Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Mexican Hat | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mexican Hat Mexican Hat Mexican Hat January 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report Installation Name, State: Mexican Hat Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Mexican Hat Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? No Depth (feet): 0 Mulitple Units Affected? No Avg Velocity (feet/year): 0 Plume Information Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 0 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach

2

MEXICO: GE Lets Mexicans Buy In  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MEXICO: GE Lets Mexicans Buy In ... General Electric de Mexico, the country's biggest manufacturer of electrical products, had been one of the major Mexican firms still wholly owned by a foreign parent. ...

1968-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Competitiveness of Mexican crude  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is under great pressure to maintain oil export revenue levels if it is to avoid a reversal in its economic recovery program. While the country's vulnerability to a price plunge is also applicable to OPEC countries, the North Sea producers, and others, Mexico does have an ace. The ace is that its heavier, metals-ridden and sulfur-laden Maya crude, which had to be pushed on customers until about 1981, is now in strong demand. Comparisons are presented of the market value of five crude oils refined in the US Gulf Coast: West Texas Intermediate (or WTI, a 40/sup 0/ API, light), Arabian Light and Isthmus (both 34/sup 0/ medium-light), Alaska North Slope (or ANS, a 27/sup 0/ API, a medium), and Maya (22/sup 0/ API, medium-heavy). In this mix, the heavier the crude, the greater is the refining margin (except for Arabian Light, for which freight cost and product yield provide lower margins than those derived from WTI). The sacrifice by OPEC and other producers cutting crude oil prices was to the benefit to refiners' improved margins during the first half of 1983. Those cuts were on the lighter-quality oils. But prices for heavier Venezuelan, Californian, and Mexican crudes increased during the second half of 1983, due to developing refinery technologies in extracting favorable product yields from them. This issue of Energy Detente presents their fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for December 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

Not Available

1983-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oil industry in Mexico and Nigeria. The Laguna deStandard Oil’s small concessions in 1937, prior to Mexico,oil industry still accounts for one-third of Mexican government revenues and Mexico’

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sensory and protein profiles of Mexican Chihuahua cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Native microflora in raw milk cheeses, including the Mexican variety Queso Chihuahua, contribute to flavor development through degradation of ... studied in four different brands of Mexican Queso Chihuahua made f...

Moushumi Paul; Alberto Nuñez; Diane L. Van Hekken…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat Mill Site -...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Mexican...

7

Mexican American city officials in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science MEXICAN AMERICAN CITY OFFICIALS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ADRIAN ARON ARRIAGA Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Mem r Member August 1973 ABSTRACT Nex1can Amer1can City Offic1als 1n Texas. (August 1973) Adrian Aron...MEXICAN AMERICAN CITY OFFICIALS IN TEXAS A Thesis ADRIAN ARON ARRIAGA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the reoui rement for the degree of MASTER OF APTS August 1973 Major Subject: Political...

Arriaga, Adrian Aron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE) Place Mexico Sector Services Product General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic / Research foundation ) References Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE) is a company located in Mexico . References ↑ "Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mexican_Electric_Research_Institute_IIE&oldid=348756" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

9

Determining the value of Mexican cattle vs. sale barn cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mexican cattle have very different characteristics with respect to these factors. Sale barn cattle coming directly into the feedyard will normally have a significantly higher medicine bill, cost of gain, and death loss than a Mexican cattle. On the other...

Horn, Shelby W.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

GIZ-Mexican-German Climate Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexican-German Climate Alliance Mexican-German Climate Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican-German Climate Alliance Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner SEMARNAT, Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Programmes and projects in Mexico[1] Overview The project aims to implement Mexican climate policies Alliance in an effective and efficient way. After 2012 the alliance is supposed to continue to support the Mexican climate policies and to introduce innovative mechanisms for adaptation and mitigation. To this end, the project will provide policy advice for SEMARNAT with regard to strategies

11

Mexican energy policy and sustainability indicators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the Mexican energy policy taking as reference the methodological framework for sustainable energy development proposed by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. This methodology takes eight related indicators to the social, environmental and economic dimensions in order to calculate a general sustainability indicator for the energy sector. In this methodology, the weight of each dimension is different; namely, the social and environmental issues have less relevance than the economic issues. The authors use this methodology because government institutions as the Department of Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources have used some indicators from such a methodology to propose plans, programs, projects and bills. Authors know of the existence of other methodologies about sustainability. Nonetheless, opting for the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean's methodology is convenient because this organization is a respectable authority for civil servants from the Mexican institutions. Our objective is just to contrast the sustainability grade of the energy sector between 1990 and 2008 for Mexico whose government started reforms in the 1990s. It concludes that those reforms did not bring about a higher sustainability level for the energy sector.

Claudia Sheinbaum-Pardo; Belizza Janet Ruiz-Mendoza; Víctor Rodríguez-Padilla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mexican-German Climate Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mexican-German Climate Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican-German Climate Alliance Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner SEMARNAT, Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Programmes and projects in Mexico[1] Overview The project aims to implement Mexican climate policies Alliance in an effective and efficient way. After 2012 the alliance is supposed to continue to support the Mexican climate policies and to introduce innovative mechanisms for adaptation and mitigation. To this end, the

13

Cost of being a Mexican immigrant and being a Mexican non-citizen in California and Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream of new arrivals (also see Massey, 2001). 2 The continuing influx of newcomers (Lien, 1994) due to the interconnectedness of the U.S. and Mexican economies (Massey and Espinosa, 1997) supports the second condition. However, as Mexican immigrants... and secure jobs compared to older workers (Clogg and Shockey, 1985; Lacy et al., 1989). Further, search theory assumes that relatively inexperienced younger workers, trying to find their most preferred match, are more likely to engage in voluntary...

Takei, Isao

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Beyond “contratos de protección”: Strong and weak unionism in Mexican retail enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

union organization in the retail industry, it is importantChris Tilly. 2006a. “The Mexican retail sector in the age ofweak unionism in Mexican retail enterprises by Chris Tilly

Tilly, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Prosodic Features that Cue Back-Channel Feedback in Northern Mexican Spanish*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican Spanish speak- ers, all from the state of Chihuahua: five from Chihuahua City, two from Delicias

Ward, Nigel

17

Chasing the illusive American dream: an historical analysis of Mexican-American education, employment, and culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the triple oppression of gender, race, and ethnicity, Chicanas have led strikes, held the Mexican-American family together, maintained binational networks, encouraged their childrens' education, and contributed to American culture. The average Mexican.... The 1940s began another stage of immigration during which Mexicans crossed the border as a result of American war labor shortages and the Bracero Program. Legislation in the second half of the century led to a sharp decline in Mexican immigration...

Ham, Arwen Eugene

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Economic reform, energy, and development: the case of Mexican manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given increasing concern over global climate change and national security there is a burgeoning interest in examining the relationship between economic growth and energy use in developed and developing countries. More specifically, decoupling energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) has fast come to be seen as in the interests of national economies and the world as a whole. Recent attention has been paid to the dramatic decreases in the energy intensity of the Chinese economy, which fell by 55% between 1975 and 1995. Do other developing economies follow similar trajectories? This paper examines the energy intensity of the Mexican economy for the period 1988–1998. Although the long-term trend in Mexican energy intensity is rising, the energy intensity of the Mexican economy began to decline in 1988. This paper explores the factors that have contributed to this reduction. Diminishing Mexican energy use per unit of GDP has been driven by significant decreases in industrial energy intensity. We show that these changes have resulted from changes in the composition of Mexican industrial structure, and technological change.

Francisco Aguayo; Kevin P. Gallagher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Renewable energy sources in the Mexican electricity sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the role of renewable energy sources (RES) in the Mexican electricity sector in the context of the proposed renewable energy bill currently under consideration in the Mexican Congress. This paper was divided into three parts. The first part presents a chronology of institutional background related to the RES. This is followed by an analysis of the coordination and management system of the Mexican electricity sector, which can facilitate the promotion and integration of the RES without significant structural changes. Finally, the pros and cons of the renewable energy bill are analyzed in order to demonstrate the need for greater coherence between the bill and the coordination system of the sector. It is concluded that when inconsistency is eliminated, RES would strongly be promoted in Mexico.

B.J. Ruiz; V. Rodríguez-Padilla; J.H. Martínez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Perceived Threat of a Heart Attack among Mexican Americans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Compared to the general population, Mexican Americans are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, such as heart attack, due to the high prevalence… (more)

Florez, Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Foreign firms to get equal opportunity in Mexican selloff plans  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) has not finalized details of its long-awaited petrochemical privatization program. However, the state oil group has made it clear the selloff schedule, due to begin during the next two months, will give equal investment opportunity to foreign firms, dashing the hopes of Mexican groups that they would be given first right of refusal in the privatization program. Meanwhile, Pemex has agreed with Shell Oil on a previously announced refining joint venture involving Shell's 225,000-bbl/day refinery at Deer Park, TX. Under the plan, Pemex will purchase a 50% stake in the refinery and join Shell in a $1-billion upgrade with would enable it to handle more Mexican crude. Sources believe that Shell and other US oil groups are interested in acquiring assets from Pemex Petroquimica.

Wood, A.; Alvarez, C.

1993-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

A study of the composition, yield, texture, and sensory characteristics of Mexican and Latin American white cheese varieties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Sensory Characteristics of Mexican and Latin American White Cheese Varieties, (May 1984) Patricia Logan Moore, B. S. , Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee; Dr. Ron Richter Manufacturing procedures for three Mexican white cheese... varieties were developed and characterized. The composition, yield, texture, and sensory characteristics of these Mexican ~hite cheeses and of Latin American white cheese were investigated. Two of the Mexican white cheese vari eti es were manufactured...

Moore, Patricia Logan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mexican Chihuahua Cheese: Sensory Profiles of Young Cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensory profiles of fresh semihard Chihuahua cheese produced in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua were developed to characterize the flavors and textures of this traditionally made Hispanic-style cheese. Multiple allotments of Chihuahua cheese, 9 brands made with raw milk (RM) and 5 brands made with pasteurized milk (PM), were obtained within 3 d of manufacture from 12 different cheese plants throughout Chihuahua, México. Cheeses were shipped overnight to Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, and flavor analyses were conducted within 14 to 18 d after manufacture. Four brands (2 RM and 2 PM cheeses) were then selected and multiple allotments were shipped at 3 distinct seasons over a 1-yr period for evaluation of flavor and texture. Microbial analysis was conducted prior to testing to ensure product safety. Descriptive analyses of cheese flavors and textures were conducted with panelists trained to use a universal or product-specific Spectrum intensity scale, respectively. Sensory profiles of cheeses varied among the different manufacturers. The most prominent flavor attributes were salty, sour, diacetyl, cooked, whey, bitter, and milk-fat. The RM cheeses had more intense sour, bitter, and prickle scores than the PM cheeses. Many cheese texture attributes were similar, but RM cheeses were perceived as softer than PM cheeses. As the demand for Hispanic-style cheeses increases, defining and understanding the sensory attributes of traditionally made Mexican cheeses provides guidance to cheese manufacturers as new ways are explored to improve the production and shelf life of the cheeses.

D.L. Van Hekken; M.A. Drake; F.J. Molina Corral; V.M. Guerrero Prieto; A.A. Gardea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Genetic epidemiological investigation of blood pressure and its metabolic correlates in Mexican American children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(D in - D zi et ha m et a l. 20 07 ). 22 In Mexican school children aged 8 to 10 years, elevated blood pressure is associated with overweight in both girls and boys (Genovesi et al. 2008) and also a predictor for elevated blood pressure...: BMI for age at or above 95th percentile (left) and 85th percentile (right) by ethnicity during 1999-2006 in non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans (Ogden et al. 2008). 24 Mexican American boys are more likely to have...

Chittoor, Geethavani

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Consuming Citizenship? The Archaeology of Mexican Immigrant Ambivalence in Early Twentieth-Century Los Angeles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To address the social meaning of consumption for Mexican immigrants, I draw heavily upon archaeological and archival data collected from an early twentieth-century railway workers community in Los Angeles occupie...

Stacey Lynn Camp

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Technological change for environmental improvement : the case of the Mexican automobile sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research was to articulate the processes and factors of technological change that promote environmental improvement while contributing to development goals in the Mexican automobile sector. The ...

Aoki, Chizuru, 1968-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cross-border business challenges: an ethnographic study of small U.S. and Mexican firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the cultural differences in Mexican and U.S. business behaviors and the challenges to successful U.S.-Mexico trade relations among small firms. The differences and challenges identified through interviews and participant...

Snider, Rhonda

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effect of pasteurization and season on the sensorial and rheological traits of Mexican Chihuahua cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seasonal changes in the flavors and textures (sensorial and rheological traits) of young Mexican Chihuahua cheese made with either raw or pasteurized ... of the cheese. Four selected brands of Chihuahua chees...

Diane L. Van Hekken; Mary Anne Drake; Michael H. Tunick…

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A general assessment of the conservation status and decline trends of Mexican amphibians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In comparison with the 364 taxa listed by the IUCN red list, the Mexican list of species at risk (NOM-059-ECOL-2001, Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales 2002) only includes 197 amphibian species (Ta...

Patricia Frías-Alvarez; J. Jaime Zúñiga-Vega…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Power of the Voice: Listening to Mexican and Central American Immigrant Experiences (1997-2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variety of artists, including the Mexican norteño ensemble Los Tigres del Norte, the Salvadoran group Tex Bronco, and the Nicaraguan singer-songwriter Flor Urbina. Finally, my conclusion sets the stage for future work on representations of immigrant...

Thornton, Megan L.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

CENTER FOR U.S. AND MEXICAN LAW UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON LAW CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internships with Pemex and with the Mexican Foreign Ministry (Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores to applicants available for the full summer): 2. Internship Preference (Pemex or Foreign Ministry

Azevedo, Ricardo

33

Variation of Western Scrub-Jay and Mexican Jay (Corvidae) vocalizations in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I recorded vocalizations of allopatric populations of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica texana and A. c. woodhouseii) and Mexican Jays (A. ultramarine couchii) at eight sites in Texas. While many call types were inconsistent in structure...

Coldren, Mary Kathleen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Postmodernism and Feminism in Mexican Theatre: Aura y las once mil vírgenes by Carmen Boullosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other things, North American presence in Mexican consumer society. The 64 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW woman looks into the camera as she rubs the cream on her face through the football helmet's mask. She looks seductively at the viewer who...

Costantino, Roselyn

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An american irony: the story of Mexican immigrant poverty in the land of immigrants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Percent of Total Population in Poverty: 2005 ............................................ 14 2 Median Net Worth of Households: 1996 to 2002 ...................................... 21 3 Number of Hispanics by County, 2000... and Hirschl 1999). As a group, Mexican Americans, and more specifically, Mexican immigrants tend to bear the burden of poverty within this nation the most heavily. For example, Hispanic households have a median net worth that is only about 9 percent...

