV (direct observation of top events), resp. m_H = 184 \\pm 22 GeV for m_T = 172 \\pm 10 GeV (Standard Model electroweak fit). Although the Higgs mass is predicted to be near the upper bound, m_H is in full accordance with the range 114 \\leq m_H < 193 GeV that is allowed by the Standard Model. We show that the inclusion of (Dirac) massive neutrinos does not alter the results presented. We also briefly discuss how the derived mass values are related to those obtained within the frame of non-commutative geometry.

  12. MT3DMS, A Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model User Guide to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    .M. Cozzarelli, M.H. Lahvis, and B.A. Bekins. 1998. Ground water contamination by crude oil near Bemidji (LNAPL) contaminant through the unsaturated zone and the formation of an oil lens on the water tableMT3DMS, A Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model ­ User Guide to the Hydrocarbon

  13. Electric and Hydrogen Vehicles Past and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in performance · Practical NiMH batteries did not yet exist · Production hybrid cars did not yet exist · Andy · Transportation Propulsion, Fuels, & Emissions ­ Electric-drive vehicles (including plug-in hybrid and fuel Research (IMR) · Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ­ Smart cars, smart parking, goods movement

  14. Implications of near-term coal power plant retirement for SO2 and NOX, and life cycle GHG emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  15. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  16. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 950-974; doi:10.3390/rs4040950 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -02431 Masala, Finland; E-Mails: juha.hyyppa@fgi.fi (J.H.); yu.xiaowei@fgi.fi (X.Y.); antero-00014 Helsinki, Finland; E-Mails: mikko.vastaranta@helsinki.fi (M.V.); markus.holopainen@helsinki.fi (M.H.) 3 School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland; E-Mail: hannu

  17. Development of a large format direct detection device for three dimensional transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare

    2009-01-01

    F. Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M.H. Ellisman, andDuttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M. Ellisman, and N.H.Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, A.C. Milazzo, and M.

  18. Input Power Measurement Techniques for Single-Phase Digitally Controlled PFC Rectifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 1. Experimental digitally controlled PFC boost rectifier implementing either DACM or DNLC control-DC converter, C =22O/LF,L-=1.5mH, V.,omanaZ 390V, f.- 65kHZ te output current measurement is freely available from a downstream DC-DC converter. Table I provides an overview of the three considered techniques

  19. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 0 3 3 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 0 7 7 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE Coast Including Peninsula Florida - 40% (full-season average for last century is 31%) 3) Gulf Coast from%) New Jersey 2% (1%) New York 10% (8%) 4% (3%) Connecticut 10% (7%) 3% (2%) Rhode

  20. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division August 2003 This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Research System I.S. Walker, D.E. Brenner, M.H. Sherman and D.J. Dickerhoff Environmental Energy Technologies and Development Agreement BG97-352(01) and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 17 (1998) 20832086 Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on SiO2 aerogel lms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    1998-01-01

    aerogel ®lms H.-H. PARK, M.-H. JO, H.-R. KIM, S.-H. HYUN Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei with a lower dielectric constant material as an intermetal dielectric (IMD). SiO2 aerogel is a promising aerogel ®lm with 70% porosity exhibited the static dielectric constant of 2 at 1 MHz, and a leakage

  2. Page 1 of 2 UNIVERSAL WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    -Cadmium (Ni-Cd) Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) Lithium Ion (Li-ion) Large or Small sealed lead acid (Pb) MercuryPage 1 of 2 UNIVERSAL WASTE and OTHER ENVIRONMENTALLY DELETERIOUS PRODUCTS Batteries All Universal Waste Batteries generated in laboratories must be collected through the hazardous waste program

  3. Controlled field experiments of wind effects on thermal signatures of buried and surface-laid land mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    mines Remke L. van Dam , Brian Borchers, Jan M.H. Hendrickx, and Sung-ho Hong New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy experiments at the outdoor land mine detection test facility at New Mexico Tech. Here, several anti by subsurface anomalies 3,4,5,6,7 . Inherent to the cyclic nature of the incoming solar radiation, the thermal

  4. On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms M.H. Kahn M.S.Mackisack M.R.Osborne§ G and of related algorithms based on maximum likelihood is discussed as the number of observations n are obtained for the frequency estimation problem. However, the algorithms considered are all scaling dependent

  5. Nonlocal Convex Functionals for Image Regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    ACI-0321917, DMS- 0312222, and the NIH under contract P20 MH65166. Supported by grants from the ONR) where da(u(x), u(y)) = Ga(t)|u(x + t) - u(y + t)|2 dt (2) Ga is a Gaussian with standard deviation a

  6. Dr. S. Cruz-Pol, INEL 4151-Electromagnetics I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

    ://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/generator/dc.html BlIF BuQF ×= ×= Encarta® Who was NikolaTesla? ØFind out what inventions he made ØHis relation = magnetic field density, [Teslas] mH mF HB ED o o /104 36 10 /1085.8 7 9 12 - - - ×= =×= = = µ µ #12;Dr

  7. arXiv:hep-ph/9801422v128Jan1998 Bounds on the Standard Higgs Boson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lath, Amitabh

    arXiv:hep-ph/9801422v128Jan1998 UPR­791­T Bounds on the Standard Higgs Boson1 Jens Erler and Paul on the extraction of the Higgs boson mass. Global fit results depend strongly on the used value for the hadronic (SM) were mainly focussed on constraining its mass, mt, while the Higgs boson mass, MH , was fixed

  8. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy Residential Building Envelopes Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchOzone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff

  9. Scaling Behavior in the Temporal Context Model Marc W. Howard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Marc

    Scaling Behavior in the Temporal Context Model Marc W. Howard Department of Psychology Syracuse numerous helpful comments on an earlier draft. Supported by 2-RO1 MH55687. Corre- spondence to Marc Howard, Syracuse University, Department of Psychology, 430 Huntington Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-2340, or marc

  10. HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+ M.H. Khan, 74078, USA ABSTRACT This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems

  11. May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    standard. 1 Max Sherman is a Senior Scientist at LBNL and the group leader of its Energy Performance Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology of the U.S. Department.2 M.H. Sherman1 Indoor Environment Department2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence

  12. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , C.P., Dickerhoff, D.J., and Sherman, M.H. Energy Performance of Buildings Group Lawrence Berkeley and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined

  13. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    , Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. Jos M C van 't Westende, Dr., Deltares, P.O. Box 177, 2600 MH meters, thermometers, void fraction meters and flow meters were used to measure the two-phase unsteady-water interface; Flow- regime transition INTRODUCTION Rapid pipe filling occurs in various hydraulic applications

  14. Adsorptive Drying of Organic Liquids- An Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, S.; Humphrey, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    . Varga, K., Beyer, H., Acta Chim. Sci. Hung., 21., 69, 1967. Wymore, C.E., I&EC Prod. Res. & Dev. 1(3), 173, 1962. Wymore, C.E., J. Inorg. Nuc1. Chern. ~, 855, 1964. *Senior author is Waxman, M.H. ,;. 160 ESL-IE-86-06-27 Proceedings from...

  15. Proceedings of FUELCELL2005 Third International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    in load, coolant flow, and coolant temperature. A first-law control volume analysis is performed or signal value Stefan-Boltzmann constant [W/(m2K4)] 1 Copyright c 2005 by ASME #12; Relative humidity lost through leakage Liq, l Liquid mAir Moist air mH2 Moist hydrogen O2 Oxygen Ohm Ohmic Out Outlet

  16. SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract -This paper proposes new solar battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract - This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. Used with portable solar panels, existing charge control methods are shown of consumer portable solar arrays. These new arrays are lightweight, durable, and flexible and have been

  17. Non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory: An application to semi-leptonic B-decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Della Morte; Jochen Heitger; Hubert Simma; Rainer Sommer

    2015-01-14

    We review a lattice strategy how to non-perturbatively determine the coefficients in the HQET expansion of all components of the heavy-light axial and vector currents, including 1/m_h-corrections. We also discuss recent preliminary results on the form factors parameterizing semi-leptonic B-decays at the leading order in 1/m_h.

  18. Wollongong University Archives WUA D130 D130 Austin Keane (1927-1979)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blennerhassett, Peter

    ." Australian Atomic Energy Commission AAEC/E 43. 1959, 25p. [Jointly with M.H. McKay and C.D. Cox] 15 "A coefficient for reactors containing Thorium." Australian Atomic Energy Commission AAEC/E49. 1960, 8p. 18 of the Doppler coefficient in natural uranium lattices." United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority AERE R/M 197

  19. Autonomic Computer Systems CS321: Motivation, What is "autonomic"?,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Thomas

    · Harddisk (1990): 200'000h Harddisk (2005): 1'200'000h Harddisk (2014): 1'600'000h (SAS/FC drives) 1.2 Mh-2004 2005-2006 Desktops: year 1 7 % 5 % year 4 (projected) 15 % 12 % Laptops: year 1 20 % 15 % year 4

  20. 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CCC 0012-1630/98/020107-17 Mark S. Blumberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Correspondence to: M. S. Blumberg Contract grant sponsor: NIMH Contract grant number: MH 50701 protecting, young emerge from their thermally se- cure environments into a world where heat loss is a constant "successful" thermoregulation. In part, our expectations arise from the idea that there exists a single core

  1. Stability of Passive Dynamic Walking on Uneven Terrain Katie Byl and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    and MFPTs on uneven terrain. mh/m a (m) MFPT: std .5° MFPT: std 1.0° walker #1 2.0 .6 20 6 walker #2 0.3 .7 Institute of Technology email: katiebyl@mit.edu, russt@mit.edu, web: http terrain. Although deterministic definitions of stability do not apply, for sufficiently low levels

  2. ME Senior Practicum Projects Overview -2008-09/10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    -stroke internal combustion engine The accumulator system is made up of NiMh battery modules donated by DenverGrid Photovoltaic Simulator (7) D. Zimmerle · John Deere Straight Vegetable Oil D. Olsen Engine Development (8) #12Sat Fiberoptic Mass Gauging A. Yalin System (9) · SAE Aero Competition (10) H. Sakurai · Neonatal Transport

  3. Top Articles http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/Xplore/toparticles.jsp 1 of 11 3/29/2005 1:30 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Liuqing

    Area Networks-specific Requirements-part 11: Wireless Lan Medium Access Control (MAC) And Physical. Performance evaluation of 32 kbits/s real-time and dual-directionvideo communication system for wireless universal battery charger for NiCd, NiMH, Li-ion and Li-polymer Lima, F.; Ramalho, J.N.; Tavares, D.; Duarte

  4. IntrAst2 (Petrovay) Stellar evolution CHARACTERISTICS AND STRUCTURE OF THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    ; interior heats up. When T > 107 K ain the core: fusion of H starts radiative equilibrium: the star reaches not cool down? Because of energy production in its core by nuclear fusion: E = mc2 and mHe > 4 · mH energy evolution MAIN SEQUENCE STARS Like the Sun, they are in ­ hydrostatic equilibrium ­ radiative equilibrium

  5. [9] M. Dietzfelbinger, A. Karlin, K. Mehlhorn, F. Meyer auf der Heide, H. Rohnert and R.E. Tarjan, Dynamic perfect hashing: upper and lower bounds, Proc. 29th IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    .A. Sober, Editor, The Chemical Rubber Co., 2nd Edition, 1970. [15] M.J. Katz, M H. Overmars and M. Sharir modeling can be solved efficiently using the data structures and properties presented in this paper­J. Giezeman, D. Halperin, and M.H. Overmars, Fast display of molecular models, in preparation. [13] L

  6. Condensed Lecture Notes (Part 3) Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It is a transparent gas under normal conditions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen storage via M + H2 MH2. · Groups 13-17 form molecular hydrides, many of which are gases. Hydrogen18 Condensed Lecture Notes (Part 3) Hydrogen Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. (Endoergic by 400 kJ/mol) TiO2 catalysis Chemistry of Hydrogen Forms hydrides with every other element

  7. Statistical evaluation of remotely sensed snow-cover products with constraints from streamflow and SNOTEL measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Statistical evaluation of remotely sensed snow-cover products with constraints from streamflow and SNOTEL measurements Xiaobing Zhoua,*, Hongjie Xieb , Jan M.H. Hendrickxa a Department of Earth; accepted 26 October 2004 Abstract Using streamflow and Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) measurements

  8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Facilities Building NE49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Install site drainage and infrastructure for temp. utilities for bldg. construction Exterior B 8 Flush and backfill new 30" CHW Main Exterior C 9 Install drainage pipe and backfill utilities under Bldg. 39 Exterior, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection MH - Manhole SOE - Support of Excavation SS - Sanitary Sewer SD - Storm

  9. A flexible control system for flexible manufacturing systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Wesley Dane

    2004-09-30

    processor material handlers (MH) Can be used to load a part into a material processor automated storage (AS) Physical space for long term storage that has a small subset of spaces that are used for interfacing with the rest of the system...

  10. Biotechnology Research Center Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goda, Keisuke

    .67 [M+H2O+H]+ 120-150 kb Time (min) 0 2 4 Heterologous production of secondary metabolites LC-MS/MS 3 4 glutamicum) Saori KOSONO Ayako YOSHIDA 1 2 #12;11 Midori KURAHASHI Secondary energy Dunaliella #12:25 " " 15:55 16:15 Harold L. Drake (University of Bayreuth, Germany) "Darwin's invertebrates: An oasis

  11. Magnetic Patterning of Permanent-Magnet Rotors for Microscale Motor/Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetic Patterning of Permanent-Magnet Rotors for Microscale Motor/Generators I. Zana* , F, USA Abstract We present and characterize a process to pattern magnetic poles on small permanent-magnet, this approach uses a ferromagnetic magnetizing head (MH) and an externally applied magnetic field, and it offers

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZHmore »production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.« less

  13. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excessmore »above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.« less

  14. A Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with $Z\\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Using the Matrix Element Method at CDF II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2009-08-25

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson and a $Z$ boson where the $Z$ boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of $b$ quarks in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on SM matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100 GeV$/c^2$ and 150 GeV$/c^2$. We set 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the cross-section for $ZH$ production as a function of the Higgs boson mass $m_H$; the limit is 8.2 times the SM prediction at $m_H = 115$ GeV$/c^2$.

  15. Review: Avgust Pavel: Prekmurska Slovenska Slovnica. Vend Nyelvtan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Šek Mertü k, Polonca

    2014-06-25

    #3;SUHG#3;QMHQLP#3; QDVWDQNRP#15;#3;åH#3;Y#3;þDVX#3;âWHIDQD#3;.]PLþD#15;#3; GD#3;EL#3;ODKNR#3;ELO#3;SUHNPXUVNL#3;NQMLåQL#3;MH]LN#3; QRUPLUDQ#3;åH#3;RE#3;VYRMHP#3;QDVWDQNX#3;#11;#20;#26;#26;#20;#12;#17;#3; 6ORYQLFD#3;MH#3;QDVWDOD#3;ªY#3;QHXJRGQHP#3;þ...DYORYH#3; VORYQLFH#29;#3; URNRSLV#3; VH#3; QDKDMD#3; Y#3; 3DYORYL#3; VSRPLQVNL#3; VREL#3; QD#3;.DWHGUL#3; ]D#3; VODYLVWL-­ NR#3;8QLYHU]LWHWQHJD#3; VUHGLãþD#3;6DYDULD#3; Y#3; 6RPERWHOX#15;#3; WLSNRSLV#3; SD#3; KUDQL#3;0X]HM#3; 6DYDULD#3;Y#3;6RPERWHOX#17...

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZH production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.

  17. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excess above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.

  18. Process for production of a metal hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  19. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125<m_H<155 GeV/c^2. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156<m_H<177 GeV/c^2, with an expected exclusion region of 148<m_H<180 GeV/c^2.

  20. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near ps = 183 GeV The ALEPHV. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson on the mass of the Higgs boson: mH > 87:9 GeV=c2 at 95% con#12;dence level. The ALEPH Collaboration wish

  1. KaushikRajashekara TheUniversityofTexasatDallas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    of a EV Power-train 13 14 #12;15 Vehicle range per battery charge under various driving conditions Fuel/DOETargets Batteries ElectricMachines PowerElectronics Futurepowertrains Conclusions 2 #12;GeneralMotorsEV1 * Engine: 1.3 liter, 4 cylinder * Battery: 100.8V DC (NiMH battery), 5.75 Ah * Motor/Generator: 13 KW @1500

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  3. Searching the Higgs with the Neurochip TOTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusini, S; Lazzizzera, I; Sartori, A; Sidoti, A; Tecchiolli, G P

    1998-01-01

    We show that neural network classifiers can be helpful in discriminating Higgs production events from the huge background at LHC, assuming the case of a mass value $M_H \\sim 200$ GeV. We use the high performance neurochip TOTEM, trained by the Reactive Tabu Search algorithm (RTS), which could be used for on-line purposes. Two different sets of input variables are compared.

  4. Searching the Higgs with the Neurochip TOTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dusini; F. Ferrari; I. Lazzizzera; A. Sartori; A. Sidoti; G. Tecchiolli

    1997-07-01

    We show that neural network classifiers can be helpful in discriminating Higgs production events from the huge background at LHC, assuming the case of a mass value $M_H \\sim 200$ GeV. We use the high performance neurochip TOTEM, trained by the Reactive Tabu Search algorithm (RTS), which could be used for on-line purposes. Two different sets of input variables are compared.

  5. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-25

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb-1. The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly-charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, mH±± > 190 - 245 GeV/c2, depending on the decay mode and coupling.

  6. Solar Neutrinos at Super-Kamiokande for Super-Kamiokande collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    in Japan. The detector consists of the 39.3m(OE) and 42m(H) main cylindrical tank and 50kton of pure water (currently, the water transparency is ¸100m at 420nm). Main tank is optically sep- arated to 32.5kton- ner wall) as a #12;ducial volume and rest of the water is used for shielding against gamma rays

  7. Magnetoelectric CoFe2O4/polyvinylidene fluoride electrospun nanofibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves, R.; Martins, P.; Moya, X.; Ghidini, M.; Sencadas, V.; Botelho, G.; Mathur, N. D.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2015-03-24

    , the nanofibre mats were coated with gold. SEM image analysis was performed using Image J software. Volume fraction of electroactive ?-phase in the nanofibre PVDF matrix was determined via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) 6, performed using a... . Magnetization loops M(H) were measured up to 10 kOe using an Oxford Instruments vibrating sample magnetometer. Piezoelectric coefficients d33 were determined using a Digital Instruments Dimension 3100 for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), with conductive...

  8. Recycling of Advanced Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    1999-10-06

    The pace of development and fielding of electric vehicles is briefly described and the principal advanced battery chemistries expected to be used in the EV application are identified as Ni/MH in the near term and Li-ion/Li-polymer in the intermediate to long term. The status of recycling process development is reviewed for each of the two chemistries and future research needs are discussed.

