National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mgr lajos grof-tisza

  1. PRELIMINARY SELECTION OF MGR DESIGN BASIS EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Kappes

    1999-09-16

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify the preliminary design basis events (DBEs) for consideration in the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). For external events and natural phenomena (e.g., earthquake), the objective is to identify those initiating events that the MGR will be designed to withstand. Design criteria will ensure that radiological release scenarios resulting from these initiating events are beyond design basis (i.e., have a scenario frequency less than once per million years). For internal (i.e., human-induced and random equipment failures) events, the objective is to identify credible event sequences that result in bounding radiological releases. These sequences will be used to establish the design basis criteria for MGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs) design basis criteria in order to prevent or mitigate radiological releases. The safety strategy presented in this analysis for preventing or mitigating DBEs is based on the preclosure safety strategy outlined in ''Strategy to Mitigate Preclosure Offsite Exposure'' (CRWMS M&O 1998f). DBE analysis is necessary to provide feedback and requirements to the design process, and also to demonstrate compliance with proposed 10 CFR 63 (Dyer 1999b) requirements. DBE analysis is also required to identify and classify the SSCs that are important to safety (ITS).

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste treatment building ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality As.surance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) site fire protection system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998b).

  4. Architektura GIS z pohledu tok dat Mgr. Toms Skopal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skopal, Tomas

    1 Architektura GIS z pohledu tok dat Mgr. Tomás Skopal Katedra informatiky, FEI VSB ­ Technická This article introduces original model of open software architecture for GIS, which should hit the intent ­ accelerate and improve GIS applications design. First part deals with the solution motivation, second part

  5. Air-Breathing Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Fuel Cell Ranga S. Jayashree, Lajos Gancs, Eric R. Choban,, Alex Primak, Dilip Natarajan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Air-Breathing Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Fuel Cell Ranga S. Jayashree, Lajos Gancs, Eric R-based microfluidic fuel cell. Micro fuel cells have long been recognized as promising high energy density power sources for portable applications. Many advances in micro fuel cell development have been made, ranging

  6. Comp. Sys. Mgr. 4 Director of IT Media Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Project Liaisons Quality Assurance and IT Analytics Mainframe Operation Web Development (Acad. & Admin Services IT Sr. Assoc. III Directory Services Datacenter Operation & Management Server Administration Office (PMO) ISS IT Internal Operations Management Office of Information Technology (OIT) Organization

  7. Complex Event Processing Synergies with Gabriella Tth, Lajos Jen Flp, rpd Beszdes, Tibor Gyimthy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    engine generates the new (predicted) PCE event Success = correct prediction in 1 hour 93.15% precision the last 1.5 hours alert (complex event) The event is predicted 0.5 or 1 hour before it really occurs CEP Secondary CEP query CEP ­ PA application Refresh predictors every half an hour Dump CEP and PA events

  8. The Recent Star Formation History of Galaxies in X--Ray Clusters Michael Lajos Balogh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogh, Michael L.

    .Sc., Math & Physics, McMaster University 1995 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment there as they are in the cluster sample. If star formation is terminated in a galaxy after a short starburst, the spectrum that star formation is terminated in galaxies that are incorporated into these clusters. This termination

  9. The MGR algorithm and its application to the generation of explanations for novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    . A stuck inlet valve in the cooling system of a nuclear reactor, for example, can set off a sequence illustrated using a problem from process control.1 1. Intelligent decision support for process control A major concern in the application of computers to the control of physical and mechanical processes is the degree

  10. Title: Freedom of Information Request DIR DIV NAME MGR DEP AMA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 to 1990 Timeline2PresentedTitle:

  11. Biomechanics of common carotid arteries from mice heterozygous for mgR, the most common mouse model of Marfan syndrome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taucer, Anne Irene

    2009-05-15

    complications affecting the normal population, including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is imperative to gather biomechanical data from the Marfan vasculature so that clinicians may predict the effects of vascular complications in Marfan...

