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Sample records for mfg continental tire

  1. Dainippon Screen Mfg Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mfg Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dainippon Screen Mfg Co Place: Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan Sector: Solar Product: Japan-based company engaged in the manufacture and sale of...

  2. Tuori Solar Energy Equipment Mfg Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tuori Solar Energy Equipment Mfg Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tuori Solar Energy Equipment Mfg Company Place: Baoding, Hebei Province, China Zip: 71000 Sector: Solar...

  3. DOE High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program Seeks To

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fund New Proposals To Jumpstart Energy Technologies | Department of Energy High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program Seeks To Fund New Proposals To Jumpstart Energy Technologies DOE High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program Seeks To Fund New Proposals To Jumpstart Energy Technologies March 18, 2016 - 3:31pm Addthis News release from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, March 17 2016 LIVERMORE, Calif - A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program

  4. HPC4Mfg: Boosting American Competiveness in Clean Energy Manufacturing through High Performance Computing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Higher efficiency jet engines to save fuel; stronger fiberglass made with less energy for wind turbines and lightweight vehicles; next generation semiconductor devices for more efficient data centers: these are just a few of the manufacturing challenges that the Energy Department's ten new High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) projects will tackle over the next year.

  5. Burning tires for fuel and tire pyrolysis: air implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.; Meardon, K.; Russell, D.

    1991-12-01

    The document was developed in response to increasing inquiries into the environmental impacts of burning waste tires in process equipment. The document provides information on the use of whole, scrap tires and tire-derived-fuel (TDF) as combustion fuel and on the pyrolysis of scrap tires. The use of whole tires and TDF as a primary fuel is discussed for dedicated tire-to-energy facilities. The use of whole tires and TDF as a supplemental fuel is discussed for cement manufacturing plants, electric utilities, pulp and paper mills, and other industrial processes. The focus of the document is on the impact of burning whole tires and TDF on air emissions. Test data are presented and, in most instances, compared with emissions under baseline conditions (no tires or TDF in the fuel). The control devices used in these industries are discussed and, where possible, their effectiveness in controlling emissions from the burning of whole tires or TDF is described. In addition, the report provides information on the processes themselves that use whole tires or TDF, the modifications to the processes that allowed the use of whole tires or TDF, and the operational experiences of several facilities using whole tires or TDF. The economic feasibility of using whole tires and TDF for the surveyed industries is discussed. Finally, contacts for State waste tire programs are presented.

  6. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  7. Tire deflation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-01-05

    A tire deflation device includes (1) a component having a plurality of bores, (2) a plurality of spikes removably insertable into the plurality of bores and (3) a keeper within each among the plurality of bores, the keeper being configured to contact a sidewall surface of a spike among the plurality of spikes and to exert force upon the sidewall surface. In an embodiment, the tire deflation device includes (a) a component including a bore in a material, the bore including a receiving region, a sidewall surface and a base surface, (b) a channel extending from the sidewall surface into the material, (c) a keeper having a first section housed within the channel and a second section which extends past the sidewall surface into the receiving region, and (d) a spike removably insertable into the bore.

  8. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  9. Scrap tires: a resource and technology evaluation of tire pyrolysis and other selected alternate technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.; Domenico, W.F.; Evans, D.R.; Fish, L.W.; Lassahn, P.L.; Toth, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    The results of a technical and economic evaluation of scrap tire pyrolysis are presented and some other alternative uses for scrap tires are discussed. A scrap tire, by definition in this report, is one for which there is no economic end use. Information is presented on the scrap tire resource, pyrolysis processes, pyrolysis products (char, oil, and gas), markets for these products, and the economics of tire pyrolysis. A discussion is presented on alternative ideas for using scrap tires as an energy resource.

  10. Kicking the Tires | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kicking the Tires September 12, 2008 On Thursday, we heard a colloquium presentation from Barry Barish of Caltech, who leads the global efforts on the International Linear Collider. This, if built, would justifiably warrant the description "Mega-project." Barry's presentation impressed many. What is even more interesting is why Barry was here. He put it directly in the introduction to his talk: "We are here to kick the tires." Now often that's fine, unless you are a tire. And

  11. New Tire Technologies Can Improve Fuel Efficiency by More Than...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by More Than 5% New Tire Technologies Can Improve Fuel Efficiency by More Than 5% Cooper Tire recently developed concept tires that can improve fuel efficiency by 5.5%,...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low Rolling Resistance Tires to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Rolling Resistance Tires on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data

  13. Vacuum pyrolysis of used tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, C.; Darmstadt, H.; Benallal, B.; Chaala, A.; Schwerdtfeger, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    The vacuum pyrolysis of used tires enables the recovery of useful products, such as pyrolytic oil and pyrolytic carbon black (CB{sub P}). The light part of the pyrolytic oil contains dl-limonene which has a high price on the market. The naphtha fraction can be used as a high octane number component for gasoline. The middle distillate demonstrated mechanical and lubricating properties similar to those of the commercial aromatic oil Dutrex R 729. The heavy oil was tested as a feedstock for the production of needle coke. It was found that the surface morphology of CB{sub P} produced by vacuum pyrolysis resembles that of commercial carbon black. The CB{sub P} contains a higher concentration of inorganic compounds (especially ZnO and S) than commercial carbon black. The pyrolysis process feasibility looks promising. One old tire can generate upon vacuum pyrolysis, incomes of at least $2.25 US with a potential of up to $4.83 US/tire upon further product improvement. The process has been licensed to McDermott Marketing Servicing Inc. (Houston) for its exploitation in the US.

  14. Scrap tire utilization via surface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauman, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a novel approach to reusing scrap tire rubber, which will be described in this presentation. In addition to consuming scrap tires, this technology represents a new approach to material engineering. Furthermore, this method of rubber recycle is most efficient in terms of energy recovery. 4 figs.

  15. Scrap tire management in the mid south region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC) is a North American tire manufacturer-sponsored advocacy organization, created to identify and promote environmentally and economically sound markets for scrap tires. This presentation gives a national overview of the scrap tire situation, and focuses on the Tennessee and Mid-south region. National generation rates and markets for scrap tires are discussed, and markets for scrap tires are described. The major markets identified are fuel, rubber products, and civil engineering applications. Three technologies that may have an impact on scrap tire recycling are discussed: pyrolysis, gasification, and devulcanization.

  16. Scrap tire pyrolysis: Experiment and modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napoli, A.; Soudais, Y.; Lecomte, D.; Castillo, S.

    1997-12-01

    Pyrolysis of waste, usually organic solids like tires, plastics or composite materials, is an alternative thermal waste treatment technology. Three main physical and chemical mechanisms - i.e.: chemical kinetics, internal heat transfer and external heat transfer - have to be considered when modelling the degradation of solid waste particles. Because of the lack of physical properties for wastes most of the models described in the literature use basic data obtained on the pyrolysis of coal, wood and biomass. In this work, the authors report basic information on the thermal degradation of tire samples at small scale: Thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), as well as direct and indirect measurements of thermal and physical properties (thermal conductivity of the tire and of the char, porosity, density, specific heat). Pyrolysis experiments on tire samples are performed in an imaging furnace. The experimental results are compared to theoretical values deduced from models that take into account physical property measurements.

  17. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To develop a new class of tires in the replacement market that improves fuel efficiency by a minimum of 3% and reduces overall tire weight by 20%. This presentation does...

  18. Tire gassification and combustion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nance, D.; Towne, G.A.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a system for disposing of a material such as vehicle tires and similar substantially organic matter and generating useful heat therefrom. It comprises gasification means for holding an amount of the material to be disposed while the material is allowed to partially combust and for containing combustible gas produced thereby, the gasification means comprising a substantially air tight gasification chamber having at least one access way for inserting the material therein; inlet means for receiving a controlled amount of oxygen containing gas into the gasification means, the inlet means comprising a tuyere disposed in the air tight gasification chamber and a blower connected to the tuyere; removal means for removing the combustible gas from the gasification means, the removal means comprising a gas outlet located above the tuyere in the gasification chamber such that substantially amounts of the combustible gases produced by the partially combusted material exits through the gas outlet; primary combustion means for receiving and mixing the combustible gas removed from the gasification means with an oxygen containing gas and burning the combustible gas; and means for directing the combustion products to a heat utilizing device.

  19. Tire Development for Effective Transportation and Utilization of Used Tires, CRADA 01-N044, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Maley

    2004-03-31

    Scrap tires represent a significant disposal and recycling challenge for the United States. Over 280 million tires are generated on an annual basis, and several states have large stockpiles or abandoned tire piles that are slated for remediation. While most states have programs to address the accumulation and generation of scrap tires, most of these states struggle with creating and sustaining recycling or beneficial end use markets. One of the major issues with market development has been the costs associated with transporting and processing the tires into material for recycling or disposal. According to a report by the Rubber Manufactures Association tire-derived fuel (TDF) represents the largest market for scrap tires, and approximately 115 million tires were consumed in 2001 as TDF (U.S. Scrap Tire Markets, 2001, December 2002, www.rma.org/scraptires). This market is supported primarily by cement kilns, followed by various industries including companies that operate utility and industrial boilers. However the use of TDF has not increased and the amount of TDF used by boiler operators has declined. The work completed through this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has shown the potential of a mobile tire shredding unit to economically produce TDF and to provide an alterative low cost fuel to suitable coal-fired power systems. This novel system addresses the economic barriers by processing the tires at the retailer, thereby eliminating the costs associated with hauling whole tires. The equipment incorporated into the design allow for small 1-inch chunks of TDF to be produced in a timely fashion. The TDF can then be co-fired with coal in suitable combustion systems, such as a fluidized bed. Proper use of TDF has been shown to boost efficiency and reduce emissions from power generation systems, which is beneficial to coal utilization in existing power plants. Since the original scope of work outlined in the CRADA could not be completed because of lack of progress by the CRADA members, the agreement was not extended beyond February 2004. The work completed included the detailed design of the mobile unit, a general economic analysis of the operating the system, and outreach activities.

  20. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant (Los Lunas, NM); Williams, Robert Leslie (Albuquerque, NM); Waldschmidt, Robert Lee (Calgary, CA); Morgan, Catherine Hook (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-09-04

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  1. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Williams, Robert Leslie; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee; Morgan, Catherine Hook

    2006-08-29

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  2. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduced Weight | Department of Energy Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss083_donley_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Vehicle Technologies

  3. System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss085_benedict_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire Vehicle Technologies

  4. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Evaluate a light weight barrier film material as a replacement for standard halo-butyl inner liner. * Milestones - Status Conduct 2 nd tire program to further ...

  5. An unresolved riddle: Tire chips, two roadbeds, and spontaneous reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nightingale, D.E.B.; Green, W.P.

    1997-12-31

    Experience with road fills in Washington State constructed with thick layers of tire chips spontaneously burning has led to a decrease in tire chip use nationally. The field measurements and samples taken indicate that a pyrolitic reaction occurred at two roadfill sites in Washington State based on a comparison to know pyrolytic reactions in controlled settings. Pyrolysis in roadbeds containing tire chips is a new phenomena previously only found in open piles of processed tire chips. Because water and nutrients were introduced, iron oxidation, microbial digestion, and chemical oxidation are possible factors contributing to the pyrolytic reactions at the two Washington State sites. A new heat ignition theory from Japanese experiments suggests a theoretical answer to practical design depth limits in roadbeds and tire chip piles may be climate (air temperature) and depth dependent.

  6. Reprocessing of used tires into activated carbon and other products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, H.; Serio, M.A.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    Landfilling used tires which are generated each year in the US is increasingly becoming an unacceptable solution. A better approach, from an environmental and economic standpoint, is to thermally reprocess the tires into valuable products such as activated carbon, other solid carbon forms (carbon black, graphite, and carbon fibers), and liquid fuels. In this study, high surface area activated carbons (> 800 m{sup 2}/g solid product) were produced in relatively high yields by pyrolysis of tires at up to 900 C, followed by activation in CO{sub 2} at the same temperature. The surface areas of these materials are comparable with those of commercial activated carbons. The efficiency of the activation process (gain in specific surface area/loss in mass) was greatest (up to 138 m{sup 2}/g original tire) when large pieces of tire material were used ({approximately} 170 mg). Oxygen pretreatment of tires was found to enhance both the yield and the surface area of the carbon product. High-pressure treatment of tires at low temperatures (< 400 C) is an alternative approach if the recovery of carbon black or fuel oils is the primary objective.

  7. Fluidized-bed combustion of scrap tires: Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, J.Y.; Mei, J.S.; Notestein, J.E.

    1981-10-01

    An introduction to fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is presented in Section 2.0. Based on this discussion of its technical development, FBC is then presented as a means of scrap tire disposal. In Section 3.0, scrap tire disposal is reviewed in the categories of (1) physical applications, (2) chemical applications, (3) pyrolysis, and (4) incineration for thermal energy recovery. Scrap tire disposal is reviewed on the basis of (1) environmental acceptability, (2) conservation of resources, (3) impact on existing industries, (4) operational feasibility, and (5) special features. The focus of this report is the fluidized-bed incineration of scrap tires for thermal energy recovery. The factors that affect scrap tire combustion are discussed in Section 4.0. These factors are (1) agitation, (2) temperature, (3) excess air, (4) residence time, (5) feed uniformity, (6) solid waste handling, and (7) pollutants emission control. In reviewing these incineration processes, (1) fuel flexibility, (2) environmental acceptability, (3) combustion efficiency, and (4) operational reliability are discussed. The results from a tire incineration experiment conducted at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center are presented in Section 5.0, and a conceptual fluidized-bed combustor is discussed in Section 6.0. Future considerations in the FBC of scrap tires are discussed in Section 7.0. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Firm eyes savings from tires-to-fuel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1983-01-31

    A $600,000 pyrolysis system to convert tire scraps into methane will eliminate a tire retreading company's landfill and boiler fuel costs and achieve a five-year payback. The process also yields steel belts, fibers, and carbon black byproducts that can be sold for additional revenue. Heat from the hot exhaust gases will be recycled to the combustion chamber. A 10% federal energy tax credit and a 10% investment tax credit lowered the capital costs for $480,000. (DCK)

  9. Recovery of commercially valuable products from scrap tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, C.

    1993-07-20

    A process is described for producing carbon black by vacuum pyrolysis of used rubber tires, which comprises pyrolysing used rubber tire material at a temperature in the range of about 490 C to about 510 C under an absolute pressure of less than about 5 kPa, and recovering a solid carbonaceous material containing carbon black having an iodine adsorption number of about 130 to about 150 mg/g.

  10. Waste tires as auxiliary fuel for cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.

    1987-01-01

    The subject I have been asked to speak about is the utilization of scrap tires as an auxiliary fuel for cement kilns. My experience with scrap tires began five years ago when we performed a technical and economic evaluation for tire pyrolysis. I work for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory which is supported by the Department of Energy. My interest in scrap tires continued; in 1984 the Department of Energy and the Portland Cement Association jointly sponsored a conference on the utilization of scrap tires in cement kilns. Most of my remarks today are based upon that conference along with some current information in the US. Mr. Sladek requested that I speak on the combustion process, the progress to date, and the factors that impede or encourage implementation of using scrap tires in cement kilns. For discussion purposes it would help if we had a common understanding of the cement manufacturing process. Cement is made by heating a mixture of finely ground limestone and silica from clay or sand to about 1450/degree/C in a large rotating kiln. The heat causes the limestone to decarbonate and subsequently react with the silica to form calcium silicates. 5 figs.

  11. EERE Energy Impacts: Self-Inflating Tires Could Save You Money...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The self-regulating tire system that the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company has developed with ... (AMT)-that works similar to the way muscles push food through the human digestive tract. ...

  12. EERE Success Story—New Tire Technologies Can Improve Fuel Efficiency by More Than 5%

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cooper Tire recently developed concept tires that can improve fuel efficiency by 5.5%, supported by a project from the EERE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO).  In addition to exceeding VTO’s goal...

  13. Passive tire pressure sensor and method (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Passive tire pressure sensor and method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Passive tire pressure sensor and method A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave

  14. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Now Assessment | Department of Energy Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save Energy Now Assessment Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save Energy Now Assessment This case study describes how the Goodyear Tire Plant saved approximately 93,000 MMBtu and $875,000 annually after increasing steam system energy efficiency in their Union City, Tennessee, plant. PDF icon Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings

  15. Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking Fleets |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking Fleets Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking Fleets April 7, 2015 - 4:52pm Addthis This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. The Goodyear

  16. 54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings 54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings December 12, 2012 - 10:30am Addthis This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital

  17. Disposal techniques with energy recovery for scrapped vehicle tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sladek, T.A.; Demos, E.K.

    1987-06-01

    The scrap tire disposal problem is serious and widespread. However there are a number of promising management options, especially using the rubber as a supplemental fuel for existing combustors. The most cost-effective approach to dealing with Denver's tire stockpile appears to be shredding to a coarse size range, storing the shreds in a secure area, and marketing the rubber to nearby cement kilns, lime kilns, and boilers. This interim step would greatly reduce the volume of the pile, facilitate the Superfund evaluation, reduce fire and disease hazards, and simplify subsequent materials handling. Further processing to obtain rubber chips or crumbs may also be practical. However the industry and the markets would have to emerge over time. New power plants or pyrolysis facilities would be impeded by the low energy prices in Denver and the need for elaborate pollution controls. Landfilling could be considered as a last resort. Landfilling costs would be minimized if the tires are shredded. Chapter 2 discusses the tire disposal problem and the general options for tire management. Chapter 3 describes the methodology used to analyze Denver's situation and presents the results and conclusions obtained. This includes evaluation of strategies to implement the more promising resource recovery options in the Denver area. Chapter 4 summarizes the lessons learned and identifies impediments and uncertainties that need to be addressed in any future studies. The Appendix contains additional acknowledgments, a list of references, definitions for the acronyms and units used in the text, the agenda for the tire workshop, and a brief description of a stockpile fire near Denver in June 1987. 111 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Vacuum pyrolyzed tire oil as a coal solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, E.C.; Shi, Y.; Ji, Q.

    1995-12-31

    Coal liquefaction is highly dependent upon the type of coal liquefaction solvent used. The solvent must readily solubilize the coal and must act as an effective hydrogen donor or shuttler. Oil derived from the vacuum pyrolysis of used rubber tires has recently been used as a coal solvent with good conversion of coal to liquids in a hydrogen atmosphere. All experiments were completed in shaken tubing reactors at 450{degrees}C utilizing a bituminous coal. Results show the effectiveness of the pyrolyzed tire oil as a coal liquefaction solvent depends upon hydrogen pressure. Electron probe microanalysis data reveal good dispersion of the molybdenum catalyst in coal particles taken from liquefaction experiments.

  19. Combustion and inorganic emissions of ground waste tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A.; Steciak, J.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study was undertaken to assess the combustion characteristics and emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} gases from ground waste tires. Results were contrasted with those obtained from burning pulverized coal. Laboratory bench-scale experiments were conducted in a drop-tube, laminar-flow furnace, in air at fuel-lean conditions, at gas temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1600 K. Two particle size cuts were burned from both materials, 75-90 {mu}m and 180-212 {mu}m. Blends of coal and tire particles, at equal weight ratios, were also burned. Pyrometric and cinematographic observations revealed that the coal particles exhibited distinct volatile and char combustion phases, while tire particles exhibited a distinct primary volatile phase followed by a char combustion phase, which was accompanied by burning of secondary pyrolysis products. SO{sub 2} emissions of burning ground tires increased from 160 to 500 ppm as the temperature increased from 1300 K to 1600 K. Combustion of coal produced SO{sub 2} emissions in the neighborhood of 200-300 ppm (corresponding to 40 to 60 wt% of its sulfur content) independent of the gas temperature. The blend of coal and tire particles (equal mass ratios) exhibited SO{sub 2} values which fell in between the above. NO{sub x} emissions were constant at approximately 175 ppm for tire crumb (corresponding to approximately 45 wt% of its fuel nitrogen content) and 625 ppm for coal (corresponding to 55 wt% of its fuel nitrogen content) in the temperature range studied. CO{sub 2} emissions from tire were 8-9 molar %, while for coal particles they were 5-7 molar %; the upper limits corresponded to approximately 100% combustion efficiency. As a means to reduce the SO{sub 2} emissions, pulverized coal and tire crumb were fluidized together with particles of a calcium bearing sorbent - calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA has been identified as an effective SO{sub 2} scrubbing agent in previous studies.

  20. The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, M.

    1996-12-31

    The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

  1. General Davis kicks the tires on a Safeguards Transporter | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Davis kicks the tires on a Safeguards Transporter | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press

  2. Demonstration of improved vehicle fuel efficiency through innovative tire design, materials, and weight reduction technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, Tim

    2014-12-31

    Cooper completed an investigation into new tire technology using a novel approach to develop and demonstrate a new class of fuel efficient tires using innovative materials technology and tire design concepts. The objective of this work was to develop a new class of fuel efficient tires, focused on the replacement market that would improve overall passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 3% while lowering the overall tire weight by 20%. A further goal of this project was to accomplish the objectives while maintaining the traction and wear performance of the control tire. This program was designed to build on what has already been accomplished in the tire industry for rolling resistance based on the knowledge and general principles developed over the past decades. Coopers CS4 (Figure #1) premium broadline tire was chosen as the control tire for this program. For Cooper to achieve the goals of this project, the development of multiple technologies was necessary. Six technologies were chosen that are not currently being used in the tire industry at any significant level, but that showed excellent prospects in preliminary research. This development was divided into two phases. Phase I investigated six different technologies as individual components. Phase II then took a holistic approach by combining all the technologies that showed positive results during phase one development.

  3. Method for recycling tires and similarly compounded materials to recover usable constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letsch, W.

