Sample records for mgsc phase iii

  1. MGSC 491 Supply Chain Management Spring 2008 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    simulation game. REQUIRED MATERIALS 1. "Supply Chain Management: Strategy, Planning and Operation" by SunilMGSC 491 Supply Chain Management Spring 2008 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA MOORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MGSC 491 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT COURSE SYLLABUS TERM Spring 2008 (15th January, 2008 ­ 5th May, 2008

  2. On the structure of blue phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; D. Marenduzzo

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilised over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities}. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  3. Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report Rosemary Lapka, Neesha Modi, Lauren Start and David Weinglass Report No. CSS11-07 April 19, 2011 #12;Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III Keoleian, Professor #12;Document Description AURORA ORGANIC DAIRY PHASE III: CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  4. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early restoration project types Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement). Criteria

  5. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Ð Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  6. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R. [comp.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  7. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  8. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  9. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  10. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  11. Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind Farm

  12. Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind

  13. Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwater 4a Jump to: navigation,III Wind

  14. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  15. Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonika Jump to: navigation,Phase 3Phase

  16. EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

  17. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zincblende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier {\\it ab initio} calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may lead to new functionalities for designing devices that manipulate spin degrees of freedom.

  18. Optical Dielectric Functions of III-V Semiconductors in Wurtzite Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2010-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of semiconductors can exhibit strong polarization dependence due to crystalline anisotropy. A number of recent experiments have shown that the photoluminescence intensity in free standing nanowires is polarization dependent. One contribution to this effect is the anisotropy of the dielectric function due to the fact that most nanowires crystalize in the wurtzite form. While little is known experimentally about the band structures wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors, we have previously predicted the bulk band structure of nine III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase.Here, we predict the frequency dependent dielectric functions for nine non-Nitride wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors (AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs and InSb). Their complex dielectric functions are calculated in the dipole approximation by evaluating the momentum matrix elements on a dense grid of special k-points using empirical pseudopotential wave functions. Corrections to the momentum matrix elements accounting for the missing core states are made using a scaling factor which is determined by using the optical sum rules on the calculated dielectric functions for the zincblende polytypes. The dielectric function is calculated for polarizations perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the crystal.

  19. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  20. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results of all other international participants in 2014, while the remaining Phase II transient case results will be reported in 2015.

  1. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  2. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be done. The anode composition needs further improvements to attain commercial purity targets. At the present corrosion rate, the vertical plate anodes will wear too rapidly leading to a rapidly increasing anode-cathode gap and thermal instabilities in the cell. Cathode wetting as a function of both cathode plate composition and bath composition needs to be better understood to ensure that complete drainage of the molten aluminum off the plates occurs. Metal buildup appears to lead to back reaction and low current efficiencies.

  3. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I: feasibility analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Victor

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Candidate energy alternatives are analyzed in Phase III, Stage I, and the appendices are presented for the feasibility analysis. Information in eight appendices includes the following: detailed statement of work; PEPCO rate schedules; cogeneration schemes; added coal, limestone, and ash storage; hot and cold thermal storage; absorption refrigeration; high temperature heat pumps; and life cycle cost analysis. (MCW)

  4. Tier I ecological evaluation for phase III channel improvements to the John. F. Baldwin ship channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bienert, R.W.; Shreffler, D.K.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in determing whether the material from proposed dredging of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel (JFBSC) is suitable for unrestricted, unconfined open-ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) prepared this report. Based on these findings, sediments that would be removed during Phase III improvements to the JFBSC fail to meet the three suitability criteria for open-ocean disposal. Firstly, fine-grained sediments comprise a significant fraction of the bottom material in some areas of the channel, and this material is not exposed to high current or wave energy. Dredged material from the JFBSC is not being proposed for beach nourishment; therefore the second criterion is not met. JFBSC sediments do not meet the third criterion because, although they may be substantially similar to substrates at several of the proposed disposal sites, they are from an area that historically has experienced loading of contaminants, which toxicology studies have shown have the potential to result in acute toxicity or significant bioaccumulation.

  5. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPRESSION OF LARGE VOLUMES OF CARBON DIOXIDE-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey; Allison, Timothy; Evans, Neal; Moreland, Brian; Hernandez, Augusto; Day, Meera; Ridens, Brandon

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2. Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2. Both test programs successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  6. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  7. Measurement of the ?[subscript e] and total [superscript 8]B solar neutrino fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory phase-III data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of [superscript 3]He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water ...

  8. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  10. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  11. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  12. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin S., E-mail: zhang72@illinois.edu; Bass, Jay D. [Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shieh, Sean R. [Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Dera, Przemyslaw [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Prakapenka, Vitali [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0}?=?3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0}?=?1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0}?=?7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0}?=?2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0}?=??0.23(3) GPa{sup ?1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0}?=??0.10(1) GPa{sup ?1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  13. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  14. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  15. Surface phase behavior in binary polymer mixtures. III. Temperature dependence of surface enrichment and of wetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    enrichment and of wetting A. Budkowski,a) F. Scheffold, and J. Klein Department of Materials and Interfaces model systems, surface enrichment from polymer blends has clear technological implications-same mixtures--surface enrichment characteristics of the air- surface preferred phases. In these binary pairs

  16. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

  17. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  18. Study of a layered iron(III) phosphate phase Na3Fe3(PO4)4 used as positive electrode in lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    prepared by solid-state reaction was studied as positive electrode in lithium batteries. Up to 1.9 Li and lithium batteries. 1. Introduction : Recently, a new class of cathodic material based on iron phosphatesStudy of a layered iron(III) phosphate phase Na3Fe3(PO4)4 used as positive electrode in lithium

  19. NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the October through December 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main field activity was reservoir testing in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' in the AEP No.1 well. In addition reservoir simulations were completed to assess feasibility of CO{sub 2} injection for the Mountaineer site. These reservoir testing and computer simulation results suggest that injection potential may be substantially more than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work also continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

  20. NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

  1. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joensuu, Greetta [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Timo [International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Nokisalmi, Petri [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  2. Methanol-based heat pump for solar heating, cooling, and storage. Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offenhartz, P O'D; Rye, T V; Malsberger, R E; Schwartz, D

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of CH/sub 3/OH vapor with solid (pellet) CaCl/sub 2/ to form the solid phase compound CaCll/sub 2/ . 2CH/sub 3/OH can be used as the basis of a combined solar heat pump/thermal energy storage system. Such a system is capable of storing heat indefinitely at ambient temperature, and can be used for space and domestic hot water heating, and for air conditioning with forced air (dry) heat rejection. It combines all features required of a residential or commercial space conditioning system except for solar collection. A detailed thermal analysis shows that the coefficient of performance for heating is greater than 1.5, and for cooling, greater than 0.5. This has been confirmed by direct experimental measurement on an engineering development test unit (EDTU). The experimental rate of CH/sub 3/OH absorption is a strong function of the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. The minimum practical hourly rate, 0.10 moles CH/sub 3/OH per mole CaCl/sub 2/, was observed with the salt-bed heat transfer fluid at 40/sup 0/C and the CH/sub 3/OH evaporator at -15/sup 0/C. a detailed performance and economic analysis was carried out for a system operated in Washington, DC. With 25 square meters of evacuated tube solar collectors, the CaCl/sub 2/-CH/sub 3/OH chemical heat pump should be capable of meeting over 90% of the cooling load, 80% of the heating load, and 70% of the domestic hot water load with nonpurchased energy in a typical well-insulated single family residence, thus saving about $600 per year. In small-scale production, the installed cost of the system, including solar collectors and backup, is estimated to be about $10,000 greater than a conventional heating and cooling system, and a much lower cost should be possible in the longer term.

  3. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  4. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

  5. NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiation on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoir, Battelle has been awarded a project to investigate the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. This project is the Phase III of Battelle's work under the Novel Concepts in Greenhouse Gas Management grant. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations and potentially in nearby deep coal seams. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January through March 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the technical activities focused on development of injection well design, preparing a Class V Underground Injection Control permit, assessment of monitoring technologies, analysis of coal samples for testing the capture system by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, and presentation of project progress at several venues. In addition, related work has progressed on a collaborative risk assessment project with Japan research institute CREIPI and technical application for the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership.

  6. SURFACE CHEMKIN-III: A Fortran package for analyzing heterogeneous chemical kinetics at a solid-surface - gas-phase interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the user`s manual for the SURFACE CHEMKIN-III package. Together with CHEMKIN-III, this software facilitates the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary heterogeneous and gas-phase chemical kinetics in the presence of a solid surface. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Surface Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of a user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Surface Subroutine Library, which is a collection of about seventy modular Fortran subroutines that may be called from a user`s application code to return information on chemical production rates and thermodynamic properties. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III includes many modifications to allow treatment of multi-fluid plasma systems, for example modeling the reactions of highly energetic ionic species with a surface. Optional rate expressions allow reaction rates to depend upon ion energy rather than a single thermodynamic temperature. In addition, subroutines treat temperature as an array, allowing an application code to define a different temperature for each species. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III allows use of real (non-integer) stoichiometric coefficients; the reaction order with respect to species concentrations can also be specified independent of the reaction`s stoichiometric coefficients. Several different reaction mechanisms can be specified in the Interpreter input file through the new construct of multiple materials.

  7. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  8. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

  9. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  10. MGSC 485 Business Process Management Fall 2007 BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    organizational change initiatives such as TQM, Business Process Reengineering, and Six-Sigma campaigns discussions. Students will learn and practice principles and techniques/tools of Lean and Six-Sigma Approach to business process improvements. This is in light of the pervasive implementations of six-sigma campaigns

  11. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

  12. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 1: characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of Phase III of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed a variety of tasks including: (1) a detailed examination of thermal processing effects, such as HCl and POCl/sub 3/ gettering on impurity behavior, (2) completion of the data base and modeling for impurities in n-base silicon, (3) extension of the data base on p-type material to include elements likely to be introduced during the production, refining, or crystal growth of silicon, (4) effects on cell performance on anisotropic impurity distributions in large CZ crystals and silicon webs, and (5) a preliminary assessment of the permanence of the impurity effects. Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. For example, discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, and conventional solar cell I-V techniques, as well as descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are included. Considerable data are tabulated on the composition, electrical, and solar cell characteristics of impurity-doped silicon.

  13. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  14. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  15. Nanostructures produced by phase-separation during growth of (III-V).sub.1-x(IV.sub.2).sub.x alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Andrew G. (Evergreen, CO); Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures (18) and methods for production thereof by phase separation during metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). An embodiment of one of the methods may comprise providing a growth surface in a reaction chamber and introducing a first mixture of precursor materials into the reaction chamber to form a buffer layer (12) thereon. A second mixture of precursor materials may be provided into the reaction chamber to form an active region (14) on the buffer layer (12), wherein the nanostructure (18) is embedded in a matrix (16) in the active region (14). Additional steps are also disclosed for preparing the nanostructure (18) product for various applications.

  16. A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

  17. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  18. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase III, Industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Windsor, CT (United States). U.S. Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Massachusetts Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the fourteenth quarter (January `95 through March `95) of the program. The ABB project team met with cognizant DOE-PETC and Penn State personnel on February 15, 1995 at Penn State to discuss our ideas for a new burner (RSFC-based) to replace the HEACC burner prior to the long term ({approximately}1000 hrs) demonstration phase of this project. The main reasons for the proposed new burner were to improve combustion efficiencies and NO{sub x} reduction. Recent, experience at MIT with 5 million Btu/hr coal firing experiments on RSFC burner have shown remarkable performance. Results indicate that RSFC-based burner has the potential to produce lower NO{sub x} and higher carbon conversion efficiencies than the HEACC burner. M.I.T. developed the RSFC burner and obtained a patent for the concept. A decision was made to go with the new, RSFC-based burner during 1000 hr demonstration. ABB-CE will fund the costs ({approximately}$50K) for design/fabrication of the proposed new burner. Penn State plans to improve coal handling by installation of a gravimetric feeder and redesign/installation of a mass flow bottom on the surge bin.

  19. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Atherton, Pamela J. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schwartz, David J. [Minneapolis Radiation Oncology, P.A., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sloan, Jeff A. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Griffin, Patricia C. [Upstate Carolina CCOP, Spartanburg, SC (United States); Deming, Richard L. [Iowa Oncology Research Association CCOP, Des Moines, IA (United States); Anders, Jon C. [Wichita Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wichita, KS (United States); Loprinzi, Charles L. [Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Burger, Kelli N. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Martenson, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Miller, Robert C., E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5-0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  20. Penile bulb dose and impotence after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 9406: Findings from a prospective, multi-institutional, phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey M. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Cox, James D. [3D Quality Assurance Center at Washington University St. Louis, MO (United States); Purdy, James A. [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bosch, Walter [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lin Xiao [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shipley, William S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between the dose to the bulb of the penis and the risk of impotence in men treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406. Methods and materials: Men enrolled on a Phase I/II dose-escalation study, RTOG 9406, who were reported to be potent at entry and evaluable (n = 158) were selected for inclusion. Follow-up evaluations were scheduled every 3, 4, and 6 months for the first, second, and the third through fifth years, then annually. At each follow-up visit an assessment of potency status was made. Penile structures were defined by a single observer blinded to the potency status, using Web-based, on-line software. The dosimetry for penile structures was calculated at the Quality Assurance Center at Washington University and provided to RTOG Statistical Headquarters to determine whether there was a relationship between dose and impotence. Results: Patients whose median penile dose was {>=}52.5 Gy had a greater risk of impotence compared with those receiving <52.5 Gy (p = 0.039). In a multivariate analysis neither age, the dose to the prostate, nor the use of hormonal therapy correlated with the risk of impotence. Conclusions: Dose to the bulb of the penis seems to be associated with the risk of radiation-induced impotence.

  1. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finley

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff â??nâ?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

  2. Value Chain Partnerships Phase III, Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    interviews conducted with participants of the Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG) and the Regional Food Systems Working Group (RFSWG). The response rate was 100%. The Pork Niche Market Working Group (PNMWG profit partners. More than eight in ten PNMWG participants developed new relationships in the past year

  3. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:

  4. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStormGLOBAL FINANCIALGP SolarparkII

  5. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  6. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  7. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  8. Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single-and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Czochralski Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this analysis we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE).

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  10. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

  11. MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting III­V materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

  12. Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

  13. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  14. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  15. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a new type of â??cumulative seismic attributeâ? (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  16. Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1479 Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical(OH)2 is presented. The ordered phase is reached via dynamic nuclear polarization followed to the effective magnetic field are used to determine the magnetic phase of the nuclear spin system. From

  17. Early cavity growth during forward burn. [Hoe Creek III problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, M.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.