  12. Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Introduction Monitoring Division Mgr Training, Adv NARAC Dispersion Modeling NARAC Web Operations Overview of Consequence Management Overview of the DOENNSA Emergency...

  13. Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality Béla Csaba, Lajos Schrettner, Árpád Beszédes clusters and software quality. Such attempts are hindered by a number of difficulties: there are problems in assessing the quality of software, measuring the degree of clusterization of software and finding the means

  14. AIR-BREATHING LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROFLUIDIC FUEL CELL Ranga S. Jayashree1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    AIR-BREATHING LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROFLUIDIC FUEL CELL Ranga S. Jayashree1 , Lajos Gancs2 , Eric R of the laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell. A 5-mm thick graphite plate (anode, fuel cell grade graphite bipolar plate purchased from Fuel Cell Stores.com) was cleaned by sonication in large portions of Milli

  15. Office: ITO PE/Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Kevin

    Mgr.: Mills/Swinson PAD No.: Smart Spaces Moving Through Smart Spaces "city-wide appliances" "in1 DARPA Office: ITO PE/Project: Pgm No.: Pgm Mgr.: Mills/Swinson PAD No.: Smart Spaces Personal Information Projection · Develop techniques for projecting personal information from cyberspace into smart

  16. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler Engr. Section Mgr., Space & National Systems Div. General Dynamics C4 Systems Jack Davis President Systems Technology Medtronic Bill Twardy Manager, Research for SRP SRP Peter Zdebel CTO ON Semiconductor

  17. Document: NA Actionee: Dorothy Riehie Document Date: 02/25/2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Request (FOI 2010-00842) DIR DIV NAME DIR DIV NAME MGR AMRC DEP AMISE AMA EMD FMD GOD HRM SED PRO 0CC AMCP OCE Riehle, Dorothy (Actionee) AMMS ORP ISI PNSO PIC RLCI SES...

  18. Document: NA Actionee: Dorothy Riehie SDocument Date: 09/23/2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Information Act Request DIR DIV NAME DIR DIV NAME MGR AMRC DEP AMSE AMA EMD FMD OOD HRM SED PRO 0CC AMCP OCE Riehle, Dorothy (Actionee) AMMS ORP 151 PNSO PIG RLCI SES...

  19. Practical (Second) Preimage Attacks on Gautham Sekar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Indian Statistical Institute, Chennai Centre, SETS Campus, MGR Knowledge City, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113, India. 2 Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113, India goals are not met. Motivation behind this work: The TCS, headquartered in India, is among the largest

  20. AcademicComputingServices(ACS) STANFORDLIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,Stanford Humanities Center/CESTA NicoleColeman Academic Technology Specialist,History JasonHeppler Headof Operations Technology Specialist,IRISS VijoyAbraham ATS,Human Biology CarlosSeligo LanguageLab ServiceMgr TakeshiSengiku Academic Technology Specialist,English KennyLigda Academic Technology Specialist,DLCL MichaelWidner ATS

  1. Energy-Efficient Platform Designs for Real-World Wireless Sensing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Unit Scheduler Power Mgr Driver Calib. PowerReg.&Distr.Switch windmill solar panel battery otherEnergy-Efficient Platform Designs for Real-World Wireless Sensing Applications Pai H. Chou sensing systems (WESS) are one of the major driving forces behind many of the recent innovations

  2. January 10, 2014School of Environmental & Forest Sciences Tom DeLuca Prof & Director/Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Krause Desktop Sup/Lab Mgr David Guenther Network Admin Lisa Nordlund Advisor / Undergrad Amanda Davis Advisor / Grad TBA Fiscal Specialist Supervisor TBA Fiscal Specialist Laura Davis REEport/Biofuels PCResource Management Wildlife Science Faculty Key Hinckley, Tom Professor Emeritus [teaching] McKEAN, BILL Professor

  3. Audience/Panel Discussion: Sites Lesson Learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control Using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Deputy Dept Mgr for Planning & Integration, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work planning and control lessons learned and audience/panel discussion on site's lessons learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline Document.