    1980-12-23

    A processing plant and method are described for processing scrap tires and similar materials containing a mixture of technical rubber, scrap metal and tire cord in which the plant is essentially vehicular and thus eliminates the necessity of hauling accumulated tires long distances with the accompanying costs. The plant includes means for directing mixed tire sizes to a cyrogenic section where the technical rubber is reduced to a sufficient temperature making it brittle so that initial separation of reusable technical rubber is accomplished; the plant is operated essentially on the reusable by-products of pyrolytic reduction of the tires so that hydrocarbons and heated gas are utilized and additional commercial by-products such as commercial soots, metal and tire beads are obtained.

  4. Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C.

    1995-06-01

    A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

  5. Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Continental Biofuels Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Continental Biofuels Corporation Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75240 Sector: Biofuels Product: Dallas-based company...

  6. A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss084_okel_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency Improving Vehicle Fuel

  7. Scrap tire recycling: Promising high value applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauman, B.D.; Leskovyansky, P.J.; Drela, H.

    1993-11-01

    Surface modification of scrap tire rubber (rubber particles treated with chlorine gas) show promise for ameliorating the scrap tire problem (the treated rubber can be used as a component in high- performance, expensive polymer systems). The process has been proven in Phase I. Phase II covers market/applications, process development (Forberg-design mixer reactor was chosen), plant design, capital cost estimate, economics environmental/safety/health, and energy impact. Almost of the small amount of chlorine is consumed. The capital costs for a rubber particle treatment facility are attractive, being at least two orders of magnitude less than that of facilities for making new polymer materials. Large volume markets using treated rubber are needed. The amount of scrap rubber available is small compared to the polymers available for replacement. 7 tabs, 16 figs.

  8. Evaluation of synergy in tire rubber-coal coprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Mayoral, M.C.; Murillo, R.; Callen, M.; Garcia, T.; Tejero, M.P.; Torres, N.

    1998-09-01

    The tire rubber-coal synergy is evaluated through the different roles that rubber can have in coprocessing systems. For that, two different experimental designs were used: a swept fixed-bed reactor and tubing bomb minireactors. In this way, coal was coprocessed with rubber liquids from rubber pyrolysis and rubber hydrogenation, in a hydrogen atmosphere at 400 C. Coal was mixed as well with rubber in different proportions and hydrogenated at 375, 400, and 425 C, and oils obtained were characterized by thin-layer chromatography to obtain hydrocarbon type composition. Rubber behavior was compared to each of the main components of tires, and all the results indicated that the slight synergy found can be due to the small free radicals from vulcanized rubber decomposition, which are able to stabilize coal radicals to light products.

  9. Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires Are

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recycled | Department of Energy 3: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires Are Recycled Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires Are Recycled There were 263 million tires scrapped in 2009 (latest available data) which amounts to more than 4.7 million tons of waste. Fortunately, 84% of that waste was recycled. Most of the recycled tires were used to make fuel for industries such as pulp and paper mills, cement kilns, and electric utilities. Ground

  10. Fact #826: June 23, 2014 The Effect of Tire Pressure on Fuel Economy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: June 23, 2014 The Effect of Tire Pressure on Fuel Economy Fact #826: June 23, 2014 The Effect of Tire Pressure on Fuel Economy Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently conducted a study that measured the effect of tire pressure on fuel economy at speeds ranging from 40 to 80 miles per hour. The figure below shows the results of a 2009 Toyota Corolla tested with all four tires at the recommended pressure (Black line), then at 75% of the recommended

  11. EERE Energy Impacts: Self-Inflating Tires Could Save You Money on Gas,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Improve Driving Safety | Department of Energy Self-Inflating Tires Could Save You Money on Gas, Improve Driving Safety EERE Energy Impacts: Self-Inflating Tires Could Save You Money on Gas, Improve Driving Safety April 29, 2015 - 10:15am Addthis Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology—also called the self-regulating tire—automatically manages the air pressure in tires so you don’t have to. | <em>Graphic courtesy of Goodyear</em> Goodyear's new Air Maintenance

  12. Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R.; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation given by PPG during the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on a system for automatically maintaining tire pressure in commercial truck tires.

  14. EERE Success Story—Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking Fleets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company is demonstrating its award-winning self-inflating tires by testing the Air Maintenance Technology (AMT) on U.S. trucking fleets. Goodyear has received...

  15. Pyrolysis of scrap tires: Can it be profitable?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis--the thermal degradation in the absence of oxygen--is one way to reprocess scrap tires. The products are fuel gas, oils, and a solid residue (char), which contains appreciable quantities of mineral matter and low-grade carbon black. The three products have comparable yields by weight. The two most important factors affecting process economics are the tipping fees charged for tire disposal and the selling prices of the products. Selling prices of the products yield low returns because of the low market value of the fuels and the low quality of the recovered char or carbon black. Therefore, to obtain a positive cash flow, it would be desirable to develop a process based on the recovery of value-added products such as high-grade carbon black, activated carbon, or valuable chemicals (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene). The authors believe that significant improvement in the economics can be accomplished by upgrading the primary pyrolysis products to secondary products of higher value.

  16. Chemi-microbial processing of waste tire rubber: A project overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.

    1993-12-01

    PNL is developing a method to use thiophillic microorganisms to devulcanize (biodesulfurize) the surface of ground rubber particles, which will improve the bonding and adhesion of the ground tire rubber into the virgin tire rubber matrix. The Chemi-microbial processing approach, introduced in this paper, is targeted at alleviating the waste tire problem in an environmentally conscious manner; it may also be applied to improve asphaltic materials and rubber and polymeric wastes to facilite their recycling. This paper outlines the logic and technical methods that will be used.

  17. Optimization of scrap tire pyrolysis using a continuous-feed steam environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrell, T.W.; Frank, S.R.; Rich, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    Estimates of the generation of scrap tires produced in the United States are on the order of 2 million tons per year. Although these tires contain a high percentage of useful hydrocarbons, steel and carbon black, approximately 70% are not effectively recycled. Recently, pyrolytic recycling of scrap tire (thermal decomposition in the absence of O{sub 2}) is receiving renewed interest because of its ability to produce valuable hydrocarbon products. We have developed a process which permits a continuous feed processing of scrap tires in a non-combustible stream environment. This system utilizes a soft seal system that operates at atmospheric pressures while minimizing any fugitive emissions. This process increases the efficiency and control of present approaches by lowering the energy requirements while maximizing the collection of valuable products. Initial bench-scale results will be presented.

  18. Pyrolysis of scrap tires and conversion of chars to activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, A.A.; Petrich, M.A. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the conversion of scrap tires to activated carbon. The authors have been successful in this endeavor, producing carbons with surface areas greater than 500 m[sup 2]/g and significant micropore volumes. Tire shreddings were pyrolyzed in batch reactors, and the pyrolysis chars activated by reaction with superheated steam. Solid products of pyrolysis and activation were studied with nitrogen adsorption techniques. They find that the porosity development during steam activation of tire pyrolysis char is similar to that reported for various other chars. A maximum in micropore volume is observed as a function of conversion, but the total surface area increases monotonically with conversion. They suggest that the activation process consists of micropore formation, followed by pore enlargement. The process conditions used in this study are a good starting point from which to optimize a process to convert tires to activated carbon.

  19. Formation of dl-limonene in used tire vacuum pyrolysis oils. [dipentene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakdel, H.; Roy, C.; Aubin, H.; Jean, G. ); Coulombe, S. )

    1991-09-01

    Tire recycling has become an important environmental issue recently due to the huge piles of tires that threaten the environment. Thermal decomposition of tire, a synthetic rubber material, enables the recovery of carbon black and liquid hydrocarbon oils. Both have potential economic values. Pyrolysis oils obtained under vacuum conditions contain a significant portion of a volatile, naptha-like fraction with an octane number similar to petroleum naphtha fraction, in addition, contains approximately 15% limonene. Potential applications of vacuum pyrolysis oil and carbon black have been investigated. However, the process economics is greatly influenced by the quality of the oil and carbon black products. This paper discusses limonene formation during used tire vacuum pyrolysis and its postulated reaction mechanism. The limonene separation method from pyrolysis oil, as well as its purification in laboratory scale, and structural characterization are discussed. Large-scale limonene separation and purification is under investigation.

  20. Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    data) which amounts to more than 4.7 million tons of waste. Fortunately, 84% of that waste was recycled. Most of the recycled tires were used to make fuel for industries such...

  1. Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuel economy 2-3 percent, this innovative technology will help save nearly 1.2 billion gallons of petroleum that experts estimate are wasted each year due to underinflated tires. ...

  2. Vacuum pyrolyzed tire oil as a coal solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, E.C.; Shi, Yanlong; Ji, Qin; Anderson, L.L.; Eyring, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    Recent interest in coprocessing coal with hydrogen rich waste materials in order to produce liquid transportation fuels has given rise to interesting twists on standard coal liquefaction. In general, coprocessing coal with a waste material has been approached with the idea that the waste material would be mixed with the coal under liquefaction conditions with little or no preliminary processing of the waste material other than shredding into smaller size particles. Mixing the waste material with the coal would occur in the primary stage of liquefaction. The primary stage would accomplish the dissolution of the coal and breakdown of the waste material. The products would then be introduced into the secondary stage where upgrading of product would occur. This paper describes the usefulness of oil derived from pyrolysis of waste rubber tires as a reactant in coal coprocessing or coal liquefaction.

  3. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  4. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will ...

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment (MC3E) Campaign Links Science Plan MC3E Website Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds...

  6. Pyrolysis kinetics of scrap tire rubbers. 1: Using DTG and TGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Park, J.K.; Chun, H.D.

    1995-07-01

    Tire pyrolysis kinetics was investigated to explore an economically viable design for the pyrolysis process. Derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were found to provide valuable information on pyrolysis kinetics and mechanisms of a heterogeneous compound like scrap tire rubbers. Kinetic parameters of each compositional compound were obtained by analyzing DTG and TGA results with a series of mathematical methods proposed in this study. The pyrolysis kinetics of the scrap tire rubbers tested was well accounted for by the first-order irreversible independent reactions of three compositional compounds. The sidewall and tread rubber exhibited different thermal degradation patterns, suggesting a compositional difference between them. Isothermal pyrolysis results showed that the sidewall rubber would hardly be degraded at low temperature regions (<600 K), whereas it would be more rapidly degraded than the tread rubber at higher temperatures ({>=}746 K). Because of the shorter pyrolysis time, the higher isothermal pyrolysis temperature appeared to be more economically favorable.

  7. Evaluation of products recovered from scrap tires for use as asphalt modifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, J.

    1992-05-01

    Western Research Institute performed rheological tests and water sensitivity tests on asphalt cements that had been modified with carbonous residues obtained from the pyrolysis of scrap tires and waste motor oil. These tests are part of an ongoing program at the University of Wyoming Chemical Engineering Department to evaluate, as asphalt additives, solid carbonous products recovered from the scrap tire and waste motor oil pyrolysis experiments conducted at the University. The tests showed that carbonous residues increased the viscosity and decreased the elasticity of AC-10 and AC-20 asphalts. The tests also indicatedthat asphalt cements modified with carbonous residues were less sensitive to water damage and age embrittlement than unmodified asphalt cements.

  8. Extraction and identification of fillers and pigments from pyrolyzed rubber and tire samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Zimmerman, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    Rubber stocks, specially tires, are composed of natural rubber and synthetic polymers and also of several compounding ingredients, such as carbon black, silica, zinc oxide etc. These are generally mixed and vulcanized with additional curing agents, mainly organic in nature, to achieve certain {open_quotes}designing properties{close_quotes} including wear, traction, rolling resistance and handling of tires. Considerable importance is, therefore, attached both by the manufacturers and their competitors to be able to extract, identify and characterize various types of fillers and pigments. Several analytical procedures have been in use to extract, preferentially, these fillers and pigments and subsequently identify and characterize them under a transmission electron microscope.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency...

  10. Tailored Recovery of Carbons from Waste Tires for Enhanced Performance as Anodes in Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naskar, Amit K; Bi,; Saha, Dipendu; Chi, Miaofang; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2014-01-01

    Morphologically tailored pyrolysis-recovered carbon black is utilized in lithium-ion batteries as a potential solution for adding value to waste tire-rubber-derived materials. Micronized tire rubber was digested in a hot oleum bath to yield a sulfonated rubber slurry that was then filtered, washed, and compressed into a solid cake. Carbon was recovered from the modified rubber cake by pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere. The chemical pretreatment of rubber produced a carbon monolith with higher yield than that from the control (a fluffy tire-rubber-derived carbon black). The carbon monolith showed a very small volume fraction of pores of widths 3 4 nm, reduced specific surface area, and an ordered assembly of graphitic domains. Electrochemical studies on the recovered-carbon-based anode revealed an improved Li-ion battery performance with higher reversible capacity than that of commercial carbon materials. Anodes made with a sulfonated tire-rubber-derived carbon and a control tire-rubber-derived carbon, respectively, exhibited an initial coulombic efficiency of 80% and 45%, respectively. The reversible capacity of the cell with the sulfonated carbon as anode was 400 mAh/g after 100 cycles, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency. Our success in producing higher performance carbon material from waste tire rubber for potential use in energy storage applications adds a new avenue to tire rubber recycling.

  11. Continental breakup and the dawn of humankind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Continental breakup and the dawn of humankind Continental breakup and the dawn of humankind In the newest "Frontiers in Science" lecture series, geologist Giday WoldeGabriel will discuss the intriguing fossil findings from an African rift valley. March 31, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  12. Wave transmission and mooring-force characteristics of pipe-tire floating breakwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Volker W.; Westerink, Joannes J.

    1980-10-01

    The results are presented of a series of prototype scale tests of a floating breakwater that incorporates massive cylindrical members (steel or concrete pipes, telephone poles, etc.) in a matrix of scrap truck or automobile tires, referred to as the Pipe-Tire Breakwater (PT-Breakwater). Tests were conducted in the large wave tank at the US Army Coastal Engineering Research Center (CERC). Breakwater modules were preassembled at SUNY in Buffalo, New York, and then transported to CERC by truck, where final assembly on location was again performed by SUNY personnel. Wave-tank tests were conducted jointly by CERC and SUNY personnel. A series of wave-tank experiments and mooring system load-deflection tests were performed, and are described. Wave-transmission and mooring-load characteristics, based on 402 separate tests, were established and are reported. (LCL)

  13. Thermal plasma pyrolysis of used old tires for production of syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.S.; Gu, B.W.; Looy, P.C.; Chu, F.Y.; Simpson, C.J.

    1996-08-01

    Thermal plasma pyrolysis of used tires for the production of syngaswas investigated experimentally and the following conclusions wereobtained: 1. A series of experiments have shown that tire waste can bepyrolyzed in a plasma reactor to produce combustible gas, such asC{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO. The combustion heat value of the produced gas is about 4-7 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is higher than that of blast furnace gas and reforming gas from coals. 2. Zinc oxidecan be captured during pyrolysis by both high temperature filters andlow temperature filters in the quenching chamber. The pollution gases,such as SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, are at relatively low levels, about 100-300ppm. 3. Increasing the tire injection quantity will increase theconcentration of hydrocarbons, increase the combustion heat of thepyrolysis product, and decrease the concentration of metal oxide. Withsteam injection, it produced a large quantity of hydrogen and carbonmonoxide with lower concentrations of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The combustion heatis slightly lower with steam injection than that without it. 4. Neitherpolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) nor p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) weredetected in the ashes. 8 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective Despite improvements in computing power, current weather and climate models are unable to accurately reproduce the formation, growth, and decay of clouds and precipitation associated with storm systems. Not only is this due to a lack of data about precipitation, but also about the 3-dimensional environment of the surrounding clouds, winds, and moisture, and how that affects the transfer of energy between the sun and Earth. To

  15. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

  17. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  18. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    development and ensemble large-scale forcings (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary

  19. Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust This is the first discovery of a potential "continental crust" on Mars. July 13, 2015 Igneous clast named Harrison embedded in a conglomerate rock in Gale crater, Mars, shows elongated light-toned feldspar crystals. The mosaic merges an image from Mastcam with higher-resolution images from ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager. Credit:

  20. Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a potential "continental crust" on Mars. July 13, 2015 Igneous clast named Harrison embedded in a conglomerate rock in Gale crater, Mars, shows elongated light-toned...

  1. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Continental Shelf appertain to the United States and are subject to its jurisdiction, control, and power of disposition as provided in this Act..." Published NA Year Signed or...

  2. Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M.R.; Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M.; Takai, K.; Haniu, H.

    2011-09-15

    In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

  3. TEM study of PM2.5 emitted from coal and tire combustion in a thermal power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reto Giere; Mark Blackford; Katherine Smith

    2006-10-15

    The research presented here was conducted within the scope of an experiment investigating technical feasibility and environmental impacts of tire combustion in a coal-fired power station. Previous work has shown that combustion of a coal + tire blend rather than pure coal increased bulk emissions of various elements (e.g., Zn, As, Sb, Pb). The aim of this study is to characterize the chemical and structural properties of emitted single particles with dimensions <2.5 {mu}m (PM2.5). This transmission electron microscope (TEM)-based study revealed that, in addition to phases typical of coal fly ash (e.g., aluminum-silicate glass, mullite), the emitted PM2.5 contains amorphous selenium particles and three types of crystalline metal sulfates never reported before from stack emissions. Anglesite, PbSO{sub 4}, is ubiquitous in the PM2.5 derived from both fuels and contains nearly all Pb present in the PM. Gunningite, ZnSO{sub 4}H{sub 2}O, is the main host for Zn and only occurs in the PM derived from the coal + tire blend, whereas yavapaiite, KFe{sup 3+}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is present only when pure coal was combusted. It is concluded that these metal sulfates precipitated from the flue gas may be globally abundant aerosols and have, through hydration or dissolution, a major environmental and health impact. 66 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Recycling of rubber tires in electric arc furnace steelmaking: simultaneous combustion of metallurgical coke and rubber tyres blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdalena Zaharia; Veena Sahajwalla; Byong-Chul Kim; Rita Khanna; N. Saha-Chaudhury; Paul O'Kane; Jonathan Dicker; Catherine Skidmore; David Knights

    2009-05-15

    The present study investigates the effect of addition of waste rubber tires on the combustion behavior of its blends with coke for carbon injection in electric arc furnace steelmaking. Waste rubber tires were mixed in different proportions with metallurgical coke (MC) (10:90, 20:80, 30:70) for combustion and pyrolysis at 1473 K in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), respectively. Under experimental conditions most of the rubber blends indicated higher combustion efficiencies compared to those of the constituent coke. In the early stage of combustion the weight loss rate of the blends is much faster compared to that of the raw coke due to the higher volatile yield of rubber. The presence of rubber in the blends may have had an impact upon the structure during the release and combustion of their high volatile matter (VM) and hence increased char burnout. Measurements of micropore surface area and bulk density of the chars collected after combustion support the higher combustion efficiency of the blends in comparison to coke alone. The surface morphology of the 30% rubber blend revealed pores in the residual char that might be attributed to volatile evolution during high temperature reaction in oxygen atmosphere. Physical properties and VM appear to have a major effect upon the measured combustion efficiency of rubber blends. The study demonstrates that waste rubber tires can be successfully co-injected with metallurgical coke in electric arc furnace steelmaking process to provide additional energy from combustion. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Initial results from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole in Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  6. Continental Divide El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    El Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Continental Divide El Coop Inc Place: New Mexico Phone Number: (505) 285-6656 Website: www.cdec.coop Twitter: @maccdec Facebook:...

  7. HPC4Mfg: Boosting American Competiveness in Clean Energy Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Manufacturing Innovation's Lightweight Innovations for Tomorrow Consortium, the Ohio ... This model is designed to foster collaboration and an open exchange of best practices and ...

  8. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-SLR-MFG-1366

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using new, proprietary manufacturing processes, 1366 Technologies aims to produce higher-quality, lower-cost silicon wafers for solar cells. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNER 1366 ...

  9. Mfg & Tech Services | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these challenges. It is through the National Prototype Center (PDF), Oak Ridge Metrology Center, and Development Laboratory that Y-12 can exercise its demonstrated...

  10. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-SLR-MFG-1366

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 TECHNOLOGIES Using new, proprietary manufacturing processes, 1366 Technologies aims to produce higher-quality, lower-cost silicon wafers for solar cells. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNER 1366 Technologies, Inc. LOCATION Bedford, Massachusetts LOAN AMOUNT $150 Million ISSUANCE DATE August 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 1,000 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 1,927,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 1,100,000 Metric Tons of CO 2 Prevented Annually

  11. Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Relationship to Adiabacity Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Rhinehart Tire Fire Dump, Operable Unit 2, Winchester, VA. (Second remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-29

    The Rhinehart Tire Fire Dump site is located in a 22-acre drainage area of a sparsely populated rural area in western Frederick County, Virginia. Surface water runoff flows into a north-south tributary that discharges to Hogue Creek, which is 4,000 feet downstream. Bedrock is noted to be highly fractured, and the ground water flow in the overburden aquifer is toward Massey Run. From 1972 to 1983, the site owner conducted a tire disposal operation, which consisted of transporting discarded tires from various locations and storing them on a 5-acre wooded slope behind his home. An estimated 5 to 7 million tires that had been accumulated caught on fire in October 1983 and burned until July 1984. As a result of the fire, a free-flowing oily-tar, which contained anthracene, benzene, cadmium, chromium, ethylbenzene, napthalene, nickel, pyrene, toluene, and zinc, began to seep out of the tire pile into Massey Run and on to Hogue Creek.