Garcia, Ginny Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Differences in Mexican-American and Anglo-American Women's Response to a Modified Clothing TAT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precise conclusions in the statistical sense, could be drawn. For the Mexican-American women studied, there was a direct relationship between cloth- ing awareness and social status scores (P. = 75-90 per- ' cent), occupational rating (no statistical....5 percent). Area of ma jnr socialization did not affect Mexican-American ~z-omen'( cognizance of clothing. Anglo-Americans were more likely to have Iliqher clothing awareness scores (P. = 95 percent) than werr the Mexico-born women. Although...

Bathke, Carol Sander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

New Mexican taxes to transform Pemex capital spending strategy  

SciTech Connect

Mexico's government this year will introduce petroleum tax reforms that will transform how its state owned petroleum company approaches capital spending. Effective Jan. 1, 1994, the Mexican government began to implement a revamped tax regime designed to accompany the breakup of Petroleos Mexicanos into four new operating subsidiaries. Each of the four new companies -- Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Refining, Pemex Natural Gas and Basic Petrochemicals, and Pemex Secondary Petrochemicals -- will be responsible for paying a new income tax. Levies on E and P will be tied to a ring-fence mechanism tailored after the scheme employed by the U.K. and Norwegian governments in the North Sea. The paper discusses the affected investment rationale, the North Sea ring-fence model, other tax changes, and shifting the burden.

Not Available

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Injury in children of low-income Mexican, Mexican American, and non-Hispanic white mothers in the USA: a focused ethnography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several studies indicate that rates of serious pediatric injury are higher among Hispanics than among non-Hispanic whites in the USA. To investigate possible contributory factors, we interviewed 50 Mexican, 30 Mexican American, and 30 non-Hispanic white mothers in their own homes in the same low-income neighborhoods of Southern California. Mothers were identified via door-to-door canvassing in areas with high rates of pediatric injury. We observed household conditions and behaviors and obtained a detailed family history, including accounts of any occurrence of serious injury in a child under 5 years old, the highest-risk age group for pediatric injury. Results show that Mexican families were poorer, less educated, and lived in more hazardous and crowded conditions than did families in the other two groups. Nevertheless, they benefited from strong family bonds and a cultural tradition in which responsible older children typically supervise younger siblings. In contrast, a number of Mexican American and white mothers had been abused as children and were estranged from their own mothers; hence they lacked support and models of good parenting. There was much less self-reported smoking, drug use, and mental dysfunction among the Mexican mothers and their male partners as well as much less excessively active and/or aggressive behavior among their children. The nature of the injuries reported by the various groups seemed to reflect these differences. Appropriate interventions for each group are discussed. The study illustrates the importance of using ethnographic methods to examine the context of pediatric injury at the household level.

Dorothy S Mull; Phyllis F Agran; Diane G Winn; Craig L Anderson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Since May, 1990, the Institute for Public Policy (IPP) has published Quarterly Profiles (QPs) of New Mexico`s citizenry. Each QP has focused on a different issue, but they have all asked a set of standard items, including questions about the public`s perceptions of the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). Each year, the IPP has used the University of New Mexico`s Survey Research Center to conduct a telephone survey of a representative random sample of New Mexicans, and respondents were asked whether they had favorable or unfavorable views of LANL and the degree to which they perceived LANL as an environmentally responsible institution. As a result of this sustained research effort, the IPP now has a collection of fifteen consecutive QPs. With an aggregate sample size of over 8800, we are now able to make precise statistical inferences with greater confidence than was possible when using individual QP samples. Such an extremely large sample mitigates two kinds of common survey research problems.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Booming Mexican market may flourish with free trade  

SciTech Connect

Private power developers and utilities in the US are courting deals to build powerplants or supply electricity in Mexico. An the pending North American Free Trade Agreement, if passed, is expected to vastly increase the Mexican market for US constructors and manufacturers in the power sector. Ironically, a powerplant now under construction near the US border could be a factor in scuttling the NAFTA treaty. Mexico is seeking more than $18 billion in private sector investment. New regulations there now allow foreign firms to own 100% of the powerplants they build. The government-owned utility, Comision Federal de Electricidad, will offer firms power purchase agreements lasting up to 30 years. CFE also offers build-operate-transfer arrangements. It recently selected a consortium including General Electric Co., Bechtel Enterprises Inc., and Mexico's Groupo ICA to build the $600-million, 700-Mw, gas and oil-fired Samalayuca II project, about 20 miles south of El Paso, Texas. It will revert to CFE after 15 years.

Not Available

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture and ripening of Manchego and Chihuahua Mexican cheeses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to survive the Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheese-making processes and its persistence during the ripening stages of both cheeses was examined. Commercial pasteurized and homogenized whole milk was inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes (strain ATCC 19114) to a level between 2×106 and 9×106 CFU/ml. The milk was used to make Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheeses in a 25-l vat. Mexican Manchego cheese was ripened for 5 days and Chihuahua cheese for 6 weeks at 12°C and 85% RH. Listeria present in the cheese was enumerated by diluting samples in sterile 0.1% peptone water and plating on Oxford agar. Duplicate samples were taken at each step of the manufacturing process. During the first week of ripening samples were taken daily from both cheeses. For Chihuahua cheese, samples were taken weekly after the first week of the ripening stage. During the manufacture of Mexican Manchego cheese, Listeria counts remained relatively constant at 106 CFU/ml, while with Chihuahua cheese there was a one log decrease in numbers (106 to 105 CFU/ml). After pressing both curds overnight, numbers of bacteria decreased in Mexican Manchego cheese to 8.2×105 but increased in Chihuahua cheese from 1.7×105 to 1.2×106 CFU/ml. During the ripening stage, counts of Listeria remained constant in both cheeses. However, since the Chihuahua cheese ripening stage is about 6 weeks, the number of bacteria decreased from 2×106 to 4×104 CFU/g. The results show that Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive the manufacture and ripening processes of both Mexican cheeses.

Claudia Solano-López; Humberto Hernández-Sánchez

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Mexican Queso Chihuahua: Functional properties of aging cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Queso Chihuahua, a semi-hard cheese manufactured from raw milk (RM) in northern Mexico, is being replaced by pasteurized milk (PM) versions because of food safety concerns and the desire for longer shelf life. In this study, the functional traits of authentic Mexican Queso Chihuahua made from RM or PM were characterized to identify sources of variation and to determine if pasteurization of the cheese milk resulted in changes to the functional properties. Two brands of RM cheese and 2 brands of PM cheese obtained in 3 seasons of the year from 4 manufacturers in Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed after 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 wk of storage at 4°C. A color measurement spectrophotometer was used to collect color data before and after heating at 232°C for 5 min or 130°C for 75 min. Meltability was measured using the Schreiber Melt Test on samples heated to 232°C for 5 min. Sliceability (the force required to cut through a sample) was measured using a texture analyzer fitted with a wire cutter attachment. Proteolysis was tracked using sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Compared with PM cheeses, RM cheeses showed less browning upon heating, melted more at 232°C, and initially required a greater cutting force. With aging, cheeses increased in meltability, decreased in whiteness when measured before heating, and required less cutting force to slice. Seasonal variations in the cheesemilk had minimal or no effect on the functional properties. The differences in the functional properties can be attributed, in part, to the mixed microflora present in the RM cheeses compared with the more homogeneous microflora added during the manufacture of PM cheeses. The degree of proteolysis and subsequent integrity of the cheese matrix contribute to melt, slice, and color properties of the RM and PM cheeses. Understanding the functional properties of the authentic RM cheeses will help researchers and cheesemakers develop pasteurized versions that maintain the traditional traits desired in the cheeses.

D.W. Olson; D.L. Van Hekken; M.H. Tunick; P.M. Tomasula; F.J. Molina-Corral; A.A. Gardea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Oil possibilities of Mesozoic in Mexican High Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Platform rocks that crop out in the Sierra Madre Oriental possibly limit the Tampico-Misantla basin to the east and the Mexican Jurassic Cretaceous geosyncline to the west. It is considered that part of the Sierra Madre Occidental served as a limit to the geosyncline from the west of Jalisco to the east of Sonora. The rocks that were studied consist of limestones, dolomites, shales, sandstones, and marls, mostly of marine origin. Results of petroleum drilling indicate that some rocks show a degree of metamorphism, especially Jurassic and Triassic rocks. In places, rocks in allochthonous blocks were drilled that showed repetition of the formations, and the drilling objectives could not be reached. In the northern part of Chihuahua, some wells were drilled in bolsons or grabens filled by Tertiary and Quaternary clastic material or overflows and volcanic rocks. According to the results obtained from this study, the following steps should be taken: (1) increase the studies of geologic and geochemical detail, (2) determine which parts of the area, from the thickness of Mesozoic sediments are prospects for more detailed studies, (3) use mining information to locate and classify areas of metamorphism, which will surely condemn some areas, especially near the Sierra Madre Occidental, (4) increase drilling of stratigraphic tests as well as those with petroleum objectives, (5) construct Mesozoic isopach maps of Mesozoic formations from geophysical information and surface and subsurface geology, and (6) study drilling records to obtain related to geohydrology, ecology, and electrical log information from the surface to total depth of the well.

Lopez, R.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radical Catholic resistance to the Mexican Revolution: the Cristero Rebellion and the Sinarquista Movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the status quo of Mexican politics. This thesis demonstrates that Catholic resistance against Mexico?s anticlerical government was a changing process. This struggle, which emerged as early as the Bourbon reforms of the eighteenth century, depended... ...............................................................................8 The Bourbon Reforms...........................................................................12 Conservatism vs. Liberalism .................................................................14...

Velazquez, Martin Tomas

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Do desperate times call for desperate measures? Strategic responses to regulatory punctuations in the Mexican banking industry, 1991-2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domestic firms? Are there any similarities between successful foreign firms and successful domestic firms? Using event-history methodologies and the Mexican banking industry as the unit of analysis, this dissertation shows the following results: Foreign...

Perez Batres, Luis Antonio

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Health insurance mediation of the Mexican American non-Hispanic white disparity on early breast cancer diagnosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examined health insurance mediation of the Mexican American (MA) non-Hispanic white (NHW) disparity on early breast ... (30% or more of the census tract households were poor), middle (5% to...

Sundus Haji-Jama; Kevin M Gorey; Isaac N Luginaah; Madhan K Balagurusamy…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Educational patterns of the marginalized: an integrated model of Mexican American performance on cognitive tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Morales, B. A. , University of Texas at El Paso Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Rogelio Saenz The explanations for Mexican American underachievement in education have been centered on the cultural deficit paradigm. However, studies of this nature have... Peer Level Institutional Level . Hypotheses . III METHODS 9 14 24 30 32 35 37 Measurement of Variables . . . Analysis . IV FINDINGS . 38 45 47 V CONCLUSIONS . 66 REFERENCES . APPENDIX A APPENDIX B 79 86 89 APPENDIX C APPENDIX D...

Morales, Maria Cristina

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mexican-Origin Interregional Migration from the Southwest: Human, Household, and Community Capital Hypotheses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 2000; Guzman et al. 2002; Hiller et al. 2007; Saenz et al. 2004, 2007; Yankow 2003). Even though studies concentrating on the migratory behaviors of Mexican-origin individuals have only existed for about three....S., allowing previous researches and the current enterprises the means to justify that it be given special attention (Galarza, Gallegos, & Samora 1970; Grebler, Moore & Guzman 1970; Griswold 1984; Moore 1970a; Trujillo 1974; Saenz, Cready, & Morales 2007...

Siordia, Carlos

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sol, Sombra, y Media Luz: History, Parody, and Identity Formation in the Mexican American Carpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pragmatics 10:1.99-123 (2000) International Pragmatics Association SOL, SOMBRA, Y MEDIA LUZ: HISTORY, PARODY, AND IDENTITY FORMATION IN THE MEXICAN AMERICAN CARPA1 Peter C. Haney Abstract This paper analyzes a parody of the tango "A media luz...'), an almost endless variety of acts appeared. Ventriloquists, mentalists, contortionists, pyrotechnics by a Chinese magician, knockabout clowning action, madcap sketch comedy, lachrymose romantic songs, wire-walking, and dizzying maromas ('somersaults...

Haney, Peter C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife. PLoS ONE 9(9): e107719. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107719 Editor: Willem van Schaik, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands Received July 4, 2014; Accepted... method (BBL disks on Mueller-Hinton agar). We interpreted the resulting inhibitory halos according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Following O¨ver et al. [36], we applied further antibiotic susceptibility testing to all G...

Cristóbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

The development of separate education for Mexican Americans in Seguin, Texas, 1900-1950  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Cit of San Antonio 1842 (San Antonio: Ledger Book and Job Office, 1858), 18, cited in Montejano, 27. Terry Jordan, "A Century and a Half of Ethnic Change in Texas, 1836-1986, " Southwestern Historical uarterl (April 1986): 393. 12 result, various.... purchase goods, landowners profited when Mexican Americans remained an inexpensive, docile labor force. Once considered the apex of American social achieve- ment and lauded as a homogenizer of race, religion, immigration, and economic status, public...

Yeager, Susan Elizabeth

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Biodemography of a long-lived tephritid: Reproduction and longevity in a large cohort of female Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a large cohort of female Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens James R. Careya,b, *, Pablo Liedoc , Hans reproductive rates, and life span were recorded in a laboratory cohort of Mexican fruit flies consisting), the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Clark and Guadalupe, 1995; Curtsinger et al., 1992; Promislow et al

Sentürk, Damla

53

Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7  

SciTech Connect

This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

Ludlam, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites  

SciTech Connect

The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Falling behind, failure and drop outs in Mexican public universities: Autonomous University of Chihuahua (Mexico) case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The subject deals with the concepts of falling behind, failure and drop outs as the main indicators to the academic measuring methods in Mexican public universities, complemented by the national proposal to establish institutional tutorial models as the probable solution for the reduction of such indicators. In addition, it includes the outcomes of diagnostic studies performed at the Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico, taking into consideration the outstanding findings about the causes that provoke such problems, and distinguish its behaviour among students coursing educative programs with social approach and its comparison to those related to sciences.

Javier Tarango

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Developments in geothermal energy in Mexico—part nineteen. Corrosion in Mexican geothermal wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas and the Comisión Federal de Electricidad have initiated a collaborative study to define the specifications of steels for use in geothermal well construction in Mexico. Tests have been designed to characterize and control identifiable factors affecting corrosion. The study includes three main areas of activity: (a) studies of cases of material failure from several Mexican fields were made; (b) studies of general, localized and stress corrosion of sample coupons exposed to geothermal fluid were made in wellhead pressure chambers; (c) laboratory tests are being carried out under controlled hydrodynamic conditions.

J.A. Sampedro; N. Rosas; R. Díaz; B. Domínguez

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table S1. Cotton extent and Mexican free-tailed bat population size per county. County State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

File S1 Table S1. Cotton extent and Mexican free-tailed bat population size per county. County State Bat population size Mean cotton hectares* County State Bat population size Mean cotton hectares 28,255 4,127 *From 1990 to 2008 Table S2. Upland and Pima cotton price over time. Year Upland Cotton

Russell, Amy L.