  9. The Higgs boson: from the lattice to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai

    2011-11-09

    We discuss the triviality and spontaneous symmetry breaking scenario where the Higgs boson without self-interaction coexists with spontaneous symmetry breaking. We argue that non perturbative lattice investigations support this scenario. Moreover, from lattice simulations we predict that the Higgs boson is rather heavy. We estimate the Higgs boson mass $m_H = 754 \\pm 20 {\\text{(stat)}} \\pm 20 {\\text{(syst)}} {\\text{GeV}}$ and the Higgs total width $\\Gamma(H) \\simeq 340 {\\text{GeV}}$.

  10. U.Va. Map : McCormick Road Area 1 (A4) Albert H. Small Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    ) Monroe Hill House/Range (MH3) 32 (B5) Montebello 33 (F1) Morea 34 (G2) Nameless Field 35 (F5) New Cabell*) 14 (F1) 108 Cresap Road 51 (C3) Dell 1 (Studio Art) 52 (C3) Dell 2 (Studio Art) 15 (D3) Dell Science Building (MSB) 25 (E4) Maury Hall (MRY*) 27 (B4) Mechanical Engineering (MEC) 28 (F2) Memorial

  11. List of significant publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, Eric

    2012-01-01

    of the most significant publications: I The histidine residue in the active center of ribonuclease. II .The position of this residue in the primary protein chain. Stein WD and Barnard EA, J.Molec. Biol. 1, 350-358 (1959). Biological function... of pancreatic ribonuclease. Barnard EA. Nature* 221, 340 -344 (1969). Evolution of ribonuclease in relation to polypeptide folding mechanisms. Barnard EA,? Cohen MS, Gold MH, Kim JK . Nature* 240, 395-398 (1972). II Number and location...

  12. 2172 J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 2172-2180 Dissociation Energy and Photochemistry of NO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    /mol. From the enthalpies of formation of O(3P2)and NOZ(~AI),we calculate MH/O(N03)= 18.87f 0.33kcal/mol at 0 thermochemical value but is consistent with a value calculated indirectly using the most recent values.3f 0.8 kcal/mol. 1. Introduction An accuratedetermination of the enthalpy of formationof

  13. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  14. 4. Nucleosynthesis I. Aretxaga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aretxaga, Itziar

    4. Nucleosynthesis I. Aretxaga 2014 #12;We have that MR-3 radR-4 There must be a z at which M= rad Taking into account that nucleosynthesis predicts n=0.68 n , then rad=4.2 x 10-5 h-2 1+zeq = 23900mh2 radiation to matter dominated Universe at z~3100 (t~60000 yr): recombination nucleosynthesis #12;Epochs

  15. Maximal CP and Bounds on the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from P and CP Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi Kuchimanchi

    2012-08-09

    We find in theories with spontaneous P and CP violation that symmetries needed to set the tree level strong CP phase to zero can also set all non-zero tree level CP violating phases to the maximal value \\pi / 2 in the symmetry basis simultaneously explaining the smallness of \\bar{\\theta} and the largeness of the CKM CP violating phase. In these models we find the one loop lower bound \\bar{\\theta} > 10^{-11} relevant for early discovery of neutron edm d_n > 10^{-27} ecm. The lower bound relaxes to \\bar{\\theta} > 10^{-13} or d_n > 10^{-29} ecm for the case where the CP phases are non-maximal. Interestingly the spontaneous CP phase appears in the quark sector, not the Higgs sector, and is enabled by a heavy left-right symmetric vectorlike quark family with mass M. These results do not vanish in the decoupling limit of M_{H_2^+} > M \\rightarrow \\infty (where M_{H_2^+} is the mass of heavy Higgs at the parity breaking scale) and the age-old expectation that laws of nature (or its Lagrangian) are parity and matter-antimatter symmetric may be testable by the above predictions and EDM experiments, even if new physics occurs only at see-saw, GUT or Planck scales. There is also a region in parameter space with M_{H_2^+} < M where the above bounds are dampened by the factor (M_{H_2^+}/M)^2. By using flavour symmetries and texture arguments we also make predictions for the CKM phase that arises from the maximal phase on diagonalization to the physical basis. There are no axions predicted in this model.

  16. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Volume 27, Autumn 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2004-01-01

    e-mail: mlecomte@pop.vjf.cnrs.fr Great Britain: Michael Hutt, David Gellner, Ben Campbell School of Oriental and African Studies Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square London WC1H 0XG U.K. e-mail: mh8@soas.ac.uk Netherlands: Mark Turin... . Lalitpur: Himal Books 2001. ISBN 99933-13-09-2). She also lists numerous articles in Japanese newspapers, magazines and websites. Working with Buddhists Alexander W. Macdonald Editorial note. – Alexander William Macdonald is a doyen...

  17. The Role of Pension Funds in Housing Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Kenneth T.

    1981-01-01

    caansapm .wH I m I mm ow mN©N HHO H?nos . >H «w v N a avUop?ab .mH w ma m NH we mmum A.aHv HHO camaqwpm .NH I I NHmN mm ¢HwN .00 HHO Hamnm .aH I NN I HN om ooom .00 a

  18. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

    2007-12-04

    We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

  19. Higgs Boson Mass and Electroweak-Gravity Hierarchy from Dynamical Gauge-Higgs Unification in the Warped Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani; Mitsuru Mabe

    2005-04-14

    Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by the Hosotani mechanism in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime is examined, relations among the W-boson mass (m_W), the Kaluza-Klein mass scale (M_{KK}), and the Higgs boson mass (m_H) being derived. It is shown that M_{KK}/m_W = (2 pi kR)^{1/2} (pi/theta_W) and m_H /m_W = 0.058 kR (pi/theta_W), where k^2, R, and theta_W are the curvature and size of the extra-dimensional space and the Wilson line phase determined dynamically. For typical values kR = 12 and theta_W = (0.2 to 0.4) pi, one finds that M_{KK} = (1.7 to 3.5) TeV, k = (1.3 to 2.6) x 10^{19} GeV, and m_H = (140 to 280) GeV.

  20. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  1. Analysis of RGU Photometry in Selected Area 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bilir; S. Karaali; R. Buser

    2004-07-02

    A low-latitude anticenter field (l=189, b=+21) is investigated by using the full calibration tools of RGU photometry. The observed RGU data are reduced to the standard system and the separation of dwarfs and evolved stars is carried out by an empirical method. Stars are categorized into three metallicity classes, i.e. -0.25<[M/H]<=+0.50, -1.00<[M/H]<=-0.25, and [M/H]<=-1.00$ dex, and their absolute magnitudes are determined by the corresponding colour-magnitude diagrams. The unusually large scattering in the two-colour diagrams is reduced by excluding 153 extra-galactic objects, identifying them compared with the charts of Basel Astronomical Institute and University of Minnesota, and by the criterion and algorithm of Gaidos et al. (1993). The local logarithmic space density for giants, D(0)=6.75, lies within the local densities of Gliese (1969) and Gliese & Jahreiss (1992). The local luminosity function for the absolute magnitude interval 3

  2. MSSM Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC: Benchmark Scenarios after the Discovery of a Higgs-like Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Stål, O.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Weiglein, G.

    2013-09-01

    A Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 125.5 GeV has been discovered at the LHC. Within the current experimental uncertainties, this new state is compatible with both the predictions for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson and with the Higgs sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We propose new low-energy MSSM benchmark scenarios that, over a wide parameter range, are compatible with the mass and production rates of the observed signal. These scenarios also exhibit interesting phenomenology for the MSSM Higgs sector. We propose a slightly updated version of the well-known mh-max scenario, and a modified scenario (mh-mod), where the light CP-even Higgs boson can be interpreted as the LHC signal in large parts of the MA-tan \\beta\\ plane. Furthermore, we define a light stop scenario that leads to a suppression of the lightest CP-even Higgs gluon fusion rate, and a light stau scenario with an enhanced decay rate of h to \\gamma\\gamma\\ at large tan \\beta. We also suggest a \\tau-phobic Higgs scenario in which the lightest Higgs can have suppressed couplings to down-type fermions. We propose to supplement the specified value of the \\mu\\ parameter in some of these scenarios with additional values of both signs. This has a significant impact on the interpretation of searches for the non SM-like MSSM Higgs bosons. We also discuss the sensitivity of the searches to heavy Higgs decays into light charginos and neutralinos, and to decays of the form H to hh. Finally, in addition to all the other scenarios where the lightest CP-even Higgs is interpreted as the LHC signal, we propose a low-MH scenario, where instead the heavy CP-even Higgs boson corresponds to the new state around 125.5 GeV.

  3. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

  4. Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Keely Britt

    2014-07-25

    also go to the entire Malapa Research Team, and Dr. Lee Berger in particular, for providing me with the life-changing opportunity to participate in this exciting and ground-breaking project. I would also like to thank Dr. Kieran McNulty and Dr. John... sediba, for which only a single, juvenile cranium belonging to the type specimen (MH1) is currently available for morphological comparison. This species of australopith was hypothesized by Berger and colleagues (2010) to represent the best candidate...

  5. A radiation-hardened, low-noise, high-speed, integrated charge preamplifier for the Superconducting Supercollider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Kuok Young

    1989-01-01

    of the tester enclosed in an Aluminium box, 28 HP6062A Pulse 6enerator 50 0 coax +7 V Ferrite Bead 10 pF Chip 1 pF 1 ns 47 0 61FE Pream Ibias N4416 475 0 1 mH g Ferrite 6ead -7 V 50 0 coax HP541110 Wavet. Rec. Fig. 13. Complete test set... and all the circuit components are soldered onto the PCB. A 24-pin. text tool socket is also soldered onto the PCB to make repetition of measurements easy to manage. The PCB is then mounted onto the Aluminium box by using four plastic snap-on's. A test...

  6. Cosmological Bounds on an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Bertolami; M. C. Bento; R. Rosenfeld

    2001-11-21

    We derive bounds on the Higgs boson coupling $g^{\\prime}$ to a stable light scalar which is regarded as a collisional dark matter candidate. We study the behaviour of this scalar, that we refer to as phion ($\\phi$), in the early Universe for different ranges of its mass. We find that a phion in the mass range of $100 \\mev$ is excluded, while if its mass is about $1 \\gev$, a rather large coupling constant, $g^{\\prime} \\gsim 2$, and $m_h \\lsim 130 \\gev$ are required in order to avoid overabundance. In the latter case, the invisible decay mode of the Higgs boson is dominant.

  7. Two formation paths for cluster dwarf galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca M. Poggianti; Nobunari Kashikawa; Terry Bridges; Bahram Mobasher; Yutaka Komiyama; Dave Carter; Sadanori Okamura; Masafumi Yagi

    2003-10-15

    A surprising result of our recent spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the Coma cluster has been the discovery of a possible bimodal distribution in the metallicities of faint galaxies at $M_B>-17$. We identified a group of dwarfs with luminosity-weighted metallicities around solar and a group with [M/H] around -1.5. A metallicity bimodality among galaxies of similar luminosities is unexpected and suggests that faint cluster galaxies could be an heterogeneous population that formed through more than one evolutionary path, possibly as a consequence of the cluster environment.

  8. Decoupling of Higgs boson from the inflationary stage of Universe evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev; S. A. Timofeev

    2010-05-07

    The constraint on the mass of Higgs field in the Standard Model at the minimal interaction with the gravity is derived in the form of lower bound $m_H> 150$ GeV by the strict requirement of decoupling the Higgs boson from the inflation of early Universe: the inflation produced by the Higgs scalar could crucially destroy visible properties of large scale structure of Universe, while the large mass makes the Higgs particle not able to produce the inflation and shifts its cosmological role into the region of quantum gravity.

  9. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-03-21

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145<mH<206 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  10. New paper chromatographic procedures for fractionating the lipides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieckert, Julius Walter

    1955-01-01

    of the phospholipides of egg yolk on silicic acid. Biochem, J,, ffisxxiii. Rouser, G., G, Marinetti and J.F. Berry 1951* Paper chromatography of phospholipides* Federation Proc. t a OaH? < Trappe, W. 19*fl Die Trennung von biologischen Fettstoffen aus ihren...*P*., B.G. Overell and M* Stack-Dunne 19^9 Chromatography on alumina-impregnated filter paper* Nature t l6*f :673* Fillerup, D.L* and J.F. Mead 1953 Chromatographic separa? tion of the plasma lipides* Proc* Soc* Exptl* Biol* and Med*. 83:57^* Hack, M.H...

  11. Method Of Charging Maintenance-Free Nickel Metal Hydride Storage Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlureau, Thierry (Bordeaux, FR); Liska, Jean-Louis (Bordeaux, FR)

    1999-11-16

    A method of charging an industrial maintenance-free Ni-MH storage cell, the method comprising in combination a first stage at a constant current I.sub.1 lying in the range I.sub.c /10 to I.sub.c /2, and a second stage at a constant current I.sub.2 lying in the range I.sub.c /50 to I.sub.c /10, the changeover from the first stage to the second stage taking place when the time derivative of the temperature reaches a threshold value which varies as a function of the temperature at the time of the changeover.

  12. Reduced ventilation and enhanced magnitude of the deep Pacific carbon pool during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, L.; McCave, I. N.; Carter, L.; Fallon, S.; Scrivner, A. E.; Primeau, F.

    2014-12-15

    to mid-depth radiocarbon-age difference over the last 20 kyr. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 274, 322–326. onk Ramsey, C., Staff, R.A., Bryant, C.L., Brock, F., Kitagawa, H., van der Plicht, J., Schlolaut, G., Marshall, M.H., Brauer, A., Lamb, H.F., Payne, R... at intermediate water depth in the Pacific Ocean during the last deglaciation. Paleoceanography 24, PA2223. Stuiver, M., Polach, H.A., 1977. Reporting of 14C data. Radiocarbon 19, 355–363. Talley, L.D., Pickard, G.L., Emery, W.J., Swift, J.H., 2011. Descriptive...

  13. Ecology and control of thrips and spider mites injurious to cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1955-01-01

    of the thriys Fxxs&Q)nie))a fossa {15nds) SNI ptatllllllllellll ttlttCl Steep M C ttM Th Bttl'1MM ceM~MM . . . . . . . ~. . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 geesons) ~cs of Tstrmgpds6s dssertorun Banks on se66erel lsl?etetlt beet lllllots ?EOIISNS K Bal'1 ath Nld Bcb... tteaa Coentiesf TeNs \\ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ * \\ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ llollb Pl?lto NN MCCCM1 4th dssc4 f Tstlollfl INC d 4 etcsIIR BRAN Rl AMa 6 BatlMM CCMtp RNCS ~ ~ ~ ~ bt RISN PIINts IRS MMchal sl?hd?lco cf 'totloltlblts dMoel4Mh BOSN I Atl? 8 Batlae...

  14. t tbar Production via Vector Boson Fusion at High Energy e^+ e^- Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikulas Gintner; Stephen Godfrey

    1996-12-12

    We examine t tbar production via vector boson fusion at high energy e^+ e^- colliders using the effective vector-boson approximation. We show cross sections as functions of CM energy for various Higgs masses ranging from 100 GeV up to 1 TeV, and also for M_H = infinity which corresponds to the LET. We give expressions for sigma(V_i V_j -> t tbar) in the 2M_(W,Z)/sqrt(s) = 0 approximation and show how this approximation effects the results.

  15. Lightest Higgs Boson and Relic Neutralino in the MSSM with CP Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae Sik Lee; Stefano Scopel

    2007-01-26

    We discuss the lower bound to the lightest Higgs boson H_1 in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, and the phenomenology of the lightest relic neutralino in the same scenario. In particular, adopting the CPX benchmark scenario, we find that the combination of experimental constraints coming from LEP, Thallium Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) measurements, quorkonium decays, and B_s -> mu mu decay favours a region of the parameter space where the mass of H_1 is in the range 7 GeV M_{H_1}/2 which is allowed by cosmology is excluded by antiproton fluxes.

  16. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces toyocaensis NRRL 15009, Producer of the Glycopeptide Antibiotic A47934

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Hee-Jeon; Kwun, Min Jung

    2014-07-31

    . Sci. U. S. A. 99:8962–8967. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.102285099. 3. Angiuoli SV, Gussman A, Klimke W, Cochrane G, Field D, Garrity GM, Kodira CD, Kyrpides N, Madupu R, Markowitz V, Tatusova T, Thom- son N,White O. 2008. Toward an online repository... ://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ nar/26.4.1107. 5. Blin K, Medema MH, Kazempour D, Fischbach MA, Breitling R, Takano E, Weber T. 2013. antiSMASH 2.0—a versatile platform for genome min- ing of secondary metabolite producers. Nucleic Acids Res. 41: W204–W212. http...

  17. A review of "The Flight of the Earls: An Illustrated History" by John McCavitt with original drawings by Seán Ó Brógáin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvihill, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    to the council that decided on the project of their setting out on the voyage!? (Annals of the Four Masters [An- nala na gCeithre Mh?istr?], 1630s, as quoted in Cusack, Illustrated History of Ireland, 1868; rpt 1995, p 468). The reaction in Ireland at the time..., such as the handsomely illustrated bicentennial edition of Thomas Packenham?s Year of Liberty: The Great Irish Rebellion of 1798. (Random House, 1998) and Mary Frances Cusack?s Illustrated History of Ireland (London: Longmans, 1868; rpt Senate/Tiger Books UK, 1995...

  18. FYI: July 3, 1980 - December 31, 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1980-01-01

    later. You're all so kind. CG FOOTWEAR PREFERRED Despite the hot weather, library employees are requested--for health reasons-­ to wear shoes of some sort while at work. Thanks for your cooperation in this. MH LFA BALLOT RESULTS The results.... It will be removed altogether in the present upheavals. It has been in the way on the ground floor, so one or more progressive-minded persons decided to cut it off and substitute a temporary half-inch pipe. Ordinarily that would have worked, but the hpt weather...

  19. Synthesis of some †-lactams via enolate-imine reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElveen, Margaret Lynn

    1978-01-01

    phenylacetate (34), menthyl mandelate (g), ethyl acetate (Q6), ethyl lactate (37), and ethyl propionate (38). The imines used in this study were benzilidene-tert-butylamine (g), benzilidenemethylamine (2g), benzilideneethylamine (24), benzi1idene- aniline (Q... phenylacetate (g), menthyl mandelate (g) which was a mixture of diastereomers (see Experimental section), ethyl acetate (36), ethyl lactate (37), and ethyl propionate (38). CeHa- ? NH ? CHsCOsEt 30 Ce Ha MH-C-OR +3 R=CHzCHs CeHeCH= N-CHzCOeEt 0 R'-3...

  20. Importance of excitonic effects and the question of internal electric fields in stacking faults and crystal phase quantum discs: The model-case of GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corfdir, Pierre; Lefebvre, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    are the electron and hole on-axis positions and the in-plane relative coordinate of the exciton, respectively. We assume that the dielectric constant e¼ 9.5e0 is the same in the ZB and WZ layers of the structure.17 me¼ 0.2m018 and mh are the electron and hole... ). 21C. Stampfl and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 57, R15052 (1998). 22A. Bellabchara, P. Lefebvre, P. Christol, and H. Mathieu, Phys. Rev. B 50, 11840 (1994). 23F. Bernardini, V. Fiorentini, and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. B 56, R10024 (1997). 24J...