  4. Sustainability 2011, 3, 443-464; doi:10.3390/su3020443 sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Buildings [16] requires member states to implement energy efficiency legislations for buildings, including Technologies of Energy and Energy Efficiency (T3E), École de Technologie Supérieure, 201 Boul. Mgr, Bourget. For instance, for a typical low thermal energy consumption building, the embodied energy of construction

  5. Trading Structure for Randomness in Wireless Opportunistic Szymon Chachulski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Randomness in Wireless Opportunistic Routing by Szymon Chachulski Submitted to the Department of ElectricalTrading Structure for Randomness in Wireless Opportunistic Routing by Szymon Chachulski mgr inz., Warsaw University of Technology (2005) Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer

  6. Chemistry Safety Notes Volume 1, Issue 2 December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry Safety Notes Volume 1, Issue 2 December 2013 "Chemistry Safety Notes" is published by the Chemistry Dept. Safety Committee, written & edited by Debbie Decker, Safety Mgr. EH&S Inspections EH job! However, there are some recent changes in EH&S mandates for us, with which we are not entirely

  7. Summary of the D&D Engineering Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics Supervisor D&D Construction WBS Mgr. D&D HP/ Rad Waste WBS Manager #12;Work Planning Process of future fusion projects.! ! Scope! · 2398 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste.! · 1995 metric tons&D Work Control Center Organizational Chart Industrial Hygiene Construction Safety D&D Engineering WBS

  8. New Houston NOx Rules: Implications and Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascone, R.

    2002-01-01

    Rules: Implications and Solutions Impact ofNew NOx Regulations in the Houston Galveston Area (HGA) Ron Cascone - Mgr. Special Projects, Utilities &Environ. ABSTRACT New regulations drastically cut the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) allowed... monitored six key atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO), lead, nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM IO ), sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds (YOCs). Except for NOx, emissions of all have decreased significantly. NOx...

  9. Driving Energy Performance with Energy Management Teams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younghein, M.; Tunnessen, W.

    2006-01-01

    , annual strategy meetings can allow teams to develop action plans for the following year that are presented to senior management far in advance. TEAMING TO OVERCOME COMMON CHALLENGES TO EFFECTIVE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: Examples from... with Energy Management Teams Meredith Younghein ENERGY STAR Industrial Communications Mgr. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC ABSTRACT Companies today face an uncertain energy future. Businesses face escalating energy prices which...

  10. Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment PAGE 1 OF 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) ATM 1040 I PAGE 1 OF 5 Aaraapace 5yst:al'n8Divllllon Non~f" /;Z#4-tl-..· SJ Ellison, Mgr. ALSEP Reliability #12;Lunar Seismic Profiling Experin1ent \\LSPEJ Non Bulova BxA BxA, Geotech Geotech Geotech BxA BxA BxA BxA BxA Geotech Geotech #12;Lunar Seismic Pr, g

  11. General and Localized Corrosion of Borated Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.E. Lister; Ronald E. Mizia; A.W. Erickson; T.L. Trowbridge; B. S. Matteson

    2008-03-01

    The Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system is being proposed to transport and store spent nuclear fuel at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The preliminary design of this system identifies borated stainless steel as the neutron absorber material that will be used to fabricate fuel basket inserts for nuclear criticality control. This paper discusses corrosion test results for verifying the performance of this material manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A, under the expected repository conditions.

  12. Are deep neural networks really learning relevant features?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the art ten years aer a state of the art: Future research in music information retrieval," J. New Music://github.com/coreyker/dnn-mgr blues classical country disco hiphop jazz metal pop reggae rock Pr blues classical country disco hiphop jazz metal pop reggae rock F 96.0 0.0 8.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 8.0 4.0 77.4 0.0 88.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0

  13. Engineering exotic phases for topologically protected quantum computation by emulating quantum dimer models RID B-7826-2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albuquerque, A. Fabricio; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Troyer, Matthias; Blatter, Gianni.