58

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An analysis of the reliability and validity of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT) with English language Learner (ELL) Mexican American children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the results of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT; Naglieri, 1997a) with a sample of English Language Learner (ELL) Mexican American children and to compare...

Villarreal, Carlo Arlan

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEC Ore Buying Station AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.0-02) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The ideal scenario was to accumulate a sufficient stockpile of ore and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Solar energy resource assessment in Mexican states along the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of renewable energy has increased over the past few years due to the high cost of fossil fuels and our great dependence on them. Solar energy has been evaluated in the majority of developed countries. Mexico is known to possess large quantities of renewable energy resources, for example, approximately 6000 MW of wind energy resources. Nevertheless, solar energy is not sufficiently developed in Mexico. In this work, the global solar resources in Mexican states along the Gulf of Mexico were assessed. The data used in the analysis were obtained from the Automatic Meteorological Stations (AMEs) of the National Meteorological Service of Mexico (NMS) every 10 min over a period of 10 years, as well as from the Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SMSE) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) every month over 22 years. \\{AMEs\\} and SMSE validation data were compared to calculate their determination coefficient, R2, which was above 90%. A total of 13 maps generated by a Geographic Information System (GIS), one per month, and annually averaged global solar resources were used to determine the areas and the periods of the year with the greatest global solar energy resources. According to the results obtained in this study, the highest amount of solar energy, i.e., greater than 6.22 kWh/m2/day, was registered on July in the state of Tamaulipas. Based on the average annual energy map, the southern region of Veracruz State registered the largest resource, i.e., greater than 5.03 kWh/m2/day. From the foregoing analysis, the primary conclusion arrived at in the present work is that solar energy has significant potential for complementing energetic requirements in Mexican states along the Gulf of Mexico. It is recommended that the government adopt policies supporting and promoting the utilization of solar energy to maintain fossil fuel reserves and to reduce greenhouse gases.

Q. Hernández-Escobedo; E. Rodríguez-García; R. Saldaña-Flores; A. Fernández-García; F. Manzano-Agugliaro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Correlation between lead isotopes in Mexican ore deposits and tectono-stratigraphic terranes  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of lead isotopes are now sufficiently understood that they can sometimes fingerprint the source of lead in ore deposits. Previous studies of lead isotopes in galena of 34 Mexican ore-deposits showed that the deposits could be clustered on the basis of their lead isotopic composition. Here they authors show that the lead isotopic signature of the Mexican deposits is independent of geologic setting but is unambiguously related to the tectono-stratigraphic terrane that hosts the deposit. Four distinct clusters in 207/204Pb vs 206/204Pb and 208/204Pb vs 206/204Pb space correlate with the newly defined Guerrero, Chihuahua, Sierra Madre and Coahuila tectono-stratigraphic terranes. The least radiogenic lead is found in deposits of the Chihuahua terrane. The Sierra Madre terrane contains the most radiogenic lead. The crustal source of lead that produced the isotopic cluster of each terrane is consistent with the nature of the terrane's basement rocks, as deduced from geologic interpretations. Thus, for the Chihuahua terrane, the isotopic data is consistent with the North American craton as the lead source; for the Sierra madre terrane, which is a composite terrane thought to be formed by displaced fragments of old continental crust, the source of lead agrees with Doe and Zartman's (1979) cratonized or uncratonized crust. This crust, however, is different in isotopic composition to that underlying the Chihuahua terrane. For the Coahuila terrane, the source is consistent with uncratonized crust; and for the Guerrero terrane, the data agrees with a source composed of mature arc volcanic-sedimentary rock sequences.

Ruiz, J.; Coney, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Depression in Mexican-American youth: a 4-year follow-up of drug abuse prevention clients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focused on white or black opiate and cocaine users, in whom depression is negatively related to treatment success. The current study investigated correlates of depression in 110 Mexican-American youth in a drug prevention program for inhalant use... Population. Theories of Depression Depression in Drug Users Depression as a Predictor in Drug Treatment The Etiology of Depression in Drug Users. . . Inhalant Use. Objectives of This Study. 12 Outcome. . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . , . . . . . 15...

Smith, Stephanie Suesan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Epidemiologic investigation of tuberculosis in a Mexican population from Chihuahua State, Mexico: a pilot study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tuberculosis (TB) and its co-morbid conditions have become a burden on global health economies. It is well understood that susceptibility of the host to TB infection/disease is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. The aims of this pilot case-control study are to characterize the sociodemographic and environmental factors related to active TB disease (TB/case) and latent TB infection (LTBI/control) status, and to identify risk factors associated with progression from LTBI to TB. We recruited 75 cases with TB (mean age=46.3y; females=41%) and 75 controls with LTBI (mean age=39.0y; females=37%), from the Mestizo population of Cuidad Juárez, Mexico. In addition to the determination of case/control status, information on environmental variables was collected (e.g., socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol consumption, substance abuse, nutritional status, household demographics, medical histories and presence of type 2 diabetes [T2DM]). The data were analyzed to identify the environmental correlates of TB and LTBI using univariate and multivariate statistical approaches. Following multivariate logistic regression analysis, TB was associated with poor nutrition, T2DM, family history of TB, and non-Chihuahua state of birth. These preliminary findings have relevance to TB control at the Mexico-United States border, and contribute to our future genetic study of TB in Mexicans.

Geetha Chittoor; Rector Arya; Vidya S. Farook; Randy David; Sobha Puppala; Roy G. Resendez; Blanca E. Rivera-Chavira; Irene Leal-Berumen; Roberto Zenteno-Cuevas; Juan Carlos López-Alvarenga; Raul A. Bastarrachea; Joanne E. Curran; Subramanian Dhandayuthapani; Lupe Gonzalez; John Blangero; Michael H. Crawford; Esteban M. Vlasich; Luis G. Escobedo; Ravindranath Duggirala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Pilot Quality Control Program for Audit RT External Beams at Mexican Hospitals  

SciTech Connect

A pilot quality control program for audit 18 radiotherapy RT external beams at 13 Mexican hospitals is described--for eleven {sup 60}Co beams and seven photon beams of 6, 10 and 15 MV from accelerators. This program contains five parts: a) Preparation of the TLD-100 powder: washing, drying and annealing (one hour 400 deg. C plus 24 hrs 80 deg. C). b) Sending two IAEA type capsules to the hospitals for irradiation at the hospital to a nominal D{sub W} = 2 Gy{center_dot}c) Preparation at the SSDL of ten calibration curves CC in the range of 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub W} for {sup 60}Co with traceability to primary laboratory NRC (Canada), according to a window irradiation: 26/10/2007-7/12/2007. d) Reading all capsules that match their hospital time irradiation and the SSDL window irradiation. f) Evaluation of the Dw imparted by the hospitals.

Alvarez R, J T; Tovar M, V M [Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory SSDL, Ionizing Radiation Metrology Department, ININ Carretera Federal Mexico Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52 750 (Mexico)

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Developments in geothermal energy in Mexico—part thirty. Conclusion of the corrosion in mexican geothermal wells project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is complementary to part 19 of this series, in which partial results from the joint IIE/CFE studies were presented. The objective was to define the specifications for steel used in geothermal well construction in Mexico and to characterize and control identifiable corrosion inducing factors. The complete results of corrosion testing in wellhead pressure chambers, down hole chambers and in an autoclave simulation system are included. Also shown are chemical, mechanical and metallographic studies on steels commonly used in Mexican geothermal wells, as well as the main conclusions.

J.A. Sampedro; N. Rosas; R. Díaz; B. Dominguez

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Residues of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in livers of Mexican free-tailed bats  

SciTech Connect

Since 1936, the size of the summer population of Mexican free-tailed bats, Tadarida brasiliensisat Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico, declined from an estimated 8.7 million to 700,000 in 1991. This decline has been attributed primarily to human disturbance and the heavy agricultural use of organochlorine pesticides. Members of this species forage extensively over heavily agricultural areas, feeding on insects potentially contaminated with high levels of insecticides and trace metals. However, contamination from elements such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic have not been examined. The accumulation of these elements in wild vertebrates is often a primary reflection of contamination of the food supply. The presence of elemental contaminants in body tissues of bats is poorly documented. The objectives of this study were to examine and compare lead, cadmium, and arsenic contamination in livers of adult T. Brasiliensis from Carlsbad Caverns and Vickery Cave, a maternity colony in northwestern Oklahoma. Lead, cadmium, and arsenic were specifically selected because of their documented toxic and/or reproductive effects and their potential availability to this species. Large quantities of tetraethyl lead have been released into the environment and other lead compounds continue to be released by industrial manufacturing and petroleum refinement processes. Cadmium is used in a number of industrial processes such as metal plating and fabrication of alloys and is released from phosphate fertilizers and combusted coals. Teratogenicity appears to be greater for cadmium than for other elements. Arsenical compounds have been commonly used as herbicides and defoliants. These compounds have been demonstrated to cause abnormal embryonic development, degenerative tissue changes, cancer, chromosomal damage, and death in domestic animals.

Thies, M.; Gregory, D. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comments on the paper "The Mexican Hat Wavelet Family. Application to point source detection in CMB maps" by J. Gonzalez-Nuevo et al. (astro-ph/0604376)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The arguments presented by Gonzalez-Nuevo et. al (2006) in favour of the Mexican Hat Wavelet Family (MHWF) are critically discussed here. These authors allege the optimal properties of this new class of filters in the detection of point sources embedded in a noise background but their claim is not based upon a solid mathematical foundation and proof.

Roberto Vio; Paola Andreani

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

70

Overcoming the barriers: school success of Mexican American graduates from Pan American University in South Texas from 1955 to 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American students who fail do so because of limited educability. This type of thinking impacted perceptions of M e x i c a n A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t s ? e d u c a b i l i t y a n d s c h o o l practices. These views served as the dominant... means by which to view Mexican American students as limited (San M i g u e l & V a l e n c i a , 1 9 9 8 ) . T h e 1 9 7 0 ? s b r o u g h t a b o u t c o n s i d e r a b l e a t t e n t i o n t o t h e education problems...

Garcia, Juanita Celia

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Prevalence of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin High-risk Variants in Mexican Mestizo Population and Their Association With Lung Function Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by restricted airflow. The best-documented genetic factor is alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. The PiZ (rs28929474) and PiS (rs17580) variants are believed to cause severe AAT deficiency and are linked to a high risk of developing COPD. This study sought to identify whether genetic polymorphisms rs28929474 and rs17580 are associated with COPD susceptibility and lung function values in a Mexican mestizo population. Methods In this study, 558 smokers were included, of whom 279 had COPD and 279 did not (smokers without COPD – SWC). The PiS and PiZ variants were genotyped by allelic discrimination. Independent populations and lung function values were compared using the Kruskal–Wallis test. A bivariate logistic regression analysis was also conducted. Results Stage I and IV COPD patients showed significant differences in the frequencies of both heterozygous genotypes compared to SWC. For PiS, individuals with the heterozygous genotype AT demonstrated a decreased FEV1/FVC ratio compared to subjects with the homozygous genotype AA (P=.037). A significant association was found between the FEV1/FVC ratio and genotype AA for PiS (OR = 0.982, ? coefficient = ?0.019, 95% CI = 0.966–0.997). Conclusions COPD-causing AAT deficiency risk alleles exist at a very low frequency among Mexican mestizo population. Although they are not directly linked in our study population with disease susceptibility, these risk alleles are associated with poorer lung function measurements. It is important to characterize how often these genetic risk variants occur in other Latin American populations.

Gloria Pérez-Rubio; Luis Octavio Jiménez-Valverde; Alejandra Ramírez-Venegas; Ángel Camarena; Raúl H. Sansores; Fernando Flores-Trujillo; Juan M. Reséndiz-Hernández; Ramcés Falfán-Valencia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A study of the reliability, validity, and norms of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale and the Marital Satisfaction Scale for use with Mexican Americans in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the instruments with Mexican Americans. Reliability data for the overall sample was excellent for both scales. Validity data indicated that Marital Satisf'action Scale question P5 has questionable validity when used with this population. Differences in means... and Marind Satisfaction Measurement Bias . Cultural Backgrounds Socioeconomic Status Acculturation 5 14 21 38 39 III METHOD 42 Population . Sample . Instruments . Procedures . Analysis of data . IV RESULTS 42 42 43 45 46 48 Sample...

Kummerer, Gene Henry

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 13.32 - W 12.87 13.24 -...

74

CO2 mitigation costs for new renewable energy capacity in the Mexican electricity sector using renewable energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide mitigation costs for the Mexican power sector are calculated in order to compare the business as usual (BAU) scenario, based on natural gas capacity growth, to a transition scenario where electricity generation growth using natural gas after 2007 is replaced by renewable energies (solar, wind, hydro and biomass). The mitigation costs are obtained using the following parameters: natural gas price, discount rate and technological progress. The latter is expressed in terms of the anticipated decrease in capital costs, as reported in electricity generation technological literature. Our results show that when technological progress is considered, CO2 mitigation costs decrease rapidly from 14 $/tCO2 (in this paper $ express 1997 US dollars and t means metric tons) to zero when the price of natural gas nears 2.68 $/GJ, (for some readers, it can be useful to know that 1.0 US$1997/GJ is 1.19 US$2001/MMBTU) which is almost the same as the 2002 price. This means that for middle natural gas prices a “no regrets” situation can be achieved. Our results also show that for prices higher than 2.80 $/GJ, the incorporation of the technological progress parameter transforms the transition scenario into a “no regrets” scenario for all the discount rate values considered in this study.

Jorge Islas; Fabio Manzini; Manuel Mart??nez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reproductive success of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in relation to common environmental noise ? biotic, non-military aircraft, and weather-related  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From 2000 to 2005 noise in Mexican spotted owl habitat in the Gila National Forest NM was monitored using an array of Larson-Davis (LD) sound level meters (SLMs). Thirty-nine SLMs were deployed across a 20 km x 24 km area collecting 2-s time interval data mid-April to July resulting in over 350 000 hr of data. Time-history profiles could be used to attribute many events to sources reliably when SNR exceeded the background by 5-10 dB. The events were categorized as biotic (insects and chorusing birds) thunder regional commercial jet aircraft and local air traffic (recreational and firefighting). Measured by the proportion of 2-s samples with LAeq > 60 dB biotic sources and thunder were the most important. Regional commercial jet traffic was the most significant anthropogenic source accounting for 2% of the total. Based on cumulative sound exposure thunder was the greatest contributor. Regression techniques were used to relate owl reproductive success to noise metrics by source. Biotic noise was the only significant correlate highly and positively related to owl reproductive success. The most reasonable interpretation was a strong relationship between biotic noise and owl prey base [Work supported by U.S. Air Force ACC/CEVP.

Ann E. Bowles; Samuel L. Denes; Chris Hobbs; Kenneth J. Plotkin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid rain effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Mexican Mayan monuments. Ingenieria... eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dis- solves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes... Autonomous University of...