  13. Health assessment for Rhinehart (Aka Winchester) Tire Fire National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Frederick County, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980831796. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-17

    The Rhinehart (aka Winchester) Tire Fire Site is located near the town of Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia. In October 1983, a fire was started in the tires disposed of on the site. Hot oil was released from the melting and pyrolysis of the tires. This oil made its way to Massey Run, a nearby surface water body. The fire was brought under control within a few days, but continued to smolder for six months. The migration of the oil and the residue from the fire have contaminated the site. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds may occur via ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption of contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediments and soils.

  14. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus Climatically

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links MC3E Home News News & Press MC3E Backgrounder (PDF, 1.61MB) SGP Images ARM flickr site Field Blog ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Operations Measurements Science Plan (PDF, 3.85 MB) Featured Data Plots SGP Data Plots (all) Experiment Planning Steering Committee Science Questions MC3E Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Meetings Cloud Life Cycle Working Group Contacts Michael Jensen, Lead Scientist Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) Thanks

  17. Geologic development and characteristics of continental margins, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf basin covers more than 500,000 km/sup 2/ and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200-m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise at a depth of 2800 m. The most complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 km/sup 2/ and in which bottom slopes range from less than 1/sup 0/ to greater than 20/sup 0/ around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope is a function of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depocenters throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often exceeding 15-20 km/m.y. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Slope oversteepening, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments, and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landslides and debris flows. Large-scale features such as shelf-edge separation scars and landslide-related canyons often result from such processes.

  18. Acetylene from the co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste tires or coal in the H{sub 2}/Ar plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, W.; Cao, Q.; Lv, Y.; Chang, L.

    2008-07-01

    Acetylene from carbon-containing materials via plasma pyrolysis is not only simple but also environmentally friendly. In this article, the acetylene produced from co-pyrolyzing biomass with waste tire or coal under the conditions of H{sub 2}/Ar DC arc plasma jet was investigated. The experimental results showed that the co-pyrolysis of mixture with biomass and waste tire or coal can improve largely the acetylene relative volume fraction (RVF) in gaseous products and the corresponding yield of acetylene. The change trends for the acetylene yield of plasma pyrolysis from mixture with raw sample properties were the same as relevant RVF. But the yield change trend with feeding rate is different from its RVF. The effects of the feeding rate of raw materials and the electric current of plasmatron on acetylene formation are also discussed.

  19. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations A

  20. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  1. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save Energy Now Assessment; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Goodyear operates more than 60 facilities in 26 countries, including the Union City, Tennessee, plant pictured above. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save Energy Now Assessment Saves $875,000 in Energy Costs; Reduces Natural Gas Consumption Industrial Technologies Program Case Study Benefits * Implemented approximately $875,000 in annual energy cost savings * Achieves annual natural gas savings of more than 93,000 MMBtu * Reduces No. 6 fuel oil consumption

  2. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  3. Isotopic prediction of eruption volume at continental volcanoes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F.V.; Valentine, G.A.; Crowe, B.M.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to determine whether isotopic techniques can be used to assess the eruption potential and eruption volume of continental stratovolcanoes. Large-volume eruptions from stratovolcanoes pose significant hazards to population and infrastructure in many parts of the world. We are testing whether this technique will allow a short- to medium-term (decades to millennia) probabilistic hazard assessment of large-volume eruptions. If successful, the technique will be useful to countries or regions that must consider medium to long-term volcanic (e.g., nuclear waste facilities). We have begun sample acquisition and isotopic measurements at two stratovolcanoes, Pico de Orizaba in eastern Mexico and Daisen in western Japan.

  4. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  5. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  7. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kiel Reese, B.; Lin, L.-H.; Long, P. E.; Moser, D. P.; Mills, H.; Sar, P.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Stan-Lotter, H.; Wagner, D.; Wang, P.-L.; Westall, F.; Wilkins, M. J.

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have included a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.

  8. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have includedmore » a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.« less

  9. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  10. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  11. Petroleum possibilities in continental margin off central Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, E.

    1986-07-01

    The continental margin off central Chile, from Valparaiso to Valdivia, encompassing an area of 100,000 km/sup 2/, has been the target of exploratory activity by Empresa Nacional del Petroleo since 1970. Exploratory drilling began in 1972. By August 1984, total exploratory efforts had resulted in drilling 14 offshore wells and acquiring 12,130 km of seismic reflection lines. A biogenic gas accumulation was discovered in the F well. Because these attempts to find oil were unsuccessful and because drilling costs have escalated, exploratory activities have been curtailed. Forearc basins off central Chile are characterized by low geothermal gradient and a sedimentary filling of Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Tertiary sequences are characterized by low organic carbon content, immature humic-type organic matter, and a biogenic gas potential. Cretaceous sequences are characterized by higher organic carbon content, good reservoir rocks, and fair to good source rocks. The organic matter is sapropelic, with vitrinite and liptinites, and is favorable for oil and gas generation. Seismic and well data suggest that Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rock sequences filling the basins (more than 4000 m thick at the shelf edge) extend 40-70 km beyond the present shelf edge. Mesozoic rocks deposited on the slope may generate petroleum and gas that could migrate upslope and accumulate in traps associated with the faulted basement highs and graben-type depressions existing at the shelf edge. This geologic setting favors the development of large petroleum accumulations along the shelf edge and graben on the sedimentary basins off central Chile.

  12. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earths energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical parameterizations that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  13. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TECHNICAL REPORT Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Energy Resource in the Continental United States 1026880 Final Report, December 2012 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT

  14. Bottom fixed OTEC plant on the edge of a continental (or island) shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daidola, J.C.; Basar, N.; Sasscer, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to a generic type of OTEC plant. This shallow water bottom fixed OTEC plant consists of a platform structure rigidly attached to the seabed at the edge of a continental or island shelf. A cost comparison and thoughts on commercialization are presented. Conclusions and recommendations indicate the desire and need for further development. 12 refs.

  15. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Iberia versus Europe - Effects of continental break-up and round-up on hydrocarbon habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourrouilh, R.; Zolnai, G.

    1988-08-01

    Based on the continuity of foldbelts and the positions of intermountain continental nuclei and transcontinental megashears, a close Pangea fit is proposed for the central and north Atlantic borderlands. The Variscan arch segment missing between Brittany and Galicia in the Gulf of Gascony (Biscaye) can tentatively be identified with the Flemish Cap block off Newfoundland. At the same time the northwest African-Gondwana border (central Morocco) was located some 800 km farther to the west-northwest, as compared to its present position in southwestern Europe (Iberia). During the opening of the central and northern segments of the Atlantic Ocean (Jurassic and Cretaceous) and during the closure of the western Mediterranean basin, i.e., the thrust of Africa toward southern Europe (Tertiary), the European continental mass underwent deformation in the transtensive and transpressive modes, which reactivated parts of its inherited structural network. The trailing south European continental margin was partially dismembered into loosely bound continental blocks, to be assembled again during the subsequent Alpine orogenic cycle. These events can be compared with processes known in the northernmost and western segments of the North American continent. Mechanisms are proposed for the formation and deformation of inter- and intraplate basins by way of moderate shifts (wrenching) and slight rotations, the direction of which changed during the Mesozoic-Tertiary according to the global stress field. The above evolution and mechanisms had multiple and decisive effects on hydrocarbon generation, habitat, and accumulation.

  17. DESIGNING AND OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2004-06-01

    During the period July 1, 2000-March 31, 2004, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) conducted an extensive demonstration of woody biomass cofiring at its Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. This demonstration, cofunded by USDOE and Allegheny, and supported by the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of EPRI, evaluated the impacts of sawdust cofiring in both cyclone boilers and tangentially-fired pulverized coal boilers. The cofiring in the cyclone boiler--Willow Island Generating Station Unit No.2--evaluated the impacts of sawdust alone, and sawdust blended with tire-derived fuel. The biomass was blended with the coal on its way to the combustion system. The cofiring in the pulverized coal boiler--Albright Generating Station--evaluated the impact of cofiring on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) when the sawdust was injected separately into the furnace. The demonstration of woody biomass cofiring involved design, construction, and testing at each site. The results addressed impacts associated with operational issues--capacity, efficiency, and operability--as well as formation and control of airborne emissions such as NO{sub x}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}2), opacity, and mercury. The results of this extensive program are detailed in this report.

  18. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    A number of blocks off Cape Hatteras have been leased by Mobil Oil, which has requested permission to drill an exploratory well, at 820-m depth, in a block identified as Manteo 467. The proposed well location is 39 miles from the coast of North Carolina. The possibility of extracting gas from the continental slope off the coast of North Carolina, particularly at slope depths, has raised a number of environmental concerns that cannot be addressed from existing data. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service to better define the nature of the continental slope benthic communities off Cape Hatteras and to delineate their areal extent. Emphasis was placed on the area around the proposed drill site in the Manteo 467 lease block.

  19. DOE/SC-ARM-14-012 The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report M Jensen P Kollias S Giangrande April 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

  20. Geologic development and characteristics of the continental margins, Gulf of Mexico. Research report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf Basin covers more than 500,000 sq km and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200 m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise, at a depth of 2800 m. The most-complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 sq km and in which bottom slopes range from < 1 deg to > 20 deg around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope are functions of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depo-centers throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often in excess of 15-20 km/my. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Oversteeping, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landsliding and debris flows. Large scale features such as shelf edge separation scars and landslide related canyons often results from such processes.

  1. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore » (Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  2. Outer continental shelf development and the North Carolina coast: a guide for local planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, D.J.; McElyea, W.D.; Godschalk, D.R.; Lofaro, N.D.

    1981-08-01

    This guide supplies local governments in North Carolina's coastal region with information on (1) the facilities and activities associated with outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and gas development, (2) their impacts on coastal communities, and (3) how local governments can manage these impacts. Offshore activities and onshore facilities accompanying each stage of OCS development (leasing, exploration, field development, production, and shutdown) are described, including factors influencing facility siting, local economies, and local natural resources. The guide helps local governments apply this information by presenting ways in which they can influence the development process.

  3. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

  4. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  5. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M; Giangrande, S; Kollias, P

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASAs) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  6. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere. Theremore » is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil-freezing) part of the cycle rather than during deglacial transgression (warming and thawing). The atmospheric flux response to a warming climate is small, relative to the rest of the methane sources to the atmosphere in the global budget, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. The increased methane flux due to ocean warming could be completely counteracted by a sea level rise of tens of meters on millennial timescales due to the loss of ice sheets, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The model results give no indication of a mechanism by which methane emissions from the Siberian continental shelf could have a significant impact on the near-term evolution of Earth's climate, but on millennial timescales the release of carbon from hydrate and permafrost could contribute significantly to the fossil fuel carbon burden in the atmosphere–ocean–terrestrial carbon cycle.« less

  7. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  9. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael; Kollias, Pavlos; Giangrande, Scott

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  10. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the Continental Shelf: The interaction of internal waves and the bottom topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Longshore sand ridges are frequently observed to occur on the continental shelf where the overlying ocean is stratified. This study formulates a model for the formation and evolution of three-dimensional longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf. The model is based on the interaction of interfacial, weakly nonlinear waves in a stratified ocean with the sedimentary bottom topography.

  11. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  12. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.

    2014-09-12

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a 6-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing datasets. Over the course of the 46 day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript describes the details of the instrumentationmore » used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings.« less

  13. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, S.

    2015-01-27

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the US Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a six-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing data sets. Over the course of the 46-day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript provides details on the instrumentationmore » used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings. In addition, the impact of including the humidity corrections and quality controls on the thermodynamic profiles that are used in the derivation of a large-scale model forcing data set are investigated. The results show a significant impact on the derived large-scale vertical velocity field illustrating the importance of addressing these humidity biases.« less

  14. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M.; Bona, J.L.

    1994-01-05

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of three- dimensional sedimentary structures such as longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf in water deeper than that of the shoaling region. Owing to the striking similarity between the bar spacing and the length scales in which interactions among the most energetic modes of shallow water waves take place, we argue that these bars are formed slowly by flows in the turbulent boundary layer generated by weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. Hence the model is based on the interaction between surficial, weakly nonlinear shallow water waves, having weak spanwise spatial dependence, and the bottom topography. While such underwater structures are not the result of a single formative agent, it is argued that the mechanism proposed in this study does contribute significantly to their generation and evolution. Comparisons of this model with oceanographic data must wait for sufficient data to become available. In conjunction with developing the sand ridge model, this study proposes new mathematical equations of interest in their own right.

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Information Program. Update 2, August 1981, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: a summary report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    In July 1980, the Office of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Information issued an initial report called Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: A Summary Report, July 1980. The purpose of this report was to provide State and local governments with current information about offshore oil and gas resources and onshore activity in the area extending from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. This information was designed to assist in socioeconomic planning for the onshore impacts of oil and gas development in the affected areas. This report, Update 2, discusses Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities and their onshore impacts for the period of February 1981 to August 1981. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the South Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Very little, if any, development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. Even though the South Atlantic OCS does contain large areas with hydrocarbon potential, little optimism has been generated by exploration associated with Lease Sale 43. Lease Sale 56 included tracts with geologic conditions more favorable to the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, especially the deepwatr tracts, but industry showed moderate interest in the first deepwater lease sale. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with Lease Sale 56. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of exploration efforts.

  16. Projected Changes in Mean and Interannual Variability of Surface Water over Continental China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Tang, Qiuhong; Huang, Maoyi; Hong, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-05-01

    Five General Circulation Model (GCM) climate projections under the RCP8.5 emission scenario were used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model to investigate the impacts of climate change on hydrologic cycle over continental China in the 21st century. The bias-corrected climatic variables were generated for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) by the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). Results showed much larger fractional changes of annual mean Evaportranspiration (ET) per unit warming than the corresponding fractional changes of Precipitation (P) per unit warming across the country especially for South China, which led to notable decrease of surface water variability (P-E). Specifically, negative trends for annual mean runoff up to -0.33%/decade and soil moisture trends varying between -0.02 to -0.13%/decade were found for most river basins across China. Coincidentally, interannual variability for both runoff and soil moisture exhibited significant positive trends for almost all river basins across China, implying an increase in extremes relative to the mean conditions. Noticeably, the largest positive trends for runoff variability and soil moisture variability, which were up to 38 0.41%/decade and 0.90%/decade, both occurred in Southwest China. In addition to the regional contrast, intra-seasonal variation was also large for the runoff mean and runoff variability changes, but small for the soil moisture mean and variability changes. Our results suggest that future climate change could further exacerbate existing water-related risks (e.g. floods and droughts) across China as indicated by the marked decrease of surface water amounts combined with steady increase of interannual variability throughout the 21st century. This study highlights the regional contrast and intra-seasonal variations for the projected hydrologic changes and could provide muti-scale guidance for assessing effective adaptation strategies for the country on a river basin, regional, or as whole.

  17. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  18. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  19. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  20. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  1. Proposed 1986 outer continental shelf oil and gas lease sale offshore the Mid-Atlantic states, OCS Sale No. 111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Sale of oil and gas development leases is proposed for 3561 lease tracts containing 20.3 million acres of outer continental shelf lying off the coasts of Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The lease tracts are located beneath 132 to 10,560 feet of water within an area 24 to 140 miles offshore. Oil would become available in 1994, with production peaking in 1999. Gas production would begin in 1998, peak in 1999, and decline by approximately 50% by the year 2005. Development of the hydrocarbon field would involve approximately 22 exploratory wells, 9 delineation wells, 5 platforms, 27 subsea completions, and 54 production wells. If implemented, the lease offering would be held in October 1985.

  2. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore » for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  3. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.

  4. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore » gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (−40 vs. −8% for anthropogenics, and −52 vs. −11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm−1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = H* (CH3COOH); H* = 105 M atm−1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 35%/25%/10% compared to our best estimate.« less

  6. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore » SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (−40% vs. −8% for anthropogenics, −52% vs. −11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm−1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm−1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations.« less

  7. Fate of nutrient enrichment on continental shelves as indicated by the C/N content of bottom sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J.; Premuzic, E.T.; Whitledge, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    The trajectory and fate of particulate matter are poorly understood processes in a spatially heterogeneous coastal ocean. Parameterization of appropriate hydrodynamics for a quantitative description of these loss processes must thus await definition of the important biological time and space scales. Since the bottom sands tend to record the history of the water column, we have selected the C/N content of shelf sediments as a possible tracer of (1) sites of nutrient introduction to the shelf by various physical mechanisms, of (2) areas of subsequent downstream utilization by the phytoplankton, and of (3) where loss of particulate matter might occur from the water column. An analysis is made of the C/N patterns of bottom surface sediments in relation to the nitrogen sources from upwelling, river runoff, and tidal mixing on the Peruvian, west African, Amazonian, Gulf of Mexico, eastern US, Bering, and North Sea shelves in an initial attempt to proscribe the particle trajectories of organic matter on the continental shelf.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  12. Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

  13. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus Planipennis) in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service issued an EA (July 2007) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the release of three parasitoids into the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed the EA, adopted it, and issued a FONSI for the proposed release of the same parasitoids into the environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  14. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  15. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  16. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts. South Atlantic summary report update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    An update of the South Atlantic Summary Report 2, this report provides current information about Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil- and gas-related activities and their onshore impacts for the period June 1982 to February, 1983. The geographical area covered by the report extends from north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida. The information is designed to assist in planning for the onshore effects associated with offshore oil and gas development. It covers lease and transportation strategies and the nature and location of onshore facilities. An appendix summarizes related state and federal studies. 11 references, 2 tables.

  17. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  18. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  19. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  20. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the late postglacial sea-level rise: An example from the central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tortora, P.

    1996-03-01

    A transgressive systems tract (TST) deposit on the inner continental shelf of the south Tuscany region (central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) formed during the last postglacial sea-level rise. Its small-scale stratigraphy has been detailed using high-resolution seismic profiles, gravity cores, and grab samples. The TST deposit overlies a lowstand unconformity, shows a tabular geometry, and comprises three internal architectures of beach facies. Because the lateral distribution of these vertical successions is not random, but parallel to the coast, each architecture represents an individual sedimentary stage during sea-level rise. However, all architectures were formed via shoreface retreat in response to the landward migration of a beach complex over the unconformity. During this migration the beach system was characterized by a source diastem located in the surf zone and by two sediment dispersal systems. One moved the eroded sand over the flat back-barrier palustrine area by storm washover, while the other transported part of this sand to the lower shoreface, forming a reworked sand sheet above the older and inactive source diastem (ravinement surface). The TST architectures originated from a transgressive succession of beach facies, differentiated according to the intensity of shoreface retreat. Architecture A represents a low preservation potential of the original beach complex, Architecture B relatively high preservation, and Architecture C no preservation. The intensity of erosion and the consequent preservation potential were totally controlled by antecedent topography.

  1. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  2. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  3. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  4. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore » relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  5. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  6. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  9. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss083donley2012o.pdf More Documents &...

  10. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss083donley2013o%20.pdf More Documents &...

  11. A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Steam System Efficiency Optimized After J.R....

  13. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiber-filled engineered plastic alternatives Re-design a lighter, more compact steel bead * Milestones - Status Identify alternate materials that provide comparable...

  14. Getting Involved in Manufacturing Day – College Educators Edition Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will help address questions on why and how community colleges, universities, and technical schools can get involved with MFG DAY.  Led by MFG DAY Co-Producers, the webinar will also...

  15. Continental Components Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Bengal, India Zip: 700 001 Sector: Hydro Product: Manufacturer of large hydroenergy systems and project development consultant. Coordinates: 22.52667, 88.34616...

  16. QER- Comment of Continental Resources, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Per your request I am sending some backup data pursuant to our conversation today. You'll note I tweaked the numbers a bit since we spoke after digging a little deeper into the data.

  17. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1986) Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al.,...

  18. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    out of BL & Aerosol processing by clouds * Variety of conditions - Useful to evaluate LES models and GCM parameterizations Slingo et al. 2004; Kollias et al. (2007) Need of...

  19. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1991-05-01

    The past year continued to be extremely productive following up two major breakthroughs made in the preceding year. One of the breakthroughs was the derivation of an integral equation for time- dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single-multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach. We successfully applied the method to the data from the USGS regional seismic arrays in central California, Long Valley and Island of Hawaii, and obtained convincing results on the scattering Q{sup {minus}1} and intrinsic Q{sup {minus}1} in these areas for the frequency range from 1 Hz to 20 Hz. The frequency dependence of scattering Q{sup {minus}1} is, then, interpreted in terms of random medium with continuous or discrete scatterers. The other breakthrough was the application of T-matrix formulation to the seismic scattering problem. We are currently working on 2-dimensional inclusions with high and low velocity contrast with the surrounding medium. In addition to the above two main lines of research, we were able to use so-called T-phase'' observed on the Island of Hawaii to map the Q value with a good spatial resolution. We found that we can eliminate remarkably well the frequency dependent recording site effect from the T-phase amplitude using the amplification factor for coda waves, further confirming the fundamental separability of source, path and site effects for coda waves, and proving the effectiveness of stochastic modeling of high-frequency seismic waves. 70 refs., 24 figs.