  1. Strength and hydration properties of reactive MgO-activated ground granulated blastfurnace slag paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Fei; Gu, Kai; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-12-10

    -activation includes the destruction of the prime material into low stable structural units, their interaction with coagulation structures and the creation of condensation structures. In the MgO-GGBS blends, the first steps consist of a breakdown of the slag bonds... on resin-impregnated polished samples. Roughly 30 points on the gel were picked up for each sample at a magnification of 2500. Figure 10 plots the Mg/Ca vs. Al/Ca ratios of the gels in the Mh-GGBS blends hydrated for 7 and 28 days. Extrapolating...

  2. An experimental study of the solubility and thermodynamic properties of nickel in the system NIO + HCL + H?O 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Saulwood

    1984-01-01

    springs on the East Pacific Rise (Edmond et al. , 1979 a, b; Craig et al. , 1980), the Salton Sea (Helgeson, 1968); geothermal water (Ellis and Mahon, 1977); and oil-field brines (Carpenter et al. , 1974) indicate that aqueous solutions involved... for the dissociated part in order to obtain the concentrations of the HCI' at temperature and pressure of the runs. From equation (1), the concentration of HCI is given by m(HCI') ' = m(CI) ' m(H ) ' / KHCF (3) asuming the activity coefficients are unity. Assuming...

  3. Is there evidence that walking groups have health benefits? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Sarah; Jones, Andy

    2015-01-19

    - cators while also making the most efficient use of doctors’ resources has yet to be determined.12–14 One way to promote and sustain walking beha- viours at the population level may be through the provision of outdoor walking groups.15 Walking groups... at a pace of 3– 5 m/h (5–8 km/h) expends sufficient energy to be classified as moderate intensity2 and is an easy and accessible way of meeting physical activity recom- mendations.3 Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have shown walking to have various...

  4. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff#12;c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hi| it| *hi _ Thi4ih Lh_hi _i uL?U|L? _i |h@?tuih| MEs ' @n2Zs E@iU @ : f @||@^ i T@h ? t}?@* %E| ' rE| n KE|c L KE| it| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi

  5. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hiU|L ihtL it| @ |Lhtii , ihUUi 5L| fE| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi _i _i?t|i tTiU|h@*i rfEs ' Çf 2 @||@^ @?| *i t; ,? t TTLt@?| sf :: {s i| i? hi4@h^ @?| ^ i t EA @ *@ uLh4i _

  6. Battery Electrode Materials with High Cycle Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Brent Fultz

    2001-06-29

    In an effort to understand the capacity fade of nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries, we performed a systematic study of the effects of solute additions on the cycle life of metal hydride electrodes. We also performed a series of measurements on hydrogen absorption capacities of novel carbon and graphite-based materials including graphite nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotubes. Towards the end of this project we turned our attention to work on Li-ion cells with a focus on anode materials.

  7. NLO Corrections to Double Higgs Production in the Higgs Singlet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis

    2015-11-12

    Higgs pair production at the LHC from gluon fusion is small in the Standard Model, but can be enhanced in models where a resonant enhancement is allowed. We examine the effect of a resonant contribution from a second scalar arising in a model with a gauge singlet scalar field in addition to the usual SU(2) scalar doublet, with mass up to $M_H$~600 GeV and discuss the interference effects in double Higgs production. We compute the NLO QCD corrections in the large $m_t$ limit and show that they can significantly distort kinematic distributions near the resonance peak.

  8. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A.E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  9. Cooperative Contractility: the Role of Stress Fibres in the Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronan, William; McMeeking, Robert M.; Chen, Christopher S.; McGarry, J. Patrick; Deshpande, Vikram S.

    2014-11-27

    of the National Academy of Sciences 92, 10252-10256. Kural, M.H., Billiar, K.L., 2014. Mechanoregulation of valvular interstitial cell phenotype in the third dimension. Biomaterials 35, 1128-1137. Liu, Z., Tan, J.L., Cohen, D.M., Yang, M.T., Sniadecki, N... . Biomaterials 35, 4015-4025. Ronan, W., Deshpande, V.S., McMeeking, R.M., McGarry, J.P., 2012. Numerical investigation of the active role of the actin cytoskeleton in the compression resistance of cells. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical...

  10. The SM Higgs-boson production in gamma gamma -> h -> bb at the Photon Collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Niezurawski; A. F. Zarnecki; M. Krawczyk

    2002-11-29

    Measuring the Gamma(h -> gamma gamma)Br(h -> bb) decay at the photon collider at TESLA is studied for a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass m_h = 120 GeV. The main background due to the process gamma gamma -> QQ(g), where Q = b,c, is estimated using the NLO QCD program (G. Jikia); the results obtained are compared with the LO estimate. Using a realistic luminosity spectrum and performing a detector simulation, we find that Gamma(h -> gamma gamma)Br(h -> bb) can be measured with an accuracy better than 2% after one year of photon collider running.

  11. A prospective randomised, open-labeled, trial comparing sirolimus-containing versus mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression in patients undergoing liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzbauer, Andreas A.; Zuelke, Carl; Graeb, Christian; Rochon, Justine; Bilbao, Itxarone; Burra, Patrizia; de Jong, Koert P.; Duvoux, Christophe; Kneteman, Norman M.; Adam, Rene; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Becker, Thomas; Beckebaum, Susanne; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Cillo, Umberto; Colledan, Michele; Fandrich, Fred; Gugenheim, Jean; Hauss, Johann P.; Heise, Michael; Hidalgo, Ernest; Jamieson, Neville; Konigsrainer, Alfred; Lamby, Philipp E.; Lerut, Jan P.; Makisalo, Heikki; Margreiter, Raimund; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Mutzbauer, Ingrid; Otto, Gerd; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Pinna, Antonio D.; Pirenne, Jacques; Rizell, Magnus; Rossi, Giorgio; Rostaing, Lionel; Roy, Andre; Sanchez Turrion, Victor; Schmidt, Jan; Troisi, Roberto I.; van Hoek, Bart; Valente, Umberto; Wolf, Philippe; Wolters, Heiner; Mirza, Darius F.; Scholz, Tim; Steininger, Rudolf; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Strasser, Simone I.; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Neuhaus, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Geissler, Edward K.

    2010-05-11

    is the study statistician. CG, IB, PB, KPdeJ, CD, KK, RA, WOB, TB, SB, OC, UDdiC, MC, FF, JG, JPH, MH, EH, NJ, AK, PEL, JPL, HM, RM, VM, IM, GO, GPP, ADP, JP, MR, GR, LR, AR, VST, JS, RT, BvanH, UV, PW, HHW, DFM, TS, RS, GS, SIS, KWJ, and PN partici- pated... of the Friedrich-Schiller- University, Jena, Germany, 20Scottish Liver Transplant Unit, The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, UK, 21Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, 22Department of General-, Visceral...

  12. Doping Experiments on Low-Dimensional Oxides and a Search for Unusual Magnetic Properties of MgAlB14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julienne Marie Hill

    2002-12-31

    Doping experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} and SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were performed with the intent of synthesizing new metallic low-=dimensional cuprate oxide compounds. Magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) measurements on a polycrystalline La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} sample chemically oxidized at room temperature in aqueous NaClO showed superconductivity with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 42.6 K and a Meissner fraction of 26%. They were unable to electrochemically oxidize La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in a nonaqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and methanol. Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} was found to decompose upon exposure to air and water. Electron paramagnetic resonance, isothermal magnetization M(H), and {chi}(T) measurements on the primary decomposition product, Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6}, were consistent with a nearly isolated, spin S = 1/2, local moment model for the Cu{sup +2} spins. From a fit of {chi}(T) by the Curie-Weiss law and of the M(H) isotherms by a modified Brillouin function, the weakly antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between adjacent Cu{sup +2} spins in Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6} was found to be J/k{sub B} = 1.06(4) K. Doping studies on SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were inconclusive. {chi}(T) measurements on an undoped polycrystalline sample of SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, a sample treated with distilled water, and a sample treated with aqueous NaClO showed no qualitative differences between the samples. In addition, {chi}(T) and M(H, T) studies of the ultra-hard material MgAlB{sub 14} were carried out in search of superconductivity or ferromagnetism in this compound. {chi}(T) measurements on a powder sample revealed temperature-independent diamagnetism from 1.8 K up to room temperature with a Curie-Weiss impurity concentration equivalent to {approx} 1 mol% of spin-1/2 ions. In contrast, M(H, T) data on hot pressed samples showed evidence of ferromagnetic transitions above {approx} 330 K. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis of the hot pressed samples indicated that the observed ferromagnetism was likely due to Fe impurities.

  13. Herwig++ 2.0 Release Note.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieseke, Stefan; Grellscheid, D.; Hamilton, K.; Ribon, Alberto; Richardson, P.; Seymour, Michael H.; Stephens, Phil; Webber, Bryan R.

    , Department of Physics, Durham University E-mail: Peter.Richardson@durham.ac.uk.ac.uk M.H. Seymour PH Department, CERN E-mail: M.Seymour@rl.ac.uk P. Stephens Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow E-mail: stephens@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk B.R. Webber Cavendish... in testing the simulation of the underlying event and producing the plots of the results of the UA5 model. References [1] S. Gieseke, A. Ribon, M. H. Seymour, P. Stephens and B. Webber, JHEP 0402 (2004) 005 [arXiv:hep-ph/0311208]. [2] S. Gieseke, D...

  14. HERWIG 6.5 release note.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corcella, G.; Knowles, I. G.; Marchesini, G.; Moretti, Stefano; Odagiri, Kosuke; Richardson, P.; Seymour, Michael H.; Webber, Bryan R.

    and Theoretical Physics and Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge E-mail: richardn@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk M.H. Seymour Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester E-mail: M.Seymour@rl.ac.uk B.R. Webber Cavendish Laboratory, University... ]. The program, together with other useful files and information, can be obtained from the following web site: http://hepwww.rl.ac.uk/theory/seymour/herwig/ This will be mirrored at CERN: http://home.cern.ch/seymour/herwig/ It is anticipated that version 6...

  15. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Volume 25 - 26, Autumn 2003 - Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2004-01-01

    of Oriental and African Studies Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square London WC1H 0XG U.K. e-mail: mh8@soas.ac.uk Netherlands: Mark Turin Himalayan Languages Project, Silodam 355 1013 AW Amsterdam Netherlands e-mail: mt272@cornell.edu EBHR 25... 1 Martin Gaenszle Professional writers of history in the Himalayan region have been pre- dominantly concerned with larger social units, dealing with issues such as the formation of states, colonial rule and, above all, nation...

  16. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Volume 24, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2003-01-01

    Môquet 94801 Villejuif cedex France e-mail: mlecomte@pop.vjf.cnrs.fr Great Britain: Michael Hutt, David Gellner, Ben Campbell School of Oriental and African Studies Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square London WC1H 0XG U.K. e-mail: mh8... in the Himalayas. A workshop organized by M. Lecomte-Tilouine 90 CNAS Alumni of Foreign Scholars 92 BOOK REVIEWS On the Languages of the Himalayas and their Links (nearly) around the World. Review Article by Roland Bielmeier 94 Janet Rizvi...

  17. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  18. Effective temperature scale and bolometric corrections from 2MASS photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Masana; C. Jordi; I. Ribas

    2006-01-03

    This paper presents a method to determine effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters and bolometric corrections for population I and II FGK type stars based on V and 2MASS IR photometry. Accurate calibration is accomplished by using a sample of solar analogues, whose average temperature is assumed to be equal to the solar effective temperature of 5777 K. By taking into account all possible sources of error we estimate associated uncertainties better than 1% in effective temperature and in the range 1.0-2.5% in angular semi-diameter for unreddened stars. Comparison of our new temperatures with other determinations extracted from the literature indicates, in general, remarkably good agreement. These results suggest that the effective temperaure scale of FGK stars is currently established with an accuracy better than 0.5%-1%. The application of the method to a sample of 10999 dwarfs in the Hipparcos catalogue allows us to define temperature and bolometric correction (K band) calibrations as a function of (V-K), [m/H] and log g. Bolometric corrections in the V and K bands as a function of effective temperature, [m/H] and log g are also given. We provide effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters, radii and bolometric corrections in the V and K bands for the 10999 FGK stars in our sample with the corresponding uncertainties.

  19. Near-infrared Spectral Features in Single-aged Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo P. Schiavon; Beatriz Barbuy; Gustavo Bruzual

    1999-10-14

    Synthetic spectra for single-aged stellar populations of metallicities [M/H] = -0.5, 0.0 and +0.5, ages = 3 to 17 Gyrs, and initial mass function exponents x = 0.1 to 2.0 were built in the wavelength range 6000-10200 Angstrons. For such we have employed the grid of synthetic spectra described in Schiavon & Barbuy (1999), computed for the stellar parameters 2500 <= Teff <= 6000 K, -0.5 <= log g <= 5.0, [M/H] = -0.5, 0.0 and +0.5, and [alpha/Fe] = 0.0, together with the isochrones by Bertelli et al. (1994) and Baraffe et al. (1998). The behavior of the features NaI8190, CaII8662, TiO6600 and FeH9900 in the integrated spectra of single stellar populations were studied in terms of metallicity, initial mass function and age variations. The main conclusions are that the NaI doublet is an IMF-sensitive feature, which is however sensitive also to metallicity and age, whereas TiO, CaII and FeH are very sensitive to metallicity and essentially insensitive to IMF and age.

  20. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  1. Characterizing the AB Doradus moving group via high-resolution spectroscopy and kinematic traceback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 10 proposed F and G members of the nearby, young moving group AB Doradus (ABD). Our sample was obtained using the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory with the coude echelle spectrograph, achieving R ? 60,000 and signal-to-noise ratio ?200. We derive spectroscopic T {sub eff}, log(g), [Fe/H], and microturbulance (v{sub t} ) using a bootstrap method of the TGVIT software resulting in typical errors of 33K in T {sub eff}, 0.08 dex in log(g), 0.03 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.13 km s{sup –1} in v{sub t} . Characterization of the ABD sample is performed in three ways: (1) chemical homogeneity, (2) kinematic traceback, and (3) isochrone fitting. We find the average metal abundance is [M/H] = –0.03 ± 0.06 with a traceback age of 125 Myr. Our stars were fit to three different evolutionary models and we found that the best match to our ABD sample is the YREC [M/H] = –0.1 model. In our sample of 10 stars, we identify 1 star that is a probable non-member, 3 enigmatic stars, and 6 stars with confirmed membership. We also present a list of chemically coherent stars from this study and the Barenfeld et al. study.

  2. Search for WH associated production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-13

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L?5.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? Collider. Events containing a W?l? candidate (with l corresponding to e or ?) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product ofmore »the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.« less

  3. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Winsche, deceased, Warren E. (late of Bellport, NY)

    1988-01-01

    The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  4. A CO-rich merger shaping a powerful and hyper-luminous infrared radio galaxy at z=2: the Dragonfly Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emonts, B H C; Stroe, A; Pentericci, L; Villar-Martin, M; Norris, R P; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; van Moorsel, G A; Lehnert, M D; Carilli, C L; Rottgering, H J A; Seymour, N; Sadler, E M; Ekers, R D; Drouart, G; Feain, I; Colina, L; Stevens, J; Holt, J

    2015-01-01

    In the low-redshift Universe, the most powerful radio sources are often associated with gas-rich galaxy mergers or interactions. We here present evidence for an advanced, gas-rich (`wet') merger associated with a powerful radio galaxy at a redshift of z~2. This radio galaxy, MRC 0152-209, is the most infrared-luminous high-redshift radio galaxy known in the southern hemisphere. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we obtained high-resolution CO(1-0) data of cold molecular gas, which we complement with HST/WFPC2 imaging and WHT long-slit spectroscopy. We find that, while roughly M(H2) ~ 2 x 10$^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$ of molecular gas coincides with the central host galaxy, another M(H2) ~ 3 x 10$^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$ is spread across a total extent of ~60 kpc. Most of this widespread CO(1-0) appears to follow prominent tidal features visible in the rest-frame near-UV HST/WFPC2 imaging. Ly$\\alpha$ emission shows an excess over HeII, but a deficiency over L(IR), which is likely the result of photo-ionisation by ...

  5. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  6. Probing the Higgs Portal at the LHC Through Resonant di-Higgs Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose M. No; Michael Ramsey-Musolf

    2013-11-25

    We investigate resonant di-Higgs production as a means of probing extended scalar sectors that include a 125 GeV Standard Model-like Higgs boson. For concreteness, we consider a gauge singlet Higgs portal scenario leading to two mixed doublet-singlet states, h_1,2. For m_h_2 > 2 m_h_1, the resonant di-Higgs production process p p -> h_2 -> h_1 h_1 will lead to final states associated with the decaying pair of Standard Model-like Higgs scalars. We focus on h_2 production via gluon fusion and on the b b tau^+ tau^- final state. We find that discovery of the h_2 at the LHC may be achieved with ~ 100 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity for benchmark parameter choices relevant to cosmology. Our analysis directly maps onto the decoupling limits of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) and more generically onto extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector in which a heavy scalar produced through gluon fusion decays to a pair of Standard Model-like Higgs bosons.

  7. Study of Higgs boson production and its b-bbar decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria; Jean-Philippe Lansberg

    2010-01-11

    We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (mH = 115-140 GeV/c^2) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (pPb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b-bbar decay. Using equivalent Weizsaecker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling gamma-gamma --> H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> p H Pb) and semielastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> Pb H X) processes at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds (gamma-gamma --> b-bbar and misidentified gamma-gamma-->q-qbar events), we find that a Higgs boson with mH = 120 GeV/c^2 could be observed in the b-bbar channel with a 3sigma-significance integrating 300 pb^-1 with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10^31 cm^-2s^-1. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t-tbar cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

  8. Saving the fourth generation Higgs with radion mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariana Frank; Beste Korutlu; Manuel Toharia

    2012-04-26

    We study Higgs-radion mixing in a warped extra dimensional model with Standard Model fields in the bulk, and we include a fourth generation of chiral fermions. The main problem with the fourth generation is that, in the absence of Higgs-radion mixing, it produces a large enhancement in the Higgs production cross-section, now severely constrained by LHC data. We analyze the production and decay rates of the two physical states emerging from the mixing and confront them with present LHC data. We show that the current signals observed can be compatible with the presence of one, or both, of these Higgs-radion mixed states (the $\\phi$ and the $h$), although with a severely restricted parameter space. In particular, the radion interaction scale must be quite low, Lambda_\\phi ~ 1-1.3 TeV. If m_\\phi ~ 125 GeV, the $h$ state must be heavier (m_h>320 GeV). If m_h ~ 125 GeV, the $\\phi$ state must be quite light or close in mass (m_\\phi ~ 120 GeV). We also present the modified decay branching ratios of the mixed Higgs-radion states, including flavor violating decays into fourth generation quarks and leptons. The windows of allowed parameter space obtained are very sensitive to the increased precision of upcoming LHC data. During the present year, a clear picture of this scenario will emerge, either confirming or further severely constraining this scenario.