78

Five Summers of Mexican Theatre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Licona, who in turn had Abuelita de Batman on stage. Rascón Banda offered two plays of social-political commentary (Por los caminos del sur and Tabasco negro, about Pemex's problems), as did Sabina Berman - a good staging of En el nombre de Dios (Los...

Burgess, Ronald D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Migration and development in Mexican communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration from Mexico to the United States constitutes one of the world's largest labor flows and generates enormous capital flows in the opposite direction. Corresponding to each of these flows is a distinct view of the ...

Schnabl, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oil industry in Mexico and Nigeria. The Laguna deStandard Oil’s small concessions in 1937, prior to Mexico,1990s Mexico is one of the top three suppliers of oil to the

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

West Mexican Metallurgy: Revisited and Revised  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoamerican metallurgy furnishes an intellectual challenge in the development of world metallurgies: the evidence indicates that it was introduced from outside after state level societies had been flourishing...

Dorothy Hosler

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

444. LaBotz, D. 2002. Fox and Pemex Win Against Oil Worker’sShields, David 2003. Pemex: Un Futuro Incierto. Mexico:websites of the pro-sovereigntist Pemex professional union

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mexican firms commit to responsabilidad integral  

SciTech Connect

With the prospect of Mexico joining the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), eyes are on the environmental performance of that country's chemical industry. Its image has already been dented directly by pollution problems at certain maquiladora plants on the U.S. border, and indirectly by the April explosions at Guadalajara, blamed on gasoline leaks from state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos, (Pemex). NAFTA has drown the issue into focus, since the pact could encourage companies to build plants in Mexico to take advantage of cheaper labor costs. Concerned that laxer environmental provisions could also play a part, environmentalists are pressuring Washington to ensure that NAFTA puts Mexico on a par with the rest of North America. But chemical markers assert that Mexico's environmental legislation is already similar to that of the US. And, under the administration of President Carlos Salinas Gortari, the Ministry of Social Development has upped enforcement, fined a number of producers, and closed down some chemical units for failing to meet environmental regulations.

Wood, A.

1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Representation of the Modern Mexican Nation in Contemporary Mexican Chronicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a actividades “propias de su sexo”. Las cronistas demuestranactividades “propias de su sexo” (Elu 11) como en el hogar,que van “de acuerdo a su sexo. ” María del Carmen Elu dice

Alfaro Porras, Arianna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Representation of the Modern Mexican Nation in Contemporary Mexican Chronicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gaseras no registradas en PEMEX, las cuales habían sidoy ex funcionarios de PEMEX. 5) No se corrigieron los signosde las instalaciones de PEMEX para garantizar las medidas de

Alfaro Porras, Arianna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

New Mexican politics: a study of territorial delegates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by land-hungry veterans, met at the Bunch of Grapes Tavern in Boston to formulate an organiza- tion and plan for getting the land they had been promised. These men shortly formed the Ohio Company of Associates with plans to raise one million dollars...-two veterans headed west from Massachusetts. The Ordinance of 1787 provided for two distinct stages of "tempo- rary" territorial administration; the eventual goal was statehood. In the first stage, the government consisted solely of a governor, secre- tary...

Young, Terry Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cigarette Experimentation in Mexican Origin Youth: Psychosocial and Genetic Determinants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...results [database on the Internet].[cited 2011 Sep...adolescent substance use and abuse.Am J Med Genet 2000...Hispanic adolescents and young adults.Hisp J Behav...questionnaires [database on the Internet].[cited 2011 Jul...cross-sectional analysis.Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2008...

Anna V. Wilkinson; Melissa L. Bondy; Xifeng Wu; Jian Wang; Qiong Dong; Anthony M. D'Amelio, Jr; Alexander V. Prokhorov; Xia Pu; Robert K. Yu; Carol J. Etzel; Sanjay Shete; and Margaret R. Spitz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cigarette Experimentation in Mexican Origin Youth: Psychosocial and Genetic Determinants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...results [database on the Internet].[cited 2011 Sep...adolescent substance use and abuse.Am J Med Genet 2000...questionnaires [database on the Internet].[cited 2011 Jul...cross-sectional analysis.Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2008...Database [homepage on the internet].Bethesda, MD: NCI...

Anna V. Wilkinson; Melissa L. Bondy; Xifeng Wu; Jian Wang; Qiong Dong; Anthony M. D'Amelio, Jr; Alexander V. Prokhorov; Xia Pu; Robert K. Yu; Carol J. Etzel; Sanjay Shete; and Margaret R. Spitz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Insects Mistaken for the Mexican Cotton Boll Weevil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-covers are also prominently ridged lengthwise. When disturbed tlle Curculio like most weevils, has the halit of drawing up its legs, bending its snout on its breast, and feigning death or "sulling," dropping to the ground It is then very difficult...

Sanderson, E. Dwight (Ezra Dwight)

1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The U. S. Army Topographical Engineers in the Mexican War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveys and gathered important geographic and economic information on New Mexico. Topographical Engineers were assigned to the field commands under Generals Taylor, Scott, and Wool, and the officers of the Corps (including Captains Joseph E. Johnston..., RECONNAISSANCE OF LIEUTENANT EMORY. V. LIEUTENANTS ABERT AND PECK IN NEW MEXICO. VI. TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS UNDER TAYLOR. VII. TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS WITH WOOL VVIII. TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS UNDER SCOTT 49 100 140 169 207 228 IX. OTHER WAR ACTIVITIES...

Traas, Adrian George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Short communication: Characterization of microflora in Mexican Chihuahua cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work was performed to identify the bacterial species present in 10 Chihuahua cheeses obtained from commercial producers in Mexico using 16S rRNA gene analysis. As expected, some of the agar media initially used for isolation were not very selective, supporting the growth of several unrelated bacterial species. Sequence analysis identified potential pathogens, including Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, in all raw milk samples and 2 pasteurized milk samples. Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis were identified in 9 and 6 samples, respectively, and would serve as acidifying agents during cheese production. Lactobacilli were identified in all cheeses, with the most prevalent being Lactobacillus plantarum identified in 7 raw milk and 1 pasteurized milk cheeses. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Streptococcus macedonicus were identified in 4 raw milk cheeses and both were present in all pasteurized milk samples, suggesting that they may play a role in the development of traditional Chihuahua cheese attributes.

J.A. Renye Jr.; G.A. Somkuti; D.L. Van Hekken; V.M. Guerrero Prieto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chapter 1Chapter 1 The United StatesMexican Border--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARIZONA NEW MEXICO TEXAS COAHUILA NUEVO LEÃ?N TAMAULIPAS BAJA CALIFORNIA SONORA CHIHUAHUA PACIFIC OCEAN

Fleskes, Joe

93

Growth and transformation of a Mexican Village : Ixpantepec Nieves, Oaxaca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Mexico today there is an accelerated migration of skilled organized labor from urban centers to rural settlements. This is primarily due to the increased exploitation of natural resources in rural regions and the ...

Olguin, Rafael G

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Economics of dual purpose production alternatives in the Mexican tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological, marketing, and financial alternatives to the dual purpose production system in Central Veracruz, Mexico were analyzed to assess their economic viability. A large dual purpose production operation was characterized in a baseline...

Ochoa-Ochoa, Rene Federico

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Three Essays on Prequential Analysis, Climate Change, and Mexican Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include: a) at Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Ing. Jorge Nu?ez, Dr. Reynaldo Sandoval, Ing. Alejandro I?iguez, Ing. Antonio Ort?z, Ing. Alejandro Anaya, Ing. Manuel Vazquez, Ing. Celestino Montiel, Ing. Eduardo Rojo y de Regil, Dr. Jose Luz Gonzalez, Dr...

Mendez Ramos, Fabian

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Childhood Obesity Among Children of Mexican Descent: A Binational Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and crude odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for weight status, CHAMACOS (Salinas, CA) and Proyecto Mariposa (Guanajuato, Jalisco, and Michoacan, Mexico)

Rosas, Lisa G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Canadian, Mexican, and U. S. Fisheries: Recent Developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this paper will review briefly the catch statistics for three countries of North America Canada, Mexico landings. The next section provides estimates of the gross value of the catch and a crude index

98

FDI as a Sustainable Development Strategy: Evidence from Mexican Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA 94720 FDI as a Sustainable Development Strategy: EvidenceSecurity and Sustainable Development, Berkeley, California.P. Gallagher: FDI as a Sustainable Development Strategy:

Gallagher, Kevin P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Free trade and freer petchems drive Mexican restructuring  

SciTech Connect

When Mexico first opened up its protected markets in 1987 by cutting import tariffs, it thrust the chemical industry into a phase of change. Now, with the advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA) and the liberalization of petrochemicals by state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), restructuring has moved up a gear.

Wood, A.

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Investigating the Relationship between Acculturation and Metabolic Syndrome among a Bi-national Sample of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This disorder is usually caused by the energy imbalance between excessive caloric 4 consumption (high calorie diet) and minimal caloric expenditure (physical inactivity). Obesity is also associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, heart.../L, or HDL ? 0.9 mmol/L in males or ? 1.0 mmol/L in females), central obesity (waist-hip ratio > 0.90 in males and > 0.85 in females, or body mass index > 30 kg/m2), or microalbuminuria34. The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel...

Guerrero, Julio

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The enacted environment--the creation of "place" by Mexicans and Mexican Americans in East Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I will examine how residents of East Los Angeles use their front yards and streets to create a sense of "place." The environment created in this way I call "enacted." People are both users and creators of a ...

Rojas, James Thomas

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Pollen from Laguna Verde, Blue Creek, Belize: Implications for Paleoecology, Paleoethnobotany, Agriculture, and Human Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and parts of the Mexican states of Chiapas and Tabasco (Coe 2005:11). In this area, there is a good fit between the Maya language and Mayan cultural elements (such as shared dietary staples, and the location of Mayan ruins; Coe 2005:11). Mayanist... lowlands? by preferring the term ?southern lowlands? to indicate all parts of the Maya Lowlands except northern Yucatan. The southern lowlands are thus considered to include Tabasco, the Lacand?n Forest of Chiapas, the Pet?n, and Belize. Definition...

Morse, Mckenzie

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Freeways and Free Speech, Rail Cars and Rancheras: Geographic and Linguistic Mobility in Contemporary Mexican and Mexican-American Cultural Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the possibility that one can make the journey, and without great travail. This freedom has become especially pronounced since the advent of the automobile. Mike Featherstone, in his introduction to Automobilities, draws attention to the sense of autonomy provided... and progress have become intertwined in the American psyche, as Cotten Seiler in A Republic of Drivers: A Cultural History of Automobility in America notes. For Seiler, the US narrates itself ever “in forward motion” and concerns itself with this movement...

Postma, Regan Lee

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and perro sin pelo del...unique haplotype between the Mexican breed Chihuahua and ancient Mexican samples. We also...continent, for example, the Mexican Chihuahua, the xoloitzcuintli (Mexican hairless...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Citizens' evaluation of the president and democratic transition : determinants and effects of presidential approval in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex (Petróleos Mexicanos), wasMexican state oil monopoly Pemex (Petróleos Mexicanos), was

Gomez Vilchis, Ricardo Roman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Summary of the Experience of Two Mexican Industrial Energy Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,100 $34,300Iyear ITESM 001198 3 0 $121,200 $15,800/year $28,600 $Olyear ITESM 002/98 6 2 $665,200 $13 4,600/year $49,200 $8,800Iyear ITESM 004/98 6 5 $241,900 $35,400/year $49,800 $23,700/year ITESM 005/98 5 5 $502,600 $48,900Iyear $35,600 $48...,100 $34,300Iyear ITESM 001198 3 0 $121,200 $15,800/year $28,600 $Olyear ITESM 002/98 6 2 $665,200 $13 4,600/year $49,200 $8,800Iyear ITESM 004/98 6 5 $241,900 $35,400/year $49,800 $23,700/year ITESM 005/98 5 5 $502,600 $48,900Iyear $35,600 $48...

Paroby, R.

107

Surface ozone background in the United States: Canadian and Mexican pollution influences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of anthropogenic emissions from Canada, Mexico, and outside North America on daily maximum 8-hour average ozone Surface ozone Air quality standard Chemical transport model Global model a b s t r a c t We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) with 1 Ã? 1 horizontal resolution to quantify the effects

Park, Rokjin

108

Grassroots cosmopolitanism : transnational communication and citizenship practices among indigenous Mexican immigrants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to questions about how to obtain birth certificates andmatrículas –a birth certificate is a requirement to obtain aconsulates cannot issue birth certificates: “you need to ask

Mercado, Antonieta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Picturing Soldaderas: Agency, Allegory, and Memory in Images of the 1910 Mexican Revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project  was   “reviving  in  an  ‘illustrative  form’  the  heroic  struggle  of  our  country  for  ‘Land  and   Liberty. ’”    

Orzulak, Jessica Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Travel-Times of the P- and S-Waves from Mexican Earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excep- tion the fundamental requirement that...interior- wall of boiler-room. This...the buildings safe for operation and providing...amperes for normal operation. A Laon tube...0.1, the fundamental REPORTS AND PAPERS...

Dean S. Carder

111

Los Sonidos del cine: Cinematic Music in Mexican Film, 1930-1950  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revueltas Edición Crítica: Redes (1935). México: Universidad1934, dir. Carlos Navarro), Redes (Nets, 1935, dir. EmilioEmilio Gómez Muriel’s Redes premiered with underscoring by

Avila, Jacqueline A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Pharmacogenetic differences in response to albuterol between Puerto Ricans and Mexicans with asthma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important public health implications since Latino childrenand public health implications of these findings. Our study

Choudhry, Shweta; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geochemistry of reversible hydratable tephra from the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of 27Al was recorded using a Varian 300 MHz spectrometer equipped with a 7 mm rotor...equilibria of pyroxenes at pressures 1 atmosphere. In C.T. Prewitt, Ed., Pyroxenes...nuclear magnetic resonance investigation in plasma-facilitated NOx reduction catalysts...

Liberto De Pablo; Mercedes Doval; Angel La Iglesia

114

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rich zone. Accurate estimation of the resource size and future production, as well as the uncertainties associated with them, is critical for the decision-making process of developing shale oil and gas resources. The complexity of the shale reservoirs...

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cancer Incidence in First Generation U.S. Hispanics: Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and New Latinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2009 American Association for Cancer Research. August 2009 research-article Research Articles Cancer Incidence in First Generation U.S. Hispanics...for reprints: Paulo S. Pinheiro, Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School...

Paulo S. Pinheiro; Recinda L. Sherman; Edward J. Trapido; Lora E. Fleming; Youjie Huang; Orlando Gomez-Marin; David Lee

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - age mexican children Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Pace of Reproduction: Cooperative Breeding in Humans Summary: ? What is the age and sex patterning of children's activities? 82-85 Net production (Production minus... is the...

117

Postcolonial analysis of educational research discourse: creating (Mexican) American children as the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research is a modern practice whose production of knowledge needs to be critically and continually examined. The pursuit of knowledge is not a neutral and objective endeavor; it is a socially situated practice that is embedded within power...