  20. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project helped address environmental barriers to offshore wind energy development in the mid-Atlantic region by providing regulators, developers, and other stakeholders with comprehensive baseline ecological data and analyses. Project funders and collaborators from a range of academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and private companies came together to study bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal distributions, densities, and movements on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf between 2012 and 2014. Specific project activities and goals included the following: (1) Conduct standardized surveys to quantify bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal densities seasonally and annually throughout the study region and identify important habitat use or aggregation areas. (2) Develop statistical models to help understand the drivers of wildlife distribution and abundance patterns. (3) Use individual tracking data for several focal bird species to provide information on population connectivity and individual movements that is complementary to survey data. (4) Identify species that are likely to be exposed to offshore wind energy development activities in the mid-Atlantic study area. (5) Develop U.S.-based technological resources and assessment methods for future monitoring efforts, including a comparison of high resolution digital video aerial surveys to boat-based surveys. (6) Help meet data needs associated with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act requirements, by contributing several years of data and analysis towards future Environmental Impact Statements. This report consists of six parts: Project overview (executive summary and Chapters 1-2); Examining wildlife distributions and relative abundance from a digital video aerial survey platform (Chapters 3-6); Examining wildlife distributions and abundance using boat-based surveys (Chapters 7-12); Integrating data across survey platforms (Chapters 13-19); Individual movements and habitat use for focal bird species (Chapters 20-25); and Nocturnal avian migration monitoring (Chapters 26-27). Boat-based and digital video aerial surveys each had specific advantages and disadvantages, but were largely complementary (Chapters 1, 5, 13-14). Digital aerial surveys were particularly useful for covering offshore areas at broad scales, where general distributions of taxonomic groups were a priority; boat surveys could provide more detailed data on species identities and behaviors, but were more limited in geographic scope due to their slower survey pace. The mid-Atlantic study area was important for wintering and breeding taxa, and its location also made it a key migratory corridor. There was considerable variation in species composition and spatial patterns by season, largely driven by dynamic environmental conditions (Chapters 12, 15, and 20-22). Habitat gradients in nearshore waters, however, were reliable influences on productivity and patterns of species distributions and abundance. Areas within about 30-40 km of the coast offshore of the mouths of Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, as well as to the south of Delaware Bay along the coast, were consistent hotspots of abundance and species diversity, regardless of survey methodology or analytical approach (Chapters 2, 12, 17). Inter-annual variation was substantial, and the importance of certain environmental variables in predicting animal distributions indicates that these species may well respond to future environmental shifts brought about by anthropogenic effects and climatic change. This study is an important first step, however, towards understanding how bird, marine mammal, and sea turtle populations in the mid-Atlantic may be exposed to offshore wind energy development and other anthropogenic activities. The results of this study provide insight to help address environmental permitting requirements for current and future offshore development projects, and serve as a starting point for more site-speci

  1. Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality PDF icon mfg-initiativefactsheetjun2015.pdf More...

  2. WindOrgChart_06-27-2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administrator Acting Center Director Brian Smith Paul Veers Chief Engineer - Wind Brian Smith Deputy Director Chief Engineer- Water Jochem Weber Windplant Design & Mfg'g. Derek...

  3. Webinar: High Performance Computing For Manufacturing Spring Solicitation, April 5, 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be hosting an informational webinar on the High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) spring solicitation on April...

  4. Webinar: High Performance Computing For Manufacturing Spring Solicitation, March 24, 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be hosting an informational webinar on the High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) spring solicitation on March...

  5. LED Product Development and Manufacturing R&D Roundtable Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Product Development and Manufacturing R&D Roundtable Summary LED Product Development and Manufacturing R&D Roundtable Summary PDF icon LED Product Dev and Mfg Roundtable ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG Industries at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a materials approach to fuel...

  7. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Goodyear at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a system for automatically...

  9. Materials Data on TiRe (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Passive tire pressure sensor and method (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series. Authors: Pfeifer, Kent Bryant ; Williams, Robert Leslie ; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee ; Morgan, Catherine Hook...

  11. High Value Scrap Tire Recycle (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bauman, B. D. Publication Date: 2003-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 895571 Report Number(s): DOECE41035-1-FINAL TRN: US200719%%953 DOE Contract Number: FC02-93CE41035 Resource ...

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-06

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  13. InterContinental Hotels Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2009 Link to project...

  14. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors John A. Musgrave, Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Patricio E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Gary Luedemann, Sammy Garcia,...

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine AtmosphericRadiation Measurement ARM Aerial Facility AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths ...

  17. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  18. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric RadiationMeasurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern ...

  19. Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Spin-off examples: accelerator components; nano-material mfg.; anti-missile defense; test ... In addition, the FEL serves as a test bed for SRF linear accelerator technologies, ...

  20. Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards.

  1. Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Midea Washing Appliance Mfg. Co., Ltd. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Midea Washing Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MESA Other GFP BARCODE DESCRIPTION MFG MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT DATE S10345 REFRIGERATOR ABSOCOLD 0000 430308515 206.66 922 136 7222013 0000031174 HEADSET PLNM22 UNIVE...

  3. OFFSITE USE FORM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the following SLAC Government Property to: for the period of to in order to continue SLAC business: PROPERTY NO. (If any) ITEM & DESCRIPTION (include, mfg, model and serial number)...

  4. Tomoe Electric Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Tomoe Electric Manufacturing Co Ltd Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 140-0013 Product: Tomoe Electric MFG, a Tokyo-based electric vehicle provider, is...

  5. 1366 TECHNOLOGIES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1366 TECHNOLOGIES 1366 TECHNOLOGIES PDF icon DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_SLR-MFG_1366-Technologies.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003600: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008551: Categorical Exclusion Determination LPO_BROCHURE_CSP

  6. LICENSEE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LICENSEE -----e-m LICENSE # _ - - - - - - - 16. Oregon fletallurgical Corp. SNM-144 Albany, OR (Ammended) 17. Pennsylvania Salt Mfg. Company C-3440 Three Penn Center Plaza Philadelphia, PA 8. Southern Research Institute 917 South 20th Street Birmingham, AL 9. Titanium Alloy Mfg. Division National Lead Company Niagara Falls, NY 1 20. Wright Air Development Center Air Research and Development Cormand Wright-Patterson Air Force Bane, Ohio ,, 'r C-3417 C-3413 ,- il i" REMARKS ----_.-- License

  7. DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2003-07-01

    During the period April 1, 2003--June 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

  8. Gas hydrates on the Atlantic Continental Margin of the United States - controls on concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, W.P.; Fehlhaber, K.; Coleman, D.F. ); Lee, M.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Large volumes of gas hydrates exist within ocean-floor deposits at water depths exceeding about 300 to 500 m. They cement a surface layer of sediments as much as about 1,000 m thick, limited at its base by increasing temperature. Gas hydrates are identified by drilled samples and by their characteristic responses in seismic reflection profiles. These seismic responses include, at the base of the hydrate-cemented surface layer, a marked velocity decrease and a sea-floor-paralleling reflection (known as the bottom-simulating reflection, or BSR), and, within the hydrate-cemented layer, a reduction in amplitude of seismic reflections (known as blanking), which is apparently caused by cementation of strata. By using seismic-reflection data we have mapped the volume of hydrate and thickness of the hydrate-cemented layer off the US East Coast. The sources of gas at these concentrations are probably bacterial generation of methane at the locations of rapid deposition, and possibly the migration of deep, thermogenic gap up faults near diapirs. The thickness of the gas-hydrate layer decreases markedly at landslide scars, possibly due to break-down of hydrate resulting from pressure reduction caused by removal of sediment by the slide. Gas traps appear to exist where a seal is formed by the gas-hydrate-cemented layer. Such traps are observed (1) where the sea floor forms a dome, and therefore the bottom-paralleling, hydrate-cemented layer also forms a dome; (2) above diapirs, where the greater thermal conductivity of salt creates a warm spot and salt ions act as antifreeze, both effects resulting in a local shallowing of the base of the hydrate; and (3) at locations where strata dip relative to the sea floor, and the updip regions of porous strata are sealed by the gas-hydrate-cemented layer to form a trap. In such situations the gas in the hydrate-sealed trap, as well as the gas that forms the hydrate, may become a resource. 32 refs., 19 figs.

  9. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  10. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, P.

    2012-12-12

    This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account for all technical constraints on energy capture and conversion.

  11. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Rhoads, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    Because of the potential impact on the environment associated with development and production activities, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 mandated that a panel of experts, the North Carolina Environmental Sciences Review Panel (NCESRP), be convened. Their purpose was to consider whether the availability of scientific information was adequate for making decisions about oil and gas leasing, exploration, and development off North Carolina. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service because of concern raised by the NCESRP (1992) that not more than 5 percent of the unusual benthic community be covered by drill muds and cuttings. The principal task of the study was to determine if the communities extended over an area of the sea floor that was 20 time larger then the area estimated to be covered by drill muds and cuttings. If more than 5 percent of the unusual benthic community were covered by drill muds and cuttings, the NCESRP recommended that a study be carried out to determine the recovery rate of this community.

  12. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  13. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. High Performance Computing for Manufacturing Parternship | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research GE, US DOE Partner on HPC4Mfg projects to deliver new capabilities in 3D Printing and higher jet engine efficiency Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE, US DOE Partner on HPC4Mfg projects to deliver new capabilities in 3D Printing and higher jet engine efficiency NISKAYUNA, NY, February 17,

  15. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration (EIA) 2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values RSE Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed

  16. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLS PDF Table

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle Fuel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight | Department of Energy Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Presentation given by Cooper Tire at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about improving vehicle fuel

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tire Inflation Requirement The California Air Resources Board (ARB) enforces regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles operating inefficiently with under inflated tires. These regulations apply to vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less. Automotive service providers performing or offering to perform automotive maintenance or repair services in the state must: Check and inflate vehicle tires to the manufacturer recommended tire pressure rating, with

  19. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Theodore; Hall, Maclin S.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development The California Energy Commission (CEC) must adopt and implement a state-wide Fuel-Efficient Tire Program that includes a consumer information and education program and minimum tire efficiency standards. The CEC must consult with the California Integrated Waste Management Board on the program's adoption, implementation, and regular review. (Reference California Public Resources Code 25770-2577

  1. Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications | Department of Energy Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Background paper prepared for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_storage.pdf More Documents & Publications Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

  2. Manufacturing R&D of PEM Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEM Fuel Cells Manufacturing R&D of PEM Fuel Cells Background paper prepared for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_fuelcell.pdf More Documents & Publications Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Workshop Summary Manufacturing R&D for systems that will produce and distribute hydrogen

  3. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the cost for the RS course is sources. Mfg. Model SN Isotope Activity (mCi) 78-4522 Ame-241Be 40.0 78-4445 Am-241Be 40.0 04191 Am-241Be 50.0 3036 Co-60 0.10 F112 Ba-133...

  4. President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation prepared by JoAnn Milliken for the 2005 Manufacturing for the Hydrogen Economy workshop PDF icon mfg_wkshp_plenary.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen Program Overview U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs

  5. Final Participant List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Participant List Final Participant List List of the participants in the 2005 Workshop on Manufacturing for the Hydrogen Economy PDF icon mfg_wkshp_particpicants.pdf More Documents & Publications Roadmap on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Attendees List DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitiation Workshop Participants List

  6. Working with NIST | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working with NIST Working with NIST Presentation prepared by Terry Lynch for the 2005 Manufacturing R&D for the hydrogen economy roadmap workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_lynch.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium: Doing Business with the National Labs TTWG Reporting and Appraisal Guide

  7. Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Presentation prepared by Andy Abele for the DOE Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_abele.pdf More Documents & Publications High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS

  8. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  9. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore » on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  10. Sulfur isotope evidence for regional recharge of saline water during continental glaciation, north-central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, D.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Sulfate concentrations in ground water from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of south-eastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois increase up to hundreds of times where the aquifer is confined beneath the Maquoketa Shale. There is no sulfate source in the aquifer or overlying rocks except for minor amounts of finely disseminated pyrite. Coinciding with increasing sulfate concentrations, {delta}{sup 34}S of the dissolved sulfate increases from less than {minus}5{per thousand} in the unconfined part of the aquifer to a nearly constant value of +20{per thousand} where the aquifer is confined and where sulfate reduction is minimal. The most likely source for this isotopically heavy sulfate is ground water associated with Silurian evaporites under Lake Michigan. It is uncertain if the sulfate-rich water was emplaced in pulses or mostly during the last glaciation.

  11. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L.

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  12. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report, 1 June 1980-1 June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, L P

    1981-02-01

    Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume I contains preliminary results of GABEX-I. (ACR)

  13. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis is on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.

  14. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  15. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    salt * Paper * Plastic * Tires * Toner cartridges * Used oil and oil filters * Wood pallets * Wood waste (spools, timbers, and crating materials) In FY 2015, 170 metric tons of...

  16. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recycle LANL innovates recycling paths for various materials. Aerosol cans Asphalt Batteries Cardboard Concrete Light bulbs Metal Pallets Paper Tires Toner cartridges Vegetation...

  17. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Reduced Weight Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight Presentation given by Cooper...

  19. Fermilab Today - Safety Tip of the Week Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With use and aging, the risk of tire failure and accidents increase. George Davidson, head of Fermilab's Transportation Services Department, advises you to routinely inspect...

  20. Legacy Fleet Improvements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    package, barrier film liner, and low hysteresis tire profile - Goodyear * Developed design process and prototype manufacturing method, proved pumping theory, refined material...

  1. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    stresses in rolling bodies such as tires may thus be monitored. Authors: Pfeifer, Kent Bryant ; Rudnick, Thomas Jeffery Publication Date: 2005-07-05 OSTI Identifier: 1175415...

  2. SuperTruck Team Achieves 115% Freight Efficiency Improvement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    including an advanced engine, highly engineered aerodynamic surfaces, wide-based low-rolling resistance tires, a long-haul hybrid system, and engine waste heat recovery. ...

  3. Fermilab_FactSheet_FOR PRINT.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Today more than 30,000 particle accelerators are used in the industrial processing of plastics, auto tires, computer chips, and many more applications. The accelerators and...

  4. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    not include tire contribution). Authors: Beck, Jason ; Salari, Kambiz ; Ortega, Jason ; Brown, Andrea Publication Date: 2013-09-30 OSTI Identifier: 1158764 DOE Contract Number:...

  5. Bridgestone Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bridgestone Corporation Place: Tokyo, Japan Product: Japan-based tire and rubber maker. References: Bridgestone Corporation1...

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aircraft Workshop 10/14/2008 1 Instrumentation for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Fred J. Brechtel, Andy Corless, Chris Marquis, Fred P. Brechtel, Sandeep Rai, Brechtel Mfg. Inc. (fredj@brechtel.com) Tim Bates & Trish Quinn, Atmospheric Chemistry Group, NOAA PMEL Christian Meinig & Scott Stalin, Engineering Dev. Division, NOAA PMEL Intro & Motivation for the development Introduction to each UAS instrument Other aircraft-deployable systems Power plant plume case study OUTLINE: SBIR

  7. Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality PDF icon mfg-initiative_factsheet_jun2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Manufacturing R&D Initiative Lowers Costs and Boosts Quality Prospects for U.S.-Based Manufacturing in the SSL Industry Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Development Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects

  8. Manufacturing R&D for systems that will produce and distribute hydrogen |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for systems that will produce and distribute hydrogen Manufacturing R&D for systems that will produce and distribute hydrogen Background paper prepared for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_production.pdf More Documents & Publications Manufacturing R&D of PEM Fuel Cells Roadmap on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy 2011 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell

  9. Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Roadmap Workshop Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop Agenda for the 2005 Manufactuirng R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop PDF icon mfg_wkshp_agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Workshop Summary President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Proceedings of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop: Washington, DC; April 2-3, 2002

  10. Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Press Releases Press Releases RSS March 18, 2016 DOE High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program Seeks To Fund New Proposals To Jumpstart Energy Technologies A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program designed to spur the use of high performance supercomputers to advance U.S. manufacturing is now seeking a second round of proposals from industry to compete for approximately $3 million in new funding. March 14, 2016 Brookhaven Lab Named an NVIDIA GPU Research Center:

  11. Berkeley Lab Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program Berkeley Lab Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program September 15, 2015 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is collaborating with Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge national laboratories on a new Department of Energy (DOE) program designed to fund and foster public-private R&D projects that enhance U.S. competitiveness in clean energy manufacturing. The High Performance Computing for Manufacturing Program (HPC4Mfg), announced this

  12. Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples Presentation prepared by Pete Devlin for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_devlin.pdf More Documents & Publications Roadmap Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy The Non-Petroleum Based Fuel Initiative - NPBF DOE Hydrogen Program New Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting

  13. DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships DOE Announces First 'HPC for Manufacturing' Industry Partnerships February 17, 2016 HPC4mfgevent On February 17, DOE announced the first 10 new HPC4Mfg projects during an event at Berkeley Lab that included representatives from EERE, LLNL, Berkeley Lab and ORNL. From left to right are Robin Miles, LLNL; Horst Simon, LBNL; Peter Nugent, LBNL; Trish Damkroger, LLNL; Dona Crawford, LLNL; Mark Johnson, DOE EERE; Kathy Yelick, LBNL;

  14. The President's Manufacturing Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The President's Manufacturing Initiative The President's Manufacturing Initiative Presentation prepared by Dale Hall for the Roadmap Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_hall.pdf More Documents & Publications The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office Roadmap on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop

  15. The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing The Road to Hydrogen--Challenges Ahead in Technology and Manufacturing Presentation prepared by Rick Zalesky for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_industry.pdf More Documents & Publications Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology

  16. Webinars | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinars Webinars PDF icon Advanced Sensors, Controls, Platforms, and Modeling for Manufacturing (October 6, 2015) PDF icon HPC4Mfg: Advancing Innovation (October 1, 2015) PDF icon Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Introduction (January 30, 2007) PDF icon Fan System Assessment Tool Introduction (March 12, 2007) PDF icon AIRMaster+ Introduction (May 15, 2007) PDF icon Pumping System Assessment Tool Overview (December 15, 2008) PDF icon QuickPEP Tool Demonstration (February 26, 2009) PDF

  17. Off the road & into the boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, B.

    1995-07-01

    This article addresses the use of discarded automobile tires as fuel in a thermal power plant. The details of Nebraska Public Power`s efforts with tire-derived fuel are outlined, as are the efforts of Wisconsin Power and Light.

  18. The overthrusted Zaza Terrane of middle Cretaceous over the North American continental carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age - relationships to oil generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echevarria Rodriguez, G.; Castro, J.A.; Amaro, S.V.

    1996-08-01

    The Zaza Terrane is part of the Caribbean plate thrust over the southern edge of the North American basinal and platform carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age. Zaza Terrane are volcanic and ophiolitic rocks of Cretaceous age. The ophiolites are mostly serpentines which behave as reservoirs and seals. All Cuban oil fields are either within Zaza Terrane or basinal carbonates underneath, or not far away to the north of the thrust contacts. It appears that the overthrusting of the Zaza Terrane caused the generation of oil in the basinal carbonate source rocks underneath, due to the increase of rock thickness which lowered the oil window to a deeper position and increased the geothermal gradient. Oil generation was after thrusting, during post-orogenic. API gravity of oil is light toward the south and heavy to very heavy to the north. Source rocks to the south are probably of terrigenous origin.

  19. Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Exxon 975-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, U. S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W. . Quissett Labs.)

    1993-03-01

    The Exxon 975--1 well, located in the southeastern part of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4,452 m relative to the Kelly Bushing. The oldest sediments penetrated by the well are Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Early Bathonian), but unambiguous seismic correlations with the COST G--1 and G--2 wells show that about 6,860 m of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks rest on the Paleozoic basement at the 975--1 wellsite. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary in the well is placed at 1,673 m; the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary occurs at 384 m. Limestone is predominant below 3,966 m (Iroquois Formation), and at the intervals 3,810--3,246 m and 1,897--1,654 m (lower and upper tongues of the Abenaki Formation). Siliciclastics of the Mohican, undivided Mic Mac-Mohawk, Missisauga, Logan Canyon, and Dawson Canyon Formations dominate the remainder of the Mesozoic section. The Exxon 975--1 well penetrated updip, more terrestrial lithofacies than the COST G--2, Conoco 145--1, and Mobil 312--1 wells. Salt, anhydrite, dolomite, and the micritic textures of the carbonates in the Iroquois Formation of the Exxon 975--1 well suggest hypersaline restricted marine and supratidal depositional environments. The predominantly nonmarine deltaic siliciclastics of the Mohican, Misaine Shale, and Mic Mac-Mohawk units are thicker in the Exxon 975--1 well, whereas marine carbonates of the Scatarie and Bacarro Limestones are usually thinner than at the downdip (seaward) wellsites. Similarly, the Early Cretaceous Missisauga and Logan Canyon Formations represent lower delta plain (alluvial and swamp) and delta front (beach, bar, and lagoon) facies at the Exxon 975--1 wellsite, whereas correlative downdip facies represent shallow marine to delta front deposition.

  20. EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interior’s 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action. This project is inactive.

  1. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values α, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ω = nω0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ω0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, θ is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Mid-Atlantic and their onshore impacts: a summary report, November 1979. Update 3, August 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the present, there are no operators drilling in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The prime targets for future exploration will be in areas of 3000 to 6000 feet (914 to 1829 m) depth of water, seaward of previously leased tracts. No commercial discoveries have been found during the 4-year drilling history of the area. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Little development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with upcoming Lease Sale 59. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of future exploration efforts. After Lease Sale 59, the next sale is Lease Sale 76, which is tentatively scheduled for March 1983.

  3. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, July 1980. Update 1, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1981-02-01

    Lease Sale 43, in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, was the first lease sale to be held in the South Atlantic. Two additional sales are scheduled between now and 1985: Sale 56 is scheduled for August 1981 and Sale 78, for January 1984. All leases from Sale 43 remain active, but no drilling has taken place since the last of six dry holes was plugged and abandoned. There are no additional plans for drilling on Sale 43 leases in the immediate future. Future exploration may shift away from previous Sale 43 leased tracts to deep-water areas after Sale 56. One hundred thirty of the 286 proposed Sale 56 tracts are in deep-water. The geologic conditions in the deep-water areas are more favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation than those under shallower waters. Structures that may provide trapping mechanisms have been shown to exist in the area. Because leases in deep-water areas take longer and are more costly to explore and develop than those in areas of shallower water, industry consensus is that longer primary lease terms may be required and some delays in acquiring rigs may be experienced. The Sale 43 area appears to be a region of relatively low hydrocarbon-bearing potential. However, the Bureau of Land Management's Intergovernmental Planning Program is preparing the necessary Regional Transportation Management Plan for the entire South Atlantic OCS Region. Nearly all the support facilities associated with Sale 43 have been removed or converted to other uses. Temporary support facilities are likely to be reactivated only if Sale 56 results in further exploration of the South Atlantic OCS.