  9. Metallicities of M Dwarf Planet Hosts from Spectral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob L. Bean; G. Fritz Benedict; Michael Endl

    2006-11-02

    We present the first spectroscopic metallicities of three M dwarfs with known or candidate planetary mass companions. We have analyzed high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of these stars which we obtained at McDonald Observatory. Our analysis technique is based on spectral synthesis of atomic and molecular features using recently revised cool-star model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis code. The technique has been shown to yield results consistent with the analyses of solar-type stars and allows measurements of M dwarf [M/H] values to 0.12 dex precision. From our analysis, we find [M/H] = -0.12, -0.32, and -0.33 for GJ 876, GJ 436, and GJ 581 respectively. These three M dwarf planet hosts have sub-solar metallicities, a surprising departure from the trend observed in FGK-type stars. This study is the first part of our ongoing work to determine the metallicities of the M dwarfs included in the McDonald Observatory planet search program.

  10. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore »are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  11. Light Stops in a minimal U(1)x extension of the MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdevilla, R M; Martin, A

    2015-01-01

    In order to reproduce the measured mass of the Higgs boson mh = 125GeV in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, one usually has to rely on heavy stops, increasing the fine tuning of the electroweak scale. By introducing a new gauge sector, the Higgs mass gets a tree-level contribution via a non-decoupling D-term, and mh = 125 GeV can be obtained with lighter stops. In this paper, we study the values of the stops masses needed to achieve the correct Higgs mass in a setup where the gauge group is extended by a single U(1)x interaction. We derive the experimental limits on the mass of the Z' gauge boson in this setup, then discuss how the stops masses vary as a function of the free parameters introduced by the new sector. We find that the correct Higgs mass can be reproduced with stops in a region between 700 - 800 GeV and a Z' resonance close to the 2.5 TeV bound from the run-I of the LHC, or in a higher region 800 - 900 GeV if the Z' resonance is heavier (3.1 TeV). This region of parameter space will be q...

  12. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-07-13

    This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

  13. Evidence for a metal-poor population in the inner Galactic Bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheis, M; Zasowski, G; Pérez, A E García; Sellgren, K; Smith, V; García-Hernández, D A; Zamora, O; Fritz, T K; Anders, F; Prieto, C Allende; Bizyaev, D; Kinemuchi, K; Pan, K; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; Shetrone, M D

    2015-01-01

    The inner Galactic Bulge has, until recently, been avoided in chemical evolution studies due to extreme extinction and stellar crowding. Large, near-IR spectroscopic surveys, such as APOGEE, allow for the first time the measurement of metallicities in the inner region of our Galaxy. We study metallicities of 33 K/M giants situated in the Galactic Center region from observations obtained with the APOGEE survey. We selected K/M giants with reliable stellar parameters from the APOGEE/ASPCAP pipeline. Distances, interstellar extinction values, and radial velocities were checked to confirm that these stars are indeed situated in the inner Galactic Bulge. We find a metal-rich population centered at [M/H] = +0.4 dex, in agreement with earlier studies of other bulge regions, but also a peak at low metallicity around $\\rm [M/H] = -1.0\\,dex$, suggesting the presence of a metal-poor population which has not previously been detected in the central region. Our results indicate a dominant metal-rich population with a metal...

  14. A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Survey of 886 Nearby M Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrien, Ryan C; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalog of near-infrared (NIR) spectra and associated measurements for 886 nearby M dwarfs. The spectra were obtained with the NASA-Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX Spectrograph during a two-year observing campaign; they have high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR $>100-150$), span 0.8-2.4 $\\mu$m and have $R\\sim2000$. Our catalog of measured values contains useful T$_{\\mathrm{eff}}$ and composition-sensitive features, empirical stellar parameter measurements, and kinematic, photometric, and astrometric properties compiled from the literature. We focus on measures of M dwarf abundances ([Fe/H] and [M/H]), capitalizing on the precision of recently published empirical NIR spectroscopic calibrations. We explore systematic differences between different abundance calibrations, and to other similar M dwarf catalogs. We confirm that the M dwarf abundances we measure show the expected inverse dependence with kinematic, activity, and color-based age indicators. Finally, we provide updated [Fe/H] and [M/H] for 16...

  15. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

    1985-02-22

    The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  16. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  17. Mass Deficits, Stalling Radii, and the Merger Histories of Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2007-06-13

    A binary supermassive black hole leaves an imprint on a galactic nucleus in the form of a "mass deficit," a decrease in the mass of the nucleus due to ejection of stars by the binary. The magnitude of the mass deficit is in principle related to the galaxy's merger history, but the relation has never been quantified. Here, high-accuracy N-body simulations are used to calibrate this relation. Mass deficits are shown to be approximately 0.5M_{12}, with M_{12} the total mass of the binary; the coefficient in this relation depends only weakly on the binary mass ratio or on the galaxy's pre-existing density profile. Hence, after N mergers, the mass deficit is ~0.5 N M_h with M_h the final (current) black hole mass. When compared with observed mass deficits, this result implies between 1 and 3 mergers for most galaxies, in accord with hierarchical galaxy formation models. Implications for binary stalling radii, the origin of hyper-velocity stars, and the distribution of dark matter at the centers of galaxies are discussed.

  18. Search for WH associated production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; Cruz-Burelo, E. De La; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Cruz, I. Heredia-De La; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N. K.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.

    2012-08-01

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L?5.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? Collider. Events containing a W?l? candidate (with l corresponding to e or ?) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

  19. Combined search for the Higgs boson with the D0 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-09-20

    We perform a combination of searches for standard model Higgs boson production in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. The different production and decay channels have been analyzed separately, with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ and for Higgs boson masses $90\\leq M_H \\leq 200$ GeV. We combine these final states to achieve optimal sensitivity to the production of the Higgs boson. We also interpret the combination in terms of models with a fourth generation of fermions, and models with suppressed Higgs boson couplings to fermions. The result excludes a standard model Higgs boson at 95% C.L. in the ranges $90 Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV.

  20. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-03-13

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ channel (l=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeVmH<206 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  1. Higgs-Boson Production at Small Transverse Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Becher; Matthias Neubert; Daniel Wilhelm

    2013-10-22

    Using methods from effective field theory, we have recently developed a novel, systematic framework for the calculation of the cross sections for electroweak gauge-boson production at small and very small transverse momentum q_T, in which large logarithms of the scale ratio m_V/q_T are resummed to all orders. This formalism is applied to the production of Higgs bosons in gluon fusion at the LHC. The production cross section receives logarithmically enhanced corrections from two sources: the running of the hard matching coefficient and the collinear factorization anomaly. The anomaly leads to the dynamical generation of a non-perturbative scale q_* ~ m_H e^{-const/\\alpha_s(m_H)} ~ 8 GeV, which protects the process from receiving large long-distance hadronic contributions. We present detailed numerical predictions for the transverse-momentum spectrum of the Higgs boson, finding that it is quite insensitive to hadronic effects.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Horizontal Continuous Casting Process of C194 Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei; Cheng Zhenkang [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Processing of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, China, 100088 (China)

    2007-05-17

    Horizontal Continuous Casting (H.C.C) is an important method to cast C194 copper ingot. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the H.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1383K{approx}1463K, the casting speed is between 7.2m/h{approx}10.8m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 3.6m/s{approx}4.6m/s. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the subsequent experiments.

  3. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Process of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, 100088 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 Kapprox1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/happrox10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/sapprox4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  4. Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 parsecs: The Southern Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. O. Gray; C. J. Corbally; R. F. Garrison; M. T. McFadden; E. J. Bubar; C. E. McGahee; A. A. O'Donoghue; E. R. Knox

    2006-03-28

    We are obtaining spectra, spectral types and basic physical parameters for the nearly 3600 dwarf and giant stars earlier than M0 in the Hipparcos catalog within 40pc of the Sun. Here we report on results for 1676 stars in the southern hemisphere observed at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory and Steward Observatory. These results include new, precise, homogeneous spectral types, basic physical parameters (including the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, [M/H]) and measures of the chromospheric activity of our program stars. We include notes on astrophysically interesting stars in this sample, the metallicity distribution of the solar neighborhood and a table of solar analogues. We also demonstrate that the bimodal nature of the distribution of the chromospheric activity parameter log R'HK depends strongly on the metallicity, and we explore the nature of the ``low-metallicity'' chromospherically active K-type dwarfs.

  5. Probing the HHH vertex in e+e-, e-gamma and gamma-gamma collisions for light and intermediate Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Ilyin; T. Kaneko; Y. Kurihara; A. E. Pukhov; Y. Shimizu

    1995-06-14

    We have studied double Higgs production at future linear colliders while paying special attention to the option of high-energy and high-luminosity photon beams. The main purpose was to examine the feasibility of e+e-, e-gamma and gamma-gamma colliders in order to probe the anomalous triple Higgs coupling, which is crucial for understanding the Standard Model. We considered mainly the cases of light and intermediate Higgs bosons. Double Higgs production is almost background free, except in the MH=MZ mass range, which is discussed separately. It is shown that for a light Higgs boson the HHH coupling can be measured even at e+e- collider at 500 GeV. For a intermediate Higgs boson a collider in the TeV region is suitable for such an investigation. We have estimated the bounds on the anomalous HHH coupling, which can be experimentally established using future linear colliders.

  6. Renormalization-group running of the cosmological constant and its implication for the Higgs boson mass in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Babic; B. Guberina; R. Horvat; H. Stefancic

    2001-11-16

    The renormalization-group equation for the zero-point energies associated with vacuum fluctuations of massive fields from the Standard Model is examined. Our main observation is that at any scale the running is necessarily dominated by the heaviest degrees of freedom, in clear contradistinction with the Appelquist & Carazzone decoupling theorem. Such an enhanced running would represent a disaster for cosmology, unless a fine-tuned relation among the masses of heavy particles is imposed. In this way, we obtain $m_H \\simeq 550 GeV$ for the Higgs mass, a value safely within the unitarity bound, but far above the more stringent triviality bound for the case when the validity of the Standard Model is pushed up to the grand unification (or Planck) scale.

  7. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff

    1998-04-09

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electroweak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $\\sin^2\\theta=1/4$ for the Weinberg angle, and the ratio $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  8. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G

    1999-01-01

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electro-weak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  9. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  10. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

    2014-11-18

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  11. Asymptotic safety of gravity and the Higgs boson mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Shaposhnikov; Christof Wetterich

    2010-01-12

    There are indications that gravity is asymptotically safe. The Standard Model (SM) plus gravity could be valid up to arbitrarily high energies. Supposing that this is indeed the case and assuming that there are no intermediate energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales we address the question of whether the mass of the Higgs boson $m_H$ can be predicted. For a positive gravity induced anomalous dimension $A_\\lambda>0$ the running of the quartic scalar self interaction $\\lambda$ at scales beyond the Planck mass is determined by a fixed point at zero. This results in $m_H=m_{\\rm min}=126$ GeV, with only a few GeV uncertainty. This prediction is independent of the details of the short distance running and holds for a wide class of extensions of the SM as well. For $A_\\lambda 0$ is favored by explicit computations existing in the literature.

  12. High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Penning

    2010-12-02

    We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

  13. A comparative study of conventionally sintered and microwave sintered nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rani, Rekha [Electroceramics Research Lab, GVM Girls College, Sonepat-131001, India and School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Juneja, J. K. [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonepat-131001 (India); Raina, K. K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Kotnala, R. K. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi -110012 (India); Prakash, Chandra, E-mail: cprakash2014@gmail.com [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Timarpur, Delhi - 110054 (India)

    2014-04-24

    For the present work, nickel zinc ferrite having compositional formula Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by conventional solid state method and sintered in conventional and microwave furnaces. Pellets were sintered with very short soaking time of 10 min at 1150 °C in microwave furnace whereas 4 hrs of soaking time was selected for conventional sintering at 1200 °C. Phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis technique. Scanning electron micrographs were taken for microstructural study. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of temperature. To study magnetic behavior, M-H hysteresis loops were recorded for both samples. It is observed that microwave sintered sample could obtain comparable properties to the conventionally sintered one in lesser soaking time at lower sintering temperature.

  14. Moving-Boundary Heat Exchanger Models with Variable Outlet Phase, ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldredge, B.D; Rasmussen, B.P.; Alleyne, A.

    2008-01-01

    a w r yna 115 uid 1 c A s c s p e r t i p m t e e i c number of elements results in a dynamically complex model that may be computationally expensive and is unsuitable for model- based control design ?3?. e g l n d t m i t b r G a d principles...://www.asme.org/terms/Terms_Use.cfm ?L LT ???Acs? ?t dz = Acs ? d dt?L LT ???dz + ?gL? 1 ? ?31? A t E p N c e B A v A T I a E E ? L LT ??m?h? ?z dz = m?outhout ? m?inthint ?40? J l Dow ESL-PA-08-11-011 1 ssume that the lumped density can be evaluated as a function of he void fraction...

  15. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Nakamura, Kenji (Toyota, JP); Au, Ming (Martinez, GA); Zidan, Ragaiy (Alken, SC)

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  16. Magnetic properties of double perovskite La2BMnO6 (B = Ni or Co) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Yuanbing; Parsons, Jason; McCloy, John S.

    2013-03-31

    Double perovskite La2BMnO6 (B = Ni and Co) nanoparticles with average particle size of ~50 nm were synthesized using a facile, environmentally friendly, scalable molten-salt reaction at 700 °C in air. Their structural and morphological properties were characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic properties were evaluated using dc magnetic M-T and M-H, and ac magnetic susceptibility versus frequency, temperature, and field. The magnetization curve shows a paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition at TC ~275 and 220 K for La2NiMnO6 (LNMO) and La2CoMnO6 (LCMO) nanoparticles, respectively. ac susceptibility revealed that the LCMO had a single magnetic transition indicative of Co2+-O2--Mn4+ ordering, whereas the LNMO showed more complex magnetic behavior suggesting a re-entrant spin glass.

  17. The LHC Higgs Boson Discovery: Implications for Finite Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinemeyer; M. Mondragon; G. Zoupanos

    2014-12-18

    Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are N = 1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which can be made finite to all-loop orders, based on the principle of reduction of couplings, and therefore are provided with a large predictive power. We confront the predictions of an SU(5) FUT with the top and bottom quark masses and other low-energy experimental constraints, resulting in a relatively heavy SUSY spectrum, naturally consistent with the non-observation of those particles at the LHC. The light Higgs boson mass is automatically predicted in the range compatible with the Higgs discovery at the LHC. Requiring a light Higgs-boson mass in the precise range of M_h = 125.6 +- 2.1 GeV favors the lower part of the allowed spectrum, resulting in clear predictions for the discovery potential at current and future pp, as well as future e+e- colliders.

  18. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Junk; Aurelio Juste

    2015-03-05

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DO. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV$Higgs boson with a mass in the range 115 GeV$Higgs boson mass of $m_H=125$ GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times branching the ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.

  19. Searches for a high mass Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pagan Griso

    2009-05-13

    Higgs boson searches are commonly considered one of the main objectives of particle physics nowadays. The latest results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations are presented here when searching for Higgs boson decaying into a W-boson pair, currently the most sensitive channel for masses greater than 130 GeV. The presented results are based on an integrated luminosity that ranges from 3.0 to 4.2 fb^-1. No significant excess over expected background is observed and the 95% CL limits are set for a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson for different mass hypotheses ranging from 100 GeV to 200 GeV. The combination of CDF and D0 results is also presented, which exclude for the first time a SM Higgs boson in the 160 < mH < 170 GeV mass range.

  20. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb -1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; et al

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in collisions at a center of mass energy of in 5.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for mH=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branchingmore »fraction of H ? bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.« less

  1. The CWKB particle production and classical condensate in de Sitter spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Biswas; I. Chowdhury

    2006-10-16

    The complex time WKB approximation is an effective tool in studying particle production in curved spacetime. We use it in this work to understand the formation of classical condensate in expanding de Sitter spacetime. The CWKB leads to the emergence of thermal spectrum that depends crucially on horizons (as in de Sitter spacetime) or observer dependent horizons (as in Rindler spacetime). A connection is sought between the horizon and the formation of classical condensate. We concentrate on de Sitter spacetime and study the cosmological perturbation of $k=0$ mode with various values of $m/H_0$. We find that for a minimally coupled free scalar field for $m^2/H_0^2condensate. We also find that the squeezed state formalism and CWKB method give identical results.

  2. Continuation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip G. Jessop

    2003-07-30

    OAK B262 In the first 8 months of this grant, the PI and his team have developed new hydrogenation catalysts for CO2 fixation, screened a series of ligands for their ability to dissolve in CO2, and invented a new and environmentally benign system for recovering and recycling homogeneous catalysts using CO2 and liquid polymers. The team has also begun work on two projects: (a) the evaluation of the effect of secondary interactions between ligands and CO2 on the insertion of CO2 into M-H bonds, and (b) the design and testing of promoters or catalysts for the insertion of CO2 into C-H bonds. Ongoing research is primarily focusing on these last two projects.

  3. Effective scalar field theory for the electroweak phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Patkós, András

    1994-01-01

    We investigate an effective model for the finite temperature restoration phase transition of the electroweak theory. It is obtained by dimensional reduction of the 3+1 dimensional full theory and by subsequent integration over all static gauge degrees of freedom. The resulting theory corresponds to a 3-dimensional O(4) ferromagnet containing cubic and quartic terms of the field in its potential function. Possible nonperturbative effects of a magnetic screening mass are parametrically included in the potential. We analyse the theory using mean field and numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. At the value of the physical Higgs mass m_H=37~{\\rm GeV}, considered in the present investigation, we find a discontinuous symmetry restoring phase transition. We determine the critical temperature, order parameter jump, interface tension and latent heat characteristics of the transition. The Monte Carlo results indicate a somewhat weaker first order phase transition as compared to the mean field treatment, demonst...

  4. Winding Transitions at Finite Energy and Temperature: An O(3) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman Habib; Emil Mottola; Peter Tinyakov

    1996-08-14

    Winding number transitions in the two dimensional softly broken O(3) nonlinear sigma model are studied at finite energy and temperature. New periodic instanton solutions which dominate the semiclassical transition amplitudes are found analytically at low energies, and numerically for all energies up to the sphaleron scale. The Euclidean period beta of these finite energy instantons increases with energy, contrary to the behavior found in the abelian Higgs model or simple one dimensional systems. This results in a sharp crossover from instanton dominated tunneling to sphaleron dominated thermal activation at a certain critical temperature. Since this behavior is traceable to the soft breaking of conformal invariance by the mass term in the sigma model, semiclassical winding number transition amplitudes in the electroweak theory in 3+1 dimensions should exhibit a similar sharp crossover. We argue that this is indeed the case in the standard model for M_H < 4 M_W.