    1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    During the early portion of the forward burn phase of the Hoe Creek III field experiment, the cavity progagated rapidly down the deviated borehole and to the top of the coal seam. As a first step to understanding this phenomena we have conducted small scale coal block experiments. Drying as well as combustion tests were performed. This paper describes the test hardware and the experimental results.

  18. Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October all three Sun servers (3000, Ultra/II) were loaded, and we were able to demonstrate the complete system ? databases, web front-page, and GeoTrek ? to a large audience. All systems required for the web-based metadata catalog are in place and operational. Version 54 of the PetroTrek/GeoTrek software was loaded in December and is being tested. It is expected this version will be placed in the production environment for beta testing in January. Installation of the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) databases on the IS Houston server was completed and GeoTrek was loaded on BEG?s server in Austin. Installation of the entire MMS well data set (35,000 records) was completed and it will be moved to the production environment for beta testing in January. The Eastern Gulf Region PTTC interior salt basin data set was prepared and it will be loaded in January. The Gulf of Mexico PGS seismic data set was prepared and loaded in December. The web-site front pages for the NGDRS GeoTrek Metadata Catalog are 70 percent completed and write-ups for the tutorials are scheduled to be completed in January. Ten users identified to be beta testers are actively testing the system.

  19. Phase III Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , two making approximately three trips per day, for approximately 15 weeks during peak tourist season to be reduced during the off-peak winter season. To support the project, passenger queuing areas ­ one Horizon oil spill. ESTIMATED COST The estimated amount of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill early restoration

  20. 12 CHAPTER 12: PROPOSED PHASE III EARLY RESTORATION PROJECTS: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Fish and that was impacted by response and SCAT activities related to the Spill. In addition, DOI and NOAA identified services resulting from the Spill. Within the remainder of this chapter, there is a subsection for each

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMissiongovCampaignsAIRS Validation

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMissiongovCampaignsAIRS

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMissiongovCampaignsAIRSIII ARM Data

  4. SBIR_Phase_III.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundAof Energy

  5. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) | DepartmentINLDepartment of Energy PROJECT

  6. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,I Jump to: navigation, searchII &

  7. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESS FACT SHEET On July 19 th and

  8. Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy

  9. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  10. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  11. Tripodal aminophenolate ligand complexes of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravan, P.; Orvig, C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article focuses on the development of radiopharmaceuticals using new chelators of gallium and indium. The radionuclide kinetics and demetalation kinetics are of great consideration. This work explored the effects of ligand backbone variations on the selectivity of multidentate aminophenolate ligands among the trivalent metal ions Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) in water. 54 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Redes III Tema 0 1 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    instalación y mantenimiento. #12;Redes III Tema 0 13 Calidad de una red ­ Transparencia semántica: La calidad transparencia en el tiempo. #12;Redes III Tema 0 14 Diseño de la red · Debe satisfacer la calidad de servicio

  13. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  14. CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

  15. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  16. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  17. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  18. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  19. III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2014 ... 7801, Springer, 2013, pp. 62–. 73, ISBN 978-3-642-36693-2. The authors gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Science ...

  20. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2, Issue,

  1. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIII

  2. PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART III -

  3. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolkerEvents)WCI-III Recap

  4. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII Jump

  5. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:II Wind FarmIII

  6. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  7. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  8. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: III-nitride materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-nitride materials SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award On September 9, 2013, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Events, News, News & Events,...

  10. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  11. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  12. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  13. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  14. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  15. anticarcinogenesis mechanisms iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Engineering Websites Summary: Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order...

  16. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  17. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  18. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  19. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  20. Chapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and purged with dry nitrogen gas. The flask is charged with 1.6 mL (2.8 g, 15 mmol) of titanium tetrachlorideChapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE* 50. AN ACTIVE FORM OF TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE Me3SiSiMe3 + 2Ti. ANDERSEN The reduction of TiCl4 with hexamethyldisilane does not afford titanium(II) chloride as reported

  1. Estimation of Sorption Behavior of Europium(III) Using Biotite Flakes - 13272

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Go; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kirishima, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of biotite and Eu(III) (europium (III)) was examined by using secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometer (SIMS), fluorescence emission spectrum and decay behavior of fluorescence emission spectrum in addition to the time-changes of Eu(III) and potassium ions concentrations in a solution, using the flake form samples. The results of SIMS showed that the intensity of Eu was gradually decreasing with depth, while the intensity of Eu in the case shaken for 30 days exceeded that in the case for 1 day. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Eu(III) and potassium ions in the flake of biotite suggested that Eu ions diffuse mainly from the edges of biotite flake, while Eu ions can slightly diffuse through some small cracks existing on the flake surface far from the edges. Besides, the elution amount of potassium from the biotite flakes into a solution was proportional to the sorption amount of Eu(III). The changes nearly revealed ion exchange between these ions, while muscovite flake sample did not show such ion exchange reaction. In addition, from the time-change of Eu(III) concentration, an apparent diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 8.0x10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s, by using two-dimensional diffusion model coupled with a film between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Furthermore, the fluorescent intensity decreased with the shaking (contacting) time. This means that Eu(III) gradually diffuses into the inside of biotite edges of the biotite flakes, after the sorption of Eu(III) in the edges. This tendency was observed also in the powder samples. The observed fluorescence decay (at 592 nm in wave length) showed almost similar curve in any samples, indicating a certain sorption form of Eu(III) onto the edges of the biotite flakes. These results mentioned above suggest that the diffusion processes through internal layer in biotite mainly control the sorption behavior of multivalent ions. Such diffusion processes affect the retardation-effects on fracture surfaces in the rock matrix, depending on the fluid flow velocity of groundwater. That is, a more reliable model considering the mass transfer in the internal layer of biotite may be required to estimate the sorption behavior of RNs with biotite which controls the whole sorption behavior of granite. (authors)

  2. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  3. Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

  4. III-V Nanowire Growth Mechanism: V/III Ratio and Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ,17,18 The growth experiments reported in this paper were performed in a horizontal OMVPE growth tube using to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature to favor vapor-solid (VS) surface growth over VLS NW growth. By tuning both the group III flow rate

  5. Airport Solor Photovoltaic Concentrator: Phase III. Project status report No. ASPCP III-11, October 1-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work reported is to operate and evaluate for three years a photovoltaic system installed at an airport. The system consists of an 80-array subsystem with a nominal rating of 225 peak kilowatts dc output at the array field. Installation of a new inverter is reported. A fire was caused by an electrical short to ground inside one of the solar cell modules and began spreading throughout one of the arrays, causing extensive damage. Fuses were installed in series with the blocking diodes to prevent high reverse currents. (LEW)

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  7. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  8. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  9. Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization(6), 066012 (June 2011) Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3593003] Keywords: europium; silica; luminescent; nanoshells; endocytosis. Paper

  10. Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  11. III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE HYGIENE DES MAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE PREVENTION HYGIENE DES MAINS HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE HYGIENE - IRD - MNHN - Cemagref 24/88 III.1. HYGIENE DES MAINS Elle est fondamentale et à renouveler plusieurs, on peut utiliser un gel ou une solution hydro alcoolique. III.2. HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE Un certain nombre de

  12. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  13. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  14. POSSIBLE PHASE LOOP FOR THE GLOBAL DECOUPLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; JONES, R.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The two eigentunes Q{sub I} and Q{sub II}, two eigenmode amplitude ratios R{sub I} and R{sub II}, and two eignmode phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I} and {Delta}{phi}{sub II}, are defined as the coupling observables for the linear weak difference betatron coupling. Simulations were carried out to investigate their behaviors in global decoupling scans. It was found that the amplitude ratios R{sub I,II} are more sensitive than the tune split when the decoupling scan is approaching the global uncoupled point, and that the phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I,II} tell the right global decoupling direction, the right strength combination of the skew quadrupoles or families. The analytical solution to these six coupling observables is calculated through both the strict matrix approach and the perturbation Hamiltonian approach. The constant phase differences in the right decoupling direction hint a possible global decoupling phase loop. Dedicated beam experiments were carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The preliminary results from the beam experiments are presented. These six parameters can be used for the global decoupling in feed-back mode, especially on the non-stop energy ramp.

  15. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  16. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  17. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  18. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  19. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  20. The Role of Basis Set Superposition Error in Water Addition Reactions to Ln(III) Cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvamme, Brandon; Wander, Matthew C F.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal in this work was to characterize the importance of basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the reaction energetics of water addition to highly charged metal ions that exhibit strong ion-dipole interactions with water. The gas phase water addition reactions, M(H?O)³+N + H?O ? M(H?O)³+N ? ? [M = La(III), Lu(III); N = 0–8] have been studied, with a particular emphasis on a posteriori methods for calculating BSSE and its constituent energetic components as a function of M(H?O) ³+N cluster size and water basis set. Because of accumulation of BSSE within the subclusters in the reaction series, the successive reaction counterpoise method for determining the BSSE correction interaction energies is advocated.

  1. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  2. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  3. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  4. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-­?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-­?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-­?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -­? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-­?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-­?tier international peer-­?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-­?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-­?term research in CCS-­?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-­?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-­?on, applied learning experiences.

  5. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

  6. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  7. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII

  8. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:

  9. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:

  10. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII(b)

  11. Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen(Redirected(NorthernIII

  12. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562 RevisionI: Energy GoalsIII:

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  14. 22c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    22c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2nd C:N:O~0 to the surface. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star

  15. 25c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    25c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1 st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2 nd C:N:O~0. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star from an M

  16. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  17. SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation was implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the SRP site. Phase III, which is discussed in this report, includes the drilling of 7 deep coreholes (sites P-24 through P-30) and the installation of 53 observation wells ranging in depth from approximately 50 ft to more than 970 ft below the ground surface. In addition to the collection of geologic cores for lithologic and stratigraphic study, samples were also collected for the determination of physical characteristics of the sediments and for the identification of microorganisms.

  18. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca....

  19. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  20. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  1. AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison...

  2. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  3. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  4. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  5. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  6. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear Polarisation of Optically Pumped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear ~IT) is close to the earth field value. From this measurement, we determine the ~He nuclear in the gaseous and fluid phases at low temperature [ii, magnetometry [2], to polarised targets for nuclear

  7. EXAFS study of Nd(III) uptake by amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) P. Mandaliev a,b,*, R. Dhn a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    EXAFS study of Nd(III) uptake by amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (C­S­H) P. Mandaliev a,b,*, R Accepted 3 June 2009 Available online 7 June 2009 Keywords: Amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C Binding mechanisms Molecular level a b s t r a c t Calcium silicate hydrate (C­S­H) phases control

  8. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information towards understanding the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases.

  9. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  10. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  11. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AS A DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of damped Ly{alpha} absorbers (DLAs) can be used to measure gas-phase metallicities at large cosmological look-back times with high precision. Furthermore, relative abundances can still be measured accurately deep into the reionization epoch (z > 6) using transitions redward of Ly{alpha}, even though Gunn-Peterson absorption precludes measurement of neutral hydrogen. In this paper, we study the chemical evolution of DLAs using a model for the coupled evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM), which is constrained by a variety of observations. Our goal is to explore the influence of Population III stars on the abundance patterns of DLAs to determine the degree to which abundance measurements can discriminate between different Population III stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). We include effects, such as inflows onto galaxies due to cosmological accretion and outflows from galaxies due to supernova feedback. A distinct feature of our model is that it self-consistently calculates the effect of Population III star formation on the reionization of an inhomogeneous IGM, thus allowing us to calculate the thermal evolution of the IGM and implement photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation. We find that if the critical metallicity of Population III to II/I transition is {approx}< 10{sup -4} Z{sub Sun }, then the cosmic Population III star formation rate drops to zero for z < 8. Nevertheless, at high redshift (z {approx} 6), chemical signatures of Population III stars remain in low-mass galaxies (halo mass {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). This is because photoionization feedback suppresses star formation in these galaxies until relatively low redshift (z {approx} 10), and the chemical record of their initial generation of Population III stars is retained. We model DLAs as these low-mass galaxies, and assign to them a mass-dependent H I absorption cross-section in order to predict the expected distribution of DLA abundance ratios. We find that these distributions are anchored toward abundance ratios set by Population II supernova yields, but they exhibit a tail which depends significantly on the Population III IMF for z > 5. Thus, a sample of DLA metallicity and relative abundance measurements at high redshift holds the promise to constrain Population III enrichment and the Population III IMF. We find that a sample of just 10 DLAs with relative abundances measured to an accuracy of 0.1 dex is sufficient to constrain the Population III IMF at 4{sigma}. These constraints may prove stronger than other probes of Population III enrichment, such as metal-poor stars and individual metal-poor DLAs. Our results provide a global picture of the thermal, ionization, and chemical evolution of the universe, and have the potential to rule out certain Population III scenarios.

  12. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

  13. Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe- 20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy C. Capdevila1, M. K Aldazabal from CEIT; and Monica Campos from Carlos III University (UC3) for their help with ODS for nuclear applications Acknowledgements Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-Cr-Al-Ti ODS alloy by C

  14. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a fused iron catalyst in a three phase slurry reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Henry J

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISCHER-TROPSCH SWi'THESIS OVER A FUSED IRON CATALYST IN A THREE PHASE SLURRY REACTOR A Thesis by HENRY J. BUCK III Submitted to the Graduate College at Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... an (Head of Department) G. Anthony (Member) M. T. Longn er (Member) May ]986 ABSTRACT Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Over Fused Iron Catalyst In a Three Phase Slurry Reactor (May 1986) Henry J. Buck III, B. S. , Old Dominion University; M. S. , Texas...

  15. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R. [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Yeates, Todd O., E-mail: yeates@mbi.ucla.edu [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of California, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing.

  16. Geometric Phase in Vacuum Instability:APPLICATIONS in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Datta

    1993-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different methods viz. i) a perturbative analysis of the Schr\\"odinger equation ii) abstract differential geometric method and iii) a semiclassical reduction of the Wheeler-Dewitt equation, relating Pancharatnam phase to vacuum instability are discussed. An improved semiclassical reduction is also shown to yield the correct zeroth order semicalssical Einstein equations with backreaction. This constitutes an extension of our earlier discussions on the topic

  17. Phased Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. These tests are described in separate planning documents. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: (1) Define the test scope for the FRS and IWTS; (2) Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; (3) Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and (4) Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  18. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  19. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  20. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Prostate A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF GEFITINIB GIVEN CONCURRENTLY WITH RADIOTHERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed patients varies from 30% to 90% in different series. Despite increased awareness and earlier diagnosis

  1. Flexible Link Continual Reassessment Methods for Trivariate Binary Outcome Phase I/II Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, Bradley P.