  4. Problems of phytostratigraphy and the correlation of the Lower Jurassic continental sediments in West Siberia and Kuznetsk and Kansk-Achinsk basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogutcheva, N.K.

    2009-06-15

    Paleofloral and palynological records of Lower Jurassic sediments in West Siberia, Kuznetsk (Kuzbass), and Kansk-Achinsk basins and their correlation are discussed. In a number of recent papers dedicated to the Jurassic stratigraphy of Siberia this problem is ambiguously treated. The reference palynological scale has been developed for the Jurassic West Siberian sediments and an uninterrupted succession of floral assemblages associated with it and with regional stratigraphic units has been recognized. On this basis the scheme of the correlation between the Lower Jurassic sediments of the Kansk-Achinsk and Kuznetsk basins and West Siberia permitting a better age estimate of coal-bearing deposits, is proposed.

  5. Goodyear Speeding Up on Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Goodyear Speeding Up on Energy Savings Goodyear Speeding Up on Energy Savings March 8, 2010 - 11:12am Addthis The Goodyear Blimp flies over Goodyear's tire plant in Union City, Tenn. | Photo courtesy of Goodyear The Goodyear Blimp flies over Goodyear's tire plant in Union City, Tenn. | Photo courtesy of Goodyear Joshua DeLung The Goodyear tire plant in Union City, Tenn., is saving energy, which helps keep the plant's operating costs down. A Save Energy Now assessment from the U.S. Department of

  6. Roadmap Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Presentation prepared by Paul Gottlieb for the 2005 Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy. PDF icon mfg_wkshp_rd.pdf More Documents & Publications Government Practices in purchasing R&D: Intellectual Property Provisions at the Department of Energy Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Roadmap Workshop Hydrogen Program

  7. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MESA Other GFP BARCODE DESCRIPTION MFG MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT DATE S10345 REFRIGERATOR ABSOCOLD 0000 430308515 $206.66 922 136 7/22/2013 0000031174 HEADSET PLNM22 UNIVE PLANTRONICSPLNM22 AV4357H7 $123.99 B01 282 7/2/2012 0000106508 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 B01 179 7/17/2013 0000106505 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 B01 272 7/17/2013 0000106506 HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50EX N/A $267.95 922 104C 3/1/2013 0000106507 HEADSET PLANTRONICS

  8. Y

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    !i fi? .&.,"(y$ 2 3 Y :ui,i' tj .r _ , .h !fieES N\jLo December ll, 1956 DBCOHTAMWATICHV OP ASSXXA' IB UtAQuPT TOOL & MK;. CMPANY, HAMILTON, CDXO R. C. Heatherton C. E. Schumann Prom Pebrusry 1 to October 5 , 1956, the Asmciats Aircraft Tool & Mfg. Company was engaged in the ka8chining of hollow dtillsd uranium slugei. Qmn caupletion of this work 8 dacontbtion cmmpaign was undertaken by Auwxirte perrcmnel. This required approximtely five weeks, during wb.ich time a total of

  9. HAN"FACT' JRll((t.CO. COPY OF LETTER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HAN"FACT' JRll((t.CO. COPY OF LETTER ,' . /g /" RECEIVED 11/17/44 FRd: FERRO METAL & CHEMICAL CORP. 5C BROAD STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. NOVEMBZH 15, 1944 ._ ' i!" THE VITRO MFG. CO. ,/ '; Eli (4 / ! 1 I: CORLISS STATION 0 T " E PITTSBURGH, PA. NOV 2( Gentlemen: ,I,& ..,. ' 713, ti,$qYp~ We have just received a cabled inquiry i?or export to.;! neutr European country on 5000 lbs. of Uranium Oxide, technical, orange or yellow and would appreciate it very much If you would

  10. Synthetic limbs: Rasmussen's lifelong quest | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    attended the 2013 Boston Marathon. Along with her husband and children, she watched the elite runners win. When her ten-year-old son reported being hungry and tired, they left the...

  11. CX-007943: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire CX(s) Applied: C Date: 02/13/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. Y-12 electromagnetic separation process wins approval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be very impressed with what Lawrence had prepared for them. According to The New World by Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr., the committee was entirely too tired from...

  13. Missouri School District Charges Up

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri's Lee's Summit R-7 school district's distribution fleet was tired. Many of the vehicles had racked up more than 300,000 miles and made frequent trips to the shop to repair the 20 plus-year-old parts.

  14. CX-004401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well StimulationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/08/2010Location(s): Waynesburg, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. Energy Department Invests More Than $55 Million to Advance Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to support projects focused on beyond lithium ion battery technologies and reducing friction and wear in the powertrain. The Army will also test and evaluate fuel-efficient tires...

  16. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tires, was needed to transport the concrete hot cell structure to the landfill and a D9 Cat was used to tow the truck and trailer up a slight incline at the final end of the...

  17. CX-006502: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Improving Fuel Efficiency through Innovative Tire Design and MaterialsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/29/2011Location(s): Pearsall, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    www.ntis.gov. The purpose of DE-EE0001552 was to develop and deploy a combination of trailer aerodynamic devices and low rolling resistance tires that reduce fuel consumption of...

  19. Fact #663: February 21, 2011 Clean Cities Program Petroleum Displaceme...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and public transportation 5.7 1.8% Fuel Economy projects such as low-resistance tires, trailer aerodynamics, and cylinder deactivation 2.6 0.8% Off-road vehicles, such as...

  20. CX-003983: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program Energy Revolving Loan - First Class Tire ShredderCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/21/2010Location(s): MichiganOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. Riverside Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 92131 Region: Southern CA Area Product: Uses scrap tires as the raw material in the production of SynBlack oil, gas, and steel Website: www.rtiworldwide.com Coordinates:...

  2. SuperTruck Team Achieves 115% Freight Efficiency Improvement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    low-rolling resistance tires, a long-haul hybrid system, and engine waste heat recovery. Many of the technologies build on VTO's research in a number of areas such as...

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Nelson - SWPA Conf June 11, 2008.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerhouse Fire Detection/Protection Case Study of Corps Powerhouse Fires and Their Impact to Hydropower Presented by Richard Nelson, PE to the The Southwestern Regional Hydropower Conference June 11, 2008, Ft. Worth, TX AIRLINE MECHANIC SOLUTIONS: P: Left inside main tire almost needs replacement. S: Almost replaced left inside main tire. P: Something loose in cockpit S: Something tightened in cockpit P: Dead bugs on windshield. S: Live bugs on back-order. AIRLINE MECHANIC SOLUTIONS: P:

  4. Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental...

  5. EA-1985: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia

  6. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  7. Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, J.C.; Tilley, F.H.

    1983-06-14

    Pieces of shredded tires are fed into the top of a vertical pyrolyzing furnace in a measured amount using a weighing hopper feed mechanism. Heated gas is introduced through inlet and pyrolyzing the tire pieces on a countercurrent flow principle to produce useful hydrocarbon volatiles and residues. The pyrolyzed residue including tire reinforcing wires are efficiently removed from the furnace by a plurality of downwardly inclined screw conveyors disposed in troughs. Each screw conveyor extends into an inclined conduit and discharges into a vertical branch conduit disposed at least partially within the cross-section of the furnace so that even discharge of the pyrolyzed residue is ensured by the combined action of gravity and the screw conveyors.

  8. EECBG Success Story: Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Save Money and Energy | Department of Energy Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents Save Money and Energy EECBG Success Story: Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents Save Money and Energy April 20, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis Workers demonstrate the nitrogen tank used to inflate tires in St. Peters, MO. | Courtesy of the City of St. Peters Workers demonstrate the nitrogen tank used to inflate tires in St. Peters, MO. | Courtesy of the City of St. Peters Residents of

  9. Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents Save Money and Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents Save Money and Energy Cha-Ching! How One Missouri Town is Helping Residents Save Money and Energy April 20, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis Workers demonstrate the nitrogen tank used to inflate tires in St. Peters, MO. | Courtesy of the City of St. Peters Workers demonstrate the nitrogen tank used to inflate tires in St. Peters, MO. | Courtesy of the City of St. Peters April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach

  10. Apparatus for weighing and identifying characteristics of a moving vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Clinton, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); LaForge, John V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for weighing a vehicle in motion is provided by employing a plurality of elongated fiber-optic sensors defined by an optical fiber embedded in an encasement of elastomeric material and disposed parallel to each other on the roadway in the path of moving vehicles. Each fiber-optic sensor is provided with contact grid means which can be selectively altered to provide the fiber-optic sensors with sensitivities to vehicular weight different from each other for weighing vehicles in an extended weight range. Switch means are used in conjunction with the fiber-optic sensors to provide signals indicative of the speed of the moving vehicle, the number of axles on the vehicle, weight distribution, tire position, and the wheelbase of the vehicle. The use of a generally N-shaped configuration of switch means also provides a determination of the number of tires on each axle and the tire footprint. When switch means in this configuration are formed of optical fibers, the extent of light transmission through the fibers during contact with the tires of the vehicle is indicative of the vehicle weight.

  11. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikesell, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  12. CX-006546: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck TireCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/19/2011Location(s): San Angelo, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. Apparatus for weighing and identifying characteristics of a moving vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, J.D.; Jordan, J.K.; Tobin, K.W. Jr.; LaForge, J.V.

    1993-11-09

    Apparatus for weighing a vehicle in motion is provided by employing a plurality of elongated fiber-optic sensors defined by an optical fiber embedded in an encasement of elastomeric material and disposed parallel to each other on the roadway in the path of moving vehicles. Each fiber-optic sensor is provided with contact grid means which can be selectively altered to provide the fiber-optic sensors with sensitivities to vehicular weight different from each other for weighing vehicles in an extended weight range. Switch means are used in conjunction with the fiber-optic sensors to provide signals indicative of the speed of the moving vehicle, the number of axles on the vehicle, weight distribution, tire position, and the wheelbase of the vehicle. The use of a generally N-shaped configuration of switch means also provides a determination of the number of tires on each axle and the tire footprint. When switch means in this configuration are formed of optical fibers, the extent of light transmission through the fibers during contact with the tires of the vehicle is indicative of the vehicle weight. 15 figures.

  14. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  15. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  16. Effects of the furnace temperature on the CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and unburned hydrocarbon emissions from the combustion of coal and alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A.; Courtemanche, B.

    1999-07-01

    Results are presented on the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), unburned aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from the combustion of pulverized bituminous coal, tire-derived fuel and, for a limited number of runs, waste plastics-derived fuel. The particle size cuts of pulverized coal, tire and plastics were 63--75 {micro}m and 180--300 {micro}m, respectively. Combustion experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale drop-tube furnace at gas temperatures, in the range of 1,300--1,600 K, and several fuel mass loadings in the furnace, expressed in terms of global equivalence ratios in the range of 0.4--2.4. The CO, CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions were monitored continuously with infrared absorption and chemiluminescent instruments. Up to sixty 2-7 ring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were detected by capillary gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. Results showed that the PAH emission yields (mg/g fuel introduced) increased drastically with increasing bulk equivalence ratio (in the aforementioned range), at fixed furnace temperatures. This was also true for the CO yields, while the CO{sub 2} yields increased with increasing {o}, reached a maximum around stoichiometry and then decreased mildly. NO{sub x} yields decreased precipitously with increasing equivalence ratio. The CO and, especially, the PAH yields from tire-derived and plastics-derived fuels were much higher than those from coal, but the relative amounts of individual PAH components were remarkably similar in the combustion effluent of all fuels. The CO{sub 2} emissions and, especially, the NO{sub x} emissions from tire crumb were lower than those from coal. The CO{sub 2} emissions from plastics were comparable to those from coal, but their NO {sub x} emissions were much lower than those from tire. At fixed bulk equivalence ratios, however, as the furnace gas temperature increased the PAH yields from coal, tire crumb, and plastics decreased drastically, while the CO emission yields increased. At the highest temperature tested herein, 1,600 K ({approx}1,300 C), the effluent of the combustion of the fuels appeared to be devoid of PAHs. No{sub x} yields increased mildly with temperature. The influence of temperature, in this range, on the CO{sub 2} emissions was not significant. 65 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Recycled materials in geotechnical applications. Geotechnical special publication No. 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Elton, D.J.

    1998-07-01

    Recycled materials have the potential for use in a variety of geotechnical and geoenvironmental applications. This proceedings contains 15 papers on field applications and laboratory testing related to recycled materials. Papers cover: geotechnics of industrial by-products; paper mill sludge for landfill cover; mitigation of void development under bridge approach slabs using rubber tire chips; tire shreds as lightweight fill for embankments and retaining walls; performance of a highway embankment and hydraulic barriers constructed using waste foundry sand, and recycled materials; lagoon-stored lime for embankment; construction and demolition debris for base and subbase applications; fly ash for fill, pavement, earth structures and aggregate; compaction of contaminated soils-reuse as a road base material; and database on beneficial reuse of foundry by-products; and more.

  18. Waste oils utilized as coal liquefaction solvents on differing ranks of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, E.C.; Shi, Y.; Liang, J.

    1995-12-31

    To determine the feasibility of using different waste oils as solvent media for coals of differing rank, oil from automobile crankcases, oil derived from the vacuum pyrolysis of waste rubber tires, and oil derived from the vacuum pyrolysis of waste plastics, have been heated to 430{degrees}C with coal in tubing reactors a hydrotreated for 1 hour. Analysis of the solvents indicates the presence of heavy metals in the waste automobile oil. Analysis of the plastic oil shows the presence of iron and calcium. The analysis of the tire oil shows the presence of zinc. Conversion yields are compared and results of analysis for the presence of metals in the liquid products are reported.

  19. Chemical reclamation of scrap rubber. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, G.C.; Chan, S.M.; Culberson, O.L.; Perona, J.J.; Larsen, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual, commercial-scale plant design was formulated for processing 22,500 t/yr of scrap rubber tires to hydrocarbon fuel gases, oils, petrochemicals (principally ethylene and aromatic liquids), and carbon black. The process is based upon molten salt (zinc chloride) pyrolysis of the rubber, and pyrolysis data obtained in a bench-scale flow apparatus. An economic assessment of the plant was made in terms of late 1979 dollars, for ranges in scrap tire costs and prices for the principal products: carbon black and the fuel gases and oil. Profitability at these 1979 costs and prices is somewhat modest by chemical processing industry standards for new processes, but any increases in energy and carbon black prices would cause favorable changes in this assessment.

  20. Ridge station eases Florida's waste-disposal problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanekamp, R.

    1994-10-01

    Two results of Florida's continuing population growth are (1) a critical need for electricity, and (2) a solid-waste disposal crisis. During a recent winter cold snap, electric demand in one service territory surged 25% over generating capacity and 10% over net system capability. Rolling blackouts ensued. At the same time, Florida's fragile wetlands environment is suffering from years of unfettered development. Groundwater sources are contaminated, landfill space is scarce, and illegal tire dumps blight the landscape. The recently constructed Ridge generating station in Polk County, Fla. is addressing both the state's electrical and environmental needs. Ridge, which entered commercial operation in May, burns a unique mix of urban woodwaste and scrap tires to provide 45 MW of critically needed electricity while keeping large quantities of solid waste out of landfills. When pipeline construction at an adjacent landfill is completed, the facility also will burn the methane gases produced when garbage decomposes.

  1. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the

  2. Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Across the Continental United States | Department of Energy Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Data analysis from this study will provide insight into real-world performance of current emissions reduction devices, under various operating conditions, and with respect to greenhouse gas emissions. PDF icon p-03_carder.pdf

  3. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. PDF icon Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic

  4. Development and Demonstration of a Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    Burns & McDonnell Engineering Company, in collaboration with Frito-Lay, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, CPL Systems, Inc., Alpha Boilers, and Kansas State University will demonstrate use of a biomass boiler in the food processing industry. The 60,000 lb/hr innovative biomass boiler system utilizing a combination of wood waste and tire-derived fuel (TDF) waste will offset all natural gas consumption at Frito-Lay's Topeka, Kansas, processing facility.

  5. Trash-fired boiler cuts plant's gas use 30%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, F

    1983-06-27

    A Minneapolis bottling plant will burn trash in a 450-horsepower boiler/incinerator to reduce natural gas consumption 30% and eliminate the costs of hauling and disposing of trash. Combined with a CA1500 heat-recovery system installed in 1982, the project will have a two-year payback. The system is clean enough that even old tires can be burned and still meet air pollution regulations. (DCK)

  6. Transportation Efficiency Strategies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Advanced Technology Vehicles: Overview and Constraints John German, ICCT EIA Energy Conference April 26, 2011 Where Does the Energy Go? http://www.fueleconomy.gov/FEG/atv.shtml Friction reduction Cylinder deactivation DI turbo Aero, tires Variable valves weight High efficient gasoline engine Clean diesel HEV expansion Base engine and vehicle improvements Efficiency/CO2 reduction EV/FCV development for future Fleet tests Research for mass production HCCI No single solution - multi-pronged

  7. Haptic Seat for Fuel Ecomony - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haptic Seat for Fuel Ecomony A new method for providing feedback to drivers of vehicles in order to maximize fuel efficiency through improved driving habits Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Today's vehicles provide feedback to the driver on a wide variety of vehicle or driver characteristics. Some of the information provided includes: speed, temperatures, tire pressure, radio, GPS, cell phone controls, trip monitors, and fuel

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived

  9. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  10. RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt055_ti_reed_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative Fuels Implementation Team (AFIT) for North Carolina Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP)

  11. SBOT IDAHO IDAHO LAB POC Stacey Francis Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IDAHO IDAHO LAB POC Stacey Francis Telephone (208) 526-8564 Email stacey.francis@inl.gov CONSTRUCTION Industrial Building Construction 236210 All Other Specialty Trade Contractors 238990 GOODS Motor Vehicle Supplies and New Parts Merchant Wholesalers 423120 Tire and Tube Merchant Wholesalers 423130 Office Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423420 Other Commercial Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423440 Other Professional Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423490 Electrical Apparatus and

  12. CAMD Nanofabrication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research :: Publications :: Infrastructure :: News :: Links :: The emerging fields of nanoscience and nanoengineering are leading to unprecedented understanding and control over the fundamental building blocks of all physical things. This is likely to change the way almost everything—from vaccines to computers to automobile tires to objects not yet imagined—is designed and made. It is anticipated that a new world of industrial products valued at $1trillion/yr and, at least, 2 million nanotech

  13. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars and Light

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trucks | Department of Energy 3: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars and Light Trucks Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars and Light Trucks A vehicle footprint is the area defined by the four points where the tires touch the ground. It is calculated as the product of the wheelbase and the average track width of the vehicle. The upcoming Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards have fuel economy targets based on the vehicle footprint. The

  14. Detection of contraband using microwave radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toth, Richard P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Bacon, Larry D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and system for using microwave radiation to detect contraband hidden inside of a non-metallic container, such as a pneumatic vehicle tire. The method relies on the attenuation, retardation, time delay, or phase shift of microwave radiation as it passes through the container plus the contraband. The method is non-invasive, non-destructive, low power, and does not require physical contact with the container.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations Box-type trailers that are at least 53 feet long and the heavy-duty tractors that pull these trailers must be equipped with fuel-efficient tires and aerodynamic trailer devices that improve fuel economy and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Tractors and trailers subject to the regulation must either use U.S. Environmental Protection Agency SmartWay certified tractors and trailers or retrofit existing equipment with SmartWay verified

  16. Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Many private sector organizations-grocers, banks, tire and hardware companies, logistics providers, and others-have begun to realize the value of using fuel cells to support their operations. And they aren't the only ones. Federal agencies across the country are incorporating advanced energy technologies, such as fuel cells, into their facilities. Federal Deployment and Demonstration Government adoption of early market

  17. ARM - Blog Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Radiosondes Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Mike Jensen, a scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, sent this update. He led the Midlatitude Continental Convective...

  18. TO: FROM: Procurement Directors

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Ground Domestic Delivery Services (DDS2) in the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. DDS2 is a full service Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (FSSI)...

  19. Restaurants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quick-find list Argonne | Continental | Mixed Menu | Burgers & Dogs | Pizza | Chicken | Seafood | Italian Mexican | Breakfast | Sandwiches | Asian | OtherEthnic | BBQ | Brew Pubs...

  20. arm2007_poster_wu_final.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The TWP-ICE IOP included an early "active monsoon" period with an apparent maritime style of convection, and a late "break" period with occasional intense continental...

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    records, and for capturing each of four broad classes of aerosol airmass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, and continental aerosols. For instantaneous matchups...

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle of continental shallow cumuli. Both subgrid cloud properties and the resolved thermodynamic structures and the surface energy budget are well simulated by the model. Using...

  3. Downstream Savings: From Water Efficiency to Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenters: Sean West, United Technologies Corporation; Jean Pullen, Southface (representing the City of Atlanta); Lindsay Wilkinson, InterContinental Hotels Group

  4. Section 77

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus. But blind application of these statistics may not be the most prudent approach for the...

  5. File:BOEMRE US.CSB.Map.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description US Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) Areas Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas...

  6. File:BOEMRE US.CSB.bathy.map.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Boundary Areas, in color Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas...

  7. CLOUD MODELING CHALLENGES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ROLE OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE DIURNAL TRANSITION FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP CONVECTION Tony Del Genio and Jingbo Wu NASAGISS ARM Science Team Meeting, 33109 Continental rainfall rates...