  5. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  6. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  7. The SM Higgs-boson production in gamma gamma -> h -> bb at the Photon Collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Niezurawski; A. F. Zarnecki; M. Krawczyk

    2002-09-06

    Measuring the Gamma(h -> gamma gamma)Br(h -> bb) decay at the photon collider at TESLA is studied for a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass m_h = 120 GeV. The main background due to the process gamma gamma -> QQ(g), where Q = b,c, is estimated using the NLO QCD program (G. Jikia); the results obtained are compared with the corresponding LO estimate. Using a realistic luminosity spectrum and performing a detector simulation with the SIMDET program, we find that the Gamma(h -> gamma gamma)Br(h -> bb) decay can be measured with an accuracy better than 2% after one year of photon collider running.

  8. Measuring Resonance Parameters of Heavy Higgs Bosons at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niels Meyer

    2003-08-13

    This study investigates the potential of the TESLA Linear Collider for measuring resonance parameters of Higgs bosons beyond the mass range studied so far. The analysis is based on the reconstruction of events from the Higgsstrahlung process e+e- -> HZ. It is shown that the total width, the mass and the event rate for Higgs production can be measured from the mass spectrum in a model independent fit. Also, the branching ratios to W- and Z-bosons can be measured, assuming these are the only relevant Higgs decay modes. The simulation includes realistic detector effects and all relevant Standard Model background processes. Results are given for mH=200-320 GeV assuming 500 fb^-1 integrated luminosity at collision energies of 500 GeV.

  9. Characterization of the Nuclear Barge Sturgis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honerlah, H. B.; Hearty, B. P.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of the Army is authorized to build and operate nuclear reactors for defense purposes under Paragraph 91b of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (1). As part of the Army Reactor Program, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for nuclear reactor engineering and design, reactor construction, and decommissioning design and implementation (2). The Corps is currently focused on ensuring the safety and security of the Army's three deactivated power reactors and planning for their final decommissioning. To support decommissioning cost projections, the Corps is gathering information on the residual radiological and chemical hazards associated with each reactor, starting with the MH-1A reactor on the Sturgis Barge (3). Because the Sturgis Barge is moored in the James River Reserve Fleet, there were unique challenges that had to be overcome during the characterization survey and others that will become a concern when final decommissioning is to be per formed.

  10. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section and search for the standard model Higgs boson in the four lepton final state in pp-bar collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.

    2013-08-15

    S. Malik,58 V. L. Malyshev,31 J. Mansour,20 J. Mart?´nez-Ortega,28 R. McCarthy,63 C. L. McGivern,40 M.M.Meijer,29,74 A. Melnitchouk,44 D. Menezes,46 P. G. Mercadante,3 M. Merkin,33 A. Meyer,18 J. Meyer,20,‡‡ F. Miconi,16 N.K. Mondal,25 M. Mulhearn,72... Leeuwen,75 N. Varelas,45 E.W. Varnes,41 I. A. Vasilyev,34 A. Y. Verkheev,31 L. S. Vertogradov,31 M. Verzocchi,44 M. Vesterinen,40 D. Vilanova,15 P. Vokac,7 H.D. Wahl,43 M.H. L. S. Wang,44 J. Warchol,50 G. Watts,73 M. Wayne,50 J. Weichert,21 L. Welty...

  11. Introduction to energy storage with market analysis and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Robert; Pillot, Christophe

    2014-06-16

    At first, the rechargeable battery market in 2012 will be described by technology - lead acid, NiCd, NiMH, lithium ion - and application - portable electronics, power tools, e-bikes, automotive, energy storage. This will be followed by details of the lithium ion battery market value chain from the raw material to the final application. The lithium ion battery market of 2012 will be analyzed and split by applications, form factors and suppliers. There is also a focus on the cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator market included. This report will also give a forecast for the main trends and the market in 2020, 2025. To conclude, a forecast for the rechargeable battery market by application for 2025 will be presented. Since energy storage plays an important role for the growing Electric Vehicle (EV) market, this EV issue is closely considered throughout this analysis.

  12. Vacuum effects of ultra-low mass particle account for Recent Acceleration of Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Parker; Alpan Raval

    1999-08-04

    In recent work, we showed that non-perturbative vacuum effects of a very low mass particle could induce, at a redshift of order 1, a transition from a matter-dominated to an accelerating universe. In that work, we used the simplification of a sudden transition out of the matter-dominated stage and were able to fit the Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) data points with a spatially-open universe. In the present work, we find a more accurate, smooth {\\it spatially-flat} analytic solution to the quantum-corrected Einstein equations. This solution gives a good fit to the SNe-Ia data with a particle mass parameter $m_h$ in the range $6.40 \\times 10^{-33}$ eV to $7.25 \\times 10^{-33}$ eV. It follows that the ratio of total matter density (including dark matter) to critical density, $\\O_0$, is in the range 0.58 to 0.15, and the age $t_0$ of the universe is in the range $8.10 h^{-1}$ Gyr to $12.2 h^{-1}$ Gyr, where $h$ is the present value of the Hubble constant, measured as a fraction of the value 100 km/(s Mpc). This spatially-flat model agrees with estimates of the position of the first acoustic peak in the small angular scale fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation, and with light-element abundances of standard big-bang nucleosynthesis. Our model has only a single free parameter, $m_h$, and does not require that we live at a special time in the evolution of the universe.

  13. Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

  14. IonCCD™ for direct position-sensitive charged-particle detection: from electrons and keV ions to hyperthermal biomolecular ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjar, Omar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Kibelka, Gottfried; Shill, Scott M.; Kuhn, Ken; Cameron, Chad; Kassan, Scott

    2011-04-01

    A novel charged-particle sensitive, pixel based detector array is described and its usage is demonstrated for a variety of applications, from detection of elemental particles (electrons) to hyper-thermal large biomolecular positive and negative ions including keV light atomic and molecular ions. The array detector is a modified light-sensitive charged coupled device (CCD). The IonCCDTM was engineered for direct charged particle detection by replacing the semi-conductor part of the CCD pixel by a conductor1. In contrast with the CCD, where the semi-conductive pixel is responsible for electron-hole pair formation upon photon bombardment, the IonCCD uses a capacitor coupled to the conductive electrode for direct charge integration. The detector can be operated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum since no high voltages are needed. The IonCCD, presented in this work is an array of 2126 active pixels with 21 um pixel width and 3 um pixel gap. The detection area is 1.5x51mm2 where 1.5 mm and 51 mm are pixel and detector array length, respectively. The result is a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector with 24 um spatial resolution and 88 % pixel area ratio (PAR). In this work we demonstrate the capabilities and the performance of the detector. For the first time we show the direct detection of 250 eV electrons providing linearity response and detection efficiency of the IonCCD as function of electron beam current. Using positive ions from and electron impact source (E-I), we demonstrate that the detection efficiency of the IonCCD is virtually independent of particle energy [250 eV, 1250 eV], particle impact angle [45o, 90o] and particle flux. By combining the IonCCD with a double focusing sector field of Mattauch-Herzog geometry (M-H), we demonstrate fast acquisition of mass spectra in direct air sniffing mode. A first step towards fast in vivo breath analysis is presented. Detection of hyper-thermal biomolecular ions produced using an electrospray ionization source (ESI) is presented. The IonCCD was used as beam profiler to characterize the beam shape and intensity of 15 eV protonated and deprotonated biomolecular ions at the exit of an RF only collisional quadrupole. We present simultaneous detection of 140 eV doubly protonated biomolecular ions when the IonCCD is combined with the M-H analyzer. The latter, demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous separation and micro-array deposition of biological material using a miniature sector field.

  15. Mid-infrared followup of cold brown dwarfs: diversity in age, mass and metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Burningham, Ben; Marley, Mark S; Waren, S J; Jones, H R A; Pinfield, D J; Smart, R L

    2009-01-01

    We present new Spitzer IRAC [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry of nine very late-type T dwarfs. Combining this with previously published photometry, we investigate trends with type and color that are useful for both the planning and interpretation of infrared surveys designed to discover the coldest T or Y dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with effective temperature (T{sub eff}) below 700 K emit more than half their flux at wavelengths longer than 3 {micro}m, and the ratio of the mid-infrared flux to the near-infrared flux becomes very sensitive to T{sub eff} at these low temperatures. We confirm that the color H (1.6 {micro}m) - [4.5] is a good indicator of T{sub eff} with a relatively weak dependence on metallicity and gravity. Conversely, the colors H - K (2.2 {micro}m) and [4.5] - [5.8] are sensitive to metallicity and gravity. Thus near- and mid-infrared photometry provide useful indicators of the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs, and if temperature and gravity are known, then mass and age can be reliably determined from evolutionary models. There are twelve dwarfs currently known with H - [4.5] > 3.0, and {approx} 500 < T{sub eff} K {approx}< 800, which we examine in detail. The ages of the dwarfs in the sample range from very young (0.1 - 1.0 Gyr) to relatively old (3 - 12 Gyr). The mass range is possibly as low as 5 Jupiter masses to up to 70 Jupiter masses, i.e. near the hydrogen burning limit. The metallicities also span a large range, from [m/H]= -0.3 to [m/H]= +0.2. The small number of T8 - T9 dwarfs found in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey to date appear to be predominantly young low-mass dwarfs. Accurate mid-infrared photometry of cold brown dwarfs is essentially impossible from the ground, and extensions to the mid-infrared space missions warm-Spitzer and WISE are desirable in order to obtain the vital mid-infrared data for cold brown dwarfs, and to discover more of these rare objects.

  16. Antiferromagnetism in EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.

    2015-05-07

    Single crystals of EuCu2As2 and EuCu2Sb2 were grown from CuAs and CuSb self-flux, respectively. The crystallographic, magnetic, thermal, and electronic transport properties of the single crystals were investigated by room-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility ? versus temperature T, isothermal magnetization M versus magnetic field H, specific heat Cp(T), and electrical resistivity ?(T) measurements. EuCu2As2 crystallizes in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm), whereas EuCu2Sb2 crystallizes in the related primitive tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm). The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and XRD data for the EuCu2Sb2 crystals showed the presence of vacancies on the Cu sites, yielding themore »actual composition EuCu1.82Sb2. The ?(T) and Cp(T) data reveal metallic character for both EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering is indicated from the ?(T),Cp(T), and ?(T) data for both EuCu2As2 (TN = 17.5 K) and EuCu1.82Sb2 (TN = 5.1 K). In EuCu1.82Sb2, the ordered-state ?(T) and M(H) data suggest either a collinear A-type AFM ordering of Eu+2 spins S = 7/2 or a planar noncollinear AFM structure, with the ordered moments oriented in the tetragonal ab plane in either case. This ordered-moment orientation for the A-type AFM is consistent with calculations with magnetic dipole interactions. As a result, the anisotropic ?(T) and isothermal M(H) data for EuCu2As2, also containing Eu+2 spins S = 7/2, strongly deviate from the predictions of molecular field theory for collinear AFM ordering and the AFM structure appears to be both noncollinear and noncoplanar.« less

  17. SDSS J0025-10 at z=0.30: a (U)LIRG to optical QSO transition candidate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar-Martin, M; Rodriguez, M; Torres, M Perez; Drouart, G

    2013-01-01

    We have characterized the amount, spatial distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the merging, double nucleus type 2 quasar SDSS J0025-10 at z=0.30 using the CO(1-0) transition, based on data obtained with ATCA. This is one of the scarce examples of quasar host galaxies where the CO emission has been resolved spatially at any redshift. We infer a molecular gas mass M(H2) = (6 +/- 1) x 1e9 Msun, which is distributed in two main reservoirs separated by ~9 kpc. ~60% of the gas is in the central region, associated with the QSO nucleus and/or the intermediate region between the two nuclei. The other 40% is associated with the northern tidal tail and is therefore unsettled. With its high infrared luminosity L(IR) = (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 1e12 Lsun, SDSS J0025-10 is an analogue of local luminous LIRGs and ULIRGs. On the other hand, the clear evidence for an ongoing major merger of two gas rich progenitors, the high L(IR) dominated by a starburst, the massive reservoir of molecular gas with a large fraction stil...

  18. Preparation and characterization of selenide semiconductor particles in surfactant vesicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ancheng; Pfeiffer, W.F.; Guillaume, B.; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-05-17

    Cadmium, lead, indium, and zinc selenide particles have been in situ generated on the surfaces of negatively charged dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) and positively charged dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) vesicles. Selenide particles were formed by two different methods. In method A, MSe particles were in situ generated from M{sup 2+}-coated DHP or (MH{sub 2}EDTA){sup 2{minus}}-coated DODAB vesicles by exposure to gaseous H{sub 2}Se. In method B, MSe particles were formed by the chemical reduction of SeO{sub 2} and M{sup 2+} in the presence of DHP vesicles. Selenide particle formation was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. Increasing the amount of H{sub 2}Se added and decreasing the pH of the solution shifted the absorption edge to higher wavelengths, which indicated the formation of larger particles. On standing particles, generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to their precursors attached to DHP vesicles, underwent time-dependent growth. Selenide particles, formed by chemical reductions, and those generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to Cd/EDTA-coated DODAB vesicles appeared to be small and more stable than their counterparts in DHP vesicles.

  19. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158<m_H<173 GeV/c^2.

  20. The Impact of Baryonic Physics on the Structure of Dark Matter Halos: the View from the FIRE Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T K; Oñorbe, J; Hopkins, P F; Muratov, A L; Faucher-Giguère, C -A; Quataert, E

    2015-01-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological zoom-in simulations from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project, for a range of halo mass (10^9-10^12 Msun) and stellar mass (10^4-10^11 Msun). The FIRE simulations incorporate explicit stellar feedback within the multi-phase ISM. We find that stellar feedback, without any "fine-tuned" parameters, can greatly alleviate small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile "alpha" shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at M_h ~ 10^10-10^11 Msun and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. This is broadly consistent with previous work using simpler feedback schemes, but we find steeper mass dependence of "alpha," and relatively late growth of cores. Because the star formation efficiency is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in the centr...

  1. Vacuum Stability and Higgs Diphoton Decay Rate in the Zee-Babu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chao; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yongchao Zhang

    2012-12-26

    Although recent Higgs data from ATLAS and CMS are compatible with a Standard Model (SM) signal at $2\\sigma$ level, both experiments see indications for an excess in the diphoton decay channel, which points to new physics beyond the SM. Given such a low Higgs mass $m_H \\sim 125 {\\rm GeV}$, another sign indicating the existence of new physics beyond the SM is the vacuum stability problem, i.e., the SM Higgs quartic coupling may run to negative values at a scale below the Planck scale. In this paper, we study the vacuum stability and enhanced Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model, which was used to generate tiny Majorana neutrino masses at two-loop level. We find that it is rather difficult to find overlapping regions allowed by the vacuum stability and diphoton enhancement constraints. As a consequence, it is almost inevitable to introduce new ingredients into the model, in order to resolve these two issues simultaneously.

  2. Flavor-singlet hybrid baryons may already have been discovered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Kittel; Glennys R. Farrar

    2005-08-12

    The splittings between the spin 1/2 and spin 3/2 iso-singlet baryons Lambda_s(1405) and Lambda_s(1520), and their charmed counterparts Lambda_c(2593) and Lambda_c(2625), have been a theoretical conundrum. Here we investigate the possibility that the QCD binding of color octets comprised of three quarks in a flavor singlet configuration is stronger than previously envisaged, allowing these states to be interpreted as hybrids consisting of three quarks plus a valence gluon (udsg) and (udcg). A fit of their mass separation allows the mass prediction of the strange and charmed flavor octet and decuplet hybrid baryons and the prediction of the mass separation of the beauty hybrids. Such hybrid states come in parity-doubled pairs with the even parity state lighter by about 300 MeV. Existing data accommodates either parity assignment for the observed states and the existence of the required unobserved partners at either higher or lower mass. We discuss difficulties with and strategies for observing the other states under the two cases. A corollary of the strong-binding-in-flavor-singlet-channel hypothesis is that the H-dibaryon may be very long lived or stable with m_H ~< 2 GeV.

  3. Transitions of two baryons to the H dibaryon in nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Gabrijela Zaharijas

    2003-03-05

    We calculate the suppression in the rate at which two baryons in a nucleus (viz., nucleons or $\\Lambda$'s) convert to an H dibaryon, using an Isgur-Karl wavefunction for quarks in the baryons and H, and a Bethe-Goldstone wavefunction for the baryons in the nucleus. If $r_H \\lsi 1/3~ r_N$, we find $\\tau_{A_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\to A'_H}\\gsi \\tau_\\Lambda$ and the observation of $\\Lambda$ decays from double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei does not exclude the existence of the H. If $m_H < 2 m_p$, nuclei are unstable but have very long lifetimes. For reasonable values of $r_H$ and the nuclear wavefunction, the lifetime can be long enough to evade anticipated SuperK limits $\\tau_{A_{NN}\\to A'_H}\\gsi {\\rm few} 10^{29}$ yr, or short enough to be observed. An analysis of SuperK data to look for this possibility should be undertaken.

  4. Measurements of the Higgs Boson in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jacob

    The generation of vector boson mass via the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model has been confirmed by the 2012 discovery of a candidate Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow{WW}$, $H\\rightarrow{ZZ}$, and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channels. In contrast, the Yukawa couplings hypothesized to provide the mass of fermions in the Standard Model have yet to be observed. The $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel currently provides the best opportunity for observing these couplings. This thesis describes two separate but related searches for Higgs boson decays in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel using proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The first analysis is a general search for all Higgs boson production mechanisms leading to a $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay using 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collision data. A deviation from the background-only hypothesis is observed with a significance of $4.5\\sigma$ for a hypothetical Higgs boson mass of ${m_{H} ...

  5. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  6. An Empirical Model for the Galaxy Luminosity and Star-Formation Rate Function at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star-formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z~4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z>8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass M{_h} by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z~4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-M{_h} relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 10 indicate that JWST will be able to detect galaxies out to z~15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density and associated reionization history by galaxies for which we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit leads to a fully reionized universe by z~6.5 an...

  7. Search for invisible decays of a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A search for evidence of invisible-particle decay modes of a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. No deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed in 4.5 fb$^{?1}$ (20.3 fb$^{?1}$) of 7 (8) TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment. Assuming the Standard Model rate for ZH production, an upper limit of 75%, at the 95% confidence level is set on the branching ratio to invisible-particle decay modes of the Higgs boson at a mass of 125.5 GeV. The limit on the branching ratio is also interpreted in terms of an upper limit on the allowed dark matter–nucleon scattering cross section within a Higgs-portal dark matter scenario. Limits are also set on an additional neutral Higgs boson, in the mass range 110 < $m_H$ < 400 GeV, produced in association with a Z boson and decaying to invisible particles.