    , or power function, to model the relationship between the dose levels and the true toxicity probabilities (O'Quigley from excessive doses and proposed by Faries (1994), Goodman et al. (1995), and O'Quigley and Shen (1996 al. (1994), O'Quigley et al. (2001), Braun (2002), and Thall and Cook (2004). One class of approaches

  2. SURVEY, ECOLOGY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY BIOTA: AUFWUCHS MICROFAUNA PHASE III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    and Technology, nor does mention of trade names or commercial products constitute their endorsement composed of four interconnected 24- gallon aquaria, stimulating summer flow and temperature (30o C Sewage Treatment Plant, while the control received dechlorinated tap water. Temperature, D.O., p

  3. Final Report on Phase III Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the extent and rate of adsorption of strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium as a function of temperature, monosodium titanate (MST) concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium.

  4. Highway Electrification And Automation Technologies - Regional Impacts Analysis Project: Phase Iii: Impacts Analysis Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scag; Path

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this study. retail price of gasoline was set at $1.45Inuut Data 1.45 Retail price of gasoline, $/gallon, taxesof retail gasoline initial vehicle cost. prices, overall

  5. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase III. Final report and third update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, J. H.; Allen, R. E.; Aklu, G. L.; Benedict, R. G.; Brown, P. E.; Hodson, J. S.; Kaminski, R. S.; Lee, N. H.; Marda, R. S.; Martin, R. J.; Molin, A. T.; Smith, M. H.; Sosnowicz, E. J.; Valorie, C. M.; Woodhull, A. S.; Ziegler, E. J.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evauating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option and proposed alternatives. The data tables, which make up the bulk of the report, are updated to January 1, 1980. The data in these tables and in the backup data file supercede the information presented in the Second Update (1979). Where required, new descriptive information is added in the text to supplement the data tables.

  6. EFFECT OF PHASE SEPARATION ON PERFORMANCE OF III-V NITRIDE SOLAR CELLS Omkar Jani1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    of a suitable lattice- matched substrate. Although sapphire is the substrate of choice for growth of GaN of the epitaxy. A high n-type defect density in thick InGaN test structures compensates the p-type doping, which is confirmed for thin InGaN test structures with indium compositions as high as 28%, and the resultant test

  7. Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase III. Biomass process development unit (PDU) construction and initial operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Hooverman, R.H.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction of the process development unit (PDU) are described in detail, examining each system and component in order. The following are covered: siting, the chip handling system, the reactor feed system, the reactor, the screw conveyor, the ash dump system, the PDU support equipment, control and information management, and shakedown runs. (MHR)

  8. Highway Electrification And Automation Technologies - Regional Impacts Analysis Project: Phase Iii: Impacts Analysis Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scag; Path

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidized battery cost scenario, life cycle RPEV costsbattery cost, eliminating fuel taxes for RPEVs and lowering energy costs would additionally improve the RPEV life cycle cost

  9. 4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | OpenDevelopment GuideMexico20082008GRED

  10. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESS FACT SHEET On July 19 th and PROJECT|

  11. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  12. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  13. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  14. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  15. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Christopher Dean, Mr. Steven Shapiro, and Mr. Matthew Gilstrap. United States Fuel Resiliency: Volume III - Regional Vulnerability and Resilience iii Table of Contents I....

  16. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  17. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  18. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  19. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  20. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergyonWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III

  1. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  2. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  3. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  4. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

  5. Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

  6. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  7. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  8. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

  9. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  10. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INICISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dey'ee of MASTER OF ARTS... December 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INCISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Approved as to style and content by: George F, Bass (Chair of Committee) c~) Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr...

  11. Collective Phase Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoji Kawamura; Hiroya Nakao; Kensuke Arai; Hiroshi Kori; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective phase response to a macroscopic external perturbation of a population of interacting nonlinear elements exhibiting collective oscillations is formulated for the case of globally-coupled oscillators. The macroscopic phase sensitivity is derived from the microscopic phase sensitivity of the constituent oscillators by a two-step phase reduction. We apply this result to quantify the stability of the macroscopic common-noise induced synchronization of two uncoupled populations of oscillators undergoing coherent collective oscillations.

  12. Materials World Network: Phase change materials for nanoelectronics: A combinatorial approach to mechanistic understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    will be explored in this project. Combinatorial materials exploration will be used to fabricate samples where filmMaterials World Network: Phase change materials for nanoelectronics: A combinatorial approach, III, Micron Technology Inc., Boise, ID Toyohiro Chikyow, National Institute for Materials Science

  13. Phase-space geometry of the generalized Langevin equation Thomas Bartsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used to model the influence of a heat bath upon a reactive system. This equation will here be studied of coupled ordinary differential equations, and the fundamental geometric structures in phase space the dynamics, (ii) a stochastic force, and (iii) a dissipative friction force. The latter two forces

  14. CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

  15. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  16. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  17. A Study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Iodide and Organic Amine Hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackstock, Joseph Beauford

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isopropylammoniumnonaiododianti- montate(III) Tris-4 -picoliniumnonaiododiantimonate(III) Tris-$-picoliniumnonaiOdodiantimonate(III) Di-isobutylamine-antimony( III) iodide reaction product Triethanolam&ne-antimony(III) iodide reaction product Flelting Point, 'C Decomposed 193... to the starch end point . Antimony was determined on eacn compound in dupli- cate. The results of these analyses are tabulated in Table II. II. Determination of' Iodine in the Reaction Products: Iodine was determined potentiometrically using a silver...

  18. Magnetic field-induced phase transformation and variant reorientation in Ni2MnGa and NiMnCoIn magnetic shape memory alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaca, Haluk Ersin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to reveal the governing mechanisms responsible for the magnetic field-induced i) martensite reorientation in Ni2MnGa single crystals, ii) stress-assisted phase transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals and iii) phase...

  19. Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, (fiscal year) 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year 1987 under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). The program is designed for implementation in a three-phase process, with Phase I determining the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas proposed for investigation. The period of performance in this initial phase is relatively brief, typically about 6 months, and the awards are limited to $50,000. Phase II is the principal research or research and development effort, and the awards are as high as $500,000 for work to be performed in periods of up to 2 years. Phase III is the commercial application. The 111 Phase I projects described were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 942 proposals received in response to the 1987 Solicitation. They cover the fields of chemistry, materials, control systems, plant natural products, instrumentation, nuclear medicine, health and environmental effects, high energy physics, particle accelerators, nuclear physics, plasma diagnostics and confinement, fusion energy systems, robotics and remote systems, nuclear reactors, space nuclear power, fuel cycle, decontamination/decommissioning, commputers in nuclear plants, coal, enhanced oil recovery/tar sands, fossil energy, photovoltaics, solar thermal, ceramics for heat engines, and industrial separation, conversion and recovery processes. (DLC)

  20. Stabilising the Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. Alexander; J. M. Yeomans

    2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation of the phase diagram of cholesteric liquid crystals within the framework of Landau - de Gennes theory. The free energy is modified to incorporate all three Frank elastic constants and to allow for a temperature dependent pitch in the cholesteric phase. It is found that the region of stability of the cubic blue phases depends significantly on the value of the elastic constants, being reduced when the bend elastic constant is larger than splay and when twist is smaller than the other two. Most dramatically we find a large increase in the region of stability of blue phase I, and a qualitative change in the phase diagram, in a system where the cholesteric phase displays helix inversion.

  1. Crystal phase identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michael, Joseph R. (Albuquerque, NM); Goehner, Raymond P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, Max E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  2. Flexoelectric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G P Alexander; J M Yeomans

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the occurence and properties of liquid crystal phases showing two dimensional splay and bend distortions which are stabilised by flexoelectric interactions. These phases are characterised by regions of locally double splayed order separated by topological defects and are thus highly analogous to the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. We present a mean field analysis based upon the Landau--de Gennes Q-tensor theory and construct a phase diagram for flexoelectric structures using analytic and numerical results. We stress the similarities and discrepancies between the cholesteric and flexoelectric cases.

  3. Thermodynamically Stable Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; S. M. Morris; E. M. Terentjev; H. J. Coles

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  4. Holographic Magnetic Phase Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad Lifschytz; Matthew Lippert

    2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4 and D8 branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  5. Phase 1 -- 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "Replace Std Task 2-1","DO RFP Development - On Site Consultation","FEMP Services will provide technical consultation...

  6. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  7. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  8. Temperature fluctuations in H II regions: t2 for the two-phase model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; B. Ercolano; X. -W. Liu

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate temperature fluctuations in H II regions in terms of a two-phase model, which assumes that the nebular gas consists of a hot and a cold phase. Methods: We derive general formulae for T([O III), the [O III] forbidden line temperature, and T(H I), the hydrogen Balmer jump temperature, in terms of the temperatures of the hot and cold phases, T_h and T_c. Results: For large temperature differences, the values of t2 required to account for the observed difference between T([O III]) and T(H I) are much lower than those deduced using the classical formulae that assume random and small amplitude temperature fluctuations. One should therefore be cautious when using a two-phase model to account for empirically derived $t^2$ values. We present a correction of a recent work by Giammanco & Beckman, who use a two-phase model to estimate the ionization rate of H II regions by cosmicrays. We show that a very small amount of cold gas is sufficient to account for t2 values typically inferred for H II regions.

  9. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  10. The superionic phase transitions in (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure up to 400?MPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner, ?.; Zdanowska-Fr?czek, M., E-mail: mzf@ifmpan.poznan.pl; Paw?owski, A.; Fr?czek, Z. J. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, Pozna? 60-179 (Poland)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on proton conductivity of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2} superionic crystal was studied in a wide temperature range and different isobaric conditions by means of impedance spectroscopy method. The measurements were performed along the trigonal c axis of the crystal, i.e., along the direction perpendicular to the plane in which, in the superionic phases, a dynamically disordered H-bond network is formed. The obtained pressure-temperature phase diagram is linear with increasing pressure. The triple point, which is the point of coexistence of the three phases: ferroelastic phase IV, ferroelastic phase III, and superionic phase II was found at p?=?116.3?MPa and T?=?287.3?K. High pressure leads to increase in the temperature range of stability of both superionic phases and to a drastic decrease in the temperature width of the ferroelastic phase III. With increasing pressure, the range of the superionic phase II expands at the expense of the range of the ferroelastic phase III, which is unstable and vanishes at the triple point.

  11. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  12. Industrial waste needs assessment. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radel, R.J.; Willis, M.P. [eds.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1992 a team was put together to begin the process of assessing the industrial waste needs of the Tennessee Valley. The team consisted of representatives from the various TVA Resource Group organizations. This initial team recommended as a starting point in the process a two-phase market research effort. A second team was then commissioned to conduct the first phase of this market research effort. The first phase of that marketing effort is now complete. This report contains an analysis of the data obtained through interviews of more than 168 individuals representing a similar number of organizations. A total of 37 TVA Resource Group employees were involved in the contact process from various organizations. In addition, the appendices provide summaries of the data used in designing the process and the reports of the Contact Coordinators (who were responsible for a series of visits). As a result of the data analysis, the Review Team makes the following recommendations: 1. Publish this report and distribute to the new management within TVA Resource Group as well as to all those participating as contacts, visitors, and contact coordinators. 2. The Resource Group management team, or management teams within each of the respective organizations within Resource Group, appoint Phase 2 assessement teams for as many of the problem areas listed in Table III as seem appropriate. We further recommend that, where possible, cross-organizational teams be used to examine individual problem areas. 3. Make this report available within Generating and Customer Groups, especially to the Customer Service Centers. 4. Establish a process to continue follow up with each of the contacts made in this assessment.

  13. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  14. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline · Background on issue · Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  15. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  16. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  17. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  18. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galán, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  19. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

  20. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  1. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exerc´icio na constru¸c~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  2. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  3. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido de cabe¸ca, com

  4. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  5. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  6. TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

  7. MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

  8. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A. [Physics and Astronomy Dept. University of Bologna, Italy viale C Berti Pichat 6/II, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  9. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  10. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    amorphous materials, such as ferrihydrite, to well-crystallized minerals such as goethite and hematite (5 assemblages. Experimental Section Oxide Synthesis and Characterization.A variety of synthetic Fe(III) oxides included a series of goethites with differing crystallinity and surface area, synthesized from Fe(NO3

  11. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  12. Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Two-Phase Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion of a dense Aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. Let {alpha}{sub 1} denote the volume fraction occupied by the gas and {alpha}{sub 2} the fraction occupied by the solid, satisfying the volume conservation relation: {alpha}{sub 1} + {alpha}{sub 2} = 1. When the particle phase occupies a non-negligible volume fraction (i.e., {alpha}{sub 2} > 0), additional terms, proportional to {alpha}{sub 2}, appear in the conservation laws for two-phase flows. These include: (i) a particle pressure (due to particle collisions), (ii) a corresponding sound speed (which produces real eigenvalues for the particle phase system), (iii) an Archimedes force induced on the particle phase (by the gas pressure gradient), and (iv) multi-particle drag effects (which enhance the momentum coupling between phases). These effects modify the accelerations and energy distributions in the phases; we call this the Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model. A characteristics analysis of the Model equations indicates that the system is hyperbolic with real eigenvalues for the gas phase: {l_brace}v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} {+-} {alpha}{sub 1}{r_brace} and for the 'particle gas' phase: {l_brace}v{sub 2}, v{sub 2} {+-}{alpha}{sub 2}{r_brace} and the particles: {l_brace}v{sub 2}{r_brace}, where v{sub i} and {alpha}{sub i} denote the velocity vector and sound speed of phase i. These can be used to construct a high-order Godunov scheme to integrate the conservation laws of a dense heterogeneous continuum.

  13. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; An, Deokkeun; /Ewha Women's U., Seoul; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Berlind, Andreas A.; /Vanderbilt U.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; /Apache Point Observ.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  14. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite the presence of interplay effect, the delivered dose may be reliably estimated using the 4D composite dose. In general the interplay effect may not be a primary concern with IMPT for lung cancers for the authors' institution. The described interplay analysis tool may be used to provide additional confidence in treatment delivery.

  15. Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradecak, Silvija

    III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

  16. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  17. Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective Strategy to Improve the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of surface titanium and oxygen atoms present. PageRIVERSIDE Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an EffectiveDISSERTATION Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective

  18. Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and passivation of a compound semiconductor surface duringIn 2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, in press with2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, ECS Transaction (

  19. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

  20. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystem Size Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystems >10 kW Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics

  1. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  2. Phase diagram of chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2-dimensional Gross Neveu model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Kohyama

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the phase diagram of the chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 1+1 dimensional (2D) two flavor massless Gross Neveu model. The resultant phase diagram shows (I) the chiral condensed phase at low temperature and density, (II) the diquark condensed phase at low temperature and high density, and (III) the chiral and diquark coexisting phase at low temperature and intermediate density. This phase structure is also seen in the 3D Gross Neveu model and the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Thus the phase diagrams of the chiral and diquark condensates in the NJL-type models do not change qualitatively in 2D, 3D and 4D.