  8. Category:Federal Environmental Statutes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act P Paleontological Resources Preservation Act S Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Retrieved from "http:...

  9. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... natural gas that could be produced with current technology, regardless of oil and natural ... a northeast- southwest trending trough related to the Atlantic Ocean continental breakup. ...

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over both the land and ocean. Therefore, it is necessary that adequate observational databases exist for both continental and maritime boundary layer clouds. Stratus cloud and...

  11. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=0af428

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a new major industrial discharge. (iv) Issuance of a new source NPDES permit for a new oilgas development and production operation on the outer continental shelf. (v) Issuance...

  12. Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joint Venture Continental Biofuels Corporation Digital Gas Inc Distribution Drive ES Alternatives Evolution Energy formerly Earth Biofuels Inc FAS Technologies LLC G3 Energy...

  13. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  14. chin-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this figure, please see http:www.arm.govdocs documentstechnicalconf9803chin-98.pdf.) Session Papers 146 A similar feature was also reported for midlatitude continental...

  15. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic...

  16. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of carbon stocks and flux, and the uncertainties inherent in each approach. The alternative approaches to estimating continental scale carbon fluxes that we explored here can...

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    influence radiative forcing, convective processes, and CO2 concentrations; and (c) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales. To meet these goals, we are...

  18. Fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas. Topical report February 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    Experiments were made on use of H and CH plasmas for converting waste materials and heavy oils to H-rich transportation fuels. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted with an industrial microwave generator and a commercial microwave oven. A continuously circulating reactor was constructed for conducting experiments on flowing oils. Experiments on decomposition of scrap tires showed that microwave plasmas can be used to decompose scrap tires into potentially useful liquid products. In a batch experiment using a commercial microwave oven, about 20% of the tire was converted to liquid products in about 9 minutes. Methane was decomposed in a microwave plasma to yield a liquid products composed of various compound types; GC/MS analyses identified unsaturated compounds including benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, methyl and ethyl naphthalene, small amounts of larger aromatic rings, and olefinic compounds. Experiments on a crude oil in a continuously flowing reactor showed that distillate materials are produced using H and CH plasmas. Also, the recycle oils had an overall carbon aromaticity lower than that of starting feed material, indicating that some hydrogenation and methanation had taken place in the recycle oils.

  19. Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

    1994-06-01

    A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

  20. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang Sai; Zhang Tianzhu

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  1. Functionalized Materials From Elastomers to High Performance Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Ann Salazar

    2003-05-31

    Synthesis and incorporation of functionalized materials continues to generate significant research interest in academia and in industry. If chosen correctly, a functional group when incorporated into a polymer can deliver enhanced properties, such as adhesion, water solubility, thermal stability, etc. The utility of these new materials has been demonstrated in drug-delivery systems, coatings, membranes and compatibilizers. Two approaches exist to functionalize a material. The desired moiety can be added to the monomer either before or after polymerization. The polymers used range from low glass transition temperature elastomers to high glass transition temperature, high performance materials. One industrial example of the first approach is the synthesis of Teflon(reg. sign). Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE or Teflon(reg. sign)) is synthesized from tetrafluoroethylene, a functionalized monomer. The resulting material has significant property differences from the parent, poly(ethylene). Due to the fluorine in the polymer, PTFE has excellent solvent and heat resistance, a low surface energy and a low coefficient of friction. This allows the material to be used in high temperature applications where the surface needs to be nonabrasive and nonstick. This material has a wide spread use in the cooking industry because it allows for ease of cooking and cleaning as a nonstick coating on cookware. One of the best examples of the second approach, functionalization after polymerization, is the vulcanization process used to make tires. Natural rubber (from the Hevea brasiliensis) has a very low glass transition temperature, is very tacky and would not be useful to make tires without synthetic alteration. Goodyear's invention was the vulcanization of polyisoprene by crosslinking the material with sulfur to create a rubber that was tough enough to withstand the elements of weather and road conditions. Due to the development of polymerization techniques to make cis-polyisoprene, natural rubber is no longer needed for the manufacturing of tires, but vulcanization is still utilized.

  2. Registrations and vehicle miles of travel of light duty vehicles, 1985--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S.; Davis, S.C.; Schmoyer, R.L.

    1998-02-01

    To obtain vehicle registration data that consistently and accurately reflect the distinction between automobiles and light-duty trucks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was asked by FHWA to estimate the current and historical vehicle registration numbers of automobiles and of other two-axle four-tire vehicles (i.e., light-duty trucks), and their associated travel. The term automobile is synonymous with passenger car. Passenger cars are defined as all sedans, coupes, and station wagons manufactured primarily for the purpose of carrying passengers. This includes taxicabs, rental cars, and ambulances and hearses on an automobile chassis. Light-duty trucks refer to all two-axle four-tire vehicles other than passenger cars. They include pickup trucks, panel trucks, delivery and passenger vans, and other vehicles such as campers, motor homes, ambulances on a truck chassis, hearses on a truck chassis, and carryalls. In this study, light-duty trucks include four major types: (1) pickup truck, (2) van, (3) sport utility vehicle, and (4) other 2-axle 4-tire truck. Specifically, this project re-estimates statistics that appeared in Tables MV-1 and MV-9 of the 1995 Highway Statistics. Given the complexity of the approach developed in this effort and the incompleteness and inconsistency of the state-submitted data, it is recommended that alternatives be considered by FHWA to obtain vehicle registration data. One alternative is the Polk`s NVPP data (via the US Department of Transportation`s annual subscription to Polk). The second alternative is to obtain raw registration files from individual states` Departments of Motor Vehicles and to decode individual VINs.

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust July 13, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 13, 2015-The ChemCam laser instrument on NASA's Curiosity rover has turned its beam onto some unusually light-colored rocks on Mars, and the results are surprisingly similar to Earth's granitic continental crust rocks. This is the first discovery of a potential "continental crust" on Mars."Along the rover's path we have seen some beautiful rocks with large, bright crystals, quite

  4. The February 2014 Accidents at WIPP - What Happened and What We Know About Why

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 19, 2015, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 1 The February 2014 Accidents at WIPP - 15024 (What Happened and What We Know About Why) Roger Nelson, Russel Patterson, Abe VanLuik U.S. Department of Energy, PO Box 3090, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (roger.nelson@wipp.ws) ABSTRACT With almost 15 years of successful and safe operations, the WIPP facility was suddenly shutdown in February 2014 due to two unrelated accidents underground. A fire burned the front tires and engine of a salt haul truck, creating

  5. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Rudnick, Thomas Jeffery

    2005-07-05

    A sensor array is configured based upon capacitive sensor techniques to measure stresses at various positions in a sheet simultaneously and allow a stress map to be obtained in near real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the distribution of stresses across a mat surface in real-time as a function of position for manufacturing and test applications. In-plane and normal stresses in rolling bodies such as tires may thus be monitored.

  6. How three smart managers control steam costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.

    1982-11-01

    Three steam-intensive companies report innovative ways to reduce steam-production costs. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. concentrated on regular maintenance, process modifications, and heat recovery, but also has an on-going policy of seeking further cost savings. Future efforts will explore computer-based boiler controls. Zenith Radio Corporation's color picture tube-making process uses 12% less steam after 700 mechanical steam traps were replaced with fixed-orifice traps. Petro-Tex Chemical Corp. reduced steam costs by monitoring and optimizing process units and by making capital investments to improve steam management. (DCK)

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Emissions by Type of Generating Unit, 2010 Emissions by Sector, 1989-2010 314 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 5.0 (s) 0.2 0.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Million Metric Tons of Gas Sulfur Dioxide ¹ For carbon dioxide: municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources; tire-derived fuel, and geothermal. For sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides: blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other

  8. Nanofabrication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility The emerging fields of nanoscience and nanoengineering are leading to unprecedented understanding and control over the fundamental building blocks of all physical things. This is likely to change the way almost everything-from vaccines to computers to automobile tires to objects not yet imagined-is designed and made. It is anticipated that a new world of industrial products valued at $1trillion/yr and, at least, 2 million nanotech workers would emerge in 10-15yrs. In order to be part of

  9. Junior Solar Sprint Inside Tips on Parts and Construction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL/BK-820-30827 Revised 8/23/01 Inside Tips on Parts and Construction Written by: Robert Haehnel 2 Parts is Parts: So you are ready to build the ultimate JSS car. You have the perfect design, and the ultimate gear ratio and tire size combination. But you just visited every hobby store in the Upper Valley and could not find a single gear or pulley that would fit your motor. Now what do you do? It is time to cannibalize! The best place to find gears and pulleys of all different sizes is in old

  10. Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications Biomass Boiler Uses a Combination of Wood Waste and Tire-Derived Fuel In 2011, the energy consumed by food and beverage manufacturing was ~1.3 quad, of which 42% was used for process heating. Over 67% of that energy was lost in waste streams. The food processing industry alone uses >10,000 boilers for heating and power; more than 70% consume natural gas or 237 trillion Btu annually. Economic and

  11. Finding & Sharing Information about Energy Efficiency | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Finding & Sharing Information about Energy Efficiency Finding & Sharing Information about Energy Efficiency June 29, 2011 - 12:27pm Addthis Drew Bittner Writer/Editor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vacation time should be relaxing, but it's often just a different kind of work. Doesn't mean it isn't fun but I seem to come home from vacation more tired than when I left. This past week was spent on the Gulf Coast, where my mother turned 81. One of my goals was

  12. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  13. What Eco-Driving Techniques Do You Use on the Road? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On Tuesday, you read about eco-driving and how it can improve fuel economy and reduce your greenhouse gas emissions. Simple measures such as observing the speed limit, planning your trips, and keeping your tires properly inflated can make a big difference in your savings. What eco-driving techniques do you use on the road? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also

  14. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lsw 1 * ,, , l .4 _. 6 my ./: L :. -. I I?QC& :Ir\ , 4 c/-f, 17 SC? 8 2-l / C.16 .'. A...--"( -.+" & 0 ( 'I, cs, F/f , "I) A ET. ENGINEEREC) MA-T-ERIALS 0 l6' :. /' t .. G~-+?b%t 4" t: " ---* &&, W&\,,,a,, inc. Corpomte Headquarters 1200 Hanna Building January 12, 1983 (%&and. Ohio 4411% (2l6) 443-KKKJ Ms Robin Crane Law Department Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 1144 E. Market Street Akron, Ohio 44316 Dear MS Crane: Attached per your telephone

  15. Property:File/GeographicExtent | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (previous 25) (next 25) A Australia-Solar-Map.png + National + Awstwspd100onoff3-1.jpg + National + B BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf + Continental US plus Alaska + BOEMRE...

  16. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed the EA, adopted it, and issued a FONSI for...

  17. fe0013531-Oregon-State | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessing the Response of Methane Hydrates to Environmental Change at the Svalbad Continental Margin Last Reviewed 1242015 DE-FE0013531 Goal The project goal is to study the...

  18. File:BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Size of this preview: 700...

  19. Property:File/Description | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Map of the U.S. land-based and offshore annual average wind speed at 100m B BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf + Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 -...

  20. Microsoft Word - Agenda 071910.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VA Tuesday, July 20 - Day 1 Time Activity HostPresenter 7:30 - 8:30 am Registration and ... Wednesday, July 21 - Day 2 Time Activity HostPresenter 7:30 - 8:30 am Continental ...

  1. Triple E Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dates: Thursday, November 19 and Friday, November 20 Location: 922 Conference Center Food Set-up - 922B Thursday, November 19th 7:45 am - registration and continental breakfast...

  2. EV Everywhere EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    within the next 10 years. 8:30-8:35 AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:30-8:35 AM CALL TO ORDER Mr. Patrick Davis, DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program 8:35-8:50 AM WELCOMING...

  3. ACRF Newsletter_May_FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Point Reyes is located at the edge of an abrupt and steep continental margin where cold ocean currents rise up from the ocean bottom. The ocean provides the moisture, and cold ...

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relative Importance of Size Distribution and Liquid Water Path to Solar Radiation in the Presence of Continental Stratus Sengupta, M.(a), Ackerman, T.P.(a), and Clothiaux, E.E.(b),...

  5. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with EPRI to study the in-stream (free-flow, zero-head) energy potential of major rivers in the continental United States and Alaska. Information from this assessment will be ...

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data set from the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa, Azores, 2009-2010 field campaign was used to investigate how continental...

  7. 2011 User Meeting Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buses to Downtown Tuesday, October 4 08:00 Continental Breakfast Session Chair: Gyorgy Snell, Takeda, Inc. 08:45 Science: What the Public is Thinking, What Congress is Doing, How...

  8. DOE/EA-1985

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    985 Final Environmental Assessment for the Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office July 2015

  9. fe0013531-Oregon-State | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessing the Response of Methane Hydrates to Environmental Change at the Svalbad Continental Margin Last Reviewed 12/4/2015 DE-FE0013531 Goal The project goal is to study the biogeochemical response of gas hydrates to environmental change at the Svalbad Continental Margin. Performer Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97339-1086 Background More research is needed to better understand the role gas hydrates play in the global carbon cycle and their potential as a future energy resource. This

  10. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Evaluation Product Provides Thermodynamic Variables from Multiple Instruments Bookmark and Share INTERPSONDE output from the SGP Central Facility during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment from April 26, 2011. INTERPSONDE output from the SGP Central Facility during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment from April 26, 2011. The Interpolated Sonde (INTERPSONDE) value-added product (VAP) is an intermediate step of the MERGESONDE VAP that produces a daily

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Cloud Properties and Their Impact on the Surface Radiation Budget Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., P. Minnis, and B. Xi, 2005: A climatology of midlatitude continental clouds from ARM SGP site. Part I: Low-level Cloud Macrophysical, microphysical and radiative properties. J. Climate. 18, 1391-1410. Dong, X., B. Xi, and P.

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turn Trash Into Treasure: Continental Warm Cloud Properties Derived from Unexploited Solar Background Signals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chiu, J., University of Reading Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Chiu JC, JA Holmes, RJ Hogan, and EJ O'Connor. 2014. "The interdependence of continental warm cloud properties derived from unexploited solar background signals in

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    International & Interstate Movements by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Deliveries The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities operated by the responding company to facilities operated by others or to consumers. Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture

  14. DE-FE0010180 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization Last Reviewed 11/27/2015 DE-FE0010180/DE-FE0005806 Goal The goal of this research is to assess the contemporary state of the upper continental slope along U.S. coastal margins to determine if gas hydrates are in equilibrium with present-day climate conditions Performers Southern Methodist University (SMU) - Dallas, TX Oregon State University (OSU) - Corvallis, OR US Geological Survey (USGS) -

  15. gottschalck(2)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoscale Variability of a Continental Stratus Cloud Event at the SGP CART Site During 1999 J. C. Gottschalck and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Current observational data bases of continental stratus are mainly composed of observations from a single location. It has been shown, however, that marine stratus decks show both mesoscale and diurnal variability (Albrecht et al. 1988; Albrecht et al. 1995; Miller and Albrecht 1995; Miller et al. 1998). Such variability

  16. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume II: an investigation of live bottom habitats north of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The report describes three study sites at the edge of the continental shelf in a 55-100m depth zone, near Cape Fear, North Carolina.

  17. Summary of the issues with regard to the carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and exposure of polycyclic organic matter (POM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    Polycyclic organic matter (POM) is emitted from a variety of sources in the environment. Evidence of the carcinogenicity of emissions from coke production, motor vehicles (includes tire wear), asphalt roofing, paving, and air blowing, catalytic cracking residential coal combustion, industrial/utility coal combustion, carbon black, and iron and steel processes is presented. The contribution of the POM fraction to the carcinogenicity of the mixture is evaluated for gasoline engine exhaust condensate and coal combustion effluent and appears to contribute the majority of the carcinogenic potential for those mixtures. Evidence of the mutagenicity of emissions from coke production, motor vehicles (including tire wear), industrial/utility coal combustion, carbon black, iron and steel processes, forest fires and open burning, residential solid fuel (wood) combustion, commercial and other incineration, commercial/industrial oil combustion, residential oil combustion, and asphalt roofing, paving, and air blowing is also presented. The problem in the use of a chemical surrogate to sample for POM-containing emissions is discussed. A discussion of the problems in evaluating the carcinogenic potential of different POM-containing mixtures is also presented.

  18. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G. E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

  19. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  1. Evaluation of a New Remote Handling Design for High Throughput Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law; Lawrence L. Macaluso

    2009-09-01

    Advanced designs of nuclear fuel recycling plants are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Previous efforts defined and characterized the performance of commercial 5 cm and 12.5 cm single-stage ACCs in a cold environment. The next logical step, the design and evaluation of remote capable pilot scale ACCs in a hot or radioactive environment was reported earlier. This report includes the development of remote designs for ACCs that can process the large throughput rates needed in future nuclear fuel recycling plants. Novel designs were developed for the remote interconnection of contactor units, clean-in-place and drain connections, and a new solids removal collection chamber. A three stage, 12.5 cm diameter rotor module has been constructed and evaluated for operational function and remote handling in highly radioactive environments. This design is scalable to commercial CINC ACC models from V-05 to V-20 with total throughput rates ranging from 20 to 650 liters per minute. The V-05R three stage prototype was manufactured by the commercial vendor for ACCs in the U.S., CINC mfg. It employs three standard V-05 clean-in-place (CIP) units modified for remote service and replacement via new methods of connection for solution inlets, outlets, drain and CIP. Hydraulic testing and functional checks were successfully conducted and then the prototype was evaluated for remote handling and maintenance suitability. Removal and replacement of the center position V-05R ACC unit in the three stage prototype was demonstrated using an overhead rail mounted PaR manipulator. This evaluation confirmed the efficacy of this innovative design for interconnecting and cleaning individual stages while retaining the benefits of commercially reliable ACC equipment for remote applications in the nuclear industry. Minor modifications and suggestions for improved manual remote servicing by the remote handling specialists were provided but successful removal and replacement was demonstrated in the first prototype.

  2. Federal offshore statistics: leasing - exploration - production - revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essertier, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Federal Offshore Statistics is a numerical record of what has happened since Congress gave authority to the Secretary of the Interior in 1953 to lease the Federal portion of the Continental Shelf for oil and gas. The publication updates and augments the first Federal Offshore Statistics, published in December 1983. It also extends a statistical series published annually from 1969 until 1981 by the US Geological Survey (USGS) under the title Outer Continental Shelf Statistics. The USGS collected royalties and supervised operation and production of minerals on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) until the Minerals Management Service (MMS) took over these functions in 1982. Statistics are presented under the following topics: (1) highlights, (2) leasing, (3) exploration and development, (4) production and revenue, (5) federal offshore production by ranking operator, 1983, (6) reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources, and (7) oil pollution in the world's oceans.

  3. Incinerator thermal release valve risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.B.

    1998-12-31

    Human health risk assessments were conducted on emissions from several types of incinerators--a hazardous waste combustor, a medical waste/tire combustor, and a refuse derived fuel combustor in three different states. As part of these studies, the short-term emissions from thermal release valves operating during upset conditions were additionally evaluated. The latter assessments addressed two specific risk-related questions: (1) what are the incremental long-term risks/hazards associated with these short-term emissions; (2) what are the acute health hazards associated with these emissions? For each study, emission estimates for both the incinerator stack and the thermal release valve were obtained from the facility. Stack testing was utilized to obtain stack gas concentrations of emissions at one facility; engineering estimates were used to ascertain emissions from the thermal release valve. The two facilities were proposed incinerators, so literature-derived emissions were used throughout.

  4. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

    1998-10-13

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

  5. System and method for weighing and characterizing moving or stationary vehicles and cargo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beshears, David L [Knoxville, TN; Scudiere, Matthew B [Oak Ridge, TN; White, Clifford P [Seymour, TN

    2008-05-20

    A weigh-in-motion device and method having at least one transducer pad, each transducer pad having at least one transducer group with transducers positioned essentially perpendicular to the direction of travel. At least one pad microcomputer is provided on each transducer pad having a means for calculating first output signal indicative of weight, second output signal indicative of time, and third output signal indicative of speed. At least one host microcomputer is in electronic communication with each pad microcomputer, and having a means for calculating at least one unknown selected from the group consisting of individual tire weight, individual axle weight, axle spacing, speed profile, longitudinal center of balance, and transverse center of balance.

  6. Fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowards, N.K.; Murphy, M.L.

    1991-10-29

    This patent describes a vessel. It comprises a fluid bed for continuously incinerating fuel comprising tire segments and the like which comprise metallic wire tramp and for concurrently removing tramp and bed materials at a bottom effluent exit means of the vessel, the vessel further comprising static air distributor means at the periphery of the bed comprising a substantially centrally unobstructed relatively large central region in which the fluid bed and fuel only are disposed and through which bed material and tramp migrate without obstruction to and through the effluent exit means, downwardly and inwardly stepped lower vessel wall means and a plurality of peripherally located centrally directed vertically and horizontally offset spaced air influent means surrounding the central region and associated with the stepped lower vessel wall means by which the bed is supported and fluidized.

  7. A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

  8. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  9. Structuring small projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pistole, C.O.

    1995-11-01

    One of the most difficult hurdles facing small project developers is obtaining financing. Many major banks and institutional investors are unwilling to become involved in projects valued at less than $25 million. To gain the interest of small project investors, developers will want to present a well-considered plan and an attractive rate of return. Waste-to-energy projects are one type that can offer diversified revenue sources that assure maximum profitability. The Ripe Touch Greenhouse project, a $14.5 million waste tire-to-energy facility in Colorado, provides a case study of how combining the strengths of the project partners can help gain community and regulatory acceptance and maximize profit opportunities.