    2008-01-01

    1934. 5, Osgood, N ~ R "A Theory of Flexure for Beams uith Nonparallel Extreme Fibers. " Journal of ~Alied Eechanics3 Vol. VIS No. 13 (SePtemberp 1939). PP. A 122-126. 6. Saksena~ G. B. "Shear Stress in Tapering Beam. " Aircraft Engineer inE, Vol... derived in mgr tcnct on the theory of elastioity, ox ccrc ~ Y(p-q) ? 4-&x The plus or adnus sign is used depending on the angle 8 and ths shear Sheol groyono/ Figure 13 If 9 is batsmen the shear diagonal and Og, then Oj is aigsbraioa13y ~ than OX...

  14. ESF Mine Power Center Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Misiak

    2000-02-10

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to structurally evaluate the existing Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) mine power center (MPC) support frames and to design service platforms that will attach to the MPC support frames. This analysis follows the Development Plan titled ''Produce Additional Design for Title 111 Evaluation Report'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This analysis satisfies design recommended in the ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Power System'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b, Section 7.6) and concurred with in the ''System Safety Evaluation of Title 111 Evaluation Reports Recommended Work'' (Gwyn 1999, Section 10.1.1). This analysis does not constitute a level-3 deliverable, a level-4 milestone, or a supporting work product. This document is not being prepared in support of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Site Recommendation (SR), Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), or License Application (LA) and should not be cited as a reference in the MGR SR, EIS, or LA.

  15. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

  16. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 7.28). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.124, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' (Ref. 7.29).

  17. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident.

  18. Secondary Low-Level Waste Treatment Strategy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. LaRue

    1999-05-25

    The objective of this analysis is to identify and review potential options for processing and disposing of the secondary low-level waste (LLW) that will be generated through operation of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). An estimate of annual secondary LLW is generated utilizing the mechanism established in ''Secondary Waste Treatment Analysis'' (Reference 8.1) and ''Secondary Low-Level Waste Generation Rate Analysis'' (Reference 8.5). The secondary LLW quantities are based on the spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) arrival schedule as defined in the ''Controlled Design Assumptions Document'' (CDA) (Reference 8.6). This analysis presents estimates of the quantities of LLW in its various forms. A review of applicable laws, codes, and standards is discussed, and a synopsis of those applicable laws, codes, and standards and their impacts on potential processing and disposal options is presented. The analysis identifies viable processing/disposal options in light of the existing laws, codes, and standards, and then evaluates these options in regard to: (1) Process and equipment requirements; (2) LLW disposal volumes; and (3) Facility requirements.

  19. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  20. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  1. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  2. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Mon

    2001-08-29

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.

  3. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  4. Studies of the biological synthesis of amino acids by Lactobacillus arabinosus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, D. W.

    1950-01-01

    MNnRLy AiCsRGsiseGy ist LGilRL Nr RLG isCAil NMoisCaA Lia dGGs MGilCWGt rNM N.GM ?0 TGiMaJ FuMCso RLCa RCAG RLG eLGACeil eNAYNaCRCNs ist aRMueRuMG Nr ill RLG iACsN ieCta psNns RN NeeuM Cs YMNRGCsa NM YMNRGCs tGMC.iRC.Ga Li.G dGGs nGll GaRidlCaLGtJ Ua...NliRCNs YMNeGtuMGa ist aTsRLGRCe AGRLNta rNM RLG YMGYiMiRCNs Nr YuMG iACsN ieCta Li.G dGGs MGrCsGt RN RLG YNCsR RLiR ilANaR ill Nr RLG CAYNMRisR iACsN ieCta iMG sNn MGitClT i.iClidlG Cs RLG YuMG aRiRG ist iR i ANtGMiRG YMCeGJ va i tCMGeR MGaulR Nr RLGaG iee...