  3. CHAOS II: Gas-Phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croxall, Kevin V; Berg, Danielle; Skillman, Evan D; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed NGC5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs (MODS) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O III] 4363, [N II] 5755, [S III] 6312) and thus measure "direct" gas-phase abundances in 29 individual HII regions. [O III] 4363 is only detected in two HII regions both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC5194 and find excellent agreement for all but one region (Delta[log(O/H)] ~ 0.04). We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (sigma = -0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10) relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretica...

  4. Requirements and Design Requirements Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razak, Saquib

    at a time. #12;Unit 24 8 Design Phase The next step in the SDLC is the Design phase which translates

  5. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  6. Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

  7. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  8. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granja, Gustavo

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio teste 7 Mostre que existe uma vizinhan resolvido para u e v como fun¸c~oes de x e y. Calcule a derivada u x (1, 1). Solu¸c~ao: Consideremos a fun teorema da fun¸c~ao impl´icita, em alguma vizinhan¸ca de (1, 1, 1, 1), o sistema pode ser resolvido em

  9. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  10. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriana Dinescu; Aurora E. Clark

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H2O)x(H2O)y3+ (x = 8, 9; y = 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  11. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinescu, Adriana; Clark, Aurora E.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H?O)x(H?O)y 3+ (x =8, 9; y= 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  12. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -iso-propylammonium- sp I. tetraiodobismuthate(III) 62. 00 62. 19 + 0. 10 10. tris-di-iso-propylammonium- hexaiodob is muthate ( III) 59. 63 60. 80 0. 19 1 1. tr i= n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobismuthate(III) 58. 97 58. 87 + 0. 02 12. tris... 6. 8 tris - di-iso-pr opylammouium- hexa iodobi s mutba(III) 10 8 6 4 7. 74 7. 72 7. 85 7. 83 7. 8 tr i - n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobis muthate(111) 10 8 6 4 7. 80 7. 78 7. 95 7. 88 7. 8 TABLE III (Contd) Compound...

  13. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  14. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  15. Viscosity near phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Probably the most enticing observation in theoretical physics during the last decade was the discovery of the great amount of consequences obtained from the AdS/CFT conjecture put forward by Maldacena. In this work we review how this correspondence can be used to address hydrodynamic properties such as the viscosity of some strongly interacting systems. We also employ the Boltzmann equation for those systems closer to low-energy QCD, and argue that this kind of transport coefficients can be related to phase transitions, in particular the QGP/hadronic phase transition studied in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  17. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  18. Benzene under High Pressure: a Story of Molecular Crystals Transforming to Saturated Networks, with a Possible Intermediate Metallic Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Xiao-Dong [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Atomic and Solid State Physics (LASSP) and Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR); Hoffmann, Roald [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Atomic and Solid State Physics (LASSP) and Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR); Ashcroft, N. W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Atomic and Solid State Physics (LASSP) and Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a theoretical study, benzene is compressed up to 300 GPa. The transformations found between molecular phases generally match the experimental findings in the moderate pressure regime (<20 GPa): phase I (Pbca) is found to be stable up to 4 GPa, while phase II (P43212) is preferred in a narrow pressure range of 4–7 GPa. Phase III (P21/c) is at lowest enthalpy at higher pressures. Above 50 GPa, phase V (P21 at 0 GPa; P21/c at high pressure) comes into play, slightly more stable than phase III in the range of 50–80 GP, but unstable to rearrangement to a saturated, four-coordinate (at C), one-dimensional polymer. Actually, throughout the entire pressure range, crystals of graphane possess lower enthalpy than molecular benzene structures; a simple thermochemical argument is given for why this is so. In several of the benzene phases there nevertheless are substantial barriers to rearranging the molecules to a saturated polymer, especially at low temperatures. Even at room temperature these barriers should allow one to study the effect of pressure on the metastable molecular phases. Molecular phase III (P21/c) is one such; it remains metastable to higher pressures up to ?200 GPa, at which point it too rearranges spontaneously to a saturated, tetracoordinate CH polymer. At 300 K the isomerization transition occurs at a lower pressure. Nevertheless, there may be a narrow region of pressure, between P = 180 and 200 GPa, where one could find a metallic, molecular benzene state. We explore several lower dimensional models for such a metallic benzene. We also probe the possible first steps in a localized, nucleated benzene polymerization by studying the dimerization of benzene molecules. Several new (C6H6)2 dimers are predicted.

  19. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  20. Phase modulated multiphoton microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Pullerits, Tonu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the modulation of the phases of the laser beams of ultra-short pulses leads to modulation of the two photon fluorescence intensity. The phase modulation technique when used in multi-photon microscopy can improve the signal to noise ratio. The technique can also be used in multiplexing the signals in the frequency domain in multi-focal raster scanning microscopy. As the technique avoids the use of array detectors as well as elaborate spatiotemporal multiplexing schemes it provides a convenient means to multi-focal scanning in axial direction. We show examples of such uses. Similar methodology can be used in other non-linear scanning microscopies, such as second or third harmonic generation microscopy.

  1. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  2. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  3. Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,III

  4. Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EM AcronymsIQATRUPACT---III Q uick F acts

  5. Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublic ArtTexasUnst,Pyron (Roscoe III)

  6. Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48HPublicforManagementUnconventionalTitle ITitle III

  7. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:Wind Farm Jump to:I JumpIII

  8. Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCN Technology Jump2011) |Panasonic HomePantexIII Wind

  9. Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio: EnergyRidgeIII Jump

  10. McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation, search NameIII

  11. Olkaria III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice ofInformation Olkaria I -II GeothermalIII

  12. Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEIBixby, Oklahoma: EnergyBlackHawkBlackIII

  13. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevadaRadioactiveRadiometricsRaftIII

  14. Hydration of a low-alkali CEM III/B-SiO{sub 2} cement (LAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Le Saout, Gwenn; Ben Haha, Mohsen; Figi, Renato [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Wieland, Erich [PSI, Laboratory for Waste Management, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration of a low-alkali cement based on CEM III/B blended with 10 wt.% of nanosilica has been studied. The nanosilica reacted within the first days and 90% of the slag reacted within 3.5 years. C-S-H (Ca/Si {approx} 1.2, Al/Si {approx} 0.12), calcite, hydrotalcite, ettringite and possibly straetlingite were the main hydrates. The pore water composition revealed ten times lower alkali concentrations than in Portland cements. Reducing conditions (HS{sup -}) and a pH value of 12.2 were observed. Between 1 month and 3.5 years of hydration more hydrates were formed due to the ongoing slag reaction but no significant differences in the composition of the pore solution or solid phase assemblage were observed. On the basis of thermodynamic calculations it is predicted that siliceous hydrogarnet could form in the long-term and, in the presence of siliceous hydrogarnet, also thaumasite. Nevertheless, even after 3.5 year hydration, neither siliceous hydrogarnet nor thaumasite have been observed.

  15. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. III. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF 758 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koz?owski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej; Szyma?ski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzy?ski, G.; Soszy?ski, I.; Wyrzykowski, ?.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Onken, Christopher A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra 2611 (Australia); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bonanos, A. Z., E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: onken@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, I. Metaxa and Vas. Pavlou St., Palaia Penteli, 15236 Athens (Greece); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magellanic Quasars Survey (MQS) has now increased the number of quasars known behind the Magellanic Clouds by almost an order of magnitude. All survey fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 70% of those in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) have been observed. The targets were selected from the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) based on their optical variability, mid-IR, and/or X-ray properties. We spectroscopically confirmed 758 quasars (565 in the LMC and 193 in the SMC) behind the clouds, of which 94% (527 in the LMC and 186 in the SMC) are newly identified. The MQS quasars have long-term (12 yr and growing for OGLE), high-cadence light curves, enabling unprecedented variability studies of quasars. The MQS quasars also provide a dense reference grid for measuring both the internal and bulk proper motions of the clouds, and 50 quasars are bright enough (I ?< 18 mag) for absorption studies of the interstellar/intergalactic medium of the clouds.

  16. Phase Change | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision, Mission and1ProposalPhase

  17. Theory of Polar Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh M. Shamid; David W. Allender; Jonathan V. Selinger

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In liquid crystals, if flexoelectric couplings between polar order and director gradients are strong enough, the uniform nematic phase can become unstable to formation of a modulated polar phase. Previous theories have predicted two types of modulation, twist-bend and splay-bend; the twist-bend phase has been found in recent experiments. Here, we investigate other types of modulation, using lattice simulations and Landau theory. In addition to twist-bend and splay-bend, we also find polar blue phases, with 2D or 3D modulations of both director and polar order. We compare polar blue phases with chiral blue phases, and discuss opportunities for observing them experimentally.

  18. Radical irradiation and misonidazole for T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer: 2 year follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abratt, R.P.; Barnes, D.R.; Hammond, J.A.; Sarembok, L.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Williams, A.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients with T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer were treated in a Phase II trial of radical irradiation plus Misonidazole (MISO). Twenty-two patients were treated and the results compared with historical controls. The cystoscopic complete tumor response between 6 and 12 months post therapy were 73 and 43%, respectively. The patient two year survival was 81 and 51%, respectively, and the patient 2 year survival with bladder preservation was 61 and 48%, respectively - 4 patients in the MISO study having undergone salvage cystectomy. Complications that may be radiation related in the MISO study are would sepsis after salvage cystectomy in 2 patients, rectal stenosis requiriing colostomy 16 months after salvage cystecomy in 1 patient and the development of a contracted bladder in 1 patient with a history of prior extensive endoscopic therapy. No misonidazole neurotoxicity seen. These findings are being further evaluated in a prospective radomized trial.

  19. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  20. PHASE TRANSFORMATIONSPHASE TRANSFORMATIONS Nucleation & Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    ;Energies involved Bulk Gibbs free energy Interfacial energy Strain energy Important in solid to solid at constant T & P), (ii) increase in (interface free-energy), (iii) increase in strain energy. In a liquid). Volume of transformed material New interface created #12;Energies involved Bulk Gibbs free energy

  1. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, Rene; Kiehn, Ruediger; Mueller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  2. Quantum Refrigerator and the III-law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amikam Levy; Robert Alicki; Ronnie Kosloff

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of temperature decrease of a cooled quantum bath is studied as its temperature is reduced to the absolute zero. The III-law of thermodynamics is then quantified dynamically by evaluating the characteristic exponent {\\zeta} of the cooling process dT(t)/dt \\sim -T^{\\zeta} when approaching the absolute zero, T \\rightarrow 0. A continuous model of a quantum refrigerator is employed consisting of a working medium composed either by two coupled harmonic oscillators or two coupled 2-level systems. The refrigerator is a nonlinear device merging three currents from three heat baths: a cold bath to be cooled, a hot bath as an entropy sink, and a driving bath which is the source of cooling power. A heat driven refrigerator (absorption refrigerator) is compared to a power driven refrigerator. When optimized both cases lead to the same exponent {\\zeta}, showing a lack of dependence on the form of the working medium and the characteristics of the drivers. The characteristic exponent is therefore determined by the properties of the cold reservoir and its interaction with the system. Two generic heat baths models are considered, a bath composed of harmonic oscillators and a bath composed from ideal Bose/Fermi gas. The restrictions on the interaction Hamiltonian imposed by the III-law are discussed. In the appendix the theory of periodicaly driven open systems and its implication to thermodynamics is outlined.

  3. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  4. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  5. THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID AND LIQUID GROUP III-V ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, T.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.A. Stevenson, J. Chern. Thermodynamics, J.V. Smith, D.J.P. Bros, J. Chern. Thermodynamics, z, R. Hultgren, P.D.J.M. Prausnitz, Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-Phase

  6. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  7. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNTIQUE DES MOLCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES AROMATIQUES COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    15. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNÉTIQUE DES MOLÉCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES orbitales moléculaires est étendue au cas des hydrocarbures conjugués contenant au moins quatre noyaux

  8. PopIII signatures in the spectra of PopII/I GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Q; Ciardi, B; Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate signatures of population III (PopIII) stars in the metal-enriched environment of GRBs originating from population II-I (PopII/I) stars by using abundance ratios derived from numerical simulations that follow stellar evolution and chemical enrichment. We find that at $z>10$ more than $10%$ of PopII/I GRBs explode in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (we refer to them as GRBII$\\rightarrow$III). Although the formation of GRBII$\\rightarrow$III is more frequent than that of pristine PopIII GRBs (GRBIIIs), we find that the expected GRBII$\\rightarrow$III observed rate is comparable to that of GRBIIIs, due to the usually larger luminosities of these latter. GRBII$\\rightarrow$III events take place preferentially in small proto-galaxies with stellar masses $\\rm M_\\star \\sim 10^{4.5} - 10^7\\,\\rm M_\\odot$, star formation rates $\\rm SFR \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-1}\\,\\rm M_\\odot/yr$ and metallicities $Z \\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-2}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$. On the other hand, galaxies with $Z < 10^{-2.8}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$ ar...

  9. Enhancing SMM properties via axial distortion of Mn-3(III) clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons S.; Brechin, E.K.; Collins A.; Karotsis G.; Jones L.F.; Inglis R.; Wernsdorfer W.; Perlepes S.P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacement of carboxylate and solvent with facially capping tripodal ligands enhances the single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of [Mn-3(III)] triangles.

  10. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session III Talks Print Text Size: A...