  8. Measuring the Top Quark Yukawa Coupling at a Linear e^+e^- Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer; Sally Dawson; Laura Reina

    1999-06-17

    The cross section for the reaction $e^+e^- \\to t\\bar{t} H$ depends sensitively on the top quark Yukwawa coupling $\\lambda_t$. We calculate the rate for $t\\bar{t}H$ production, followed by the decay $H\\to b\\bar{b}$, for a Standard Model Higgs boson with 100 < m_H <130 GeV. We interface with ISAJET to generate QCD radiation, hadronization and particle decays. We also calculate the dominant $t\\bar{t}b\\bar{b}$ backgrounds from electroweak and QCD processes. We consider both semileptonic and fully hadronic decays of the $t\\bar{t}$ system. In our analysis, we attempt full reconstruction of the top quark and W boson masses in the generated events. The invariant mass of the remaining b-jets should show evidence of Higgs boson production. We estimate the accuracy with which $\\lambda_t$ can be measured at a linear e^+e^- collider. Our results, including statistical but not systematic errors, show that the top quark Yukawa coupling can be measured to 6-8 % accuracy with 1000 fb^{-1} at $E_{CM}=1 TeV$, assuming 100 % efficiency for b-jet tagging. The accuracy of the measurement drops to 17-22 % if only a 60 % efficiency for b-tagging is achieved.

  9. The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth program. IV. A low-mass planet orbiting an M dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wright, Jason T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-10-10

    We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msin i = 5.35 ± 0.75 M {sub ?}, orbital period P = 11.4433 ± 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ?0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H and K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = –0.22, [Fe/H] = –0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 ± 0.0021 R {sub ?} based on interferometry from CHARA.

  10. Number Count of Peaks in the CMB Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshifumi Futamase; Masahiro Takada

    2000-09-11

    We investigate the dependence of cosmological parameters on the number count of peaks (local maxima and minima) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky. The peak statistics contains the whole information of acoustic oscillations in the angular power spectrum $C_l$ over $l$-space and thus it can place complementary constraints on the cosmological parameters to those obtained from measurements of $C_l$. Based on the instrumental specifications of Planck, we find that the number count of peaks can provide new constraints on the combination of the matter density $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ and the Hubble parameter $h$ approximately scaled as $\\Omega_{\\rm m} h^{-4.9}$ for a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model with $\\Omega_{m}=0.3$ and $h=0.7$. Therefore, we suggest that combining it with the constraints from $C_l$ scaled as $\\Omega_{m}h^{3.8}$ (or commonly $\\Omega_{\\rm m}h^2$) can potentially determine $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ or equivalently solve the cosmic degeneracy by the CMB data alone.

  11. Updated search for the standard model Higgs boson in events with jets and missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; M. A. Ciocci; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. De Barbaro; L. Demortier; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. d'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; R. Eusebi; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernandez Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzalez Lopez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; T. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martinez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernandez; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; T. Riddick; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; A. Safonov; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; P. Sinervo; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; B. Stelzer; O. Stelzer-Chilton; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vaquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizan; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; A. Warburton; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi

    2013-01-18

    We present an updated search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson in the final state with missing transverse energy and two jets. We use the full CDF data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb${}^{-1}$ at a proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. New to this analysis is the inclusion of a $b$-jet identification algorithm specifically optimized for $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ searches. Across the Higgs boson mass range $90 \\le m_H \\le 150$ GeV$/c^2$, the expected 95% credibility level upper limits on the $V H$ production cross section times the $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ branching fraction are improved by an average of 14% relative to the previous analysis. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV$/c^2$, the observed (expected) limit is 3.06 (3.33) times the standard model prediction, corresponding to one of the most sensitive searches to date in this final state.

  12. Millimeter Wave Observations of the Core-Jet and Molecular Gas in the FR I Radio Galaxy NGC 3801

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousumi Das; Stuart N. Vogel; Gijs A. Verdoes Kleijn; Christopher P. O'Dea; Stefi A. Baum

    2005-05-13

    We present BIMA 3 mm observations of the radio continuum source and the molecular gas disk in the radio loud Fanaroff & Riley Type I (FR I)galaxy NGC3801.We have detected a continuum source in the nucleus and determined that it has a flat millimeter-wave spectrum, suggesting that the emission is non-thermal and due to an AGN; the radio core is not evident in existing VLA observations. We also map the extended 3 mm emission from the previously known radio jets. In addition, we detect CO (1--0) emission associated with the dust disk observed in previous HST images. A velocity gradient is observed, indicating a two kpc radius rotating gas ring or disk oriented roughly perpendicular to the radio jets. The inferred molecular gas mass of the disk is $M(H_{2})=3\\times10^{8}M_{\\odot}$, about 1% of the dynamical mass. We also find a $\\sim 10^8$ M$_\\odot$ molecular gas clump not associated with the gas disk. There is evidence that this gas is associated with a merger and is infalling. This suggests that FR I type activity is related to merger activity, as is thought to be the case for FR II type radio galaxies. We also find indications that one of the radio jets is entraining gas from the infalling molecular gas.

  13. Singlet Portal Extensions of the Standard Seesaw Models to a Dark Sector with Local Dark Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungwon Baek; P. Ko; Wan-Il Park

    2013-07-19

    Assuming ({\\it i}) the seesaw mechanism works for neutrino masses and mixings, ({\\it ii}) dark matter is absolutely stable due to unbroken $U(1)_X$ dark gauge symmetry, and ({\\it iii}) the singlet fields ($H^\\dagger H$ and $N_R$) are portal to the dark sector, we construct a simple model which is consistent with all the cosmological observations as well as terrestrial experiments available as of now, including leptogenesis, extra dark radiation of $\\sim 8 %$ (resulting in $N_{\\rm eff} = 3.130$ the effective number of neutrino species), Higgs inflation, small and large scale structure formation, and current relic density of scalar dark matter ($X$). The electroweak vacuum of this model is stable up to Planck scale for $m_H = 125$ GeV without any other new physics. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken $U(1)_X$ case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if $U(1)_X$ is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models. Detailed study of Higgs properties at the LHC would shed light on the models described in this work.

  14. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et. al,

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  15. Higgs inflation and Higgs portal dark matter with right-handed neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoyuki Haba; Hiroyuki Ishida; Ryo Takahashi

    2015-05-02

    We investigate the Higgs inflation and the Higgs portal dark matter with the right-handed neutrino. The dark matter and the right-handed neutrino in the Higgs inflation play important roles in explaining the recent experimental results of the Higgs and top masses, and the cosmic microwave background by BICEP2 at the same time. This inflation model predicts $805~{\\rm GeV} \\lesssim m_{\\rm DM} \\lesssim1220~{\\rm GeV}$ for the DM mass, $1.05 \\times10^{14}~{\\rm GeV} \\lesssim M_R \\lesssim 2.04 \\times10^{14}~{\\rm GeV}$ for the right-handed neutrino mass, and $8.42 \\lesssim \\xi \\lesssim 12.4$ for the non-minimal coupling within $m_H=125.6 \\pm 0.35~{\\rm GeV}$ for the Higgs and $M_t=173.34 \\pm 0.76~{\\rm GeV}$ for the top masses.

  16. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-11-12

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is sensitive to both the standard model Higgs boson and to the neutral Higgs bosons predicted by the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM). No excess of events is observed in the tau-pair invariant-mass spectrum. For a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of 110-145 GeV upper limits at 95% confidence level (CL) on the production cross section are determined. We exclude a Higgs boson with m(H) = 115 GeV with a production cross section 3.2 times of that predicted by the standard model. In the MSSM, upper limits on the neutral Higgs boson production cross section times branching fraction to tau pairs, as a function of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass, m(A), sets stringent new bounds in the parameter space, excluding at 95% CL values of tan(beta) as low as 7.1 at m(A) = 160 GeV in the m[h](max) benchmark scenario.

  17. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  18. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-03-01

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb?¹ to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collisions collected at ?s=7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9–115.5 GeV, 131–238 GeV and 251–466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124–519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around mH~126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations (? ). The local significances of H ? ??, Hmore »? ZZ(?) ? ?????????? and H ? WW(?) ? ???????¯, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8?, 2.1? and 1.4?, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110–600 GeV is estimated to be ~1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2?.« less

  19. Higgs Boson Mass predicted by the Four Color Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashay Dharwadker; Vladimir Khachatryan

    2009-12-28

    We show that the mathematical proof of the four color theorem yields a perfect interpretation of the Standard Model of particle physics. The steps of the proof enable us to construct the t-Riemann surface and particle frame which forms the gauge. We specify well-defined rules to match the Standard Model in a one-to-one correspondence with the topological and algebraic structure of the particle frame. This correspondence is exact - it only allows the particles and force fields to have the observable properties of the Standard Model, giving us a Grand Unified Theory. In this paper, we concentrate on explicitly specifying the quarks, gauge vector bosons, the Standard Model scalar Higgs $H^{0}$ boson and the weak force field. Using all the specifications of our mathematical model, we show how to calculate the values of the Weinberg and Cabibbo angles on the particle frame. Finally, we present our prediction of the Higgs $H^{0}$ boson mass $M_{H^{0}} = 125.992 \\simeq 126 GeV$, as a direct consequence of the proof of the four color theorem.

  20. Standard Model Higgs Boson Combination at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Ming Yao for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2012-01-24

    We present the recent results from combinations of searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson ($H$) by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 8.2 (CDF) and 8.6 (D0) fb$^{-1}$. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been added, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. No excess is observed above background expectation, and set 95% C.L. upper limits (median expected) on Higgs boson production at factors of 1.17 (1.16), 1.71 (1.16), and 0.48(0.57) times the SM predictions for Higgs bosons of mass $m_H$=115, 140, and 165 GeV/c$^2$, respectively. We exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 156--177 GeV/c$^2$ at the 95% C.L, with an expected exclusion region 148--180 GeV/c$^2$. The absence of a Higgs boson signal also constrains some new physics such as $4^{th}$ generation models and other exotic models.

  1. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-26

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

  2. A combination of searches for the invisible decays of the Higgs boson using the CMS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Searches for invisible decays of the Higgs boson using Run 1 proton-proton collision data from the CMS experiment at the LHC are combined. The searches cover a wide range of Higgs boson production modes namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion and vector boson associated production. The data samples used were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at 8 TeV. Data, in all channels, are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and corresponding detector acceptances, limits are set on the invisible branching fraction for each production mode separately and for the full combination of all channels. From the combination of all channels, we set an observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction for $m_{H}$ = 125 GeV to be 36\\% (30\\%) at 95\\% confidence level.

  3. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  4. Is the Standard Model saved asymptotically by conformal symmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gorsky; A. Mironov; A. Morozov; T. N. Tomaras

    2014-10-02

    It is pointed out that the top-quark and Higgs masses and the Higgs VEV satisfy with great accuracy the relations 4m_H^2=2m_T^2=v^2, which are very special and reminiscent of analogous ones at Argyres - Douglas points with enhanced conformal symmetry. Furthermore, the RG evolution of the corresponding Higgs self-interaction and Yukawa couplings \\lambda(0)=1/8 and y(0)=1 leads to the free-field stable point \\lambda(M_Pl)= \\dot \\lambda(M_Pl)=0 in the pure scalar sector at the Planck scale, also suggesting enhanced conformal symmetry. Thus, it is conceivable that the Standard Model is the low-energy limit of a distinct special theory with (super?) conformal symmetry at the Planck scale. In the context of such a "scenario" one may further speculate that the Higgs particle is the Goldstone boson of (partly) spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. This would simultaneously resolve the hierarchy and Landau pole problems in the scalar sector and would provide a nearly flat potential with two almost degenerate minima at the electroweak and Planck scales.

  5. NEW ATLAS9 AND MARCS MODEL ATMOSPHERE GRIDS FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meszaros, Sz.; Allende Prieto, C.; De Vicente, A.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Castelli, F.; Garcia Perez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R.; Plez, B.; Schiavon, R.; Shetrone, M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new grid of model photospheres for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey of stellar populations of the Galaxy, calculated using the ATLAS9 and MARCS codes. New opacity distribution functions were generated to calculate ATLAS9 model photospheres. MARCS models were calculated based on opacity sampling techniques. The metallicity ([M/H]) spans from -5 to 1.5 for ATLAS and -2.5 to 0.5 for MARCS models. There are three main differences with respect to previous ATLAS9 model grids: a new corrected H{sub 2}O line list, a wide range of carbon ([C/M]) and {alpha} element [{alpha}/M] variations, and solar reference abundances from Asplund et al. The added range of varying carbon and {alpha}-element abundances also extends the previously calculated MARCS model grids. Altogether, 1980 chemical compositions were used for the ATLAS9 grid and 175 for the MARCS grid. Over 808,000 ATLAS9 models were computed spanning temperatures from 3500 K to 30,000 K and log g from 0 to 5, where larger temperatures only have high gravities. The MARCS models span from 3500 K to 5500 K, and log g from 0 to 5. All model atmospheres are publicly available online.

  6. RUPRECHT 147: THE OLDEST NEARBY OPEN CLUSTER AS A NEW BENCHMARK FOR STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Jason L.; Wright, Jason T.; Wolfgang, Angie; Brewer, John M.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-05-15

    Ruprecht 147 is a hitherto unappreciated open cluster that holds great promise as a standard in fundamental stellar astrophysics. We have conducted a radial velocity survey of astrometric candidates with Lick, Palomar, and MMT observatories and have identified over 100 members, including 5 blue stragglers, 11 red giants, and 5 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s). We estimate the cluster metallicity from spectroscopic analysis, using Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), and find it to be [M/H] = +0.07 {+-} 0.03. We have obtained deep CFHT/MegaCam g'r'i'z' photometry and fit Padova isochrones to the (g' - i') and Two Micron All Sky Survey (J - K{sub S} ) color-magnitude diagrams, using the {tau}{sup 2} maximum-likelihood procedure of Naylor, and an alternative method using two-dimensional cross-correlations developed in this work. We find best fits for Padova isochrones at age t = 2.5 {+-} 0.25 Gyr, m - M = 7.35 {+-} 0.1, and A{sub V} = 0.25 {+-} 0.05, with additional uncertainty from the unresolved binary population and possibility of differential extinction across this large cluster. The inferred age is heavily dependent on our choice of stellar evolution model: fitting Dartmouth and PARSEC models yield age parameters of 3 Gyr and 3.25 Gyr, respectively. At {approx}300 pc and {approx}3 Gyr, Ruprecht 147 is by far the oldest nearby star cluster.

  7. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  8. Standard Model thermodynamics across the electroweak crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laine, M

    2015-01-01

    Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass mH = 125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a "soft point" at temperatures around T = 160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial "structure" visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of perce...

  9. Standard Model thermodynamics across the electroweak crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine; M. Meyer

    2015-07-23

    Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass mH = 125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a "soft point" at temperatures around T = 160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial "structure" visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of percent from the free value even at T > 160 GeV.

  10. Search for a Two-Higgs-Boson Doublet Using a Simplified Model in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2013-03-18

    We present a search for new particles in an extension to the standard model that includes a heavy Higgs boson (H?), a lighter charged Higgs boson (H±), and an even lighter Higgs boson h?, with decays leading to a W-boson pair and a bottom-antibottom quark pair in the final state. We use events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum, and at least four jets in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb?¹ collected by the CDF II detector in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. We find the data to be consistent with standard model predictions and reportmore »the results in terms of a simplified Higgs-cascade-decay model, setting 95% confidence level upper limits on the product of cross section and branching fraction from 1.3 pb to 15 fb as a function of H? and H± masses for m?h=126 GeV/c²« less

  11. Color--Magnitude Diagram and Luminosity Function of M4 Near the Hydrogen-Burning Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedin, L R; King, I R; Piotto, G; Bedin, Luigi R.; Anderson, Jay; King, Ivan R.; Piotto, Giampaolo

    2001-01-01

    A proper-motion separation of M4 members from field stars, using deep HST observations separated by a time base-line of 5 years, allows us to study a pure sample of cluster main-sequence stars almost to the minimum mass for hydrogen burning. High-precision photometry shows how badly current theoretical models fail to reproduce the color-magnitude diagram of low-mass stars of moderate metallicity ([M/H] ~ -1). This inability of theory to reproduce the luminosity-radius relation casts doubt on the theoretical mass-luminosity relation, which is needed to convert the observed luminosity function (LF) into a mass function (MF), as well as to convert our locally determined LF into a global MF. To the extent that we trust theoretical M-L relations for such transformations, we obtain a flat MF from the LF, and some indication that theoretical masses might be too low at a given luminosity, near the H-burning limit.

  12. Color--Magnitude Diagram and Luminosity Function of M4 Near the Hydrogen-Burning Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi R. Bedin; Jay Anderson; Ivan R. King; Giampaolo Piotto

    2001-09-05

    A proper-motion separation of M4 members from field stars, using deep HST observations separated by a time base-line of 5 years, allows us to study a pure sample of cluster main-sequence stars almost to the minimum mass for hydrogen burning. High-precision photometry shows how badly current theoretical models fail to reproduce the color-magnitude diagram of low-mass stars of moderate metallicity ([M/H] ~ -1). This inability of theory to reproduce the luminosity-radius relation casts doubt on the theoretical mass-luminosity relation, which is needed to convert the observed luminosity function (LF) into a mass function (MF), as well as to convert our locally determined LF into a global MF. To the extent that we trust theoretical M-L relations for such transformations, we obtain a flat MF from the LF, and some indication that theoretical masses might be too low at a given luminosity, near the H-burning limit.

  13. Ferromagnetic response of multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3} films mediated by epitaxial strain and chemical pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, J.; Morán, O.; Astudillo, A.; Bolaños, G.; Arnache, O.

    2014-05-07

    High quality Tb{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x?=?0, 0.3) films have been grown under different values of compressive/tensile strain using (001)-oriented SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates. The films were grown by means of rf sputtering at substrate temperature of 800??°C. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that films are single phase, preferentially oriented in the (111) and (122) directions for films deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates, respectively. Although the TbMnO{sub 3} target shows antiferromagnetic order, the films deposited on both substrates show weak ferromagnetic phase at low temperature coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase. The introduction of Al in the films clearly enhances their ferromagnetic behavior, improving the magnetic performance of this material. Indeed, M(H) measurements at 5?K show a well-defined hysteresis for films grown on both substrates. However, a stronger magnetic signal (larger values of remanence and coercive field) is observed for films deposited on MgO substrates. The chemical pressure generated by Al doping together with the substrate-induced strain seem to modify the subtle competition between magnetic interactions in the system. It is speculated that such modification could lead to a non-collinear magnetic state that may be tuned by strain modifications. This may be performed by varying the thickness of the films and/or considering other substrate materials.

  14. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the decay channel $H$ to $Z Z$ to 4 leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    A search for a Higgs boson in the four-lepton decay channel H to ZZ, with each Z boson decaying to an electron or muon pair, is reported. The search covers Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 < mH < 600 GeV. The analysis uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS detector in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV from the LHC. Seventy-two events are observed with four-lepton invariant mass m[4 leptons] > 100 GeV (with thirteen below 160 GeV), while 67.1 +/- 6.0 (9.5 +/-1.3) events are expected from background. The four-lepton mass distribution is consistent with the expectation of standard model background production of ZZ pairs. Upper limits at 95% confidence level exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the ranges 134-158 GeV, 180-305 GeV, and 340 -465 GeV. Small excesses of events are observed around masses of 119, 126, and 320 GeV, making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal.