  5. REVIEW OF NRC APPROVED DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Markman

    1999-09-17

    Preliminary design concepts for the proposed Subsurface Repository at Yucca Mountain indicate extensive reliance on modern, computer-based, digital control technologies. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the degree to which the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has accepted and approved the use of digital control technology for safety-related applications within the nuclear power industry. This analysis reviews cases of existing digitally-based control systems that have been approved by the NRC. These cases can serve as precedence for using similar types of digitally-based control technologies within the Subsurface Repository. While it is anticipated that the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) will not contain control systems as complex as those required for a nuclear power plant, the review of these existing NRC approved applications will provide the YMP with valuable insight into the NRCs review process and design expectations for safety-related digital control systems. According to the YMP Compliance Program Guidance, portions of various NUREGS, Regulatory Guidelines, and nuclear IEEE standards the nuclear power plant safety related concept would be applied to some of the designs on a case-by-case basis. This analysis will consider key design methods, capabilities, successes, and important limitations or problems of selected control systems that have been approved for use in the Nuclear Power industry. An additional purpose of this analysis is to provide background information in support of further development of design criteria for the YMP. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify and research the extent and precedence of digital control and remotely operated systems approved by the NRC for the nuclear power industry. Help provide a basis for using and relying on digital technologies for nuclear related safety critical applications. (2) Identify the basic control architecture and methods of key digital control systems approved for use in the nuclear power industry by the NRC. (3) Identify and discuss key design issues, features, benefits, and limitations of these NRC approved digital control systems that can be applied as design guidance and correlated to the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) design requirements. (4) Identify codes and standards used in the design of these NRC approved digital control systems and discuss their possible applicability to the design of a subsurface nuclear waste repository. (5) Evaluate the NRC approved digital control system's safety, reliability and maintainability features and issues. Apply these to MGR design methodologies and requirements. (6) Provide recommendations for use in developing design criteria in the System Description Documents for the digital control systems of the subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. (7) Develop recommendations for applying NRC approval methods for digital control systems for the subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will focus on the development of the issues, criteria and methods used and required for identifying the appropriate requirements for digital based control systems. Attention will be placed on development of recommended design criteria for digital controls including interpretation of codes, standards and regulations. Attention will also focus on the use of digital controls and COTS (Commercial Off-the-shelf) technology and equipment in selected NRC approved digital control systems, and as referenced in applicable codes, standards and regulations. The analysis will address design issues related to COTS technology and how they were dealt with in previous NRC approved digital control systems.

  6. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  7. Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

  8. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-11-16

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  9. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  10. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-12

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the disposal container inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be a barrier made of high-nickel alloy. The defense HLW disposal container interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and the internal waste by transferring heat from the canisters to the external environment and by protecting the canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal container also interfaces with the canisters by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. A loaded and sealed disposal container (waste package) interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift waste package supports upon which the waste packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement /Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval for the disposal container/waste package.

  11. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-12

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lid will be made of high-nickel alloy. The basket will assist criticality control, provide structural support, and improve heat transfer. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and internal waste by transferring heat from the SNF to the external environment and by protecting the SFN assemblies and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The system also interfaces with the SFN by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents of the SFN. The waste package interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift pallets upon which the wasted packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Assembly Transfer System, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and retrieval of the disposal container/waste package.