  11. NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    i" /} , NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array Structures Utilizing Smart *National Research Council hitrodoetion Mesoscale Periodic Arlay Structures (MPAS, also known as crystalline

  12. Eu(III) Complexes of Octadentate 1-Hydroxy-2-pyridinones: Stability and Improved Photophysical Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Evan G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1,2-HOPO) 2 ] ? , which lack a water molecule in the innerEu(III) complexes that lack a water molecule in their inner

  13. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–V Semiconductor Thin Films by Oxide Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–Vfor high-temperature thermoelectric charac- terization ofdiffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin-?lm ErAs:

  14. Multi-phasing CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics for multiphase flows is an emerging field. Due to the complexity and divergence of multiphase thermal and hydraulic problems, further development of multiphase flow modelling, closure laws and numerical methods is needed in order to achieve the general purpose and optimised CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods, which will be applicable to the wide variety of multiphase flow problems. In the paper, an original approach to the various aspects of multiphase CFD modelling is presented. It is based on the multi-fluid modelling approach, development of necessary closure laws and derivation of appropriate numerical methods for efficient governing equations solution. Velocity and pressure fields are solved with the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) type pressure-corrector method developed for the multiphase flow conditions. For the solution of scalar parameters transport equations both implicit and explicit methods are presented. The implicit method is suitable for steady state, slow transients and problems without the sharp fronts propagation. Explicit method is developed in order to predict scalar parameters fronts propagation, as well as phase interface tracking problems. The challenge towards the multiphase flow solution on both the macro and micro level is presented in order to perform multiphase CFD simulations and analyses of multiphase flows in complex geometry of nuclear power plant components, such as nuclear fuel rod bundles thermal-hydraulics. Presented methodology and obtained CFD results comprise micro-scale phenomena of phases' separation, interface tracking, heated surfaces dry-out and critical heat flux occurrence, as well as macro-scale transport and distributions of phase volumes. (authors)

  15. Performance of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier for the treatment of arsenic in groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical modeling and solid phase studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beak, Douglas G.; Wilkin, Richard T.; (EPA)

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic is expected to play a key role in directing arsenic uptake processes. Geochemical modeling reveals contrasting pH-dependencies for As(III) and As(V) precipitation. At the moderately alkaline pH conditions typically encountered in zerovalent iron reactive barriers, As(III) is unlikely to precipitate as an oxide or a sulfide phase. Conversely, increasing pH is expected to drive precipitation of metal arsenates including ferrous arsenate. Bacterially mediated sulfate reduction plays an important role in field installations of granular iron. Neoformed iron sulfides provide surfaces for adsorption of oxyanion and thioarsenic species of As(III) and As(V) and are expected to provide enhanced arsenic removal capacity. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate that arsenic is sequestered in the solid phase as both As(III) and As(V) in coordination environments with O and S. Arsenic removal in the PRB probably results from several pathways, including adsorption to iron oxide and iron sulfide surfaces, and possible precipitation of ferrous arsenate. Corrosion of granular iron appears to result in some As(III) oxidation to As(V) as the proportion of As(V) to As(III) in the solid phase is greater compared to influent groundwater. As(0) was not detected in the PRB materials. These results are broadly comparable to laboratory based studies of arsenic removal by zerovalent iron, but additional complexity is revealed in the field environment, which is largely due to the influence of subsurface microbiota.

  16. NGNP PHASE I REVIEW

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges| Department of EnergyFriday,NGNP PHASE I

  17. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 29, NO. 12, DECEMBER 1994 A 6 GHz 60 mW BiCMOS Phase-Locked Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razavi, Behzad

    so as to lower the static phase error because, at 6 GHz, the mixer operates in small-signal regime oscillator to achieve a period equal to two ECL gate delays. A mixer topology is also used that exhibits full III, the mixer in Section IV, and the pulse shaping circuit in Section V. Experimental results

  18. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling-motor bearings and seals. Final report: Phase III, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic laboratory testing and evaluation program to select high-temperature seals, bearings, and lubricants for geothermal downhole drilling motors is summarized.

  19. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

  20. Underground gasification for steeply dipping coal beds: Phase III. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1981. [Rawlins Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations are being made for the August start-up of Rawlins Test 2. Site construction activities began May 4 with the mobilization of the construction subcontractor. The drilling program was completed this quarter with the installation of instrumentation wells. The Experimental Basis Document, PGA Operating Manual, and DAS Operating Manual have also been completed.

  1. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I. Feasibility analysis. Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Feasibility Analysis covers a wide range of studies and evaluations. The Report is divided into five parts. Section 1 contains all material relating to the Institutional Assessment including consideration of the requirements and position of the Potomac Electric Co. as they relate to cogeneration at Georgetown in parallel with the utility (Task 1). Sections 2 through 7 contain all technical information relating to the Alternative Subsystems Analysis (Task 4). This includes the energy demand profiles upon which the evaluations were based (Task 3). It further includes the results of the Life-Cycle-Cost Analyses (Task 5) which are developed in detail in the Appendix for evaluation in the Technical Report. Also included is the material relating to Incremental Savings and Optimization (Task 6) and the Conceptual Design for candidate alternate subsystems (Task 7). Section 8 contains all material relating to the Environmental Impact Assessment (Task 2). The Appendix contains supplementary material including the budget cost estimates used in the life-cycle-cost analyses, the basic assumptions upon which the life-cycle analyses were developed, and the detailed life-cycle-cost anlysis for each subsystem considered in detail.

  2. Microsoft Word - SECARB Phase III CO2 sequestration Final EA MNM 3-2 as sent.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Southeast

  3. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Oral Examination Boards Phase III, Part 8 of 9

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant Impact for1-935-98 December 19988-99 October

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  5. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and Phase III. Quarter progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is presented on the development of a coal-fired high performance power generation system by the year 2000. This report describes the design of the air heater, duct heater, system controls, slag viscosity, and design of a quench zone.

  6. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 × more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup –4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  7. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  8. Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Phase 1 of this accident...

  9. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  10. Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

  11. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  12. Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Bull-Games, III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Provenance and Identification", BSA 60 (1965),58-98; KZ = sealing from Kato Zakros (no in D.G. HOGARTH, "The Zakro Sealings", JHS 22 U902),76-93 and./or in D. LEVI, "Le cretule diZakro",ASAtene 8-9 [925-6], 157-201); M as t e rs/G roup s III = J.G. YOUNGER... irn{, anrl rincc tlrr: bull sect}1s 1r; l*uk ov*r its t*;r attrl intu it, iltr: lr*r l}t*trlil hr irgllr.rw i"rnd r"l{rl t s*lid ltlirltirrrn lihe rlie *rre built irtt{} th*, ltr}rlh"wsst {:{l!-t1rr rf Phaillt}s's r-'gfltral r6urt., Alrn t*o. il ix...

  13. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 Msun die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core collapse, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by collapse and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning ari...

  14. AVTA: 2010 Toyota Prius Gen III HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  15. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  16. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  17. Joint estimation of phase and phase diffusion for quantum metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai D. Vidrighin; Gaia Donati; Marco G. Genoni; Xian-Min Jin; W. Steven Kolthammer; M. S. Kim; Animesh Datta; Marco Barbieri; Ian A. Walmsley

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase estimation, at the heart of many quantum metrology and communication schemes, can be strongly affected by noise, whose amplitude may not be known, or might be subject to drift. Here, we investigate the joint estimation of a phase shift and the amplitude of phase diffusion, at the quantum limit. For several relevant instances, this multiparameter estimation problem can be effectively reshaped as a two-dimensional Hilbert space model, encompassing the description of an interferometer phase probed with relevant quantum states -- split single-photons, coherent states or N00N states. For these cases, we obtain a trade-off bound on the statistical variances for the joint estimation of phase and phase diffusion, as well as optimum measurement schemes. We use this bound to quantify the effectiveness of an actual experimental setup for joint parameter estimation for polarimetry. We conclude by discussing the form of the trade-off relations for more general states and measurements.

  18. Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential geothermal direct-use energy market and its application to projects in California are assessed. Project identification effort is to be focused on those that have the highest probability for near-term successful commercial operations. Near-term herein means 2 to 5 years for project implementation. Phase I has been focused on defining and assessing: (1) the geothermal direct-use resources that are suitable for near-term utilization; and (2) the generic applications (municipal heating districts, horticultural greenhouse firms, laundries, etc.) that are suitable for near-term projects. Five economic development regions in the state, containing recognized geothermal direct-use resources, have been defined. Thirty-eight direct use resources have been evaluated in these regions. After assessment against pre-selected criteria, twenty-seven have been rated with a priority of I, II or III, thereby qualifying them for further marketing effort. The five areas with a priority of I are summarized. These areas have no perceived impediments to near-term development. Twenty-nine generic categories of applications were assessed against previously selected criteria to determine their near term potential for direct use of geothermal fluids. Some twenty industry, commercial and institutional application categories were rated with a priority of I, II or III and warrant further marketing efforts. The seven categories with a priority of I are listed. These categories were found to have the least impediments to near-term application projects.

  19. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  20. Infocom 2001 VIP -Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Zarki, Magda

    Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5 Video Over IP Magda El-Zarki (University of California at Irvine) Monday, 23 April, 2001 - Morning #12;MPEG-4 over IP - Part 3 Magda El Zarki Dept. of ICS UC, Irvine elzarki@uci.edu #12;Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.3 Outline of Tutorial 1. Part

  1. COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbusch, Karin

    COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1 , Johannes Härtel2 grammar teaching system COMPASS III. COMPASS stands for COMbina- torial and Paraphrastic Assembly]. COMPASS invites the student to construct sentences by composing syntactic trees out of lexically anchored

  2. J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification Physics Abstracts 05) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non

  3. Fusing Statecharts and Java MARIA-CRISTINA MARINESCU, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III, Leganes, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, César

    III, Legan´es, Spain C ´ESAR S ´ANCHEZ, IMDEA Software Institute, Spain and Institute for Applied Physics, CSIC, Spain This paper presents FUSE, an approach for modeling and implementing embedded software-Cristina Marinescu, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Spain; C´esar S´anchez IMDEA

  4. Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Ocean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement Ecole Doctorale de Sciences de l'Univers de l'Environnement et de l'Espace Assimilation de donn´ees de t-27Jun2007 #12;Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et

  5. UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON INDIVIDUAL FINANCIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN PHS RESEARCH UMBC # III-1.11.02 I. POLICY STATEMENT Externally sponsored research is a vital FOR POLICY UMBC strives for excellence and academic integrity in its research enterprise while also promoting

  6. UNIVERSIT TOULOUSE III -PAUL SABATIER U.F.R. Sciences et Vie de la Terre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo-tectonique présentée et soutenue par de la Terre TH�SE pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo

  7. Universit Paul Czanne -Aix-Marseille III pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III THÈSE pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences de l'Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III n 2007AIX30060 Discipline : Optique électromagnétique et image Chat Perdu. À Robert Mi(t)chou(m). Aux Special Ca's (Frères)...et à leur Moitié (Relax). Aux Morbai

  8. Thermodynamic Features of the Complexation of Neodymium(III) and Americium(III) by Lactate in Trifluoromethanesulfonate Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protonation of lactate has been studied in a variety of electrolyte solutions using microcalorimetry to reveal a distinct medium influence imposed on the thermochemistry of the investigated equilibrium. The thermochemistry of lactate protonation, when studied directly in 1.0 M sodium lactate, agreed well with the studies performed in trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate). This thermodynamic agreement suggests that the physical chemistry of lactate in the solutions applicable to the TALSPEAK process – a solvent extraction method for separating trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides within the scope of used nuclear fuel processing efforts – may be simulated in triflate solutions. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry have been subsequently used to study the thermodynamic features of neodymium and americium complexation by lactate using triflate as a strong background electrolyte. Three successive mononuclear lactate complexes were identified for Nd(III) and Am(III). The stability constants for neodymium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.01, log ß2 = 4.66 ± 0.02 and log ß3 = 5.6 ± 0.1, and for americium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.06, log ß2 = 4.7 ± 0.1 and log ß3 = 6.2 ± 0.2, were found to closely agree with the thermodynamic studies reported in sodium perchlorate solutions. Consequently, the thermodynamic medium effect, imposed on the TALSPEAK-related solution equilibria by the presence of strong background electrolytes such as NaClO4 and NaNO3, do not significantly impact the speciation in solution.

  9. Adhesion-induced Phase Separation of Biomembranes--Effective Potential and Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Yuan Wu

    2005-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical analyses and numerical simulations for the adhesion-induced phase separation of multi-component membranes with two types of ligand-receptor complexes (junctions). We show that after integrating all possible distributions of the junctions, the system can be regarded as a membrane under an effective external potential. Mean field theory and Gaussian approximation are used to analyze the effective membrane potential and we find (i) The height difference of the junctions is the main factor that drives phase separation at sufficiently large junction height difference. (ii) In the two phase region far from the mean-field critical point, because of the higher entropy associated with the softer junctions, phase coexistence occurs when the effective binding energy of the more rigid junctions is higher. (iii) In the two phase region near the mean-field critical point, the shape of the effective potential shows that the phase coexistence occurs when the effective binding energy of softer junctions is higher. The effect of junction density on the critical point is studied by Monte Carlo simulations, and the result shows that phase separation occurs at larger junction height difference as junction density of the system decreases.

  10. Berry Phase in Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Gang He; Xue-Qian Li; Bruce H. J. McKellar; Yue Zhang

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation if the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges which implies that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a non-zero Berry phase with just two generations.

  11. Method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  12. Rheology of Cubic Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Henrich; Kevin Stratford; Peter V. Coveney; Michael E. Cates; Davide Marenduzzo

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of cubic blue phases under shear flow via lattice Boltzmann simulations. We focus on the two experimentally observed phases, Blue Phase I (BPI) and Blue Phase II (BPII). The disclination network of Blue Phase II continuously breaks and reforms under steady shear, leading to an oscillatory stress response in time. For larger shear rates, the structure breaks up into a Grandjean texture with a cholesteric helix lying along the flow gradient direction. Blue Phase I leads to a very different response. Here, oscillations are only possible for intermediate shear rates -- very slow flow causes a transition of the initially ordered structure into an amorphous network with an apparent yield stress. Larger shear rates lead to another amorphous state with different structure of the defect network. For even larger flow rates the same break-up into a Grandjean texture as for Blue Phase II is observed. At the highest imposed flow rates both cubic blue phases adopt a flow-aligned nematic state. Our results provide the first theoretical investigation of sheared blue phases in large systems, and are relevant to understanding the bulk rheology of these materials.

  13. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluka, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka, N.III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka(t), N.solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium

  14. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 10771085 Application of europium(III) chelate-dyed nanoparticle labels in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 1077­1085 Application of europium(III) chelate for immunosensors with fluorescent europium(III) chelate nanoparticle labels (Seradyn) in a competitive atrazine

  15. 3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near-Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Sensitization of Ho(III) and Pr(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Palsson, Lars-Olof; Beeby, Andrew; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest in Near Infra-Red (NIR) emission originating from organic complexes of Ln{sup III} cations. As a major impetus, biological tissues are considerably more transparent at these low energy wavelengths when compared to visible radiation, which facilitates deeper penetration of incident and emitted light. Furthermore, the long luminescence lifetimes of Ln{sup III} complexes (eg. Yb{sup III}, {tau}{sub rad} {approx} 1 ms) when compared to typical organic molecules can be utilized to vastly improve signal to noise ratios by employing time-gating techniques. While the improved quantum yield of Yb{sub III} complexes when compared to other NIR emitters favors their use for bioimaging applications, there has also been significant interest in the sensitized emission from other 4f metals such as Ln = Nd, Ho, Pr and Er which have well recognized applications as solid state laser materials (eg. Nd {approx} 1.06 {micro}m, Ho {approx} 2.09 {micro}m), and in telecommunications (eg. Er {approx} 1.54 {micro}m) where they can be used for amplification of optical signals. As a result of their weak (Laporte forbidden) f-f absorptions, the direct excitation of Ln{sup III} cations is inefficient, and sensitization of the metal emission is more effectively achieved using the so-called antenna effect. We have previously examined the properties of several Eu{sup III} complexes which feature 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one (Fig. 1) as the light harvesting chromophore. While the 1,2-HOPO isomer was found to strongly sensitize Eu{sup III}, we noted the analogous Me-3,2-HOPO isomer does not, which prompted further investigation of the properties of this chromophore with other metals.