  10. Fuel Economy Standards for New Light Trucks (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    In March 2006, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) finalized Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards requiring higher fuel economy performance for light-duty trucks in model year (MY) 2008 through 2011. Unlike the proposed CAFE standards discussed in Annual Energy Outlook 2006, which would have established minimum fuel economy requirements by six footprint size classes, the final reformed CAFE standards specify a continuous mathematical function that determines minimum fuel economy requirements by vehicle footprint, defined as the wheelbase (the distance from the front axle to the center of the rear axle) times the average track width (the distance between the center lines of the tires) of the vehicle in square feet.

  11. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  12. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

    1998-01-01

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

  13. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HTH-1RC Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page E-1 Table E-1. HTH-1RC_Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/26/09 15:45 - 21:00 NA DH rig (LK17) arrives on site, rig is inspected, tire replaced, and rig was moved to HTH-1 pad. 05/26/09 23:30 NA Fishing tool was run 180 ft down HTH-1 and the bladder pump was retrieved. 05/27/09 01:00 NA Rig is moved off HTH-1 and goes to UC-1-P-1S

  14. Method and appartus for converting static in-ground vehicle scales into weigh-in-motion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for converting in-ground static weighing scales for vehicles to weigh-in-motion systems. The apparatus upon conversion includes the existing in-ground static scale, peripheral switches and an electronic module for automatic computation of the weight. By monitoring the velocity, tire position, axle spacing, and real time output from existing static scales as a vehicle drives over the scales, the system determines when an axle of a vehicle is on the scale at a given time, monitors the combined weight output from any given axle combination on the scale(s) at any given time, and from these measurements automatically computes the weight of each individual axle and gross vehicle weight by an integration, integration approximation, and/or signal averaging technique.

  15. Product Life-Cycle Management: The future of product and packaging design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, L.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Product Life-Cycle Management (PLCM) is the control of environmental impacts associated with all the life phases of a product, from design through manufacture, packaging and disposal. PLCM dictates that products be manufactured using less harmful chemicals and fewer resources. Product packaging must be minimal and made of renewable and recyclable resources. Both the product and the package must contain recycled material. Packaging and products must also be collected for recycle at the end of their intended use, requiring infrastructure to collect, transport and process these materials. European legislation now requires the return and recycle of packaging materials by the end of 1993. Requirements are also being imposed on manufacturers of automobile related products; automotive batteries, tires and even automobiles themselves must now be accepted back and recycled. Increasing public concerns and awareness of environmental impacts plus the decreasing availability of natural resources will continue to push product life-cycle legislation forward.

  16. Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2007-09-15

    A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Ranking low cost sorbents for mercury capture from simulated flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Revata Seneviratne; Cedric Charpenteau; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2007-12-15

    Coal fired utility boilers are the largest anthropogenic source of mercury release to the atmosphere, and mercury abatement legislation is already in place in the USA. The present study aimed to rank low cost mercury sorbents (char and activated carbon from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber and two coal fly ashes from UK power plants) against Norit Darco HgTM for mercury retention by using a novel bench-scale reactor. In this scheme, a fixed sorbent bed was tested for mercury capture efficiency from a simulated flue gas stream. Experiments with a gas stream of only mercury and nitrogen showed that while the coal ashes were the most effective in mercury capture, char from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber was as effective as the commercial sorbent Norit Darco HgTM. Tests conducted at 150{sup o}C, with a simulated flue gas mix that included N{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and HCl, showed that all the sorbents captured approximately 100% of the mercury in the gas stream. The introduction of NO and NO{sub 2} was found to significantly improve the mercury capture, possibly by reactions between NOx and the mercury. Since the sorbents' efficiency decreased with increasing test temperature, physical sorption could be the initial step in the mercury capture process. As the sorbents were only exposed to 64 ng of mercury in the gas stream, the mercury loadings on the samples were significantly less than their equilibrium capacities. The larger capacities of the activated carbons due to their more microporous structure were therefore not utilized. Although the sorbents have been characterized by BET surface area analysis and XRD analysis, further analysis is needed in order to obtain a more conclusive correlation of how the characteristics of the different sorbents correlate with the observed variations in mercury capture ability. 34 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  19. An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Category: Aerosols Continuing observations of aerosol and cloud optical property have been made using MFRSR and MWR at the ARM SGP site since

  20. Federal offshore statistics: leasing, exploration, production, revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essertier, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The statistics in this update of the Outer Continental Shelf Statistics publication document what has happened since federal leasing began on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1954. Highlights note that of the 29.8 million acres actually leased from 175.6 million acres offered for leasing, 20.1% were in frontier areas. Total revenues for the 1954-1982 period were $58.9 billion with about 13% received in 1982. The book is divided into six parts covering highlights, leasing, exploration and development, production and revenue, reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources, and pollution problems from well and tanker accidents. 5 figures, 59 tables.

  1. EA-2011: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus Planipennis) in the Continental United States The DOE Oak Ridge Office issued a FONSI for the proposed release of the three parasitoids into the environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle.

  2. Draft AGENDA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Adviso y Committee Meeting r L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Monet 1&2, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 December 9, 2010 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and...

  3. 2011 Tribal Energy Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forging a new era of Department of Energy and tribal relations, more than 350 people, including representatives from 54 tribes across the continental United States, attended the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Summit held May 4-5, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

  4. CX-100151 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State of Illinois SEP: Continental Electrical Construction Company, LLC: Technology and Demonstration Grant No. 13-432003 Award Number: DE-EE0006225 CX(s) Applied: B5.16, B1.31 Date: 12/19/2014 Location(s): IL Office(s): Golden Field Office

  5. Algae: The Source of Reliable, Scalable, and Sustainable Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Brian Goodall (Sapphire Energy) spoke on Continental Airlines’ January 7th Biofuels Test. The flight was fueled, in part, by Sapphire’s algae-based jet fuel.

  6. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  7. Integrated Risk Framework for Gigawatt-Scale Deployments of Renewable Energy: The U.S. Wind Energy Case; October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, B.

    2010-04-01

    Assessing the potential environmental and human effects of deploying renewable energy on private and public lands, along our coasts, on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and in the Great Lakes requires a new way of evaluating potential environmental and human impacts. The author argues that deployment of renewables requires a framework risk paradigm that underpins effective future siting decisions and public policies.

  8. Structural elements of the Sulu Sea, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, K.; Block, M.; Kudrass, H.R.; Meyer, H. , Hannover )

    1994-07-01

    The structure and tectonic history of the Sulu Sea are described on the basis of seismic reflection data combined with the findings of onshore and offshore geological studies, and the results of ODP Leg 124 drilling. Closing of a hypothetical Mesozoic proto-South China Sea associated with the formation of oceanic crustal splinters in the late Eocene followed by southward subduction and, in turn, progressive collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with the micro-continental Borneo plate since the middle Miocene, resulted in the formation of the structurally complex Sulu-Borneo collision belt. The latter comprises north Sabah, southern and central Palawan, and the northwest Sulu basin. Fracturing of the Borneo micro-continental plate into the Sulu and Cagayan ridges initiated the opening of the southeast Sulu basin during the late Oligocene through the early Miocene. Collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with Cagayan Ridge in the late early Miocene and oblique collision of these blocks with the central Philippines resulted in the still ongoing closing of the southeast Sulu basin since the middle or late Miocene. Closing of the southeast Sulu basin began with the formation of an oceanic crustal slab.

  9. CX-007894: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling Wildlife Densities and Habitat Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Continental Shelf CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.2, B3.3, B3.16 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  10. CX-005999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Continental Casting, LLC - Compressed Air ImprovementsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/31/2011Location(s): Monroe City, MissouriOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. LIVE: Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment Capabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar convened with top U.S. government scientists and key industry and stakeholder leaders to discuss how to strengthen capabilities for responding to potential blowouts of oil and gas wells on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  12. Biomass Feedstock Availability in the United States: 1999 State Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-01-01

    Interest in using biomass feedstocks to produce power, liquid fuels, and chemicals in the U.S. is increasing. Central to determining the potential for these industries to develop is an understanding of the location, quantities, and prices of biomass resources. This paper describes the methodology used to estimate biomass quantities and prices for each state in the continental United States.

  13. CX-010941: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessing the Response of Methane Hydrates to Environmental Change at the Svalbard Continental Margin CX(s) Applied: B3.6, Other: Biological & Geochemical Analysis-Lab Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume I: an investigation of live bottom habitats south of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The study areas include nine live bottom areas located off South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  15. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  16. AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PNEUMO CAPSULE SYSTEM FOR CONVEYING MINERALS AND MINE WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Charles W. Lenau

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using a new and advanced pneumatic capsule pipeline (PCP) system for transporting minerals and mine wastes. The new system is different from conventional PCPs in two main respects: (1) it uses linear induction motors (LIMs) instead of blowers (fans) at the inlet of the pipeline to drive (pump) the capsules and the air through the pipeline; and (2) the capsules in the PCP have steel wheels running on steel rails as opposed to capsules in conventional systems, which use wheels with rubber tires running inside a pipe without rail. The advantage of using LIM pump instead of blower is that the former is non-intrusive and hence does not block the passage of capsules, enabling the system to run continuously without having to make the capsules bypass the pump. This not only simplifies the system but also enables the system to achieve much larger cargo throughput than that of PCPs using blowers, and use of LIMs as booster pumps which enables the system to have any length or to be used for transporting cargoes over practically any distance, say even one thousand kilometers or miles. An advantage of using steel wheels rolling on steel rails instead of using rubber tires rolling inside a pipeline is that the rolling friction coefficient and hence the use of energy is greatly reduced from that of conventional PCP systems. Moreover, rails enable easy control of capsule motion, such as switching capsules to a branch line by using railroad switching equipment. The advanced PCP system studied under this project uses rectangular conduits instead of circular pipe, having cross-sectional areas of 1 m by 1 m approximately. The system can be used for various transportation distances, and it can transport up to 50 million tonnes (metric tons) of cargo annually--the throughput of the largest mines in the world. Both an aboveground and an underground system were investigated and compared. The technical feasibility of this new PCP system was determined by designing the details of the system and conducting a detail analysis of the system--both steady and unsteady analyses. Through the detailed design and analyses, it was found that no technical problem or hurdle exist that would otherwise prevent commercial use of the system today. Still, since it is a new technology, it will be prudent and advantageous to run a demonstration project before this technology is used.

  17. Federal offshore statistics: 1992. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenues as of December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, D.K.

    1993-12-31

    The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, enacted in 1953 and amended several times, charges the Secretary of the Interior with the responsibility for administering and managing mineral exploration and development of the outer continental shelf, as well as for conserving its natural resources. This report documents the following: Federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; Federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from Federal offshore leases; disbursement of Federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. 11 figs., 83 tabs.

  18. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  19. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  20. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  1. UC-702 UC-702

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    317 (Rev. 1) DOE/NV-317 (Rev. 1) UC-702 UC-702 RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENTS RELEASED FROM U.S. CONTINENTAL TESTS 1961 THROUGH 1992 AUGUST 1996 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

  2. NUG 1998

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG 1998 Dates April 8 & 9, 1998 Location Lawrence Berkeley National Lab NERSC's Web Site Presentations Agenda Energy Research Scientific Computing Users Group (ERSUG) Schedule April 6, 1998 Monday April 6, 1998 Berkeley Lab - Perseverance Hall Time Scheduled Event Speaker / Session Leader 08:00 Continental Breakfast 08:30 Welcome Ricky Kendall 08:35 View From Washington Tom Kitchens 08:55 New NERSC Staff Introductions Horst Simon 09:00 NERSC Research Efforts (Leverage to the NERSC Program)

  3. Forging a New Era -- Recapping the Tribal Energy Summit | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Nez Perce Chairman offers opening prayer at the Indian Energy Tribal Summit. | Courtesy of the Department of Energy Nez Perce Chairman offers opening prayer at the Indian Energy Tribal Summit. | Courtesy of the Department of Energy Tracey A. LeBeau Former Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs Forging a new era of Department of Energy and tribal relations, more than 350 people, including representatives from 54 tribes across the continental United States, attended the

  4. Geodynamics in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The report sets forth a program of continuing and new activities believed to be of first order importance during the opening years of the coming decade. The principal focus for geodynamics studies is crustal dynamics, with emphasis on the origin and evolution of continental and oceanic crust, the continent - ocean transition, the relation of mantle dynamics to crustal dynamics, and a framework for understanding resource systems and natural hazards. (ACR)

  5. Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, Caroline; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2015-07-14

    A webinar about the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was presented by Bri-Mathias Hodge and Caroline Draxl on July 14, 2015. It was hosted by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. The toolkit is a grid integration data set that contains meteorological and power data at a 5-minute resolution across the continental United States for 7 years and hourly power forecasts.

  6. The Effect of Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform Clouds Over ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform Clouds Over ARM SGP Site Z. N. Kogan, D. B. Mechem, and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Metorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction Continental low stratiform clouds cover the sky about 23% of the time during the fall, winter, and spring months and play a significant role in the Earth' radiation budget. Information about cloud structure and variability is crucial in determining areal averages of cloud

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Amount of Midlatitude Continental Clouds in Tomsk Region: Preliminary Results T.B. Zhuravleva, T.M. Rasskazchikova, and T.K. Sklyadneva Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia S.V. Smirnov Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems SB RAS Tomsk, Russia The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program provides concentrated measurements of surface radiative budget as well as measurements of the atmospheric constituents including clouds, aerosols, water vapor,

  8. ARM - Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 14, 2009 [Facility News] Field Campaigns Selected for Fiscal Year 2011 Bookmark and Share Indian Landscape The Department of Energy recently announced the selection of three major campaigns that will be funded by the ARM Climate Research Facility in 2011. These campaigns-spanning the continental United States to India to the tropical Pacific Ocean-address major scientific uncertainties related to climate systems around the globe, and each includes significant international or interagency

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 30, 2007 [Facility News] Atqasuk Joins International Network of Meteorological Stations Bookmark and Share On the skydeck at Atqasuk, the new met pack (above right) and GPS receiver (circled at left) acquire data for the SuomiNet. At the North Slope of Alaska, the ARM operates a research site in the remote town of Atqasuk, Alaska, to provide continental Arctic data to the climate research community. The Atqasuk site is proving useful to climate modelers since this inland site is more

  10. 2013 Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee 2013 Tentative Agenda Monday, October 7 07:30 Registration, Continental Breakfast Building 50 Auditorium Session Chair: Corie Ralston, LBNL 08:25 UEC Welcome, Meeting Logistics Corie Ralston, LBNL 08:30 LBNL Welcome Paul Alivisatos, LBNL 08:40 ALS: Progress and Prospects Roger Falcone, LBNL 09:10 DOE Update James

  11. 2013 Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Agenda banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee 2013 Tentative Agenda Monday, October 7 07:30 Registration, Continental Breakfast Building 50 Auditorium Session Chair: Corie Ralston, LBNL 08:25 UEC Welcome, Meeting Logistics Corie Ralston, LBNL 08:30 LBNL Welcome Paul Alivisatos, LBNL 08:40 ALS: Progress and Prospects Roger Falcone, LBNL 09:10 DOE Update James Murphy,

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Significant Decadal Brightening over the Continental United States Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Augustine, J., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes

  13. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What Controls the Vertical Extent of Continental Shallow Cumulus? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhang Y and SA Klein. 2013. "Factors controlling the vertical extent of fair-weather shallow cumulus clouds over land: investigation of diurnal-cycle observations collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains site." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences,

  14. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Vapor Turbulence Statistics in the Convective Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, V Wulfmeyer, LK Berg, and JH Schween. 2014. "Water vapor turbulence profiles in stationary continental convective mixed layers." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119,

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Precipitating Cumulus Congestus Observed by the ARM Radar Suite During the MC3E Field Campaign Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mechem, D. B., University of Kansas Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mechem DB, SE Giangrande, CS Wittman, P Borque, T Toto, and P Kollias. 2015. "Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 14, 2009 [Facility News] Field Campaigns Selected for Fiscal Year 2011 Bookmark and Share Indian Landscape The Department of Energy recently announced the selection of three major campaigns that will be funded by the ARM Climate Research Facility in 2011. These campaigns-spanning the continental United States to India to the tropical Pacific Ocean-address major scientific uncertainties related to climate systems around the globe, and each includes significant international or interagency

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 31, 2010 [Facility News] Scientists Convene at SGP Site for Complex Convective Cloud Experiment Bookmark and Share The MC3E planning team poses for a group photo near the ARM millimeter wave cloud radar at the SGP Central Facility. Mike Jensen, principle investigator for the campaign, is second from left. Photo courtesy of Brad Orr. In early May, scientists involved in the Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), a joint field program involving NASA Global Precipitation

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Surface Aerosol and Ozone Budgets at ARM Continental and Polar Sites Iziomon, M.G. and Lohmann, U., Dalhousie University, Canada Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Although tropospheric aerosols and ozone are of significant importance to climate change and contribute substantially to the radiative forcing of the Earth's climate, the understanding of their climatic influence are compounded by their variable concentrations. Long-term measurements

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM SGP Data to Evaluate the Summertime Boundary Layer in the ECMWF Model Cheinet, S.(a), Jakob, C.(b), and Morcrette, J.-J.(a), ECMWF (a), BMRC (b) In summertime, sub-tropical continental boundary layers are crucially affected by dry, shallow cumulus and deep precipitating convections. Site measurements allow continuous and high resolution measurements of many aspects of the boundary layer properties. They are thus particularly adapted to evaluate the representation of these various

  20. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Country Definitions Key Terms Definition Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Country Definitions Key Terms Definition Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Point of Entry Definitions Key Terms Definition Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Point of Exit Definitions Key Terms Definition Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from

  4. Demonstration of Modular BioPower Using Poultry Litter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter DOE SBIR Phase-I Final Report Contract: DE-FG03-01ER83214 Community Power Corporation Prepared by: John P. Reardon, Art Lilley, Kingsbury Browne and Kelly Beard Community Power Corporation 8420 S. Continental Divide Rd., Suite 100 Littleton, CO 80228 with Jim Wimberly Foundation for Organic Resources Management 101 W. Mountain St., Ste 200 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 and Dr. Jack Avens Department of Food Science and Human

  5. DOE_MA0518 December 2000

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    was written in conjunction with the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Nevada Test Site. The history was released at the official celebration held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on December 18, 2000, fifty years after President Harry S. Truman formally designated the site as the location for conducting nuclear weapons tests within the continental United States. The history represents a unique partnership between a field office and two headquarters offices of the U.S. Department of Energy. The

  6. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library Ranger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ranger NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Ranger Operation Ranger was the first continental nuclear test series conducted at the Nevada Proving Ground (now called the Nevada National Security Site). Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Click the Category, Number, or Date table header links to sort the information The photographs are displayed in groups of ten (10). Click the Next and Previous link at the bottom to

  7. ghan-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparison of Single-Column Model Simulations of Summertime Midlatitude Continental Convection S. J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. A. Randall, K.-M. Xu, and D. G. Cripe Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado R. T. Cederwall, S. C. Xie, and J. J. Yio Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California J. Hack and J. Pedretti National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado S. F. Iacobellis and

  8. gottschalck(1)-99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Macroscopic Cloud and Boundary Layer Properties for Continental Stratus at the SGP CART Site During 1997 J. C. Gottschalck and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Stratus and stratocumulus clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and thus play an important role in climate over both the land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Consequently, there is a great need for accurate boundary layer cloud parameterizations in climate models (Slingo

  9. kollias-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 High Resolution Doppler Radar Observations in Continental Stratus Clouds P. Kollias and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Vertical mixing is a key factor in determining the macroscopic and microscopic structure of stratus clouds. The vertical velocities resolved from millimeter-wavelength radars can be used to define the turbulence structure within such clouds (Frisch et al. 1995). To illustrate the utility of such radar measurements for studying the turbulence

  10. kollias-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Flux Representations of Vertical Velocity Fluctuations in Continental Stratus Clouds Using a mm-Wavelength Doppler Radar P. Kollias and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction A cloud mass flux representation of the vertical turbulent fluxes provides a physical framework for understanding the effects of shallow convection in maintaining the vertical structure of the boundary layer. This approach is based on the assumption that coherent updrafts and downdraft

  11. schwartz(2)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Turnover Times and Mean Heights of Modeled Sulfate and SO 2 over the North Atlantic and Adjacent Continental Regions S. E. Schwartz and C. M. Benkovitz Environmental Chemistry Division Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract Shortwave radiative forcing of climate by direct light scattering by sulfate and other aerosols is considered important in the context of anthropogenic climate change. Representation of this forcing in climate models requires a chemical model for the

  12. sgp_stratus_poster_v1.0.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Persistence of Post-frontal Stratus in Numerical Models D. B. Mechem 1 and Y. L. Kogan 2 1 Department of Geography, University of Kansas, 2 CIMMS, The University of Oklahoma Mid-latitude synoptic systems are frequently accompanied by broad areas of low-altitude cloudiness located behind the cold front. Field and Wood (J. Clim. 2007) show that these clouds constitute a significant climatological signal. How different are postfrontal continental stratus from marine stratocumulus?