  12. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the horizontal PGV hazard curve for the waste emplacement level. The relation of this analysis to other work feeding the seismic consequence abstraction and the TSPA is shown on Figure 1-1. The ground motion hazard results from the PSHA provide the basis for inputs to a site-response model that determines the effect of site materials on the ground motion at a location of interest (e.g., the waste emplacement level). Peak ground velocity values determined from the site-response model for the waste emplacement level are then used to develop time histories (seismograms) that form input to a model of drift degradation under seismic loads potentially producing rockfall. The time histories are also used to carry out dynamic seismic structural response calculations of the drip shield and waste package system. For the drip shield, damage from seismically induced rockfall also is considered. In the seismic consequence abstraction, residual stress results from the structural response calculations are interpreted in terms of the percentage of the component (drip shield, waste package) damaged as a function of horizontal PGV. The composite hazard curve developed in this analysis, which reflects the results of site-response modeling and the bound to credible horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level, also feeds the seismic consequence abstraction. The composite hazard curve is incorporated into the TSPA sampling process to bound horizontal PGV and related seismic consequences to values that are credible.

  13. Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System transports Waste Packages (WPs) from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) to the subsurface area of emplacement, and emplaces the WPs once there. The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System also, if necessary, removes some or all of the WPs from the underground and transports them to the surface. Lastly, the system is designed to remediate abnormal events involving the portions of the system supporting emplacement or retrieval. During emplacement operations, the system operates on the surface between the WHB and North Portal, and in the subsurface in the North Ramp, access mains, and emplacement drifts. During retrieval or abnormal conditions, the operations areas may also extend to a surface retrieval storage site and South Portal on the surface, and the South Ramp in the subsurface. A typical transport and emplacement operation involves the following sequence of events. A WP is loaded into a WP transporter at the WHB, and coupled to a pair of transport locomotives. The locomotives transport the WP from the WHB, down the North Ramp, and to the entrance of an emplacement drift. Once docked at the entrance of the emplacement drift, the WP is moved outside of the WP transporter, and engaged by a WP emplacement gantry. The WP emplacement gantry lifts the WP, and transports it to its emplacement location, where the WP is then lowered to its final resting position. The WP emplacement gantry remains in the drift while the WP transporter is returned to the WHB by the locomotives. When the transporter reaches the WHB, the sequence of operations is repeated. Retrieval of all the WPs, or a large group of WPs, under normal conditions is achieved by reversing the emplacement operations. Retrieval of a small set of WPs, under normal or abnormal conditions, is known as recovery. Recovery performed under abnormal conditions will involve a suite of specialized equipment designed to perform a variety of tasks to enable the recovery process. Recovery after abnormal events may require clearing of equipment, rock, and ground support to facilitate recovery operations. Stabilization of existing ground support and installation of new ground support may also be needed. Recovery of WP(s) after an event that has contaminated drifts and/or WPs will require limiting the spread of contamination. Specialized equipment will also be necessary for system restoration (e.g., after a derailment, component failure). The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System interfaces with the Subsurface Facility System and Ground Control System for the size and layout of the underground openings. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Ventilation System for the emplacement drift operating environment and the size of the drift isolation doors. The system interfaces with all WP types for the size, weight, and other important parameters affecting emplacement, recovery, and retrieval. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System for the rail system upon which it operates and the distribution of power through the rail system. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for the transmission of data to and from the system equipment, and for remote control of system equipment. The system interfaces with the Ground Control System for any repairs that are made. The system interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System for the WP emplacement mode and hardware. The system interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System and the Waste Handling Building System for the receipt (during emplacement) and delivery (during retrieval/recovery) of WPs.