Rivas, Araceli

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

Picturing Soldaderas: Agency, Allegory, and Memory in Images of the 1910 Mexican Revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consciousness:  James  Agee  and  Walker   Evans,  ‘Let  Consciousness:  James  Agee  and  Walker   Evans,   ‘Let  

Orzulak, Jessica Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America and northern South America. (In the annual mean theAmerica and northern South America. This pattern appearsMéxico and northern South America, a pattern that is again

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

576 Fernndezetal.-ConservationstatusofMexicanGeomyidaeandHeteromyidae RevistaMexicanadeBiodiversidad85:576-588,2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Zoot�cnia y Ecolog�a, Universidad Aut�noma de Chihuahua. Perif�rico Francisco R. Almada, Km. 1, 31453 Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. 2 Department of Biological Sciences

New Mexico, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Próspero: A Study of Success from the Mexican Middle Class in San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boundaries ..................................... 14 4 Present Day Boundaries of Mexico and the United States ......................... 18 5 Map of Downtown San Antonio and Surrounding Area ............................ 27 6 Distribution of Race..." (Cooper 2010). Within Arizona, as well as other states across the country, activists staged public 3 protests against this new law, threatening to boycott all Arizona-based travel and business dealings. Unfortunately, Arizona is not the only...

Bertinato, Sarita

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Photographs of Mexican festivals by George O. Jackson de Llano reflect the diversity,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spain around 1600. The Mayo dancers wear leg-rattles during their performances. They make the rattles of a local marine snail (Plicopurpura pansa). [Bottom] A Nahua man from the mountains of Puebla, in east

Mathis, Wayne N.

123

Los Sonidos del cine: Cinematic Music in Mexican Film, 1930-1950  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and produced by Germán Camus. 25 During Mexico’s silent filmof Manuel de la German Camus also produced twelve episodesby Ernesto Vollrath ( 1919). Camus began his career first as

Avila, Jacqueline A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Structural Characteristics of Forest Stands Within Home Ranges of Mexican Spotted Owls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, J. Iniguez, S. Jojola, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, H. Lineiro, K. Maddock, G. Stoddard, J.Todd, V. Ray, and especially A.J. Helgenberg. J.F. Cully, Jr., A.B. Franklin, M.H. Reiser,W, and W. Shepperd and J.K. Dwyer assisted with debugging the habitat data files. R.A. Wilson and B

125

Mexican Spotted Owl Home Range and Habitat Use in Pine-Oak Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current address: Nongame Birds Program Manager, Arizona Game and Fish Department, 2222 W. Greenway Road. Cossette. For habitat sampling, we thank D. Brown, M. Gaud, B. Gill, M. Hemecke, E. Kenney, D. Kitterman, J. Kitterman, W. Kunkle, P. May, J. McNamara, M. Nelson, C. Newell, V. Pagliarinl. J. Protiva, and D. Ryan. J

126

Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. D. Crounse et al. : Biomass burning pollution overChemistry and Physics Biomass burning and urban airprimary anthropogenic and biomass burning organic aerosols

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Geochemistry of reversible hydratable tephra from the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recorded using a Varian 300 MHz spectrometer equipped with a...probe. Samples were spun at 6 KHz. Signals of 27Al were recorded...of pyroxenes at pressures 1 atmosphere. In C.T. Prewitt, Ed...magnetic resonance investigation in plasma-facilitated NOx reduction...

Liberto De Pablo; Mercedes Doval; Angel La Iglesia

128

A Mexican case study on a centralised database from world natural history museums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collections in Mexico, the United States, Canada, and Europe. This information was compiled in a centralized database and various analyses were developed to address historical patterns of ornithological investigations in Mexico: current and potential...

Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Gordillo-Martí nez, Alejandro

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Company Name: Chipotle Mexican Grill Web Site: www.chipotle.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in line with full-service restaurants, coupled with the speed and convenience of fast food. We try to do situations; Maintaining a clean restaurant with excellent quality food and customer service; Maintaining: demonstrate that food served fast didn't have to be a "fast-food" experience. We use high-quality raw

New Hampshire, University of

130

The Influence of Caregiver-Child Acculturation Gap on Mexican American Adolescents' Depression and Suicidality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the passion you had for counseling. Thank you for being part of this journey! Mom, dad, Amber and A.J.—thank you for your love and support in each step of my life, including graduate school and my dissertation. You have always believed in me... teens. However, compared with Latinas, Latino boys are more likely to be successful in their attempts (Wagner, 2009). The purpose of the present manuscript is to present the acculturation gap hypothesis (Birman, 2006) within the cultural...

Piña-Watson, Brandy Michelle

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nonlinear seismic response of Mexican bridges with base isolation accounting for soil structure interaction effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of the nonlinear behavior of the isolation pads of the bridges on the seismic responses (accelerations, displacements, and pier seismic forces), and to study combined effects of base isolation and inertial interaction due to the presence...

Olmos Navarrete, Bertha Alejandra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

EN CARNE PROPIA: EMBODIED IDENTITIES IN CUBAN AND MEXICAN CULTURAL PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In twentieth-century Cuba and Mexico, each post-revolutionary state consolidated power through cultural production, especially film and literature, by funding national cinema and institutions such as the Union of Cuban ...

Drickey, Kirsten

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Garbage, society, and environment in a Mexican municipio: The case of Coxcatlán, Puebla, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.17 Local recyclables collector pile 136 Figure 3.18 Fierro viejo collector truck 136 Figure 3.19 Small dumpsite in the Barranca Soyolapa 138 Figure 3.20 Larger tiradero clandestino along the highway 139 Figure 3.21 Large burn pit 141 Figure 3.22 Burn pile... Reuse and recycling 135 Dumping and burying 137 Burning 140 Composting, “abono”, and keeping animals 143 THE GARBAGE MANGAGEMENT TRAJECTORY IN COXCATLÁN 143 CHAPTER 4: Household garbage management in Coxcatlán 148 OBJECTIVES AND METHODS 149 Project...

Hilburn, Andrew Michael

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Towards videogame design guidelines to promote significant leisure activities in Mexican older adults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to formulate design guides to create digital games that promote significant leisure activities in older adults from Mexico. As a first step towards this goal, seven-hundred and ninety-four older adults up to 60 years old ... Keywords: game design, leisure activities, older adults

Ramón R. Palacio; Christian O. Acosta; Alberto L. Morán; Joaquín Cortez

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Manzanillo, Tecomán, Colima, 28100, Mexico 3 Department of Biology, 130 College Place, Syracuse University recognized, increasing the number of described species from four to 20. Based on field surveys in Mexico reported four species of pollinators (Riley, 1892; Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982; Powell, 1984), including three

Althoff, David M.

136

Sustaining a House of Cards: The Health Care of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working conditions, working hours, and pay (economic exclusion). The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which passed on March 23, 2010, became yet another policy following the historical trend of restricting and limiting the health care...

Patel, Tejal Sanmukh

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

How Educational Data Mining Empowers State Policies to Reform Education: The Mexican Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, Mexico is living a full transformation in strategic areas such as: education, energy, finances, fiscal, and labor. This ... , the Federal Government has ordered an educational reform. A briefing of the ...

Alejandro Peña-Ayala; Leonor Cárdenas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fantasía and Disobedient Daughters Undistressing Genres and Reinventing Traditions in the Mexican American Carpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the early 20th century. From the beginning of the 20th century to the 1930s, commercial farming dominated by Anglo settlers progressively replaced the older ranching economy. Although ranching had also been Anglo-dominated after 1848, the transition... and scatological vocabulary. 6 Audiences in the theaters were expected to show a corre­ sponding respect toward the performers by dressing well and remaining quietly in their seats. Ramirez, in her study of Spanish-language dramatic companies in Texas, notes...

Haney, Peter C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Politics of Mexican Documentary Distribution: Three Case Studies, 1988-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economy, informed by Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and concepts borrowed from cultural studies. The case studies under analysis involved the documentary production and distribution of three production houses. Each of them participates in a different field...

Pé rez Tejada, Manuel Antonio

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Feather mites (Acarina: Analgesoidea) of some Texan and Mexican falconiform and strigiform birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species found on eacl!. Harris haw!i-Parabuteo unicinc. tu harris! (Audubon) P eudal)biotin&rs rniilvu'in is (Trouessart) Caracara-Caracars c?&eriway audubonii (Cassir&) Ga?&ucinia hyalothrix Gaud and iouchet Red-tailed Hawk-B& tco jama...&censis borealis (Gmelin) Gabucinia tistata sp. n. Swainson's I. awk ? Bi tco swa&'neon! Btnnp:. rte ztveous tex i. . us sp. n. Long horned o I- u!&o virgin!anus G . el! n Protaiecs "ttenuatus (Buchholz) Barred o. rl-Sirix var!a Bangs Dernonoton serve!. us...

Elbihari, Sabir

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Continued Oppression of Middleclass Mexican Americans: An Examination of Imposed and Negotiated Racial Identities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semistructured open ended interviews (1-3 hours each), 10 months of ethnography in Phoenix and San Antonio, as well as a descriptive analysis of the Alamo monument website and Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office 2011 press releases this dissertation examines how...

Delgado, Daniel Justino

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean with the Atlantical. (2005b). 1. POGA (Pacific Ocean-Global Atmosphere): Inoutside of the tropical Pacific Ocean that computes SST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mexican Instability, War Plan Green, and the U.S. Army, 1903 - 1940  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not disrupt improvement in bilateral relations, and a settlement was eventually reached in 1941.26 Oil was the most difficult issue to resolve. In 1934, C?rdenas formed a national oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), and in 1935 he encouraged oil...

Lange, David Michael

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stability in a new destination : Mexican immigrants in Clark County, Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s plans to privatize Pemex, the national oil and gasve never seen any money from Pemex come here to the rancho.

Keyes, David Gordon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Insecticides and bridge-roosting colonies of Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that agricultural insects constitute one-third to one-half of the free-tail's total diet (DesMarais et al. , 1980; Mizutani, 1992), with moths and other lepidopterans constituting the majority of the morning diet (Whitaker et aL, 1996). Recently, foraging of free...

Sandel, Jody Kay

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Developing a marketing plan for cheese in the Mexican market: an internship at Specialty Trading Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drink "Chocolak" and the regular milk drink, "Lechelak" which arc distributed in Mexico. Specialty Trading Corporation is managed by Dr. Saul Mercado. He is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. Since 1975, Dr. Mercado has had extensive experience in doing... years as Marketing Manager for one of the largest milk cooperatives in Mexico. His office is in Mexico City, which will allow him to better assess your needs. Between Dr. Mercado and Dr. Argaez, they bring thirty years of experience in the dairy...

Whiteley, Venetia Lane

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The economic impact of the eradication of the screwworm on Mexican livestock producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Committee) Ronald D. Lacewell (Member) l. onni . on s r) ames . ris iansen (Member) ie . adberg (Head of Dep rtment) May 1987 ABSTRACT Economic Impact From Screwworm Eradication In Mexico (May 1987) John Edward Jinkins, B. S. A. , University... flies to mate with the w1ld fly population. Screwworms have now been erad1cated from all of North America except the Yucatan Peninsula. The purpose of this study was to quantify benefits of screwworm eradication in Mexico. Two questionnaires wer e...

Jinkins, John Edward

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Trade-concentration and its impact on commerce and traders of a Mexican city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation evaluates the changes in food retailing patterns in the face of openmarket trends in a medium sized city (Citlalicalli) in central Mexico. This evaluation is carried out using the model of retail trade-concentration. The following...

Anand, Jayant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that households? experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models... of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing iii homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA...

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Expansion of the Hadley Cell under global warming.poleward expansion of the Hadley Cell and poleward movement

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect

This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, stratified random sample of 992 New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in October, 1992. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current images and perceptions of the Laboratory. The sample margin of error is plus or minus 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.

NONE

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Beneth corporate codes of conduct : what drives compliance in two Mexican garment factories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the question: under what conditions do corporate codes of conduct work? To answer this question, I develop two case studies of subcontracting factories that are subject to a multinational company's ...

Romis, Monica

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nineteenth century American interpretations of the justice of the Mexican War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entered. Mexico City on September lent 1847, Americans vexe increasing t~eir demand for an end to host11 it1es. Even the aged Albert Gsllstin ?toiued. those uxging an immediate bsl+ to the invasion oi' Mexico. President Polk dispatched Nicholas P...

Mathis, Robert Neil

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Public Policy for the Poor? A Randomized Evaluation of the Mexican Universal Health Insurance Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: A Massive Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals, and financial health protection Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals, and financial health protection beneficiaries for the Poor? 3 / 31 #12;Seguro Popular: A Massive Reform medical services, preventive care, pharmaceuticals

Chen, Yiling

155

Mexican Silver for the Cortes of Cadiz during the War against Napoleon, 1808-1811  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of duties on the brisk transatlantic trade but, above all,fact, maintenance of this vital transatlantic connection wastheir control of transatlantic trade. 55 The enormous

Marichal Salinas, Carlos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Constructing check-lists and avifauna-wide reviews: Mexican bird taxonomy revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Pliego et al. 1993, Peterson and Navarro-Sigüenza 2000b), we have become aware of numerous species taxa that merit full recognition as species, under both the biological species concept and the evolutionary species concept (Navarro-Sigüenza et al. 1992..., Peterson and Navarro-Sigüenza 2000a, Puebla-Olivares et al. 2008). This realization led to the de- velopment of a new, country-wide taxonomic treatment under the evolutionary species concept (Navarro-Sigüenza and Peterson 2004), which was subsequently...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Pemex to acquire interest in Shell Texas refinery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Petroleos Mexicanos and Shell Oil Co. have signed a memorandum of understanding to form a joint refining venture involving Shell's 225,000 b/d Deer Park, Tex., refinery. Under the agreement, Mexico's state owned oil company is to purchase a 50% interest in the refinery, and Shell is to sell Pemex unleaded gasoline on a long term basis. Under the venture, Shell and Pemex plan to add undisclosed conversion and upgrading units tailored to process heavy Mexican crude. The revamp will allow Pemex to place more than 100,000 b/d of Mayan heavy crude on the U.S. market. Mayan accounts for 70% of Mexico's crude oil exports. In turn, Shell will sell Pemex as much as 45,000 b/d of unleaded gasoline to help meet Mexico's rapidly growing demand.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 26. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1985 Average .................................. 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .................................. 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .................................. 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .................................. 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .................................. W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .................................. 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .................................. 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .................................. W -

159

Assured pasts or gambled futures : contrasting approaches to context in selected 20th century Mexican and Argentine art practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio Galán, Me Quiero Morir, Oil on Canvas, Mexico City,international oil consortiums operating in Mexico and usingMe Quiero Morir, Oil on Canvas, Mexico City, 1985 In the

Cereijido, Fabian Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Return Migrations, Assimilation, and Cultural Adaptations among Mexican American Professionals from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................. 23 3. LITERATURE REVIEW AND THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES????. 28 3.1 Review of the pertinent literature ............................................................... 30 3.2 Canonical explanations and expectations... approaches and marginal accommodations... ............................ 40 3.6 Deconstructing the canons and apostles of assimilation ............................ 45 3.7 Synthesis of theoretical perspectives...