  16. Philosophia Mathematica (III) 17 (2009), 341362. doi:10.1093/philmat/nkn032 Advance Access publication November 6, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. easwaran@gmail.com Philosophia Mathematica (III) Vol. 17 No. 3 C

  17. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  18. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  19. Three phase downhole separator process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  20. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  1. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  2. Phase transition towards strange matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; Ad. R. Raduta; M. Oertel

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase diagram of a system constituted of neutrons and $\\Lambda$-hyperons in thermal equilibrium is evaluated in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that this simple system exhibits a complex phase diagram with first and second order phase transitions. Due to the generic presence of attractive and repulsive couplings, the existence of phase transitions involving strangeness appears independent of the specific interaction model. In addition we will show under which conditions a phase transition towards strange matter at high density exists, which is expected to persist even within a complete treatment including all the different strange and non- strange baryon states. The impact of this transition on the composition of matter in the inner core of neutron stars is discussed.

  3. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtin, Michael T. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (San Francisco, CA); Denney, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  4. Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or as pdf files. The user interface provides stepwise guides with built-in checks for efficient entry of required input data on fuels of interest to allow a successful execution of the model. The model was developed with data from several fuels selected by the sponsors, including bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and petroleum coke (petcoke). The data from these fuels were obtained using small pilot-scale entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasifiers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The CABRE III model is expected to further advance the knowledge base for the NCHT® Program and, more importantly, allow for prediction of the slagging and fouling characteristics of fuels in reducing environments. The information obtained from this program will potentially also assist in maintaining prolonged gasifier operation free from failure or facilitate troubleshooting to minimize downtime in the event of a problem.

  5. The Determination of Pertechnetate and Non-Pertechnetate Species in Hanford Tanks - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, James B. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, WA (United States); Catlow, Stanley A. [Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical method is required to distinguish between the pertechnetate and non-pertechnetate forms of technetium; currently, the methods available only report the total technetium present in a sample. The overall objective of this effort is to develop a method for routinely analyzing Hanford tank waste for technetium in the pertechnetate and the non-pertechnetate forms. A phased approach will be deployed to accomplish this objective: Phase I Comparison of existing technetium analysis methods with modification; Phase II Demonstration of modified methods using non-pertechnetate spiked simulants; and, Phase III Demonstration of chosen method on Hanford tank sample containing non-pertechnetate. This report describes the Phase I work, providing a comparison of Aliquat 336 and TEVA(R)1 in the removal of pertechnetate and discussing the subsequent analysis for technetium in both alkaline and acidic environments without oxidation. The effort was executed under LAB-PLN-13-00004, The Determination of Pertechnetate and Non-Pertechnetate Species in Hanford Tanks Phase I.

  6. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Dean Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  7. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W. Jr. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA)); Cochran, H.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Phase space quantum mechanics - Direct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasiri, S.; Sobouti, Y.; Taati, F. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, 45195-1159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Department of Physics, Zanjan University, Zanjan (Iran); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, 45195-1159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, 45195-1159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, D-78457 Sanadaj (Iran)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional approach to quantum mechanics in phase space (q,p), is to take the operator based quantum mechanics of Schroedinger, or an equivalent, and assign a c-number function in phase space to it. We propose to begin with a higher level of abstraction, in which the independence and the symmetric role of q and p is maintained throughout, and at once arrive at phase space state functions. Upon reduction to the q- or p-space the proposed formalism gives the conventional quantum mechanics, however, with a definite rule for ordering of factors of noncommuting observables. Further conceptual and practical merits of the formalism are demonstrated throughout the text.

  9. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  10. Nano-scale metal contacts for future III-V CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Alex

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As modem transistors continue to scale down in size, conventional Si CMOS is reaching its physical limits and alternative technologies are needed to extend Moore's law. Among different candidates, MOSFETs with a III-V ...

  11. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in...

  12. XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

  13. Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Samuel Curtis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

  14. Quantitative analysis of the EGFRvIII mutant receptor signaling networks in Glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hua Ming Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive adult brain tumor and remains incurable despite multimodal intensive treatment regimens. EGFRvIII is a truncated extracellular mutant of the EGF receptor (EGFR) that is ...

  15. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title...

  16. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012_Modeling the Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling the Performance of Large- Scale CO 2 Storage Systems: A Comparison of Different Sensitivity Analysis Methods 24 October 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012...

  17. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume III, Roadmap Explorations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozdogan, Kirk

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III of this guide may be used as an in-depth reference source for acquiring deep knowledge about many of the aspects of transitioning to lean. Lean change agents and lean implementation leaders should find this ...

  18. Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order response evident for SimTest media. Steerable Needle Application Nano

  19. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  20. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised...

  1. AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L....

  2. Microsoft Word - NRAP_TRS_III_Mobilization_and_Transport_of_Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 21 May 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2015 Disclaimer This report was...

  3. Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 -Security of Federal Automated Information Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 - Security of Federal Automated Information Resources A automated information security programs; assigns Federal agency responsibilities for the security of automated information; and links agency automated information security programs and agency management

  4. CREATING A MULTIVALENT SUBUNIT VACCINE USING TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM TIP PROTEINS AS ANTIGENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markham, Aaron Paul

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Many gram-negative bacterial pathogens employ type III secretion systems (TTSS) to transport effector proteins into eukaryotic host cell membranes and cytoplasms to subvert normal cellular functions. TTSSs contain a basal ...

  5. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  6. A high-throughput, near-saturating screen for type III effector genes from Pseudomonas syringae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    criteria defined 29 type III proteins from P. syringae pv. tomato, and 19 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola [disease resistance (R) pro- teins], a battery of host responses is triggered, including localized

  7. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy`s )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

  8. Development of X-ray lithography and nanofabrication techniques for III-V optical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Michael H. (Michael Hong)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers the development of fabrication techniques for Bragg-grating-based integrated optical devices in III-V materials. Work on this rich family of devices has largely been limited to numerical analysis ...

  9. Spectroscopic and Computational Studies of the Physical Properties and Reactivities of Peroxomanganese(III) Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Robert Alan

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of MnIII intermediates were generated and studied using various spectroscopic techniques, including electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD, ...

  10. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  11. Platform for monolithic integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacella, Nan Yang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors and Si complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor (CMOS) enables the creation of advanced circuits with new functionalities. In order to merge the two technologies, ...

  12. Substrate engineering for monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohrman, Carl Lawrence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge virtual substrates, fabricated using Si1-xGex-.Ge, compositionally graded buffers, enable the epitaxial growth of device-quality GaAs on Si substrates, but monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS ...

  13. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  14. Characterization of a synthetic peroxodiiron(III) protein model complex by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    The vibrational spectrum of an ?[superscript 1],?[superscript 1]-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex was measured by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and fit using an empirical force field analysis. Isotopic 18O2 ...

  15. The class III ribonucleotide reductase from Neisseria bacilliformis can utilize thioredoxin as a reductant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yifeng

    The class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied to date couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxynucleotides with the oxidation of formate to CO[subscript 2]. Here we report the cloning and heterologous ...

  16. Reactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , the reactivity of lead (Pb(II)) on naturally occurring Mn(III,IV) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals was evaluated using to suggest oxidation as an operative sorption mechanism. Lead appeared to coordinate to vacancy sitesReactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface C H R I S T O P H E R J . M

  17. Impurity-induced disorder in III-nitride materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J; Allerman, Andrew A

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impurity-induced disordering in III-nitride materials comprises growing a III-nitride heterostructure at a growth temperature and doping the heterostructure layers with a dopant during or after the growth of the heterostructure and post-growth annealing of the heterostructure. The post-growth annealing temperature can be sufficiently high to induce disorder of the heterostructure layer interfaces.

  18. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  19. The iron(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DTPA in an aqueous solution / longy Steven Harry Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christiansen, Steven Harry

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition rate, the monohydroxo form of Fe(III)-DTPA is suggested as the reactive intermediate. If the air source of the above system was eliminated, the decomposition reaction continued until the oxygen was depleted. The reaction products... Preparation of Fe(III) -DTPA Run Procedures Analytical RESULTS 32 33 34 38 Kinetics Identification of Decomposition Products 38 57 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 80 LITERATURE CITED VITA 83 87 vi LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Typical coordination...

  20. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  1. Crystal Structures of Endotaxic Phases in Europium Potassium Silicate Having a Pellyite Unit Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru; Aksenov, S. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Taroev, V. K. [Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vinogradov Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of three phases of the synthesized europium potassium silicate were determined by X-ray diffraction. Two of these phases crystallize in a new structural type. The chemical formulas of the phases were determined. The orthorhombic unit-cell parameters of all three phases are equal: a = 14.852(1) A, b = 15.902(1) A, c = 7.243(1) A, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (phase I) and sp. gr. Pbam (phases II and III). The structures were solved by direct methods and refined from X-ray diffraction data collected from one crystal to R = 0.0271, 0.0479, and 0.0582 based on 4370, 3320, and 2498 reflections, respectively, with |F| > 3{sigma}(F). The crystal- chemical formulas of the phases (Z = 4) are K{sub 3}Eu{sub 3+}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 15}] . 2H{sub 2}O, K{sub 3}Eu{sup 3+}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 13}(OH){sub 4}] . 2H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}Eu{sup 3+}[Si{sub 4}O{sub 9.5}(OH)](OH){sub 2}. 5.5H{sub 2}O. The structure of phase I consists of silicon-oxygen sheets [Si{sub 6}O{sub 15}] analogous to those found in the isostructural compound K{sub 3}Nd[Si{sub 6}O{sub 15}] . 2H{sub 2}O. In the structures of phases II and III, the ribbons [Si{sub 6}O{sub 17}] and [Si{sub 8}O{sub 21}] run along the shortest c axis and are linked together by Eu{sup 3+} octahedra and trigonal prisms to form three-dimensional layered and framework structures containing K atoms between the sheets and in the channels. The fragments are also linked through hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups and water molecules.

  2. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  3. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  4. Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

  5. Phase measurement system using a dithered clock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

    1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

  6. Gd(III) polyaminocarboxylate chelate: realistic many-body molecular dynamics simulations for molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    performances in reproducing gas- phase and condensed phase pr. A theoretical analysis, based on fitting a fluctuating charges model on ab initio data, also indicates

  7. Inverse operator representations of quantum phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. Saxena

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We define quantum phase in terms of inverses of annihilation and creation operators. We show that like Susskind - Glogower phase operators, the measured phase operators and the unitary phase operators can be defined in terms of the inverse operators. However, for the unitary phase operator the Hilbert space includes the negative energy states. The quantum phase in inverse operator representation may find the applications in the field of quantum optics particularly in the squeezed states.

  8. Thermodynamics of Blue Phases In Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present extensive numerical studies to determine the phase diagrams of cubic and hexagonal blue phases in an electric field. We confirm the earlier prediction that hexagonal phases, both 2 and 3 dimensional, are stabilized by a field, but we significantly refine the phase boundaries, which were previously estimated by means of a semi-analytical approximation. In particular, our simulations show that the blue phase I -- blue phase II transition at fixed chirality is largely unaffected by electric field, as observed experimentally.

  9. Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation If conventional or other renewable energy funding cannot be procured, or if an agency is working...

  10. Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Twentieth quarterly report: September-November 1979. [Hanna IV and Hoe Creek III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second phase of the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification test, Hanna IV-B, which was initiated on April 20, 1979, was completed on October 4, 1979. Sandia National Laboratories provided support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. During the final gasification stage, 765 tons of coal were reacted involving 17,000 cubic feet. The Hoe Creek III experiment conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratories began on August 15, 1979, and was terminated on October 10, 1979. The purpose of the experiment was to test the drilled borehole linking concept. Sandia National Laboratories' involvement consisted of fielding and monitoring both an inverted thermocouple and a surface electrical resistivity network. The inverted thermocouple was successfully tested and provided thermal data from beneath the burn zone. A real time analysis procedure for the electrical resistivity technique was implemented at Hoe Creek III. Unfortunately, there was insufficient change in the data for this to have been a useful diagnostic. Efforts are continuing to identify the reason for this lack of response.

  11. MARVELS-1b: A Short-Period, Brown Dwarf Desert Candidate from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Brian L; Fleming, Scott W; Stassun, Keivan G; Gaudi, B Scott; Barnes, Rory; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Eastman, Jason D; Wright, Jason; Siverd, Robert J; Gary, Bruce; Ghezzi, Luan; Laws, Chris; Wisniewski, John P; de Mello, G F Porto; Ogando, Ricardo L C; Maia, Marcio A G; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Pepper, Joshua; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Hebb, Leslie; De Lee, Nathan; Wang, Ji; Wan, Xiaoke; Zhao, Bo; Chang, Liang; Groot, John; Varosi, Frank; Hearty, Fred; Hanna, Kevin; van Eyken, J C; Kane, Stephen R; Agol, Eric; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bochanski, John J; Brewington, Howard; Chen, Zhiping; Costello, Erin; Dou, Liming; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Fletcher, Adam; Ford, Eric B; Guo, Pengcheng; Holtzman, Jon A; Jiang, Peng; Leger, R French; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malik, Mohit; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Rohan, Pais; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Snedden, Stephanie A; Simmons, Audrey; Weaver, B A; Weinberg, David H; Xie, Ji-Wei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new short-period brown dwarf candidate around the star TYC 1240-00945-1. This candidate was discovered in the first year of the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the third phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), and we designate the brown dwarf as MARVELS-1b. MARVELS uses the technique of dispersed fixed-delay interferometery to simultaneously obtain radial velocity measurements for 60 objects per field using a single, custom-built instrument that is fiber fed from the SDSS 2.5-m telescope. From our 20 radial velocity measurements spread over a ~370 d time baseline, we derive a Keplerian orbital fit with semi-amplitude K=2.533+/-0.025 km/s, period P=5.8953+/-0.0004 d, and eccentricity consistent with circular. Independent follow-up radial velocity data confirm the orbit. Adopting a mass of 1.37+/-0.11 M_Sun for the slightly evolved F9 host star, we infer that the companion has a minimum mass of 28.0+/-1.5 M_Jup, a semimajor axis 0....