  15. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to aa in the ???? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for the decay to a pair of new particles of either the 125 GeV Higgs boson (h) or a second charge parity (CP)-even Higgs boson (H) is presented. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. The search was done in the context of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the new particles are the lightest neutral pseudoscalar Higgs bosons (a). One of the two a bosons is required to decay to two muons while themore »other is required to decay to two ? leptons. No significant excess is observed above the expected backgrounds in the dimuon invariant mass range from 3.7 to 50 GeV. Upper limits are placed on the production of h ? aa relative to the standard model gg ? h production, assuming no coupling of the a boson to quarks. The most stringent limit is placed at 3.5% for ma = 3.75 GeV. Upper limits are also placed on the production cross section of H ? aa from 2.33 to 0.72 pb, for fixed ma = 5 GeV with mH ranging from 100 to 500 GeV.« less

  16. Detection of Dense Molecular Gas in Inter-Arm Spurs in M51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Corder; K. Sheth; N. Z. Scoville; J. Koda; S. N. Vogel; E. Ostriker

    2008-11-18

    Spiral arm spurs are prominent features that have been observed in extinction and 8$\\mu$m emission in nearby galaxies. In order to understand their molecular gas properties, we used the Owens Valley Radio Observatory to map the CO(J=1--0) emission in three spurs emanating from the inner northwestern spiral arm of M51. We report CO detections from all three spurs. The molecular gas mass and surface density are M$_{H2} \\sim3\\times10^6$ M$_{\\sun}$ and $\\Sigma_{H2} \\sim$50 M$_{\\sun}$ pc$^{-2}$. Thus, relative to the spiral arms, the spurs are extremely weak features. However, since the spurs are extended perpendicular to the spiral arms for $\\sim$500 pc and contain adequate fuel for star formation, they may be the birthplace for observed inter-arm HII regions. This reduces the requirement for the significant time delay that would be otherwise needed if the inter-arm star formation was initiated in the spiral arms. Larger maps of galaxies at similar depth are required to further understand the formation and evolution of these spurs and their role in star formation - such data should be forthcoming with the new CARMA and future ALMA telescopes and can be compared to several recent numerical simulations that have been examining the evolution of spiral arm spurs.

  17. THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-10-01

    In coordinately unsaturated molecular metal complexes, carbon-hydrogen bonds of the peripheral ligands may, if the stereochemistry allows, closely approach a metal center so as to develop a three-center two-electron bond between the carbon, the hydrogen, and the metal atoms, C-H-M. In some instances, the interaction .is followed by a scission of the C-H bond whereby the metal is effectively oxidized and discrete M-H and M-C {sigma} bonds are forrned. This class of metal-hydrogen-carbon interactions and reactions is shown to be a common phenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuum studies of nickel and platinum with simple organic molecules like olefins, and arenes are described. These surface chemistry studies were done as a function of surface crystallography and surface composition. The discussion is largely limited to the chemistry of methyl isocyanide, acetonitrile, benzene and toluene. Molecular orbital calculations are presented that support the experimental identification of the importance of C-H-M metal bonding for metal surfaces.

  18. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting Self-Similarity of the Circumgalactic Medium with Virial Mass using MgII Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Churchill, Christopher W; Nielsen, Nikole M; Kacprzak, Glenn G

    2013-01-01

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the MAGIICAT MgII Absorption-Galaxy Catalog (Nielsen et al.) and showed that the mean MgII 2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, W_r(2796) ~ (D/R_vir)^-2, with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the MgII absorption covering fraction is invariant with galaxy virial mass, M_h, over the range 10.7 impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T=10^{4-4.5} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the MgII absorbing gas such that the mean W_r(2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ~ 0.3 R_vir, ...

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma and fast growth rate of diamond single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derkaoui, N.; Rond, C. Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A.

    2014-06-21

    One of the best ways to increase the diamond growth rate is to couple high microwave power to the plasma. Indeed, increasing the power density leads to increase gas temperature the atomic hydrogen density in the plasma bulk, and to produce more hydrogen and methyl at the diamond surface. Experimental and numerical approaches were used to study the microwave plasma under high power densities conditions. Gas temperature was measured by optical emission spectroscopy and H-atom density using actinometry. CH{sub 3}-radical density was obtained using a 1D model that describes temperatures and plasma composition from the substrate to the top of the reactor. The results show that gas temperature in the plasma bulk, atomic hydrogen, and methyl densities at the diamond surface highly increase with the power density. As a consequence, measurements have shown that diamond growth rate also increases. At very high power density, we measured a growth rate of 40??m/h with an H-atom density of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup ?3} which corresponds to a H{sub 2} dissociation rate higher than 50%. Finally, we have shown that the growth rate can be framed between a lower and an upper limit as a function depending only on the maximum of H-atom density measured or calculated in the plasma bulk. The results also demonstrated that increasing fresh CH{sub 4} by an appropriate injection into the boundary layer is a potential way to increase the diamond growth rates.

  20. Simulating the 21-cm signal from reionisation including non-linear ionisations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Sultan; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G

    2015-01-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionisation and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionisation, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into a semi-numerical code, SimFast21, that evolves reionisation on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parameterize the ionisation rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion is super-linearly dependent on halo mass (Rion ~ Mh^1.41), in contrast to previous assumptions. We implement these scalings into SimFast21 to identify the ionized regions. We tune our models to be consistent with recent observations of the optical depth, ionizing emissivity, and neutral fraction by the end of reionisation. We require an average photon escape fraction fesc=0.04 within ~ 0.5 cMpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, to simultaneously match these data. We present predictions for the 21cm power spectrum, and show tha...

  1. The Effect of Halo Mass on the HI Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Ilsang

    2015-01-01

    We combine data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) to study the cold atomic gas content of galaxies in groups and clusters in local universe. A careful cross-matching of galaxies in the SDSS, ALFALFA and SDSS group catalogs provides a sample of group galaxies with stellar masses $10^{8.4} M_{\\odot} \\le M_{*} \\le 10^{10.6} M_{\\odot}$ and group halo masses $10^{12.5} h^{-1} M_{\\odot} \\le M_h \\le 10^{15.0} h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$. Controlling our sample in stellar mass and redshift, we find no significant radial variation in the galaxy \\hi\\ gas-to-stellar mass ratio for the halo mass range in our sample. However, the fraction of galaxies detected in ALFALFA declines steadily towards the centers of groups with the effect being most prominent in the most massive halos. In the outskirts of massive halos a hint of a depressed detection fraction for low mass galaxies suggests pre-processing that decreases the \\hi\\ in these galaxies before they fall into massive cluste...

  2. Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between ? – ? • ?(x,t)/aH and ?. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean (???), together with the fluctuations of ? around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10% at kmore »relation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, M ? 5 x 10¹²Mh?¹, compared to the dark matter at z – 0 and 1. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean (???) away from the linear theory prediction –fLT?, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k LT from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between ? and ? is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.« less

  3. Effective Field Theory for Higgs Plus Jet Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

    2014-09-30

    We use an effective field theory (EFT) which includes all possible gluon-Higgs dimension-5 and dimension-7 operators to study Higgs boson plus jet production in next-to-leading order QCD. The EFT sheds light on the effect of a finite top quark mass as well as any Beyond-the-Standard Model (BSM) modifications of Higgs-gluon effective couplings. In the gluon channel, the accuracy of the heavy-top approximation for differential distributions arises from the non-interference between the helicity amplitudes of the G^3 h and G^2 h operators in the m_h < p_T limit at lowest order. One dimension-7 operator involving quark bilinears, however, contributes significantly at high p_T, and potentially offers a channel for seeing BSM effects. One-loop renormalization of these operators is determined, allowing resummation of large logarithms via renormalization group running. NLO numerical results at the LHC are presented, which include O(1/m_t^2) contributions in the SM limit.

  4. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (�¢����38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (�¢����17.0%), and diel rate of travel (�¢����18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  5. Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  6. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  7. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  8. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  9. Astrometry and Photometry for Two Dwarf Carbon Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; C. C. Dahn; R. L. Walker; C. B. Luginbuhl; A. B. Monet; H. H. Guetter; R. C. Stone; F. J. Vrba; D. G. Monet; J. R. Pier

    1998-03-05

    Preliminary trigonometric parallaxes and BVI photometry are presented for two dwarf carbon stars, LP765-18 (= LHS1075) and LP328-57 (= CLS96). The data are combined with the literature values for a third dwarf carbon star, G77-61 (= LHS1555). All three stars have very similar luminosities (9.6m/H]<-1.0. The kinematics indicate that they are members of the Galactic spheroid population. The subluminosity of all three stars is due to an as-yet-unknown combination of (undoubtedly low) metallicity, possibly enhanced helium abundance, and unusual line-blanketing in the bandpasses considered. The properties of the stars are compared with models for the production of dwarf carbon stars.

  10. Superconductivity and Physical Properties of CaPd2Ge2 Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A; Prozorov, Ruslan; Johnston, David C

    2014-10-08

    We present the superconducting and normal state properties of CaPd2Ge2 single crystals investigated by magnetic susceptibility ?, isothermal magnetization M, heat capacity Cp, in-plane electrical resistivity ? and London penetration depth ? versus temperature T and magnetic field H measurements. Bulk superconductivity is inferred from the ?(T) and Cp(T) data. The ?(T) data exhibit metallic behavior and a superconducting transition with Tc onset = 1.98 K and zero resistivity at Tc 0 = 1.67 K. The ?(T) reveals the onset of superconductivity at 2.0 K. For T > 2.0 K, the ?(T) and M(H) are weakly anisotropic paramagnetic with ?ab > ?c. The Cp(T) data confirm the bulk superconductivity below Tc = 1.69(3) K. The superconducting state electronic heat capacity is analyzed within the framework of a single-band ?-model of BCS superconductivity and various normal and superconducting state parameters are estimated. Within the ?-model, the Cp(T) data and the ab plane ?(T) data consistently indicate a moderately anisotropic s-wave gap with ?(0)/kBTc ? 1.6, somewhat smaller than the BCS value of 1.764. The relationship of the heat capacity jump at Tc and the penetration depth measurement to the anisotropy in the s-wave gap is discussed.

  11. The Abundance Distribution in the Extrasolar-Planet Host Star HD19994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verne V. Smith; Katia Cunha; Daniela Lazzaro

    2001-03-04

    Abundances of 22 elements have been determined from a high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectrum of HD19994, a star recently announced as harboring an extrasolar planet. A detailed spectroscopic analysis of this stars finds it to have a mass of 1.2+/-0.1Msun. HD19994 is found to be slightly enriched in "metals" relative to the Sun 9[Fe/H]=+0.09+/-0.05 and an average of all metals of [m/H]=+0.13), as are most stars known with extrasolar planets. In a search for possible signatures of accretion of metal-rich gas onto the parent stars (using HD19994 and published abundances for other stars), it is found that a small subset of stars with planets exhibit a trend of increasing [X/H] with increasing condensation temperature for a given element X. This trend may point to the accretion of chemically fractionated solid material into the outer (thin) convection zones of these solar-type stars. It is also found that this small group of stars exhibiting an accretion signature all have large planets orbiting much closer than is found, in general, for stars with planets not showing this peculiar abundance trend, suggesting a physical link between accretion and orbital separation. In addition, the stars showing evidence of fractionated accretion are, on average, of larger mass (1.2Msun) than stars not showing measurable evidence of accretion (1.0Msun).

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of dendrimers based on melamine as drug delivery vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jong Doo

    2009-05-15

    ), 1.44 (s, 18H); 13 C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl 3 ) ? 156.26, 79.13, 47.54, 39.05, 29.86, 28.55; MS (ESI-TOF) calcd for C 16 H 33 N 3 O 4 331.25, found 332.27 (M+H) + . Intermediate 3. A reaction solution of 2 (5.0 g, 15.1 mmol) and DIPEA (8.0 mL, 46....12, 165.77, 164.86, 156.13, 135.69, 133.74, 129.72, 127.75, 79.05, 72.35, 70.26, 63.50, 47.97, 43.32, 42.14, 40.73, 39.74, 37.28, 36.96, 29.85, 28.61, 27.66, 27.04, 26.92, 26.79, 19.28; MS (MALDI-TOF) calcd for C 45 H 73 N 9 O 6 Si 863.55, found 864...

  13. Limits on a Composite Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sekhar Chivukula; Nick Evans; Christian Hoelbling

    2000-06-06

    Precision electroweak data are generally believed to constrain the Higgs boson mass to lie below approximately 190 GeV at 95% confidence level. The standard Higgs model is, however, trivial and can only be an effective field theory valid below some high energy scale characteristic of the underlying non-trivial physics. Corrections to the custodial isospin violating parameter T arising from interactions at this higher energy scale dramatically enlarge the allowed range of Higgs mass. We perform a fit to precision electroweak data and determine the region in the (m_H, Delta T) plane that is consistent with experimental results. Overlaying the estimated size of corrections to T arising from the underlying dynamics, we find that a Higgs mass up to 500 GeV is allowed. We review two composite Higgs models which can realize the possibility of a phenomenologically acceptable heavy Higgs boson. We comment on the potential of improvements in the measurements of m_t and M_W to improve constraints on composite Higgs models.

  14. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-10-01

    Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

  15. Search for a Two-Higgs-Boson Doublet Using a Simplified Model in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnstone, A.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2013-03-01

    We present a search for new particles in an extension to the standard model that includes a heavy Higgs boson (H?), a lighter charged Higgs boson (H±), and an even lighter Higgs boson h?, with decays leading to a W-boson pair and a bottom-antibottom quark pair in the final state. We use events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum, and at least four jets in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb?¹ collected by the CDF II detector in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. We find the data to be consistent with standard model predictions and report the results in terms of a simplified Higgs-cascade-decay model, setting 95% confidence level upper limits on the product of cross section and branching fraction from 1.3 pb to 15 fb as a function of H? and H± masses for m?h=126 GeV/c²

  16. Vacuum Stability of Standard Model^{++}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R; Vlcek, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The latest results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments point to a preferred narrow Higgs mass range (m_h \\simeq 124 - 126 GeV) in which the effective potential of the Standard Model (SM) develops a vacuum instability at a scale 10^{9} -10^{11} GeV, with the precise scale depending on the precise value of the top quark mass and the strong coupling constant. Motivated by this experimental situation, we present here a detailed investigation about the stability of the SM^{++} vacuum, which is characterized by a simple extension of the SM obtained by adding to the scalar sector a complex SU(2) singlet that has the quantum numbers of the right-handed neutrino, H", and to the gauge sector an U(1) that is broken by the vacuum expectation value of H". We derive the complete set of renormalization group equations at one loop. We then pursue a numerical study of the system to determine the triviality and vacuum stability bounds, using a scan of 10^4 random set of points to fix the initial conditions. We show that, if there...

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H -> WW -> lepton+neutrino+q'qbar Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2011-04-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in events containing a charged lepton (ell), missing transverse energy, and at least two jets, using 5.4 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primarily to Higgs bosons produced through the fusion of two gluons or two electroweak bosons, with subsequent decay H->WW->ell+nu+q'qbar, where ell is an electron or muon. The search is also sensitive to contributions from other production channels, such as WH->ell+nu+bbbar In the absence of signal, we set limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section for H production sigma(ppbar->H+X) in these final states. For a mass of MH=160 GeV, the limit is a factor of 3.9 larger than the cross section in the standard model, and consistent with expectation.

  18. Testing Low-Energy, High-Power Energy Storage Alternatives in a Full-Hybrid Vehicle (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosgrove, J.; Gonger, J.

    2014-01-01

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle gasoline use. However, the battery cost in HEVs contribute to higher incremental cost of HEVs (a few thousand dollars) than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. Significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can improve the vehicle-level cost vs. benefit relationship for HEVs. Such an improvement could lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate gasoline savings. After significant analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage program suggested a new set of requirements for ESS for power-assist HEVs for cost reduction without impacting performance and fuel economy significantly. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This poster will describe development of the LEESS HEV test platform, and LEESS laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results. The first LEESS technology tested was lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) - i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon). We will discuss the performance and fuel saving results with LIC with comparison with original NiMH battery.

  19. The case for mixed dark matter from sterile neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis Lello; Daniel Boyanovsky

    2015-08-17

    Sterile neutrinos are $SU(2)$ singlets that mix with active neutrinos via a mass matrix, its diagonalization leads to mass eigenstates that couple via standard model vertices. We study the cosmological production of heavy neutrinos via \\emph{standard model charged and neutral current vertices} under a minimal set of assumptions: i) the mass basis contains a hierarchy of heavy neutrinos, ii) these have very small mixing angles with the active (flavor) neutrinos, iii) standard model particles, including light (active-like) neutrinos are in thermal equilibrium. If kinematically allowed, the same weak interaction processes that produce active-like neutrinos also produce the heavier species. We introduce the quantum kinetic equations that describe their production, freeze out and decay and discuss the various processes that lead to their production in a wide range of temperatures assessing their feasibility as dark matter candidates. We identify processes in which finite temperature collective excitations may lead to the production of the heavy species. As a specific example, we consider the production of heavy neutrinos in the mass range $M_h \\lesssim 140 \\,\\mathrm{MeV}$ from pion decay shortly after the QCD crossover including finite temperature corrections to the pion form factors and mass. We consider the different decay channels that allow for the production of heavy neutrinos showing that their frozen distribution functions exhibit effects from "kinematic entanglement" and argue for their viability as mixed dark matter candidates. We discuss abundance, phase space density and stability constraints and argue that heavy neutrinos with lifetime $\\tau> 1/H_0$ freeze out of local thermal equilibrium, and \\emph{conjecture} that those with lifetimes $\\tau \\ll 1/H_0$ may undergo cascade decay into lighter DM candidates and/or inject non-LTE neutrinos into the cosmic neutrino background.

  20. THE APOKASC CATALOG: AN ASTEROSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC JOINT SURVEY OF TARGETS IN THE KEPLER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Elsworth, Yvonne; Chaplin, William J. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hekker, Saskia; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mészáros, Sz. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); García, Rafael A.; Beck, Paul [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS—Université Denis Diderot-IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Mathur, Savita [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); García Pérez, Ana [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, 32 Fowlkes Road, TX 79734-3005 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias (IAC), C/Va Lactea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); An, Deokkeun [Department of Science Education, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Beers, Timothy C., E-mail: pinsonneault.1@osu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46656 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of the order of 80 K in T {sub eff}, 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with T {sub eff} and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0 and 200 K cooler than that expected from the infrared flux method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in T {sub eff} and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.