Garcia, Jesus Alberto

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services such as water purification and mitigation ofoutputs (i.e. water purification, carbon sequestration,at producing water infiltration and purification services,

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Acta Botanica Mexicana 91: 27-36 (2010) The Mexican rooTs of The indian Lavender Tree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its essential oil. its origin from Mexico was not well understood because the name B. delpechiana has in Mexico, proved to be a success, giving the indian oil a superior odor and a longer persistence. The indian oil eventually took over the international markets and its industrial exploita- tion in Mexico

Becerra, Judith X.

163

Assured pasts or gambled futures : contrasting approaches to context in selected 20th century Mexican and Argentine art practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio Galán, Me Quiero Morir, Oil on Canvas, Mexico City,Me Quiero Morir, Oil on Canvas, Mexico City, 1985 In theinternational oil consortiums operating in Mexico and using

Cereijido, Fabian Pablo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Toward a greener campus : experiments with sustainable resource management at one Mexican university and two United States universities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern society faces a range of difficult resource management problem like climate change, acid rain and soil depletion. To confront problems like these successfully, educational institutions, along with all other public ...

Coffie, Randall Gregory Jesus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Update of the Mexican Health Care Formulary and Supply Catalog in the Context of the Health Technology Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the instruments Mexico has available for the optimization of resources specifically allocated to health technologies is the Health Care Formulary and Supply Catalog (Cuadro Básico y Catálogo de Insumos del Sector Salud [CBCISS]). The aim of the CBCISS is to collaborate in the optimization of public resources through the use of technologies (supplies) that have proven their safety, therapeutic efficacy, and efficiency. The importance of the CBCISS lies in the fact that all public institutions within the National Health System must use only the established technologies it contains. The implementation of strategies that strengthen the CBCISS update process allows it to be thought of as an essential regulatory tool for the introduction of health technologies, with relevant contributions to the proper selection of cost-effective interventions. It ensures that each supply included on the list meets the criteria sufficient and necessary to ensure efficacy, safety, effectiveness, and, of course, efficiency, as evidence supporting the selection of suitable technologies. The General Health Council (Consejo de Salubridad General [CSG]) is a collegial body of constitutional origin that—in accordance with its authority—prepares, updates, publishes, and distributes the CBCISS. To perform these activities, the CSG has the CBCISS Inter-institutional Commission. The CBCISS update is performed through the processes of inclusion, modification, and exclusion of supplies approved by the Interior Commission. The CBCISS update process consists of three stages: the first stage involves a test that leads to the acceptance or inadmissibility of the requests, and the other two focus on an in-depth evaluation for the ruling. This article describes the experience of health technology assessment in Mexico, presents the achievements and outlines the improvements in the process of submission of new health technologies, and presents a preliminary analysis of the submissions evaluated until December 2012. During the analysis period, 394 submissions were received. After confirming compliance with the requirements, 59.9% of the submissions passed to the next stage of the process, technology assessment. In the third stage, the committee approved 44.9% of the submissions evaluated. The improvements established in the country in terms of health technology assessment allowed choosing the technologies that give more value for money in a context of public health institutions.

Pedro Rizo Ríos; Aurora González Rivera; Itzel Rivas Oropeza; Odette Campos Ramírez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Experience of Job-Displaced Mexican-Americans From San Antonio, Texas Who Have Received Retraining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Emotional Distress, Education and Retraining, Entrepreneurship and Problems with Workforce Benefits. iv The themes were expanded based on participants’ words and then discussed through a post-analysis literature review. Recommendations were made... Education and Retraining…. .......................................................... 102 Problems with Workforce………….. ............................................ 119 Entrepreneurship...

Mena, Diana

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of flooding, ecotourism, biodiversity conservation andconservation and ecotourism. The Costa Rican PES program hasDirect Payments for Use Ecotourism Certification Non-Timber

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nacional Campesina (CNC) Centro de Estudios Económicos yand Hubert C. de Gramont. 1996. La CNC y el nuevo movimientoFederation of Campesinos (CNC) and access to credit through

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mexican Provincial Society during the Age of Revolution: A Social and Economic History of Toluca, 1790-1834  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rosaura. Toluca 1603: Vista de ojos. Zinacantepec, México:Rodríguez, Toluca, 1603: vista de ojos (Zinacantepec,in Selected Sources, 1603-1834 .. 205!

Mairot, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Just the Tip of the Iceberg: The Truncation of Mexican American Identity in My Family/Mi Familia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huaco-Nuzman, Carmen. "Mi Familia/My Family." Review. AztlánAmerica. lowa City: Familia/Mi Familia. Dir. Gregory Nava.Saga Traces 'My My Family/Mi Familia. National Catholic

Serrato, Phillip

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

An economic analysis of supervised credit for Mexican rubber producers in the El Palmar region of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is recomtended, in which the participation of several government agencies is required in the '. HARP to achieve real econo nic progress. Concerr. ing the analysis of rare of return on rubbe- invest- men , production data for rubber were scarce ano difficult... by Production Purpose of the Loans, 1962-1967, the El Palmer Region, Mexico. 36 Estimated - er Hectare* Cash-Expenditure Requirements for the Establishment of Rubber Plantings in the El Palmer Region, Mexico, 19 68. 44 Annual Current end Projected. per...

De Armero Tapia, Luis Ernesto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Zapatismo y sustentabilidad. La Jornada, August 14.Saber Ambiental: Sustentabilidad, Racionalidad, Complejidad,2009. Ecología política, sustentabilidad y poder social en

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Characterization of resistance to the Mexican spittlebug complex Aeneolamia albofasciata (Lallemand) and Prosapia simulans (Walker) in selected buffelgrass genotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- zuela, Guyana, Surinam, Trinidad, Tobago, Grenada, Brazil and Argen- tina. Borrer and DeLong (1976) placed the Homoptera among those insects that undergo incomplete metamorphosis. The spittlebug conforms, pass- ing through egg, nymph and adult stages...

Head, Henry Wesley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Forecasting Mexican imports of U.S. corn, sorghum and soybeans under free trade and debt reduction scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, resulting in larger than planned financial deficits. Also, oil prices had declined further and there was a major earthquake in Mexico City. The 1985 agreement continued many of the elements of the prior agreement, but also included major reforms... of Mexico's economic policies. These reforms included reduction of tariffs and trade restrictions, liberalization of foreign investment, reductions in public spending, tax reform, divestiture of state-owned enterprises, and reform of domestic price...

Lyford, Conrad Power

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Conflict and change in a bifurcated community: Anglo - Mexican-American political relations in a South Texas town.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co;. :un'ties h vc . '. '. a 'ca . . !!"ricans lau!. ched em! . ', to cont ol ?. I - . . : ?. c ~ . . . c '. . !c coco . :. '- '!' 'mero' ! s o' oolems con. . ront the: u' onomous po'? u'c, . l organize ? ''on o . . ' x cnn . us ricans Q, . sct...

Miller, Michael Victor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Acculturation, behavioral risk factors, and cardio- metabolic dysfunction in Mexican American women living in a border region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suarez, L. , Laufman, L. , Barroso, C. , & Chalela, P. (Suarez, Laufman, Barroso, & Chalela, 2000). Substantial

Espinosa de los Monteros, Karla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

?-3 and ?-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intakes and the Risk of Breast Cancer in Mexican Women: Impact of Obesity Status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...units), socioeconomic status, energy intake (continuous...no), and menopausal status. Linear trend tests...menopause, socioeconomic status, ever use of hormone...physical activity, energy intake (continuous...

Véronique Chajès; Gabriela Torres-Mejía; Carine Biessy; Carolina Ortega-Olvera; Angélica Angeles-Llerenas; Pietro Ferrari; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce; and Isabelle Romieu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Freedom's Journal and El Clamor Publico: African American and Mexican American Cultural Fronts in Nineteenth-Century Newsprint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History Co. , 1890. Print. Beal, Thomas D. Rev. of Freedom'sHistory Co. , 1890. Print. Beal, Thomas D. Rev. of Freedom'sand Rights of All. 5 D. Thomas Beal, “Freedom's Journal: The

Nunez, Arturo Romero

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Role of Forecasting, Price Negotiation and Procurement Management in Determining Availability of Antiretroviral Medicines (ARVs) in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the Mexican pharmaceutical industry. The interviewsdevelopment of the [pharmaceutical industry], its employees,to the Mexican pharmaceutical industry. The time a patented

Adesina, Adebiyi Ola-Oluwa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mexican Hat Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Mexican Hat Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Housing Transition in Mexico: Local Impacts of National Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFE) and Mexican Petrol (PEMEX), the two largest state-SHF FOVISSSTE Banks INVI PEMEX C F E SOFOLES Other Number ofproperty. Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the Mexican national

Monkkonen, Paavo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Protection and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moved forward, environmentalists and Mexican stakeholders59 Stat. 1219. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).1992. Integrated Environmental Plan for the Mexican-U.S.

Sánchez-Rodríguez, Roberto; Mumme, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rogelio A. Hernndez-Lpez Leschziner Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Chemistry, Award by ANFEQUI (Mexican Association of Chemistry Schools), Chihuahua, Mexico. Jan-Jun 2008

Leschziner, Andres

184

The Housing Transition in Mexico: Local Impacts of National Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Commission (CFE) and Mexican Petrol (PEMEX), theElectricity Commission (CFE), the national energy company,

Monkkonen, Paavo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

www.growit.umd.edu Home and Garden Information Center 12005 Homewood Road Ellicott City, MD 21042 www.hgic.umd.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, habanero, piquin, tabasco; and 3. Southwestern/Mexican varieties, such as numex, poblano, pasilla, mulatto

Hill, Wendell T.

186

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F.O.B. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1983 Average .......... 24.54 - 23.99 - - 1984 Average .......... 24.70 - 25.35 - - 1985 Average .......... 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .......... 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .......... 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .......... 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .......... W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .......... 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .......... 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .......... W - 13.42 - - 1993 Average .......... W - 12.03 - - 1994 Average .......... W - 12.39 - - 1995 Average .......... 14.44 - 14.37 - - 1996 Average .......... 17.14 - 17.43 - - 1997 Average .......... 14.29 - 14.97 - -

187

Case studies of low socioeconomic Mexican American graduates in the Austin Independent School District: why they didn't drop out  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with each participant and with key informants such as parents and school personnel. Issues examined included participant perceptions of factors that kept them in school, the support systems they believed were important, and the challenges they encountered...

Duncan, Lucila Diaz

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bread and roses (2000) Maya is a quickwitted young woman who comes over the Mexican border without papers and makes her  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cavi con I ventilator? Do you think I'm kidding? = Pensi che stia scherzando? #12;You get any chance

Schenato, Luca

189

A Case Study of the College Experiences of a Mexican-American Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder: A Conversation between Mother and Son  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barbara J. Greybeck Gwendolyn Webb-Hasan Head of Department, Fredrick Nafukho December 2013 Major Subject: Educational Administration Copyright 2013 Alicia A. Carrillo ii ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to conduct an in...

Carrillo, Alicia A.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recommendations to make the affordable housing sector in Mexico more efficient in order to increase the welfare and quality of life of Mexicans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enrique Peña Nieto, Mexico's current president, voiced strong support for extending the social mission of INFONAVIT -- the largest mortgage lender in Mexico -- to embrace quality of life metrics. He also indicated a strong ...

Medina Flores, Alba

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Characterization of a Karst Coastal Ecosystem in the Mexican Caribbean: Assessing the Influence of Coastal Hydrodynamics and Submerged Groundwater Discharges on Seagrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrographic variability of this inherently vulnerable ecosystem and assess its influence on a key habitat, the seagrass. The chapters follow the three-branched nature of the study which tackled the connected ecosystem issues of coastal hydrology, physical...

Medina, Israel

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Does Culture Matter? Understanding Cultural Representation in the Writing of First to Third Generation Mexican American Students in a Transitional High School to College Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and university level. Statement of the Problem On March 10, 2009, President Obama spoke on educational policy in the U.S. (Martin, 2009). He indicated that he would continue endorsing the ?No Child Left Behind? program for the improvement of student... and university level. Statement of the Problem On March 10, 2009, President Obama spoke on educational policy in the U.S. (Martin, 2009). He indicated that he would continue endorsing the ?No Child Left Behind? program for the improvement of student...

Aguilar, Liz Ann Ba?ez

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

When to Intervene: Elementary School, Middle School or Both? Effects of keepin’ It REAL on Substance Use Trajectories of Mexican Heritage Youth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A second reason is developmental. Elementary school is a period of skill building...2006...), when students may be especially amenable to prevention messages and willing to practice the drug resistance skills pre...

Flavio F. Marsiglia; Stephen Kulis; Scott T. Yabiku; Tanya A. Nieri…

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Angolan Cabinda 1983-2010 Canadian Bow River 1996-2010 Canadian Light Sour Blend W 90.81 W W W W 2010-2013 Canadian Lloydminster 70.87 79.48 80.36 W 92.04 W 1983-2013 Ecuadorian Oriente 1983-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 1996-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 100.31 W W 97.05 101.32 W 2009-2013 Mexican Mayan 98.74 98.36 96.26 99.63 99.74 99.31 1983-2013 Mexican Olmeca 1996-2010 Nigerian Forcados Blend 1996-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe W W W 2009-2013 Venezuelan Furrial 1996-2008 Venezuelan Leona 1996-2010

195

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Angolan Cabinda 64.60 W 1978-2008 Canadian Bow River 52.38 81.82 1978-2008 Canadian Light Sour Blend 74.59 93.75 83.54 2010-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 48.54 79.33 50.11 64.41 78.41 77.01 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente W 74.74 1978-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 71.27 89.56 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 62.98 74.36 104.51 103.17 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 59.96 82.99 55.07 70.36 98.27 99.81 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.12 99.40 1978-2008 Nigerian Forcados Blend 93.72 110.57 1978-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe 65.60 82.66 115.82 115.85 2009-2012 Venezuelan Furrial - - 1978-2008 Venezuelan Leona W W 1978-2008 Venezuelan Merey

196

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Algerian Saharan Blend 65.95 81.78 115.82 114.02 2009-2012 Angolan Cabinda 69.17 W 1978-2008 Brazilian Marlim 58.94 76.63 107.13 114.32 2009-2012 Canadian Bow River 52.36 84.29 55.71 68.92 82.02 77.19 1978-2012 Canadian Light Sour Blend 59.12 76.56 96.52 87.82 2009-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 50.94 82.50 53.44 68.13 82.24 81.33 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Napo 48.74 72.97 97.91 101.53 2009-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente 64.57 87.25 56.97 75.48 101.74 105.50 1978-2012 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 72.93 95.46 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 64.38 77.96 106.67 106.93 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 60.93 84.29 56.03 70.87 98.81 100.29 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.77 101.14 1978-2008

197

Racializing the Migration Process: An Ethnographic Analysis of Undocumented Immigrants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,creates the racialization of the Mexican immigrant, specifically the undocumented immigrant—the "illegal alien." I argue that this unilateral interaction operates with a racial formation of the Mexican immigrant created by elite white (non-Hispanic) males. The anti...