  13. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updraft and Downdraft Statistics of Simulated Tropical and Midlatitude Cumulus Convection K.-M. Xu and D. A. Randall Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction The statistics of updrafts and downdrafts were substantially different between tropical/subtropical and midlatitude continental cumulus convection (LeMone and Zipser 1980; Lucas et al. 1994). The Thunderstorm Project (Byers and Braham 1949) provided the only statistics for midlatitude

  14. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 18, 1950, President Harry S. Truman authorized the establishment of a continental testing site on a 680-square mile section of the Nellis Air Force Gunnery and Bombing Range. First known as the Nevada Proving Grounds, it officially became the Nevada Test Site in 1955, opening the door to an atomic age that not only affected national security, but national culture as well. Today it is known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Testing Captures America's Attention The Ranger test

  15. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 18, 1950, President Harry S. Truman authorized the establishment of a continental testing site on a 680-square mile section of the Nellis Air Force Gunnery and Bombing Range. First known as the Nevada Proving Grounds, it officially became the Nevada Test Site in 1955, opening the door to an atomic testing age that not only affected national security, but national culture as well. Today it is called the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Ranger test series At the commencement of

  16. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Five of the first six nuclear tests conducted by the United States occurred in the far reaches of the Pacific Ocean. Almost immediately, scientists and military planners discovered that logistics, weather, security and safety concerns required the need for a continental test site. The effort of transporting, supplying and housing a nuclear test task force in the middle of the Pacific was more than originally anticipated. In addition to the communist insurgency in Korea, the need for a

  17. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Williams Biodiversity Research Institute 27 Oct. 2015 Wildlife distributions and habitat use on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf © Jonathan Fiely-BRI U.S. Dept. of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources Maryland Energy Administration Other sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sea Duck Joint Venture The Bailey Wildlife Foundation Collaborators: Biodiversity Research Institute North Carolina State University

  18. Memorandum of Understanding between the Dept. of Interior and Dept. of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT and the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY for the COORDINATED DEPLOYMENT OF OFFSHORE WIND AND MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES ON THE UNITED STATES OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF I. Purpose The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Ocean Energy, Management, Regulation, and

  19. Innovation to Go - Penta Chart Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring tree health with NMR LA-UR-16-20316 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Monitoring tree health with NMR Tree mortality threatens the climate regulation functions of forests * Continental-scale climate-induced mortality observed globally * Climate predictions indicate increased in drought * We lack non-destructive measurement methods to verify theories and improve models A portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) system for identifying plant

  20. EA-2011: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11: Final Environmental Assessment EA-2011: Final Environmental Assessment The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed and adopted a July 2007 EA prepared by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the release of three parasitoids into the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. PDF icon EA-2011: Final EA More Documents & Publications EA-2011: Finding of No Significant Impact

  1. Post operational investigation of the recovered North East Frigg subsea production equipment after 10 year`s service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, L.J.; Fjaertoft, L.

    1995-12-31

    Elf Petroleum Norge had for 10 years been operating the North East Frigg field. This gas field was the first subsea field on the Norwegian Continental shelf. It was shut down on the 8th May 1993. Elf Petroleum Norge used the shut down as an ideal opportunity to review the performance of the subsea equipment. An investigation was initiated,its purpose, to gather information regarding the history, wear, effect of cathodic protection, corrosion etc from the X-mas tree components.

  2. Coastal energy transportation study, phase ii, volume 1: a study of OCS onshore support bases and coal export terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cribbins, P.D.

    1981-08-01

    This study concentrates on siting alternatives for on-shore support bases for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and coal export terminals. Sixteen alternative OCS sites are described, and a parametric analysis is utilized to select the most promising sites. Site-specific recommendations regarding infrastructure requirements and transportation impacts are provided. Eleven alternative coal terminal sites are identified and assessed for their potential impacts.

  3. Microsoft Word - SGPNews_Sept2010b.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern
Great
Plains
 Newsletter
 In early May, scientists involved in the Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), a joint field program involving NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Program and ARM investigators, held their first onsite planning meeting to begin pinpointing the details for this major effort. Planned for April-May 2011 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site, the campaign is highly complex, involving five remote radiosonde sites, supplemental

  4. Microsoft Word - Xie-SC.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparison and Evaluation of Cumulus Parameterizations Under Summertime Mid-Latitude Continental Conditions S. C. Xie, R. T. Cederwall, and J. J. Yio Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California K.-M. Xu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction Parameterization of cumulus convection in general circulation models (GCMs) is recognized as one of the most important and complex issues in model physical parameterizations.

  5. March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg March We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Continental

  6. Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of

  7. EA-1985: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    85: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1985: Finding of No Significant Impact Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia

  8. LM Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Click on a site for more information. The Energy Department is committed to managing its responsibilities associated with the environmental legacy of World War II and the Cold War. This legacy includes radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous material at sites across the country. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for ensuring that Energy's post-closure responsibilities are met and for providing

  9. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource. PDF icon Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rio Blanco - CO 0-09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Project Rio Blanco (CO.0-09) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: ~ 52 miles north of Grand Junction, Co. , Rio Blanco County , Colorado CO.0-09-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CO.0-09-1 Site Operations: The project was a cooperative research effort undertaken in 1973 between CER Geonuclear Corp, Continental Oil Co (Conoco), and the US Energy Research and Development Administration

  11. origins.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was written in conjunction with the 50th anni- versary commemoration of the Nevada Test Site. The history was released at the official celebration held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on December 18, 2000, fifty years after President Harry S. Truman formally designated the site as the location for conducting nuclear weapons tests within the continental United States. The history represents a unique partnership between a field office and two head- quarters offices of the U.S. Department of Energy. The

  12. Data Report on Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel SNF Storage Canisters |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Data Report on Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel SNF Storage Canisters Data Report on Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel SNF Storage Canisters The report assesses the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. A detailed evaluation of the storage system environment, including uncertainties in temperature, humidity, and sea and continental salt occurrence is provided, and the potential impacts on

  13. Federal offshore statistics: leasing, exploration, production, revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essertier, E.P.

    1984-09-01

    This publication is a numerical record of what has happened since Congress gave authority to the Secretary of the Interior in 1953 to lease the federal portion of the Continental Shelf for oil and gas. The publication updates and augments the first Federal Offshore Statistics, published in December 1983. It also extends a statistical series published annually from 1969 until 1981 by the US Geological Survey (USGS) under the title Outer Continental Shelf Statistics. The USGS collected royalties and supervised operation and production of minerals on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) until the Minerals Management Service (MMS) took over these functions in 1982. Some of the highlights are: of the 329.5 million acres offered for leasing, 37.1 million acres were actually leased; total revenues for the 1954 to 1983 period were $68,173,112,563 and for 1983 $9,161,435,540; a total of 22,095 wells were drilled in federal waters and 10,145 wells were drilled in state waters; from 1954 through 1983, federal offshore areas produced 6.4 billion barrels of oil and condensate, and 62.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas; in 1983 alone production was 340.7 million barrels of oil and condensate, and 3.9 trillion cubic feet of gas; and for the second straight year, no oil was lost in 1983 as a result of blowouts in federal waters. 8 figures, 66 tables.

  14. The IBA Easy-E-Beam Integrated Processing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.; Lisanti, Thomas F.

    2011-06-01

    IBA Industrial Inc., (formerly known as Radiation Dynamics, Inc.) has been making high-energy and medium-energy, direct-current proton and electron accelerators for research and industrial applications for many years. Some industrial applications of high-power electron accelerators are the crosslinking of polymeric materials and products, such as the insulation on electrical wires, multi-conductor cable jackets, heat-shrinkable plastic tubing and film, plastic pipe, foam and pellets, the partial curing of rubber sheet for automobile tire components, and the sterilization of disposable medical devices. The curing (polymerization and crosslinking) of carbon and glass fiber-reinforced composite plastic parts, the preservation of foods and the treatment of waste materials are attractive possibilities for future applications. With electron energies above 1.0 MeV, the radiation protection for operating personnel is usually provided by surrounding the accelerator facility with thick concrete walls. With lower energies, steel and lead panels can be used, which are substantially thinner and more compact than the equivalent concrete walls. IBA has developed a series of electron processing systems called Easy-e-Beam for the medium energy range from 300 keV to 1000 keV. These systems include the shielding as an integral part of a complete radiation processing facility. The basic concepts of the electron accelerator, the product processing equipment, the programmable control system, the configuration of the radiation shielding and some performance characteristics are described in this paper.

  15. The theory and a technique for an efficiency enhancing two stage bottoming cycle for piston/cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, F.; Zeh, D.

    1995-12-31

    While there is now much interest in electric vehicles or various hybrids, the most benefit may result from a revolutionary modification and efficiency improvement of the conventional internal combustion Otto cycle engine, by recovering a large portion of the availability that exists at the end of the power stroke. This paper will describe the theory and a potentially practical method for achieving a 50% improvement in power output and fuel efficiency. While the topping cycle will remain the internal combustion piston/cylinder engine, a two stage bottom cycle will be used. The first bottom stage is a single process consisting of a turbine installed in the exhaust stream to extract power from the excess pressure that exists when the engine exhaust valve opens. The second bottom stage is a complete external combustion gas turbine cycle consisting of a compressor, exhaust gas to compressed air heat exchanger and a turbine. Such a two stage bottoming cycle can be practical and may increase the power output by about 50%. This means that a car that achieves 30 mpg without a bottoming cycle can achieve 45 mpg with this bottoming cycle. Alternatively if the performance of cars can be improved to 66 mpg by means of decreasing the power requirements with smaller size and frontal area, better aerodynamics, lower rolling resistance tires and better transmission and drive trains, this vehicle can be extended to 100 mpg with this combined cycle engine.

  16. Factors affecting degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) during pre-flotation conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caparanga, Alvin R. Basilia, Blessie A.; Dagbay, Kevin B.; Salvacion, Jonathan W.L.

    2009-09-15

    In general, plastics are exposed to different degrading agents in every procedure involved in their recovery from waste mixture and from subsequent recycling. In this study, two methods of pre-flotation conditioning were used to determine how these methods affect the general properties of the pre-conditioned PET particles to be recovered from the PET-PVC mixture. The first method comprised the conditioning of PET samples using an alkaline solution of nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) based on the patent by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. The second method, developed in this study, was a conditioning process which used an alkali-less solution of the same nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) used in the first method. The following analytical methods were used to characterize properties of the pre-conditioned PET samples that were correlated to relative degradation of the samples: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), for thermal behavior of the samples; FT-IR spectroscopy, for functional groups present in the samples; and, Pohl's method, for carboxyl end-group concentration count. Results show that in addition to water the presence of NaOH in the conditioning solution contributes to the further degradation of the polymer.

  17. Co-Firing Oil Shale with Coal and Other Fuels for Improved Efficiency and Multi-Pollutant Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Carrington; William C. Hecker; Reed Clayson

    2008-06-01

    Oil shale is an abundant, undeveloped natural resource which has natural sorbent properties, and its ash has natural cementitious properties. Oil shale may be blended with coal, biomass, municipal wastes, waste tires, or other waste feedstock materials to provide the joint benefit of adding energy content while adsorbing and removing sulfur, halides, and volatile metal pollutants, and while also reducing nitrogen oxide pollutants. Oil shale depolymerization-pyrolysis-devolatilization and sorption scoping studies indicate oil shale particle sorption rates and sorption capacity can be comparable to limestone sorbents for capture of SO2 and SO3. Additionally, kerogen released from the shale was shown to have the potential to reduce NOx emissions through the well established reburning chemistry similar to natural gas, fuel oil, and micronized coal. Productive mercury adsorption is also possible by the oil shale particles as a result of residual fixed-carbon and other observed mercury capture sorbent properties. Sorption properties were found to be a function particle heating rate, peak particle temperature, residence time, and gas-phase stoichmetry. High surface area sorbents with high calcium reactivity and with some adsorbent fixed/activated carbon can be produced in the corresponding reaction zones that exist in a standard pulverized-coal or in a fluidized-bed combustor.

  18. A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Robbins; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

    1999-05-01

    This is the first Annual Technical Report of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. Activities from the first three quarters of the fiscal 1998 year were reported previously as Quarterly Technical Progress Reports (DOE/PC93054-57, DOE/PC93054-61, and DOE/PC93054-66). Activities for the period July 1 through September 30, 1998, are reported here. This report describes CONSOL's characterization of process-derived samples obtained from HTI Run PB-08. These samples were derived from operations with Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal, simulated mixed waste plastics, and pyrolysis oils derived from waste plastics and waste tires. Comparison of characteristics among the PB-08 samples was made to ascertain the effects of feed composition changes. A comparison also was made to samples from a previous test (Run PB-06) made in the same processing unit, with Black Thunder Mine coal, and in one run condition with co-fed mixed plastics.

  19. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-12-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

  20. Final report for the Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Wozniak

    1999-02-16

    The project objective was to develop the technologies necessary to prototype a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) powered, mid-size automobile with operational capabilities comparable to gasoline automobiles. A system approach was used to design and develop the engine, gas storage system and vehicle packaging. The 2.4-liter DOHC engine was optimized for natural gas operation with high-compression pistons, hardened exhaust valves, a methane-specific catalytic converter and multi-point gaseous injection. The chassis was repackaging to increase space for fuel storage with a custom-designed, cast-aluminum, semi-trailing arm rear suspension system, a revised flat trunk sheet-metal floorpan and by equipping the car with run-flat tires. An Integrated Storage system (ISS) was developed using all-composite, small-diameter cylinders encapsulated within a high-strength fiberglass shell with impact-absorbing foam. The prototypes achieved the target goals of a city/highway driving range of 300 miles, ample trunk capacity, gasoline vehicle performance and ultra low exhaust emissions.

  1. Co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system with coal and refuse derived fuels and/or sludges. Task 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLallo, M.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1994-01-01

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach, the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire-derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  2. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  3. Jobs, tax revenue persuade Oklahoma to waive buyback rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, V.

    1985-10-28

    The chance to add up to 900 new jobs and $54 million in tax revenues led Oklahoma regulators to agree to a one-time waiver of a controversial state ruling that discourages long-term buyback rates for cogenerators. The ruling will allow a 100 MW cogeneration project to proceed with its plan to sell steam to the Firestone tire plant and electricity to the local utility. Economic forecasts show that the deal will give the Oklahoma facility the lowest operating cost for any Firestone plant in the country. It will also make Oklahoma more attractive to new businesses and industry. Regulators emphasize that the waiver of rule 58-H applies only to this project, with future proposals to be judged on their own merits. Despite its large gas surplus, the state has virtually no cogeneration, which requires a steady, low-cost fuel supply, an expanding requirement for electricity, and the presence of large industrial steam users. Other issues the commission considered were the capacity and energy buyback rates.

  4. Processing and mechanical behavior of hypereutectoid steel wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.; Kim, D.K.

    1996-06-25

    Hypereutectoid steels have the potential for dramatically increasing the strength of wire used in tire cord and in other high strength wire applications. The basis for this possible breakthrough is the elimination of a brittle proeutectoid network that can form along grain boundaries if appropriate processing procedures and alloy additions are used. A review is made of work done by Japanese and other researchers on eutectoid and mildly hypereutectoid wires. A linear extrapolation of the tensile strength of fine wires predicts higher strengths at higher carbon contents. The influence of processing, alloy additions and carbon content in optimizing the strength, ductility and fracture behavior of hypereutectoid steels is presented. It is proposed that the tensile strength of pearlitic wires is dictated by the fracture strength of the carbide lamella at grain boundary locations in the carbide. Methods to improve the strength of carbide grain boundaries and to decrease the carbide plate thickness will contribute to enhancing the ultrahigh strength obtainable in hypereutectoid steel wires. 23 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H.

    1998-12-31

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  6. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

    2003-02-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

  7. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

    2001-11-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

  8. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  9. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  10. Structural framework, stratigraphy, and evolution of Brazilian marginal basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, H.A.O.

    1982-06-01

    The structural framework of the Brazilian continental margin is basically composed of eight structural types: antithetic tilted step-fault blocks, synthetic untilted step-fault blocks, structural inversion axes, hinges with compensation grabens, homoclinal structures, growth faults with rollovers, diapirs, and igneous structures. The antithetic tilted and synthetic untilted step-fault blocks are considered as synchronous, complementary structural systems, separated by an inversion axis. Two evaporitic cycles (Paripueira and Ibura) were differentiated in the Sergipe-Alagoas type basin and tentatively correlated to the evaporitic section of other Brazilian marginal basis. Four phases are considered in the evolution of the Brazilian marginal basins: pre-rift, rift, transitional, and drift. During the pre-rift phase (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), continental sediments were deposited in peripheral intracratonic basins. In the rift phase (Early Cretaceous), the breakup of the continental crust of the Gondwana continent gave rise to a central graben and rift valleys where lacustrine sediments were deposited. The transitional phase (Aptian) developed under relative tectonic stability, when evaporitic and clastic lacustrine sequences were being deposited. In the drift phase (Albian to Holocene), a regionl homoclinal structure developed, consisting of two distinct sedimentary sequences, a lower clastic-carbonate and an upper clastic. From the Albian to the Holocene Epoch, structures associated to plastic displacement of salt or shale developed in many Brazilian marginal basins. Two phases of major igneous activity occurred: one in the Early Cretaceous associated with the rift phase of the Gondwana continent, and the other in the Tertiary during the migration phase of the South American and African plates.

  11. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  12. First North American longwall in pitching seams proven feasible. [Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1983-12-01

    There are 1.4 Gt (1.5 billion st) of recoverable coal under less than 914 m (3,000 ft) of cover in Colorado in pitching seams. Snowmass Coal Co., in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, introduced the longwall mining method in pitching seams to North America. This venture is a coal mining research program directed toward the profitable production of coal under difficult mining conditions as found in pitching seams of the western US. Snowmass Coal classifies pitching seams into the following categories for longwall on the strike in seams 3 m (10 ft) or less thick: Flat = 0 to 10/sup 0/: Normal continuous mines and shuttle cars work efficiently. Slight = 10/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/: The maximum pitch that rubber tired equipment will function. Moderate = 22/sup 0/ to 40/sup 0/: The angle of repose of mined coal. Steep = 40/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/: The limit of safe use of this roof support. Vertical = over 60/sup 0/. The longwall roof support covered here will work in all pitches except vertical. The shearer and conveyor will work in flat through moderate conditions. Longwalling across strike with this equipment in seam pitch over 60/sup 0/ could be accomplished with an inclined face. Development of the first longwall panel began in 1979 and was completed in 1981. The longwall equipment was installed and mining began on Aug. 11, 1981. Snowmass' performance shows that the capacity of a longwall operating on moderate pitch, up to 45/sup 0/, should be the same as a flat seam longwall. With equipment now available, pitching seam longwall is not only feasible, but cost competitive. The actual roof support method of troika concept has excellent maneuverability, good support, and low maintenance. The shearer has proven power to operate on moderate pitching seams.

  13. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

  15. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  16. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  17. Comprehensive characterization report on Winter Quarters Bay, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, A.B.; White, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Winter Quarters Bay is a small embayment located adjacent to the United States largest base in Antarctica, McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station, which is managed by the National Science Foundation`s Office of Polar Programs, was constructed in 1955, has been in constant use since that time, and has a population of about 1,000 persons during the summer and about 250 people for the winter. The bay offers shelter for ships and an ice dock is used during January and February to off load fuel and cargo. During earlier times, trash from the McMurdo Station was piled on the steep shoreline of the bay, doused with several thousand gallons of fuel and ignited. That practice has ceased and the site has been regraded to cover the waste. The bottom of the bay is littered with drums, equipment, tanks, tires, all sorts of metal objects, cables, etc., especially the southeastern side where dumping took place. The sediments are gravel in some places yet fine and fluid at other sites with coarse particles intermixed. The original benthic community is not well recorded but significant ecological changes have occurred. Sediments are contaminated with PCBs, metals, and hydrocarbon fuels. This report summarizes available information on Winter Quarters Bay and was originally intended to be used by workshop participants to become familiar with the bay prior to becoming updated with unpublished data by various Antarctic investigators. The proposed workshop was to assist the National Science Foundation in determining whether and how the bay should be remediated and to develop an integrated research plan if additional data were needed. However, plans changed, the workshop was never conducted, but the briefing report was prepared. Most of this report reviews and summarizes other published data. The only new data are those from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory`s investigation into the distribution of organic contaminants in the bay and sediment toxicity testing.

  18. Research, Development and Demonstration of Bio-Mass Boiler for Food Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Steve; Knapp, David

    2012-07-01

    Frito-Lay is working to reduce carbon emissions from their manufacturing plants. As part of this effort, they invested in a biomass-fired boiler at the Topeka, Kansas, plant. Frito-Lay partnered with Burns & McDonnell Engineering, Inc. and CPL Systems, Inc., to design and construct a steam producing boiler using carbon neutral fuels such as wood wastes (e.g. tree bark), shipping pallets, and used rubber vehicle tires. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined with Frito-Lay, Burns & McDonnell, and CPL to analyze the reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions that result from use of biomass-fired boilers in the food manufacturing environment. DOE support provided for the data collection and analysis, and reporting necessary to evaluate boiler efficiencies and reductions in CO2 emissions. The Frito-Lay biomass-fired boiler has resulted in significant reductions in CO2 emissions from the Topeka production facility. The use of natural gas has been reduced by 400 to 420 million standard cubic feet per year with corresponding reductions of 24,000 to 25,000 tons of CO2. The boiler does require auxiliary functions, however, that are unnecessary for a gas-fired boiler. These include heavy motors and fans for moving fuel and firing the boiler, trucks and equipment for delivering the fuel and moving at the boiler plant, and chippers for preparing the fuel prior to delivery. Each of these operations requires the combustion of fossil fuels or electricity and has associated CO2 emissions. Even after accounting for each of these auxiliary processes, however, the biomass-fired boiler results in net emission reductions of 22,500 to 23,500 tons of CO2 per year.

  19. Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.

    1998-04-16

    Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

  20. NUG Meeting November 12, 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG Meeting November 12, 2001 Dates November 12, 2001 Location SC2001 Denver Marriott City Center, 1701 California Street, Denver, Colorado Presentations Agenda Agenda NERSC User Group Meeting, November 12, 2001 Note: all times are Mountain Time. 8:00- 8:30 Continental Breakfast 8:30- 8:45 Ryne Welcome / Introductions 8:45- 9:30 Kramer Overview: NERSC status report and plans for FY02 NERSC-3 status, user survey, mass storage, networking, elimination of clear text passwords in the near future