  12. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  13. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  14. Discrete Phase Space: Quantum mechanics and non-singular potential functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Anadijiban

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional potential equation, motivated by representations of quantum mechanics, is investigated in four different scenarios: (i) In the usual Euclidean space $\\mathbb{E}_{3}$ where the potential is singular but invariant under the continuous inhomogeneous orthogonal group $\\mathcal{I}O(3)$. The invariance under the translation subgroup is compared to the corresponding unitary transformation in the Schr\\"{o}dinger representation of quantum mechanics. This scenario is well known but serves as a reference point for the other scenarios. (ii) Next, the discrete potential equation as a partial difference equation in a three-dimensional lattice space is studied. In this arena the potential is non-singular but invariance under $\\mathcal{I}O(3)$ is broken. This is the usual picture of lattice theories and numerical approximations. (iii) Next we study the six-dimensional continuous phase space. Here a phase space representation of quantum mechanics is utilized. The resulting potential is singular but posse...

  15. Composition, stability, and measurement of reduced uranium phases for groundwater bioremediation at Old Rifle, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Davis, J. A.; Bargar, John R.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Williams, K. H.; Veramani, H.; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Stubbs, J. B.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Lesher, Emily; Wilkins, Michael J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Longg, P. E.

    2011-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Reductive biostimulation is currently being explored as a possible remediation strategy for uranium (U) contaminated groundwater, and is currently being investigated at a field site in Rifle, CO, USA. The long-term stability of the resulting U(IV) phases is a key component of the overall performance and depends upon a variety of factors, including rate and mechanism of reduction, mineral associations in the subsurface, and propensity for oxidation. To address these factors, several approaches were used to evaluate the redox sensitivity of U: measurement of the rate of oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite (UO2(s)) deployed in groundwater at Rifle, characterization of a zone of natural bioreduction exhibiting relevant reduced mineral phases, and laboratory studies of the oxidative capacity of Fe(III) and reductive capacity of Fe(II) with regard to U(IV) and U(VI), respectively.

  16. Geometric phase in Stückelberg interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lih-King Lim; Jean-Noël Fuchs; Gilles Montambaux

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the time evolution of a two-dimensional quantum particle exhibiting an energy spectrum, made of two bands, with two Dirac cones, as e.g. in the band structure of a honeycomb lattice. A force is applied such that the particle experiences two Landau-Zener transitions in succession. The adiabatic evolution between the two transitions leads to St\\"uckelberg interferences, due to two possible trajectories in energy space. In addition to well-known dynamical and Stokes phases, the interference pattern reveals a geometric phase which depends on the chirality (winding number) and the mass sign associated to each Dirac cone, as well as on the type of trajectory (parallel or diagonal with respect to the two cones) in parameter space. This geometric phase reveals the coupling between the bands encoded in the structure of the wavefunctions.

  17. Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering] [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering; Belashchenko, Kirill [Department of Physics & Astronomy] [Department of Physics & Astronomy

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

  18. Phase appearance or disappearance in two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -phase flows. Such models have crucial importance in many industrial areas such as nuclear power plant safety safety studies. In nuclear reactors, the appearance of vapor around the fuel rods interferes.cordier@cea.fr, anela.kumbaro@cea.fr 2 Universit´e de Toulouse; UPS, INSA, UT1, UTM ; Institut de Math´ematiques de

  19. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  20. Geometric phases in quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Sjöqvist

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of quantum information science has opened up a new venue for applications of the geometric phase (GP), as well as triggered new insights into its physical, mathematical, and conceptual nature. Here, we review this development by focusing on three main themes: the use of GPs to perform robust quantum computation, the development of GP concepts for mixed quantum states, and the discovery of a new type of topological phases for entangled quantum systems. We delineate the theoretical development as well as describe recent experiments related to GPs in the context of quantum information.

  1. Ising model: secondary phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You-gang Feng

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lttice-spin phonons are considered, which make the heat capacity at the critical temperature satisfy experimental observations better. There is a BEC phase transition in an Ising model attributable to the lattice-spin phonons. We proved that the spin-wave theory only is available after BEC transition, and the magnons have the same characteristics as the lattice-spin phonons', resulting from quantum effect. Energy-level overlap effect at ultralow temperature is found. A prediction of BEC phase transition in a crystal is put forward as our theory generalization.

  2. PHASE NOISE IN MICROWAVE OSCILLATORS AND AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    presents analysis and measurements of phase noise in oscilla- tors and amplifiers. Low phase noise- multaneous small size, low phase noise, DC power consumption and thermal drift is presented. Design stepsPHASE NOISE IN MICROWAVE OSCILLATORS AND AMPLIFIERS by MILOS JANKOVI´C B.E., University of Arkansas

  3. Reference Phase of Fresnel Zone Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Webb

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard zone plate assumes that the shortest ray connecting a radiation source and a detection point has a phase of 0 deg thereby defining a reference phase. Here we examine the experimental consequences of varying this reference phase from 0 deg to 360 deg. It is concluded that reference phase is an intrinsic and useful property of zone plates.

  4. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ma, Qingyu, E-mail: maqingyu@njnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  5. The Phase of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an analogy with the well-known double-slit experiment, we show that the standard phase of neutrino oscillations is correct, refuting recent claims of a factor of two correction. We also improve the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillations taking into account explicitly the finite coherence time of the detection process.

  6. Representation of noncommutative phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang Li; Jianhua Wang; Chiyi Chen

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The representations of the algebra of coordinates and momenta of noncommutative phase space are given. We study, as an example, the harmonic oscillator in noncommutative space of any dimension. Finally the map of Sch$\\ddot{o}$dinger equation from noncommutative space to commutative space is obtained.

  7. Accreting White Dwarfs among the Planetary Nebulae Most Luminous in [O III]5007 Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose that some of the most luminous planetary nebulae (PNs) are actually proto-PNs, where a companion white dwarf (WD) accretes mass at a relatively high rate from the post-asymptotic giant branch star that blew the nebula. The WD sustains a continuous nuclear burning and ionizes the nebula. The WD is luminous enough to make the dense nebula luminous in the [O III]5007 line, In young stellar populations these WD accreting systems account for a small fraction of [O III]-luminous PNs, but in old stellar populations these binaries might account for most, or even all, of the [OIII]-luminous PNs. This might explain the puzzling constant cutoff (maximum) [O III]5007 luminosity of the planetary nebula luminosity function across different galaxy types.

  8. Modification and benchmarking of SKYSHINE-III for use with ISFSI cask arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertel, N.E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry cask storage arrays are becoming more and more common at nuclear power plants in the United States. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72, limits doses at the controlled area boundary of these independent spent-fuel storage installations (ISFSI) to 0.25 mSv (25 mrem)/yr. The minimum controlled area boundaries of such a facility are determined by cask array dose calculations, which include direct radiation and radiation scattered by the atmosphere, also known as skyshine. NAC International (NAC) uses SKYSHINE-III to calculate the gamma-ray and neutron dose rates as a function of distance from ISFSI arrays. In this paper, we present modifications to the SKYSHINE-III that more explicitly model cask arrays. In addition, we have benchmarked the radiation transport methods used in SKYSHINE-III against {sup 60}Co gamma-ray experiments and MCNP neutron calculations.

  9. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  10. The collision of Title III and Title V: A potential permitting and enforcement nightmare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facca, G.; Faler, M.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 (CAA) mandated that all facilities classified as major were to obtain a Federal Title V operating permit. In addition, any facility, either major or minor, which emits certain chemicals or compounds above a specific single quantity limit or a total aggregate limit are subject to Title III requirements and are required to obtain a Title V permit as well. The problem with obtaining a Title V permit for Title III substances is there is limited data, at least for the utilities sources, on emission factors and emission rates for many of the Title III listed chemical compounds. In addition, the emission data that exists is very conservative, and if used, would show the facilities to be significant emitters of hazardous air emissions, while actual emissions are significantly less. This could lead a facility to applying for a Title V permit unnecessarily, a time consuming process at best. In Iowa, facilities submitted the first Title V permit applications in 1994. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently in the process of reviewing the submittals prior to issuing operating permits. Title III has not been addressed at all in the submittals and therefore will not be included in this round of finished permits that are to be issued. The outcome of this is that the Title V permits will have to be opened and amended to include the applicable Title III operating conditions and constraints. This paper will examine the areas where Title III and Title V collide and the potential permitting and enforcement issues that will have to be faced by the facilities that operate under these permits. This paper is based on the opinions of two of the three responsible parties (facilities and consultants) that are dealing with the potential permitting and enforcement wreckage before the collision occurs.

  11. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Lanthanide Organic Phase Complexes in the TALSPEAK Separations Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimes, Travis S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neodymium(III) and europium(III) at variable temperatures:study of complexation of europium and dicarboxylic acids.preferential salvation of europium(III) in water/non-aqueous

  12. A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, James Ferrell

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTIOB BETWEEN BISMUTH ( III) BROMIDE AND AMIBE HYDROBROMIDES A Thesis JAMES FERRELL OSBORNE Submitted to the Graduate School ef the ASriculture and Mechanical CelleSe of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the deSree of MASTER OF SCIENCE AuSust, 1960 MaJor Sub]ect: Chemistry A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTION BETWEEN BISMUTH (III) BROMIDE AND AMINE HYDRQBRGMIDES A Thesis JAMES FEREKLL OSBORNE Approved as to style and content by...

  13. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  14. Quantum phases and dynamics of geometric phase in a quantum spin chain system under linear quench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujit Sarkar; B. Basu

    2011-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum phases of anisotropic XY spin chain system in presence and absence of adiabatic quench. A connection between geometric phase and criticality is established from the dynamical behaviour of the geometric phase for a quench induced quantum phase transition in a quantum spin chain. We predict XX criticality associated with a sequence of non-contractible geometric phases.

  15. Thermophysical properties of coexistent phases of plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Dan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium is the element with the greatest number of allotropic phases. Thermally induced transformations between these phases are typically characterized by thermal hysteresis and incomplete phase reversion. With Ga substitutal in the lattice, low symmetry phases are replaced by a higher symmetry phase. However, the low temperature Martensitic phase transformation ({delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime}) in Ga stabilized {delta}-phase Pu is characterized by a region of thermal hysteresis which can reach 200 C in extent. These regions of thermal hysteresis offer a unique opportunity to study thermodynamics in inhomogeneous systems of coexistent phases. The results of thermophysical properties measured for samples of inhomogeneous unalloyed and Ga alloyed Pu will be discussed and compared with similar measurements of their single phase constituents.

  16. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  17. Rheology of cholesteric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dupuis; D. Marenduzzo; E. Orlandini; J. M. Yeomans

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals offer a spectacular example of naturally occurring disclination line networks. Here we numerically solve the hydrodynamic equations of motion to investigate the response of three types of blue phases to an imposed Poiseuille flow. We show that shear forces bend and twist and can unzip the disclination lines. Under gentle forcing the network opposes the flow and the apparent viscosity is significantly higher than that of an isotropic liquid. With increased forcing we find strong shear thinning corresponding to the disruption of the defect network. As the viscosity starts to drop, the imposed flow sets the network into motion. Disclinations break-up and re-form with their neighbours in the flow direction. This gives rise to oscillations in the time-dependent measurement of the average stress.

  18. Phase comparator apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffield, F.E.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention finds especially useful application for interferometer measurements made in plasma fusion devices (e.g., for measuring the line integral of electron density in the plasma). Such interferometers typically use very high intermediate frequencies (e.g., on the order of 10 to 70 MHz) and therefore the phase comparison circuitry should be a high speed circuit with a linear transfer characteristic so as to accurately differentiate between small fractions of interference fringes.

  19. Final Report: Sensorpedia Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Resseguie, David R [ORNL

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) Phase 3 development of Sensorpedia, a sensor information sharing platform. Sensorpedia is ORNL s Wikipedia for Sensors. The overall goal of Sensorpedia is to enable global scale sensor information sharing for scientific research, national security and defense, public health and safety, emergency preparedness and response, and general community awareness and outreach.

  20. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  1. Confined Cubic Blue Phases under Shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; D. Marenduzzo; P. V. Coveney; M. E. Cates

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of confined cubic blue phases under shear flow via lattice Boltzmann simulations. We focus on the two experimentally observed phases, blue phase I and blue phase II. The disinclination network of blue phase II continuously breaks and reforms under shear, leading to an oscillatory stress response in time. The oscillations are only regular for very thin samples. For thicker samples, the shear leads to a "stick-slip" motion of part of the network along the vorticity direction. Blue phase I responds very differently: its defect network undergoes seemingly chaotic rearrangements under shear, irrespective of system size.

  2. Geometric Phase and Classical-Quantum Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indubala I. Satija; Radha Balakrishnan

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the geometric phase factors underlying the classical and the corresponding quantum dynamics of a driven nonlinear oscillator exhibiting chaotic dynamics. For the classical problem, we compute the geometric phase factors associated with the phase space trajectories using Frenet-Serret formulation. For the corresponding quantum problem, the geometric phase associated with the time evolution of the wave function is computed. Our studies suggest that the classical geometric phase may be related to the the difference in the quantum geometric phases between two neighboring eigenstates.