  14. DOE Hydropower Program Biennial Report for FY 2005-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, Michael J; Cada, Glenn F; Acker, Thomas L.; Carlson, Thomas; Dauble, Dennis D.; Hall, Douglas G.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Program is part of the Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Program's mission is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will increase the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower. The Department's Hydropower Program activities are conducted by its national laboratories: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [formerly Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory], Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and by a number of industry, university, and federal research facilities. Programmatically, DOE Hydropower Program R&D activities are conducted in two areas: Technology Viability and Technology Application. The Technology Viability area has two components: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices) and (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis). The Technology Application area also has two components: (1) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications) and (2) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology). This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2005-2006 under all four program areas. Major accomplishments include the following: Conducted field testing of a Retrofit Aeration System to increase the dissolved oxygen content of water discharged from the turbines of the Osage Project in Missouri. Contributed to the installation and field testing of an advanced, minimum gap runner turbine at the Wanapum Dam project in Washington. Completed a state-of-the-science review of hydropower optimization methods and published reports on alternative operating strategies and opportunities for spill reduction. Carried out feasibility studies of new environmental performance measurements of the new MGR turbine at Wanapum Dam, including measurement of behavioral responses, biomarkers, bioindex testing, and the use of dyes to assess external injuries. Evaluated the benefits of mitigation measures for instream flow releases and the value of surface flow outlets for downstream fish passage. Refined turbulence flow measurement techniques, the computational modeling of unsteady flows, and models of blade strike of fish. Published numerous technical reports, proceedings papers, and peer-reviewed literature, most of which are available on the DOE Hydropower website. Further developed and tested the sensor fish measuring device at hydropower plants in the Columbia River. Data from the sensor fish are coupled with a computational model to yield a more detailed assessment of hydraulic environments in and around dams. Published reports related to the Virtual Hydropower Prospector and the assessment of water energy resources in the U.S. for low head/low power hydroelectric plants. Convened a workshop to consider the environmental and technical issues associated with new hydrokinetic and wave energy technologies. Laboratory and DOE staff participated in numerous workshops, conferences, coordination meetings, planning meetings, implementation meetings, and reviews to transfer the results of DOE-sponsored research to end-users.

  15. Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System transports Waste Packages (WPs) from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) to the subsurface area of emplacement, and emplaces the WPs once there. The system also, if necessary, removes some or all of the WPs from the underground and transports them to the surface. Lastly, the system is designed to remediate abnormal events involving the portions of the system supporting emplacement or retrieval. During emplacement operations, the system operates on the surface between the WHB and North Portal, and in the subsurface in the North Ramp, access mains, and emplacement drifts. During retrieval or abnormal conditions, the operations areas may also extend to a surface retrieval storage site and South Portal on the surface, and the South Ramp in the subsurface. A typical transport and emplacement operation involves the following sequence of events. A WP is loaded into a WP transporter at the WHB, and coupled to a pair of transport locomotives. The locomotives transport the WP from the WHB, down the North Ramp, and to the entrance of an emplacement drift. Once docked at the entrance of the emplacment drift, the WP is moved outside of the WP transporter, and engaged by a WP emplacement gantry. The gantry lifts the WP, and transports it to its emplacement location, where the WP is then lowered to its final resting position. The gantry remains in the drift while the WP transporter is returned to the WHB by the locomotives. When the transporter reaches the WHB, the sequence of operations is repeated. Retrieval of all the WPs, or a large group of WPs, under normal conditions is achieved by reversing the emplacement operations. Retrieval of a small set of WPs, under normal or abnormal conditions, is known as recovery. Recovery performed under abnormal conditions will involve a suite of specialized equipment designed to perform a variety of tasks to enable the recovery process. Recovery after abnormal events may require clearing of equipment, rock, and ground support to facilitate recovery operations. Stabilization of existing ground support and installation of new ground support may also be needed. Recovery of WPs after an event that has contaminated drifts and/or WPs will require limiting the spread of contamination. Specialized equipment will also be necessary for system restoration. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Facility System and Ground Control System for the size and layout of the underground openings. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Ventilation System for the emplacement drift operating environment and the size of the drift isolation doors. The system interfaces with all WP types for the size, weight, and other important parameters affecting emplacement, recovery, and retrieval. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System for the rail system upon which it operates and the distribution of power throuch the rail system. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for the transmission of data to and from the system equipment, and for remote control of system equipment. The system interfaces with the Ground Control System for any repairs that are made. The system interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System for the WP emplacement mode and hardware. The system interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System and the Waste Handling Building System for the receipt (during emplacement) and delivery (during retrieval/recovery) of WPs.