Molina, Hilario 1972-

2011-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

How to Efficiently Process Uncertainty within a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, New Mexico, and the Mexican state of Chihuahua. In such situations, a cor­ rect response to the user

Ward, Karen

199

Towards Secure Cyberinfrastructure for Sharing Border Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico, and the Mexican state of Chihuahua. In such situations, a correct re­ sponse to the user's query

Ward, Karen

200

Towards Secure Cyberinfrastructure for Sharing Border Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the geological maps of Texas, New Mexico, and the Mexican state of Chihuahua. In such situations, a correct re

Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Riparian wetlands and visitor use management in Big Bend National Park, Texas'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Mexican States of Chihuahua and Coahuila. Big Bend National Park contains about 27,000 acres of wetland

202

A 16,000 14 C yr B.P. packrat midden series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intersect with each other and the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sonora. The Border- lands occupy the broad

203

Technical Report UTEP-CS-07-12 Three Prosodic Features that Cue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican Spanish speak- ers, all from the state of Chihuahua: five from Chihuahua City, two from Delicias

Ward, Nigel

204

How to Improve Inter-Disciplinary Collaboration and Education Paper: jc*-**-**-****  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the geological maps of Texas, New Mexico, and the Mexican state of Chihuahua. In such situations, a correct

Kreinovich, Vladik

205

How to Efficiently Process Uncertainty within a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, New Mexico, and the Mexican state of Chihuahua. In such situations, a cor- rect response to the user

Ward, Karen

206

Rogelio Rebolledo After receiving his MBA from Iowa in 1971, Rogelio Rebolledo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's President Vincente Fox as a distinguished member of the Board of Pemex, the Mexican Petroleum Company. He

Anstreicher, Kurt M.

207

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LULUCF NAFTA NGO NIE NRDC OECD PEMEX Bioclimate Research andFoundation, Mexican Petroleum (PEMEX), the World Bank, and

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Polish Agriculture in Transition: Does it Hurt to be Slapped by an Invisible Hand?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum company in Mexico, Pemex: high salaries and theThe Mexican attempt to reform Pemex may have interesting

Karp, Larry; STEFANOU, SPIRO

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobiana pronares informe Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Summary: FFM Mexican Forest Fund FIA International Automotive Federation GIS Geographical Information System... of Geography, Statistics and Information Systems...

210

Sacramento en El Movimiento : Chicano politics in the civil rights era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s resistance to the desegregation of Washington Elementaryresistance mounted by Mexican parents of school children at Washington Elementary,

Márquez, Lorena Valdivia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Poverty, solidarity, and opportunity: the 1938 San Antonio pecan shellers' strike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the U.S. Newly arrived Mexican workers faced discrimination in the workplace and in their personal lives. That discrimination resulted in low wages for Mexican workers. Low wages forced Mexicans in San Antonio to live in the city’s west side neighborhood...

Keyworth, Matthew Jerrid

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average .......... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 - 1979 Average .......... W 21.51 - 25.40 29.17 20.78 22.23 1980 Average .......... 37.73 34.68 W 37.89 34.61 33.42 29.49 1981 Average .......... 40.03 36.84 W 38.95 33.56 36.87 31.52 1982 Average .......... 33.71 33.08 W 34.95 32.97 33.11 25.86 1983 Average .......... 30.79 29.31 25.27 30.28 28.90 30.00 24.56 1984 Average .......... 28.59 28.63 25.35 29.51 28.79 29.46 25.84 1985 Average .......... 27.21 27.48 24.38 27.94 26.97 27.60 24.57 1986 Average .......... 14.54 14.27 13.52 13.71 14.39 14.28 11.24 1987 Average .......... 17.72 18.43 15.98 18.63 17.60 18.32 16.03 1988 Average .......... W 14.96 12.21 15.21 13.77 14.69 11.65 1989 Average .......... W 18.15 15.36 18.71 17.69 W

213

A Review Essay: The Sexuality of Migration: Border Crossings and Mexican Immigrant Men (2009) by Lionel Lionel Cantú Jr. and edited by Nancy A. Naples and Salvador Vidal-Ortiz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. and edited by Nancy A. Naples and Salvador Vidal-Ortiz. New York: New York University Press, 2009, 256 pages, $22.00 Paper. Ray Sin University of Kansas Foucault reveals that sexuality and sexual identities are signifi- cant axes of power but it is only...

Ray, Sin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican Perspective Jump to: navigation,...

215

mexicanhat.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of the Halgaito showed the presence of hydrogen sulfide gas and naturally occurring petroleum. The groundwater compliance strategy for the Mexican Hat site is no remediation....

216

Site Access  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Michigan, New York, Vermont, Washington, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec. Mexican citizens are required to present a passport with visa or a Border Crossing...

217

Women weaving the dream of the revolution in the American continent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a starting point for Indian populations identifyingfigures. ” “The Indian extends his arc or points histhesis” on Mexican Indian women. His point of departure drew

Angeleri, Sandra

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Giannini Foundation and the Welfare of California Agriculturists in a Changing State, Nation and World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican workers in the Imperial Valley struck for higherfields in Salinas and Imperial Valley and orange groves inparticularly the San Diego/Imperial Valley water transfer

Rausser, Gordon C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sexual racism and the limits of justice : a case study of intimacy and violence in the Imperial Valley, 1910-1925.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes early twentieth newspaper coverage following six murder and assault trials involving Punjabis, Mexicans and Black migrants in the Imperial Valley. Because this… (more)

Ruiz, Stevie R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - astyanax fasciatus characiformes Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The postembryonic growth of an organism differs from the Summary: be by describing two fish species with very different adult patterns, Astyanax fasciatus (Mexican blind...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherinopsid freshwater fishes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Plateau, where the Laja River is located, hosts around 100 native freshwater fish... webs. Reservoirs and non-native fishes have altered food webs in Mexican freshwater...

222

An evaluation of Mexico's declining oil production and waning petroleum reserves .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??rather than invested in exploration projects, infrastructure modernization, or process efficiency improvement. Decades of severe financial constraints placed on Pemex by the Mexican government, coupled… (more)

Rangel, Erik.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - american monsoon region Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variations of the Global Monsoon Precipitation in the Last Millennium: Results from ECHO-G Model Summary: monsoon and the Mexican-North American monsoon regions. However, the...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - american summer monsoon Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variations of the Global Monsoon Precipitation in the Last Millennium: Results from ECHO-G Model Summary: monsoon and the Mexican-North American monsoon regions. However, the...

225

Passive Air Sampling of Organochlorine Pesticides in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Passive Air Sampling of Organochlorine Pesticides in Mexico ... accumulated levels of this insecticide in blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk samples from Mexican women. ...

Fiona Wong; Henry A. Alegria; Terry F. Bidleman; Víctor Alvarado; Felipe Angeles; Alfredo Ávila Galarza; Erick R. Bandala; Idolina de la Cerda Hinojosa; Ignacio Galindo Estrada; Guillermo Galindo Reyes; Gerardo Gold-Bouchot; José Vinicio Macías Zamora; Joaquín Murguía-González; Elias Ramirez Espinoza

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Recent development of transparency and access to information at the federal level in Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transparency and access to information have become important elements of the Mexican political transition. The goal of this study is to contribute to the debate… (more)

Arteaga Cano, Issac Armando.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Essays in Regulatory Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

municipality by time and gas station fixed effects. Tablethe newspapers about Mexican gas stations that cheat theThe information about gas stations that commit fraud is

Guerrero, Santiago

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - af type 2-diabetes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans and in two northern-European populations, from Finland and Germany... -nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP-44, -43, -19, and ... Source: Cox,...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - apple cultivars bred Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHYTOPATHOLOGY Letter to the Editor Summary: 688 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Letter to the Editor Potato Cultivars from the Mexican National Program: Sources... Pea, A., Niederhauser, J....

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - ascochyta blight resistance Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the late blight pathogen appeared. Retrospective analysis... available well adapted potato varieties resistant to late blight to Mexican, Eastern European, and North... blight...

231

Most Viewed Documents for Fission and Nuclear Technologies: December...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten (2004) 21 Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.;...

232

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

233

Los Humeros III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contracts have already been signed with the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) for the installation of an additional 25 MW Single Flash power generation unit and...

234

LETHAL YELLOWING OF PALMS http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/Palms/lethal_yellow_facts.htm 1 of 9 2/8/2007 10:17 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the northeastern tip of the Yucatán Peninsula. Since then it has spread west to the Mexican state of Tabasco

Mazzotti, Frank

235

Abstract B54: Latina farmworkers: Relationships between Pap screening behaviors, acculturation, and cultural cancer screening scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...screening behavior and intent to undergo Pap tests among Mexican farmworker women in South...specified 1) Mexican immigrant, 2) no Pap test in over 2 years, 3) 20 women who lived...assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis rank test. When the test was statistically significant...

Lisa C. Watson; Yelena Tarasenko; Moya Alfonso; Claudia Reyes-Garcia; John S. Luque

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dairy Sci. Technol. 88 (2008) 525536 Available online at: c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2008 www.dairy-journal.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and rheological traits of Mexican Chihuahua cheese Diane L. Van Hekken1*, Mary Anne Drake2 , Michael H. Tunick1 Desarrollo, Cuauhtémoc, Chihuahua, 31570, Mexico Abstract ­ The seasonal changes in the flavors and textures (sensorial and rheological traits) of young Mexican Chihuahua cheese made with either raw or pasteurized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Reduction Kinetics of Cu-Based Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Air Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Only Sahir et al. performed a rate analysis from the reported batch fluidized bed CLOU experimental data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ... data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ...

Kun Wang; Qingbo Yu; Qin Qin

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

APPLICATION FOR SUMMER INTERNSHIPS IN MEXICO THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER 2014 INTERNSHIPS IS FEBRUARY 19, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internships with Pemex and with the Mexican Foreign Ministry (Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores de México.uh.edu/clinic/Guidelines-for-seeking-academic-credit.asp. Mexican Foreign Ministry (SRE) ­ Eligible for Academic Credit Pemex ­ NOT eligible for Academic Credit Fellowship Pemex ­ Eligible for Public Interest Fellowship #12;APPLICATION FOR SUMMER INTERNSHIPS IN MEXICO 2

Azevedo, Ricardo

239

The Clean Water Act at 40: The Successes and The Challenges Keynote Address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- poor and had no sanitation facilities. My father was ostracized by the contractor community for paying million to provide sanitation for the colonias, the settlements of poor Mexican immigrants and the highest to pick up Mexican workers--"wetbacks" as they were then known. Their settlements were dirt-poor and water

Wolfe, Patrick J.

240

Pemex sets petchem privatization plan  

SciTech Connect

Last week, Mexico's state-owned oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), was scheduled to unveil plans for the sale of basic petrochemical plants. The first privatization package - Pemex ammonia plants at Cosoleacaque and Camargo - will involve the sale of securities on the Mexican Stock Exchange, allowing a large number of Mexican investors to acquire parts of the business.

Alvarez, C.

1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Absorbing devaluation: Pemex penalized  

SciTech Connect

Shock from Mexico`s international finance debacle has created a ripple across the global pond, affecting trading markets from Buenos Aires to Hong Kong. Mexican consumers must cope with a currency that can purchase 40% fewer imported goods than it could seven weeks ago. The Mexican government has taken austerity measures controlling prices on staple consumer items designed to prevent rampant inflation. State oil company Petroleos Mexicanos is left exposed to some of the costs of the peso devaluation to supply Mexican gasoline markets with imported supply. However, Mexico`s flexible tax structure allows Pemex to divert the cost throughout its operations.

NONE

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft Word - HAT-2012_Final.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat, Utah Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Annual Inspection of the Mexican Hat, Utah, UMTRCA Title I Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 3, 2012. The disposal cell was in excellent condition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site lead and three inspectors from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) were part of the annual inspection. The cell condition was unchanged from the previous year. Minor fence repair was performed near the beginning of the north diversion channel. A slight rockslide near perimeter sign P22 loosened fence strands, and a radiation protection sign was missing from perimeter sign P31; these repairs are the only future

243

mexicanhat.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Location and History Regulatory Setting The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and about 10 miles north of the Utah-Arizona border. The site is also the location of a former uranium-ore-processing mill. Texas-Zinc Minerals Corporation constructed the Mexican Hat mill on land leased from the Navajo Nation and operated the facility from 1957 to 1963. Atlas Corporation purchased the mill in 1963 and operated it until it closed in 1965. A sulfuric acid

244

Microsoft Word - HAT 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat, Utah Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 29, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in excellent condition and functioning as designed. Runoff from storm events continues to transport sediment into the west diversion channel, resulting in low-density vegetation growth within the entire length of the channel; however, the performance of the diversion channel has not been impaired. Vandalism continues at the site as indicated by new bullets holes in several perimeter signs. The seismic monitoring station installed on site in 2007 as part of the EarthScope USArray Project continues to collect data.

245

mexhat.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat Disposal Site Mexican Hat Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Mexican Hat, Utah, between 1957 and 1963. These operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1989. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the Mexican Hat Disposal Cell under general license in 1997. DOE is responsible, under the general license, for the long-term custody, monitoring, and maintenance of the site. The DOE Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Program at the DOE Grand Junction (Colorado) Office is responsible for the long- term safety and integrity of the disposal site. Because the site is on Navajo Nation land, the Navajo Nation

246

Manifest domesticity in times of love and war : gender, race, nation, and empire in the works of Louisa May Alcott, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Gertrude Atherton, and Pauline Hopkins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

backgrounds have played Indian, she points out that “personsat present, she also points out that “the Indian is steadilyAtherton’s point of view, Mexicans and Indians belong to the

Hsu, Shih-szu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - algirdas smilgevicius zita Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75 Geochemical Evidence for Slab Melting in theTrans-MexicanVolcanic Belt Summary: DECEMBER 26, 2006 Geochemical studies of Plio-Quaternary volcanic rocks from theValle de...

248

Methodologies for Analyzing Impact of Urbanization on Irrigation Districts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The region of Texas along the Mexican border has been experiencing rapid urban growth. This has caused fragmentation of many irrigation districts who are struggling to address the resulting challenges. In this paper, we analyze the growth of urban...

Bonaiti, G.; Fipps, G.

249

Marine Fisheries On the cover: A corral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Fish Muscle Changes, Aluminum in Fish, and Ludwig Named 21 The Tuna Fisheries of South Africa, Angola, and Ghana; Finland's Fish Trade; World Fish Meal and Oil Production; Mexican Fish Meal; Rafts

250

Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources...