  3. Abstract Two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) comprise an aqueous phase containing all non-carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Abstract Two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) comprise an aqueous phase containing all non developed to address this issue is two-phase par- titioning bioreactor (TPPB) technology which involves

  4. Classical potential describes martensitic phase transformations between the , , and titanium phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, John

    Classical potential describes martensitic phase transformations between the , , and titanium phases of titanium that includes nucleation and growth requires an accurate classical potential. Optimization transformations. Molecular-dynamics simulations map out the pressure-temperature phase diagram of titanium

  5. Phase change material storage heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goswami, D. Yogi (Gainesville, FL); Hsieh, Chung K. (Gainesville, FL); Jotshi, Chand K. (Gainesville, FL); Klausner, James F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  6. Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III, SAPT-5st, and VRT(MCY-5f) surfaces FRANK N. KEUTSCH1 , NIR GOLDMAN2 , HEATHER A. HARKER3 , CLAUDE of the water dimer very well. The VRT(MCY-5f) and especially the VRT(ASP-W)III potentials show larger

  7. Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

  8. Molecular Cell, Vol. 11, 12791289, May, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press RNAse III-Mediated Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    -Mediated Degradation of Unspliced Pre-mRNAs and Lariat Introns While most RNase III-like enzymes cleave ds to bacteria, where RNase III processes and degrades a large number of mRNAs (Bardwell etRPS22B and RPL18A transcripts trigger degradation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and lariat introns and can al., 1989; Court, 1993

  9. Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Herein, we show that a simple trigonal prismatic uranium(III) complex can indeed display slow magnetic

  10. UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The policy on approval of written academic agreements delineates. There are separate policies and procedures for approval of research agreements, both sponsored and unsponsored, which

  11. Calcolo 2B -Analisi III (corso 2003-2004) 14 luglio 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    globali iii) Sul quadrato chiuso ci sono i massimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse y dove la funzione vale 5 e i minimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse x dove la funzione vale -1/4. 2 #12;

  12. ROTSE-III Performance in the Swift Era Yost, S. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    436, Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract. We report the successful performance of the Robotic Optical network of 4 unfiltered 0.45m optical telescopes. The telescopes operate robotically, automatically response the the small, accurate Swift error boxes. We report ROTSE-III's general results, including OTs

  13. III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    18 III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS) 3335-5-14 Powers for a graduate degree 3335-9-32 Requirements for a professional degree DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS NOTE: If you PROGRAM PROPOSALS Completion of this form serves as a degree program proposal and provides information

  14. Identification and Characterization of Bovine Pol III Promoters to Express a Short-Hairpin RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peoples, Michael D 1978-

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Each bPol III promoter was able to express a functional shRNA resulting in a reduction of luciferase activity greater than 68 percent. The bH1 and bU6-2 Luc shRNA vectors were the most effective vectors when transfected with >76 percent (p-value <0...

  15. Light Extraction Efficiency and Radiation Patterns of III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant NETL, DE-PS26-08NT00290, the National Science]­[7], thermoelectric [8]­[11], photovoltaics and solar energy conversion [12]­[14], and terahertz photonics [15], III

  16. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BREAKOUT CRITERIA FOR ACCRETION-POWERED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ioka, Kunihito, E-mail: hiroki@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [KEK Theory Center, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency {eta}. By varying the efficiency {eta} and opening angle {theta}{sub op} for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition {eta} {approx}> 10{sup -4}({theta}{sub op}/8 Degree-Sign ){sup 2} is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.

  17. A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köhler, Kai

    A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations We give a new proof of the Jantzen sum formula for integral repre- sentations of Chevalley formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry to generalized flag varieties. Our proof involves

  18. Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    ), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

  19. Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

  20. Design Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic, and Allison M. Okamura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    and steer around obstacles to reach previously inaccessible locations. Control and planning based on a steering model can compensate for targeting disturbances due to needle bending, error in insertion angleDesign Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic

  1. Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The results indicated that the sorption of Eu. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Eu-HA complexes indicated that the distances

  2. Erwin Schroedinger and the rise of wave mechanics. III. Early response and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehra, J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article (Part III) deals with the early applications of wave mechanics to atomic problems - including the demonstration of the formal mathematical equivalence of wave mechanics with the quantum mechanics of Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan, and that of Dirac - by Schroedinger himself and others. The new theory was immediately accepted by the scientific community.

  3. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanga, Fengzai; Moodya, Michael P.; Martina, Tomas L.; Bagota, Paul A. J.; Kappersa, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    study of Cu grains 385 (Kempshall, et al., 2001). In terms of binary III-nitrides, the metal–N bond length in the 386 wurtzite structure increases from AlN, to GaN and to InN (Ambacher, 1998), being 387 associated with corresponding bond energy of 2...

  4. Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires Hadas Shtrikman,*, Ronit, 2008; Revised Manuscript Received January 13, 2009 ABSTRACT The growth of wurtzite GaAs and In wurtzite structure and are observed to thicken (via lateral growth) once the axial growth exceeds a certain

  5. Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

    Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes Dmitrii us to calculate the efficiency of an incoherent pump in general-geometry double-clad fibers. This approach yields accurate estimates of the absorption rate of each mode of the pump in the first order

  6. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  7. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    rotational­ vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H2 16 O and p-H2IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy

  8. The Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution vs. temperature and its evolution during some selected solar ares, representative of the wideThe Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres Dip. di Scienze Fisiche & Astronomiche class C5.8) to very intense ones (X9) are selected as representative of the aring Sun. The emission

  9. 412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressler, Steven L.

    - formed through this manipulation because it somehow simplifies the process of control appears Geometry, Neural Control; Muscle Models; Optimization Principles in Motor Control References Bennett, D. J412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is now

  10. Analise Matematica III Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 Termodinamica dos Gases Ideais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Anâ??alise Matemâ??atica III ­ Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 ­ Termodinâ??amica dos Gases Ideais N Termodinâ??amica afirma que existe uma funâ?ºcâ?ao E : M # R, dita a energia interna do gâ??as, cuja derivadaâ??amicos gerais pela Segunda Lei da Termodinâ??amica. 2 #12;

  11. Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

  12. Development of Light Guides for the Camera of CANGAROO-III , A. Maeshiro1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    the energy threshold of CANGAROO-III tele- scope, good light collection efficiency is very important-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Kyoto, Japan 3 MSSSO, Australian National University, ACT 2611, Australia 4 Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 5 Institute

  13. Laboratory "Behavioral and Social Sciences" (Lab III) General Rules for Using the Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at or in the building are to be reported immediately to the Laboratory Manager. 3. In order to save energy electrical. Concerning the general philosophy and the rules for booking rooms, please check the Memorandum and Memorandum for Room Booking at the Lab III website. The laboratory guidelines are meant to enable researchers to make

  14. JACQUES H. C. DELABlh REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N 1, 1975 73

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    " REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N° 1, 1975 73 ;. ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO DE LA GENITALIA DEL MACHO DE LAS ESPECIES DE ACROMYRMEX DEL URUGUAY * Lucrecia Covelo de ZoIessi, YoIanda Petrone de Abenan1 Acrumyrmex de Ias especies encontradas hasta el momento, en el Uruguay. Queremos destacar que Ia placa

  15. PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 1 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 DIVISION 13 SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating condition. The system #12;PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 2 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 detail battery calculations per NFPA 72. 4. Indicate all A/C, fans, Dampers to be monitored by fire alarm detailed battery calculations per the

  16. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase-Product Complex,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    synthesis in mammals, nitrite and sulfite assimilation, and methane production in methanogens. Tet of two ALA molecules to form the basic pyrrole structure (porphobilinogen, PBG), and assembly of four PBG pyrroles into a linear tetraypyrrole (hydroxymethylbilane, HMB). Subsequently, uroporphyrino- gen III

  17. CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    Name: CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012 Note: You, . . . , rn of real numbers and an integer k. The problem is to output s1, s2, . . . , sn where si = k-1 q=0 ri+q, for i = 1, 2, . . . , (n - k + 1) and si = ri for i = (n - k + 2), (n - k + 3), . . . , n

  18. Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center, Division designed quantum mechanical simulation tools that have been shown to accurately predict dynamic processes. We also performed calculations on Cu phenatroline with a bidentate stator. DFT is able to accurately

  19. Solid waste operations complex W-113: Specifications. Preliminary design report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is Volume III of the Preliminary Design report for the Solid Waste Retrieval Facility at Hanford. The report was prepared by Raytheon and BNFL Inc. and submitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in January 1995. This volume is a complete listing of the specifications for construction and the required material and equipment.

  20. Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1 , Wen Chao Lee1 This study demonstrates the feasibility of using water and the contents of waste Li-ion batteries for the electrodes in a Li-liquid battery system. Li metal was collected electrochemically from a waste Li

  1. Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D from our laboratory show a modified formula of hot melt ink that can be used in 3D thermal wax printing. Fleming III* Keywords: 3D Structure, Hot Melt, Blowing Agents, Calorimetry Abstract The ability to form

  2. High temperature thermoelectric characterization of III-V semiconductor thin films by oxide bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    bonding Je-Hyeong Bahka) , Gehong Zenga) , Joshua M. O. Zide b) , Hong Luc) , Rajeev Singhd) , Di Lianga bonding technique is developed for high temperature thermoelectric characterization of the thin film III-W-N diffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin film ErAs:InGaAlAs metal/semiconductor nanocomposite

  3. Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III for 3D printing comprises different waxes, tackifier and plasticizer resins, rheology modifiers, and UV rheological (or flow) behavior. 1 3D printing, direct ink-jet printing, and related approaches such as hot

  4. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  5. III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    204 III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries* NANCY H. GOLDSTEIN for policy issues affecting the use of ferroalloys in steel making and certain other alloy production of the Delphi. The Steel and Ferroalloy Delphi included three rounds. The questions and exercises presented

  6. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  7. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifers R O B North, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 The potential for anaerobic benzene. [14C]Benzene was not oxidized to 14CO2 at most sites examined, which is consistent with previous

  8. III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    189 III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study SELWYN ENZER The application of Delphi to the identification and assessment of possible developments in plastics and competing. The ability to tailor-make plastics for various applications, enhanced by growth in understanding of organic

  9. Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    #12;Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III spacecraft on a note of high achieve- ment: the dramatic missions of Apollo XI and XII, the scientifically productive planetary operations, contrib- uted to the successful culmination of the Apollo program, and engaged

  10. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to design a pump for a trough solar power plant system, the intent is for the design to be extensible to a solar power tower application. This can be accomplished by adding pumping stages to increase the discharge pressure to the levels necessary for a solar power tower application. This report incorporates all available conceptual design information completed for this project in Phase I.

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Shi [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Koike, Shota [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Pan, Li Qiang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Bin [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)] [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China)] [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki, E-mail: n-suzuki@p.chiba-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ?ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ?Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ?ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in unfolded proteins.

  12. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and vivianite formed. The results of this study suggest that Fe (III) in loess sediments represents a potentially important source of electron acceptors to support microbial activity in dry environments.

  13. Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Child, C.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

  14. Phases of holographic d-wave superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikun, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study different phases in the holographic model of d-wave superconductor. These are described by solutions to the classical equations of motion found in different ansatze. Apart from the known homogeneous d-wave superconducting phase we find three new solutions. Two of them represent two distinct families of the spatially modulated solutions, which realize the charge density wave phases in the dual theory. The third one is the new homogeneous phase with nonzero anapole moment. These phases are relevant to the physics of cuprate high-Tc superconductor in pseudogap region. While the d-wave phase preserves translation, parity and time reversal symmetry, the striped phases break translations spontaneously. Parity and time-reversal are preserved when combined with discrete half-periodic shift of the wave. In anapole phase translation symmetry is preserved, but parity and time reversal are spontaneously broken. All of the considered solutions brake the global $U(1)$. Thermodynamical treatment shows that in the s...

  15. Studies of phase separable soluble polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furyk, Steven Michael

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers were investigated as phase anchors for SCS palladacycle catalysts. The oligomeric PEG chains were sufficient to engender polar phase solubility in a heptane-DMA thermomorphic system. Microwave irradiation of these thermomorphic...

  16. CRAD, Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  17. Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

  18. Early chemical enrichment of the universe and the role of very massive pop III stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Matteucci; F. Calura

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the role of very massive pop III stars in the chemical enrichment of the early universe is discussed. We first compare our predictions with the abundance ratios measured in the high redshift Lyman-alpha forest to check whether they are compatible with the values predicted by assuming that the early universe was enriched by massive pop III stars. We conclude that to explain the observed C/Si ratio in the intergalactic medium, a contribution from pop II stars to carbon enrichment is necessary, already at redshift z=5. We then evaluate the number of Pair-Instability Supernovae (SN_(gamma gamma)) required to enrich the universe to the critical metallicity Z_cr, i.e. the metallicity value which causes the transition from a very massive star regime (m > 100 M_sun) to a lower mass regime, similar to the one characteristic of the present time (m enrich a cubic megaparsec of the intergalactic medium at high redshift for a variety of initial mass functions. The number of ionizing photons provided by these SN_(gamma gamma) and also by the pop III stars ending as black holes was computed and we conclude that there are not enough photons to reionize the universe, being down by at least a factor of ~ 3. Finally, we calculate the abundance ratios generated by pop III stars and compare it with the ones observed in low metallicity Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). We suggest that pop III stars alone cannot be responsible for the abundance ratios in these objects and that intermediate mass pop II stars must have played an important role especially in enriching DLAs in nitrogen.

  19. Biotransformation of Two-Line Silica-Ferrihydrite by a Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium: Formation of Carbonate Green Rust in the Presence of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reductive biotransformation of two Si-ferrihydrite (0.01 and 0.05 mole% Si) coprecipiates by Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, was investigated in 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid-buffered media (pH ~7) with lactate as the electron donor. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (electron shuttle) that stimulates respiration was present in the media. Experiments were performed without and with PO43- (ranging from 1 to 20 mmol/L in media containing 50 mmol/L Fe). Our objectives were to define the combined effects of SiO44- and PO43- on the bioreducibility and biomineralization of ferrihydrites under anoxic conditions. Iron reduction was measured as a function of time, solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, and aqueous solutions were analyzed for Si, P, Cl- and inorganic carbon. Both of the ferrihydrites were rapidly reduced regardless of the Si content. Si concentration had no effect on the reduction rate or mineralization products. Magnetite was formed in the absence of PO43- whereas carbonate green rust GR(CO32-) ([FeII(6-x)FeIIIx(OH)12]x+(CO32-)0.5x.yH2O) and vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2.8H2O], were formed when PO43- was present. GR(CO32-) dominated as a mineral product in samples with < 4 mmol/L PO43-. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of GR(CO32-) varied with PO43- concentration; it was 2 in the 1 mmol/L PO43- and approached 1 in the 4- and 10-mmol/L PO43- samples. GR appeared to form by solid-state transformation of ferrihydrite. Medium PO43- concentration dictated the mechanism of transformation. In 1 mmol/L PO43- media, an intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase with structural Fe(II), which we tentatively assigned to a protomagnetite phase, slowly transformed to GR with time. In contrast, in medium with >4 mmol/L PO43-, a residual ferrihydrite with sorbed Fe2+ phase transformed to GR. Despite similar chemistries, PO43- was shown to have a profound effect on ferrihydrite biotransformations while that of SiO44- was minimal.

  20. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    de Ju?rez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, M?xico By Dr. Alfredo Granados Olivas Coordinador del Centro de Informaci?n Geogr?fica The Universidad Aut?noma de Ciudad Ju?rez (UACJ) in collaboration... Centro de Informaci?n Geogr?fica The Universidad Aut?noma de Ciudad Ju?rez (UACJ) in collaboration with Zhuping Sheng, Texas A& M University System J. Phillip King, New Mexico State University Bobby Creel, New Mexico Water Resources Research...