  1. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  2. The CMSSM and NUHM1 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; De Roeck, A.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Marrouche, J.; Martinez Santos, D.; et al

    2014-06-13

    We analyze the impact of data from the full Run 1 of the LHC at 7 and 8 TeV on the CMSSM with ? > 0 and 0, incorporating the constraints imposed by other experiments such as precision electroweak measurements, flavour measurements, the cosmological density of cold dark matter and the direct search for the scattering of dark matter particles in the LUX experiment. We use the following results from the LHC experiments: ATLAS searches for events with E/T accompanied by jets with the full 7 and 8 TeV data, the ATLASmore »and CMS measurements of the mass of the Higgs boson, the CMS searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons and a combination of the LHCb and CMS measurements of BR(Bs ? ?+?–) and BR(Bd ? ?+?–). Our results are based on samplings of the parameter spaces of the CMSSM for both ? > 0 and ? 0 with 6.8×106, 6.2×106 and 1.6×107 points, respectively, obtained using the MultiNest tool. The impact of the Higgs-mass constraint is assessed using FeynHiggs 2.10.0, which provides an improved prediction for the masses of the MSSM Higgs bosons in the region of heavy squark masses. It yields in general larger values of Mh than previous versions of FeynHiggs, reducing the pressure on the CMSSM and NUHM1. We find that the global ?2 functions for the supersymmetric models vary slowly over most of the parameter spaces allowed by the Higgs-mass and the E/T searches, with best-fit values that are comparable to the ?2/dof for the best Standard Model fit. As a result, we provide 95% CL lower limits on the masses of various sparticles and assess the prospects for observing them during Run 2 of the LHC.« less

  3. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the four-lepton channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-11

    The final ATLAS Run 1 measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channel $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to\\ell^+\\ell^-\\ell^{'+}\\ell^{'-}$, where $\\ell,\\ell^{'}=e$ or $\\mu$, are presented. These measurements were performed using $pp$ collision data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ signal is observed with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, with an expectation of 6.2 standard deviations, at $m_{H}$ = 125.36 GeV, the combined ATLAS measurement of the Higgs boson mass from the $H\\to \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channels. The production rate relative to the Standard Model expectation, the signal strength, is measured in four different production categories in the $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channel. The measured signal strength, at this mass, and with all categories combined, is 1.44 $^{+0.40}_{-0.33}$. The signal strength for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion or in association with $t\\bar{t}$ or $b\\bar{b}$ pairs is found to be 1.7 $^{+0.5}_{-0.4}$, while the signal strength for vector-boson fusion combined with $WH/ZH$ associated production is found to be 0.3 $^{+1.6}_{-0.9}$.

  4. ULAS J141623.94+134836.3: A BLUE T DWARF COMPANION TO A BLUE L DWARF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Looper, Dagny; Rayner, John T.

    2010-06-15

    We confirm the substellar nature of ULAS J141623.94+134836.3 (aka SDSS J1416+1348B), a common proper motion companion to the blue L dwarf SDSS J141624.08+134826.7 identified by Burningham et al. and Scholz. Low-resolution 0.8-2.4 {mu}m spectroscopy obtained with the Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX shows strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption bands, consistent with a T7.5 spectral type, and we see possible indications of NH{sub 3} absorption in the 1.0-1.3 {mu}m region. More importantly, the spectrum of SDSS J1416+1348B shows a broadened Y-band peak and highly suppressed K-band flux, both indicative of high surface gravity and/or subsolar metallicity. These traits are verified through spectral model fits, from which we derive atmospheric parameters T{sub eff} = 650 {+-} 60 K, log g = 5.2 {+-} 0.4 cgs, [M/H] {<=} -0.3, and K{sub zz} = 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, the temperature being significantly warmer than that estimated by Burningham et al. These fits also indicate a model-dependent spectroscopic distance of 10.6{sup +3.0}{sub -2.8} pc for SDSS J1416+1348B, formally consistent with the 7.9 {+-} 1.7 pc astrometric distance for SDSS J1416+1348A from Scholz. The common peculiarities of these two co-spatial, co-moving sources suggest that their unusual blue colors-and those of other blue L and T dwarfs in general-arise from age/gravity or metallicity effects, rather than cloud properties alone.

  5. Higgs boson mass and new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedor Bezrukov; Mikhail Yu. Kalmykov; Bernd A. Kniehl; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

    2012-09-27

    We discuss the lower Higgs boson mass bounds which come from the absolute stability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum and from the Higgs inflation, as well as the prediction of the Higgs boson mass coming from asymptotic safety of the SM. We account for the 3-loop renormalization group evolution of the couplings of the Standard Model and for a part of two-loop corrections that involve the QCD coupling alpha_s to initial conditions for their running. This is one step above the current state of the art procedure ("one-loop matching--two-loop running"). This results in reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs boson mass bounds and predictions, associated with the Standard Model physics, to 1-2 GeV. We find that with the account of existing experimental uncertainties in the mass of the top quark and alpha_s (taken at 2sigma level) the bound reads M_H>=M_min (equality corresponds to the asymptotic safety prediction), where M_min=129+-6 GeV. We argue that the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in this range would be in agreement with the hypothesis of the absence of new energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, whereas the coincidence of M_H with M_min would suggest that the electroweak scale is determined by Planck physics. In order to clarify the relation between the Fermi and Planck scale a construction of an electron-positron or muon collider with a center of mass energy ~200+200 GeV (Higgs and t-quark factory) would be needed.

  6. METALLICITY AND TEMPERATURE INDICATORS IN M DWARF K-BAND SPECTRA: TESTING NEW AND UPDATED CALIBRATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS OF 133 SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.; Lloyd, James P.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2012-04-01

    We present K-band spectra for 133 nearby (d < 33 ps) M dwarfs, including 18 M dwarfs with reliable metallicity estimates (as inferred from an FGK type companion), 11 M dwarf planet hosts, more than 2/3 of the M dwarfs in the northern 8 pc sample, and several M dwarfs from the LSPM catalog. From these spectra, we measure equivalent widths of the Ca and Na lines, and a spectral index quantifying the absorption due to H{sub 2}O opacity (the H{sub 2}O-K2 index). Using empirical spectral type standards and synthetic models, we calibrate the H{sub 2}O-K2 index as an indicator of an M dwarf's spectral type and effective temperature. We also present a revised relationship that estimates the [Fe/H] and [M/H] metallicities of M dwarfs from their Na I, Ca I, and H{sub 2}O-K2 measurements. Comparisons to model atmosphere provide a qualitative validation of our approach, but also reveal an overall offset between the atomic line strengths predicted by models as compared to actual observations. Our metallicity estimates also reproduce expected correlations with Galactic space motions and H{alpha} emission line strengths, and return statistically identical metallicities for M dwarfs within a common multiple system. Finally, we find systematic residuals between our H{sub 2}O-based spectral types and those derived from optical spectral features with previously known sensitivity to stellar metallicity, such as TiO, and identify the CaH1 index as a promising optical index for diagnosing the metallicities of near-solar M dwarfs.

  7. (Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten's of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  8. [Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology]. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten`s of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  9. Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between ? – ? • ?(x,t)/aH and ?. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean (???), together with the fluctuations of ? around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10% at k<0.2hMpc?¹ to 25% at k ~ 0.45hMpc?¹ at z – 0. Both the stochastic relation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, M ? 5 x 10¹²Mh?¹, compared to the dark matter at z – 0 and 1. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean (???) away from the linear theory prediction –fLT?, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k < 0.1 hMpc?¹. The stochasticity in the ? – ? relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of fLT from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between ? and ? is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.

  10. Towards tailoring the magnetocaloric response in FeRh-based ternary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Radhika Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Lewis, L. H.

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we demonstrate that the magnetocaloric response of FeRh-based compounds may be tailored for potential magnetic refrigeration applications by chemical modification of the FeRh lattice. Alloys of composition Fe(Rh{sub 1?x}A{sub x}) or (Fe{sub 1?x}B{sub x})Rh (A?=?Cu, Pd; B?=?Ni; 0?M(H) curves measured in the vicinity of the magnetostructural temperature (T{sub t}). It is found that the FeRh working temperature range (?T{sub FWHM}) may be chemically tuned over a wide temperature range, 100?K???T???400?K. While elemental substitution consistently decreases the magnetic entropy change (?S{sub mag}) of the FeRh-based ternary alloys from that of the parent FeRh compound (?S{sub mag},{sub FeRh}???17?J/kg?K; ?S{sub mag,FeRh-ternary?=}?7–14?J/kg?K at H{sub app}?=?2?T), the net refrigeration capacity (RC), defined as the amount of heat that can be transferred during one magnetic refrigeration cycle, of the modified systems is significantly higher (RC{sub FeRh}???150?J/kg; RC{sub FeRh-ternary?=}?170–210?J/kg at H{sub app}?=?2?T). These results are attributed to stoichiometry-induced changes in the FeRh electronic band structure and beneficial broadening of the magnetostructural transition due to local chemical disorder.

  11. Can bars be destroyed by a central mass concentration? I. Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Athanassoula; J. C. Lambert; W. Dehnen

    2005-07-24

    We study the effect of a central mass concentration (CMC) on the secular evolution of a barred disc galaxy. Unlike previous studies, we use fully self-consistent 3D $N$-body simulations with live haloes, which are known to be important for bar evolution. The CMC is introduced gradually, to avoid transients. In all cases where the mass of the CMC is of the order of, or more than, a few per cent of the mass of the disc, the strength of the bar decreases noticeably. The amount of this decrease depends strongly on the bar type. For the same CMC, bars with exponential surface-density profile, which formed in a disk-dominated galaxy (MD-type bars), can be totally destroyed, while strong bars with a flat surface-density profile, whose evolution is largely due to the halo (MH-type bars), witness only a decrease of their strength. This decrease occurs simultaneously from both the innermost and outermost parts of the bar. The CMC has a stronger effect on the Fourier components of higher azimuthal wave number $m$, leading to fatter and/or less rectangular bars. Furthermore, the CMC changes the side-on outline from peanut-shaped to boxy or, for massive CMCs, to elliptical. Similarly, side-on initially boxy outlines can be destroyed. The CMC also influences the velocity dispersion profiles. Most of the decrease of the bar strength occurs while the mass of the CMC increases and it is accompanied by an increase of the pattern speed. In all our simulations, the mass of the CMC necessary in order to destroy the bar is at least several per cent of the mass of the disc. This argues that observed super-massive black holes are not likely to destroy pre-existing bars.

  12. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  13. Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-12-13

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

  14. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the “Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile” (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditions—it is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  15. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  16. Critical behavior and magnetocaloric effect of Pr{sub 1?x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T. A.; Phan, The-Long; Yu, S. C.; Thanh, T. D.; Yu, Yikyung; Tartakovsky, D. M.; Ho, T. O.; Thang, P. D.; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2015-05-07

    The critical behavior of Pr{sub 1?x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} samples with x?=?0.25, 0.27, and 0.29 has been investigated. Detailed analyses of magnetic-field dependences of magnetization at temperatures around the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition, M(H, T), reveal that the samples undergo a second-order magnetic phase transition. The Arrott plot method predicts the values of critical parameters to be T{sub C}????118?K, ??=?0.351?±?0.003, ??=?1.372?±?0.002, and ??=?4.90?±?0.02 for x?=?0.25; T{sub C}????116?K, ??=?0.362?±?0.002, ??=?1.132?±?0.004, and ??=?4.09?±?0.03 for x?=?0.27; and T{sub C}????110?K, ??=?0.521?±?0.002, ??=?0.912?±?0.005, and ??=?2.71?±?0.02 for x?=?0.29. The values of ??=?0.351 (for x?=?0.25) and ??=?0.362 (for x?=?0.27) are close to the value ??=?0.365 expected for the 3D Heisenberg model, proving an existence of short-range ferromagnetic interactions in these samples. A slight increase in Ca-doping content (x?=?0.29) leads to the shift of the ? value (=0.521) towards that of the mean-field theory (with ??=?0.5) characteristic of long-range ferromagnetic interactions. The samples also exhibit a magnetocaloric effect: around T{sub C} of Pr{sub 1?x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} compounds, magnetic-entropy change reaches the maximum values of about 5.0, 4.1, and 2.5?J kg{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for x?=?0.25, 0.27, and 0.29, respectively, under an applied-field change of 50 kOe. Magnetic-field dependences of the maximum magnetic-entropy change (?S{sub max}) obey a power law |?S{sub max}(H)| ? H{sup n}, where exponent values n?=?0.68–0.74 are close to those obtained from the theoretical relation n?=?1?+?(????1)/(??+??)

  17. Radiatively-driven natural supersymmetry at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer; Vernon Barger; Peisi Huang; Dan Mickelson; Azar Mustafayev; Warintorn Sreethawong; Xerxes Tata

    2015-04-14

    Radiatively-driven natural supersymmetry (RNS) potentially reconciles the Z and Higgs boson masses close to 100 GeV with gluinos and squarks lying beyond the TeV scale. Requiring no large cancellations at the electroweak scale in constructing M_Z=91.2 GeV while maintaining a light Higgs scalar with m_h 125 GeV implies a sparticle mass spectrum including light higgsinos with mass 100-300 GeV, electroweak gauginos in the 300-1200 GeV range, gluinos at 1-4 TeV and top/bottom squarks in the 1-4 TeV range (probably beyond LHC reach), while first/second generation matter scalars can exist in the 5-30 TeV range (far beyond LHC reach). We investigate several characteristic signals for RNS at LHC14. Gluino pair production yields a reach up to m_{\\tg} 1.7 TeV for 300 fb^{-1}. Wino pair production -- pp\\to\\tw_2\\tz_4 and \\tw_2\\tw_2 -- leads to a unique same-sign diboson (SSdB) signature accompanied by modest jet activity from daughter higgsino decays; this signature provides the best reach up to m_{\\tg} 2.1 TeV within this framework. Wino pair production also leads to final states with (WZ\\to 3\\ell)+\\eslt as well as 4\\ell+\\eslt which give confirmatory signals up to m_{\\tg} 1.4 TeV. Directly produced light higgsinos yield a clean, soft trilepton signature (due to very low visible energy release) which can be visible, but only for a not-too-small a \\tz_2-\\tz_1 mass gap. The clean SSdB signal -- as well as the distinctive mass shape of the dilepton mass distribution from \\tz_{2,3}\\to\\tz_1\\ell\\ell decays if this is accessible -- will mark the presence of light higgsinos which are necessary for natural SUSY. While an e^+e^- collider operating with \\sqrt{s} 600 GeV should unequivocally reveal the predicted light higgsinos, the RNS model with m_{1/2}> 1 TeV may elude all LHC14 search strategies even while maintaining a high degree of electroweak naturalness.

  18. Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Jessie Shelton

    2015-02-27

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z_D Z_D can allow sensitivity to the Z_D for epsilon >~ 10^(-9) - 10^(-6) (10^(-10) - 10^(-7)) for the mass range 2 m_mu < m_(Z_D) < m_h/2 by searching for displaced dark photon decays. We also compare the Z_D sensitivity at pp colliders to the indirect, but model-independent, sensitivity of global fits to electroweak precision observables. We perform a global electroweak fit of the dark photon model, substantially updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude epsilon as low as 3 x 10^(-2). Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ~2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ~4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  19. Interstellar Gas in the NGC 4410 Galaxy Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith

    2000-05-04

    We present new radio continuum, 21 cm HI, and 2.6 mm CO data for the peculiar radio galaxy NGC 4410A and its companion NGC 4410B, and compare with available optical and X-ray maps. Our radio continuum maps show an asymmetric double-lobedstructure, with a high surface brightness lobe extending 3.6 arcmin (~100 kpc) to the southeast and a 6.2 arcmin (~180 kpc) low surface brightness feature in the northwest. Molecular gas is abundant in NGC 4410A, with M(H2) ~ 4 X 10^9 M(sun) (using the standard Galactic conversion factor), but is undetected in NGC 4410B. HI is less abundant, with M(HI) ~ 10^9 M(sun) for the pair. Our HI map shows a 3 X 10^8 M(sun) HI tail extending 1.7 arcmin (50 kpc) to the southeast of the pair, coincident with a faint optical tail and partially overlapping with the southeastern radio lobe. The HI tail is anti-coincident with a 2' (56 kpc) long X-ray structure aligned with a stellar bridge that connects the pair to a third galaxy. If this X-ray emission is associated with the group, there is 3 - 8 X 10^8 M(sun) of hot gas in this feature: either intracluster gas or shocked gas associated with the bridge. Our detection of abundant interstellar gas in this pair suggests that the distortions in this lobe map have been caused by the interstellar medium in this system. The interaction of the two galaxies and the subsequent motion of the interstellar medium in the system relative to the jet may have produced sufficient ram pressure to bend the radio jet. An alternative hypothesis is that the jet was distorted by ram pressure due to an intracluster medium, although the small radial velocity of NGC 4410A relative to the group and the lack of diffuse X-ray emission in the group makes this less likely unless the group is not virialized or is in the process of merging with another group.

  20. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  1. PHEV-EV Charger Technology Assessment with an Emphasis on V2G Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisacikoglu, Mithat C; Bedir, Abdulkadir; Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-03-01

    More battery powered electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will be introduced to the market in 2011 and beyond. Since these vehicles have large batteries that need to be charged from an external power source or directly from the grid, their batteries, charging circuits, charging stations/infrastructures, and grid interconnection issues are garnering more attention. This report summarizes information regarding the batteries used in PHEVs, different types of chargers, charging standards and circuits, and compares different topologies. Furthermore, it includes a list of vehicles that are going to be in the market soon with information on their charging and energy storage equipment. A summary of different standards governing charging circuits and charging stations concludes the report. There are several battery types that are available for PHEVs; however, the most popular ones have nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) chemistries. The former one is being used in current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), but the latter will be used in most of the PHEVs and EVs due to higher energy densities and higher efficiencies. The chargers can be classified based on the circuit topologies (dedicated or integrated), location of the charger (either on or off the vehicle), connection (conductive, inductive/wireless, and mechanical), electrical waveform (direct current (dc) or alternating current (ac)), and the direction of power flow (unidirectional or bidirectional). The first PHEVs typically will have dedicated, on-board, unidirectional chargers that will have conductive connections to the charging stations or wall outlets and will be charged using either dc or ac. In the near future, bidirectional chargers might also be used in these vehicles once the benefits of practical vehicle to grid applications are realized. The terms charger and charging station cause terminology confusion. To prevent misunderstandings, a more descriptive term of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) is used instead of charging station. The charger is the power conversion equipment that connects the battery to the grid or another power source, while EVSE refers to external equipment between the grid or other power source and the vehicle. EVSE might include conductors, connectors, attachment plugs, microprocessors, energy measurement devices, transformers, etc. Presently, there are more than 40 companies that are producing EVSEs. There are several standards and codes regarding conductive and inductive chargers and EVSEs from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the Underwriter Laboratories (UL), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the National Electric Code (NEC). The two main standards from SAE describe the requirements for conductive and inductive coupled chargers and the charging levels. For inductive coupled charging, three levels are specified: Level 1 (120 V and 12 A, single-phase), Level 2 (208 V-240 V and 32 A, single-phase), and Level 3 (208-600 V and 400 A, three-phase) . The standard for the conductive-coupled charger also has similar charging ratings for Levels 1 and 2, but it allows higher current ratings for Level 2 charging up to 80 A. Level 3 charging for this standard is still under development and considers dc charging instead of three-phase ac. More details in these areas and related references can be found in this Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report on PHEV-EV charger technology assessment.

  2. Activation cross sections of $?$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Tárk'anyi; S. Tak'acs; F. Ditrói; A. Hermanne; A. V. Ignatyuk; M. S. Uddin

    2014-12-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  3. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too