M. A. Armienta; N. Segovia

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980s, when oil prices collapsed and Mexico found itself inwere sourced from oil, and about a third of [Mexico’s] staterole of oil in the Mexican economy has made Mexico the

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Survey on ionic liquids effect based on metal anions over the thermal stability of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A survey on the effect of ionic liquids (ILs) over the thermal stability of a heavy Mexican oil was performed. ILs used were based on [Cnim]+ and [Cnpyr]+ organic cations with FeCl 4 ...

J. A. Murillo-Hernández; S. López-Ramírez…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Immunologic, genetic and social human risk factors associated to histoplasmosis: Studies in the State of Guerrero, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Immunologic and occupational aspects of the susceptible population exposed to Histoplasma capsulatum, the causative agent of histoplasmosis were analyzed in the Mexican State of Guerrero. Three areas were stud...

Maria Lucia Taylor; Amelia Pérez-Mejía; Jesús K. Yamamoto-Furusho…

254

Titre de l'article : DYNAMIQUES ET ENJEUX DE L'AGRICULTURE EN MILIEU LACUSTRE : Comparaison du lac Inl (Birmanie) et des chinampas de Mexico (Mexique)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mexican chinampas and the Inle lake have developed similar techniques of agriculture in shallow lakes systems, which may, ultimately, disappear. Key-words: Chinampas, Xochimilco, Inle lake, agriculture

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Sacramento en El Movimiento : Chicano politics in the civil rights era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their concerns, the parents lost recording. Senón M.SCUSD lost the respect and trust of many of the parents inlost the battle to keep Washington Elementary School segregated, Mexican parents

Márquez, Lorena Valdivia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mexico clings to petrochemical assets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mexico clings to petrochemical assets ... Responding to political and public pressure, the Mexican government abandoned its already delayed plans to sell a majority stake in government-owned petrochemical assets to domestic and foreign investors. ...

GEORGE PEAFF

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

A new species of Dalea series Compactae (Leguminosae: Amorpheae) from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dalea janosensis,...a new species from the northwestern periphery of the Mexican state of Chihuahua, is described and illustrated. It belongs...Dalea subgenus Dalea section Kuhnistera series Comp...

A. Eduardo Estrada-C.; José A. Villarreal-Q.; Humberto Vega-M.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

VolumeI:QuickStart for Grassland,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Estacion Experimental La Campana in Chihuahua, Mexico, in particular, have provided ongoing support y Pecuarias (México) Land EKG Inc. (Montana) Mexican Protected Natural Areas (Chihuahua and Sonora

259

Assessment of DDT and DDE Levels in Soil, Dust, and Blood Samples From Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess levels of DDT and DDE in two environmental matrices (soil and dust) and to investigate the blood levels of these insecticides in exposed children living in a north Mexican stat...

Fernando Díaz-Barriga Martínez…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Designing adaptable housing : the specific case of INFONAVIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional way of designing housing of the Mexican government agencies, obliges the population they serve (mostly working class people), to live in rigid dwellings that have little or no flexibility to be adapted to ...

Martin, Andrea M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Anthropology of Intangible Cultural Heritage and Migration: An Uncharted Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of literature on migration and culture in the Americas (Arizpe et al. 2007) showed that research into the migration of Mexicans to the United States addresses topics as diverse as gender relations (Betti...

Cristina Amescua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wake II model for hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines for the wave plus current case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kostas Lambrakos, for their time and advice relating the Wake II model, necessary for the success in completing this research. I am grateful to the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Institute of Petroleum) for its support during all my graduate...

Ramirez Sabag, Said

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - ad libitum lunch Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

167 Marshall Street 472-4876 GreekAmerican Lunch... Dinner Alto Cinco 526 Westcott Street 422-6399 MexicanVegan LunchDinner appeThaizing 727 S. Crouse Avenue......

264

Tyndall Briefing Note No. 12 November 2004 Tyndall Briefing Note No. 12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Mexican Government) Email and telephone contact for correspondence: e.boyd@uea.ac.uk; +44-1603 for A&R project activities under the CDM was scheduled for COP-9. The following section reviews

Watson, Andrew

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol dependence increases Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Alcohol dependence in Native and Mexican Americans in San... ;12 month prevalence of DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence by race-ethnicity from the National Longitudinal......

266

Essays in Regulatory Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of regular and premium gasoline of gas station i at month t,the Mexican gasoline market, all gas stations are franchisesdecreases in gasoline demand in gas stations exposed in the

Guerrero, Santiago

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Photovoltaic-Powered Water Desalination Plant ’SORO’ — Design, Start Up, Operating Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the framework of a Mexican-German agreement for scientific and technical cooperation a photovoltaic powered water desalination plant is operated jointly as a “remote...2...has been designed and fabricated by A...

G. Neuhäusser; J. Mohn; G. Petersen

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National Laboratories has been quietly drawing in some of the...

269

www.hfs.washington.edu/UWStreetFood/ & Resident Dining Account  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................... $ 1.75 Shinka Tea Chocolate Pudding ...................... $ 2.50 COLD DRINKS Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Sprite, ...............$ 1.05 Lemonade, Grape Fanta, Orange Fanta, Water Mexican Coke or Orange

Washington at Seattle, University of

270

Chapter 5Chapter 5 Challenge Theme 3.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Borderlands. Lack of water treatment and wastewater infrastructure on both sides of the United States­ Mexican the Environment and Safeguarding Human Health 95 Lack of Infrastructure In Texas alone, more than 1,800 rural

Fleskes, Joe

271

Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers in Trilateral Meeting Focused on Energy Cooperation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON—On December 15, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host a trilateral meeting with Natural Resources Canada Minister Greg Rickford and Mexican Secretary of Energy Pedro Joaquin Coldwell.

272

Representations of the radiated energy in earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Freund L.B. 1981. On energy radiation from seismic...Ordaz M. 1994. Seismic energy release in Mexican subduction...Theory McGraw-Hill, New York. Vassiliou M.S. , Kanamori H. 1982. The energy release in earthquakes......

Luis Rivera; Hiroo Kanamori

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Private vs. public ownership of power generation in Mexico : should environmental policymakers care?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress has not yet approved regulatory reform in the Mexican energy sector. In fact, the debate is deadlocked, with many political actors disagreeing on even the most basic principles that ought to guide future investments ...

Flores Montalvo, Andres, 1967-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

It's My (National) Stage Too: Sabina Berman and Jesusa Rodríguez as Public Intellectuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

company, PEMEX, centers on increased privatization that would generate massive demonstrations, and perhaps interruptions in transportation. While opinions on the parallel government are divided, even on the left, it is clear that the Mexican authorities...

Day, Stuart A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

United States Navy Basic Plan Green-One: an analysis of the U.S. Navy's strategic war plan against Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry and the possibility of the industry being nationalized by the Mexican government. The Cardenas administration, after scrutinizing the oil industry, created a national petroleum firm (PEMEX) in 1934 . (40) Furthermore, Cardenas encouraged...

Schmidt, Steven Jon

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The North American Free Trade Agreement: A Legal Analysis of Effects and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploration As a service to PEMEX, the Mexican government'sU.S. $250,000 offered by PEMEX; that figure will rise to 70will be required to use PEMEX union workers. Cross-Border

Steinberg, Richard

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A quantitative analysis of the effects of tariff and non-tariff barriers on U.S. - Mexico poultry trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the inception of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994, tariff restriction to U.S. poultry products entering the Mexican market has decreased significantly. While poultry trade from the U.S. to Mexico has increased...

Magana Lemus, David

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Revision of the Genus Cardiochiles s.l. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Cardiochilinae) for Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are recorded for first time from Mexico. The species Toxoneuron bicolor Szdpligeti and Psilommiscus levis (Mao) new combination, are re-described. Phylogenetic relationships of the Mexican Cardiochilinae are analyzed showing that at least five genera...

Mercado Uribe, Imelda

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Abstract A57: Water consumption and urinary arsenic concentrations among U.S. Hispanic, U.S. non-Hispanic, and Sonora, Mexico residents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...volumes among U.S. Hispanic and non-Hispanics, and Mexicans. Modeling...Methods: Over 350 households (152 in Arizona...collected from all household water sources, including...groups. Among U.S. Hispanics, median 24-hour...

Robin Harris; Jason Roberge; Mercedes Meza; and Luis Gutierrez-Millan

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Small area estimation when auxiliary information is measured with error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ethnicity, namely Mexican American, Other Hispanic, White non-Hispanic, Black non-Hispanic and Other, by age group, namely 2029...which samples approximately three million households each year, provides high-quality up-to-date......

Lynn M. R. Ybarra; Sharon L. Lohr

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International migration within Latin America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International migration within Latin America ·Mostly labor circulation flows ·Industrial and urban;Example of International migration: Mexicans to US ·1920s revolution and post- revolution chaos in Mexico

Lopez-Carr, David

282

Enforcing boundaries : globalization, state power and the geography of cross- border consumption in Tijuana, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE, Federal Electricitydid the billing in dollars, CFE charged in Mexican pesos,distribution is owned and ran by CFE, just like in the rest

Murià Tuñón, Magalí

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

VETPAR-3893; No of Pages 12 Spatial distribution of acaricide profiles (Boophilus microplus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican cattle ranches (located in the states of Yucata´n, Quintana Roo, and Tabasco). Three questions to OP/SP, and Tabasco ticks tended to be resistant to Am (all with P 0.05), acaricide profiles appeared

Chowell, Gerardo

284

Mexico Trade Scholars in the U. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mexico Trade Scholars in the U. S. ... THE industrialization of Mexico, which President Manuel Avila Comacho has underscored as his No. 2 objective—his No. 1 objective is to help win the war—is promoted by sending many promising young Mexicans to the United States to receive technical training as part of the Inter-American Trade Scholarship program. ... Already scholarship awards for factory and technical training have been made to 22 young Mexicans. ...

1943-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

An analysis of the economic incentives for increased trade in milk and milk products between the United States and Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resulting from Alternative Pooling Strategies: August 1994 Mexican Packaged Imports . 144 xvrr LIST OF TABLES (CONTINUED) TABLE Page 43 Prices Resulting from Alternative Pooling Strategies: August 1994 U. S. Packaged Sales. . 145 44 Prices Resulting... Bulk Shipments. 146 47 Prices Resulting from Alternative Pooling Strategies: December 1994 Mexican Packaged Imports. . 147 48 Prices Resulting from Alternative Pooling Strategies: December 1994 U. S. Packaged Sales. . 147 49 Prices Resulting from...

Ernstes, David P

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Stratigraphic investigations of selected sediments, southwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(F) gure 4). Adjacent to the area studied in this paper. and to the west and south lie the Mexican states of Veracruz, Tabasco, Cempeche and Yuc: L n, These states include the latter thr . e provinces of the Mexican gulf coast, namely Veracruz... relatively large portion of the region (53 percent) is classed as level topography, (James 1950). Veracruz, Tabasco, and most of the Campeche lowlands are classed as tropical forests with the northeast coast of Yucatan being scrub forest. The tropical...

Morton, William Thomas

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mayan People Within and Beyond Boundaries: Social Categories and Lived Identity in Yucatán  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of understanding Maya self-identification.” p.xxii Hervik admits postmodernism in his “decoding the ethnographers’ use of literary devices to establish authority and legitimizing subjectivity” but goes beyond this by paying attention to methodology.... “I was less interested in direct quotes, instead aspiring to embody and experience the prototype definitions of words and categories, while fully aware that such definitions could never be fully achieved but the process of tyring to reach...

Metz, Brent

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted response rate was 76%. Among men, 21% of Mexican Americans, 19.9% of South/Central Americans, 11.6% of Puerto Ricans and 6.9% of Cuban Americans reported DUI. Rates were lower among women, ranging from 9.7% for Mexican Americans to 1.3% for Cuban Americans. Mexican American men had the highest 12-month arrest rate (1.6%) and the highest lifetime arrest rate (11.2%). Drinkers who reported DUI were heavier drinkers than those not reporting DUI according to a variety of indicators. However, most DUI incidents involved non-alcohol-dependent drivers. Mexican Americans and South Central/Americans, men, younger drivers, those with less than high school education, those with higher income and higher alcohol consumption were more likely to report DUI and DUI arrests. These findings show that Hispanic national groups in the U.S. are diverse regarding drinking and DUI-related experiences.

Raul Caetano; Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler; Lori A. Rodriguez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

290

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- MexHat  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Utah Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet

291

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

292

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 SHARE Media Contact: Fred Strohl Communications 865.574.4165 Boatner elected to Mexican Academy of Sciences OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 11, 1997 - Dr. Lynn A. Boatner of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently was elected as a Corresponding Member of the Academia Mexicana de Ciencias (Mexican Academy of Sciences). As a corresponding member of the Academy, Boatner, a section head in the Solid State Division, will collaborate with Mexican scientists for the further development of science in Mexico. The academy, established in 1959, is a not-for-profit non-government association, with membership including distinguished members of the scientific community. One of the main objectives is to promote science research in Mexico, as well as to support communication and interaction

293

Fumonisin Content in Masa and Tortillas from Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the prevalence of NTDs in Mexico and California noted that there was a gradient of risk, with the highest rate in Mexico (32.6 NTDs per 10000 live births), the lowest among U.S. Caucasians and second-generation Mexican Americans (5.8 and 6.8 NTDs per 10000 live births, respectively), and an intermediate rate among populations of Mexico-born Mexicans in the United States (16.0 NTDs per 10000 live births). ... We thank Dr. Patricia Tamaz-Guerra, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, for the Mexican maize-based samples, Ivonne Garcia-Hernandez for expert technical assistance, Adrienne Kelly-Webb and Paula Sit for calcium determinations, and Billy D. Deadman for statistical analyses. ...

Mary A. Dombrink-Kurtzman; Timothy J. Dvorak

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

Tuberculosis on the move: the impact of immigration on TB rates in the counties of the Southwestern United States, 1987-1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'/0), Guanajuato (8. 5'/0), Mexico (6. 1'/0), Zacatecas (5. 1/0), and Durango (4. 5'/0) (Instituto Nacional de Estadisticas, Geografia, y Informatics, 1998). The TB rates for all of these states save Zacatecas and Durango are below the Mexican national rate...'/0), Guanajuato (8. 5'/0), Mexico (6. 1'/0), Zacatecas (5. 1/0), and Durango (4. 5'/0) (Instituto Nacional de Estadisticas, Geografia, y Informatics, 1998). The TB rates for all of these states save Zacatecas and Durango are below the Mexican national rate...

Dorrell, David William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Management of Aflatoxin Contaminated Maize in Tamaulipas, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of Aflatoxin Contaminated Maize in Tamaulipas, Mexico ... Maize is the staple food of the Mexicans, and Tamaulipas is an important producer and suffered a strong AF contamination in this cereal for several years, 440?000 tons just in 1991, both at field and at storage places. ... The Mexican Government has spent around 2 million U.S. dollars yearly to develop the Aflatoxin in Maize Detection Program of the State of Tamaulipas, where all the maize crop of this State was analyzed, around 20?000 AF chemical analysis every year (Juan et al., 1995). ...

Magda Carvajal; Gustavo Arroyo

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

Rate Analysis of Chemical-Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) for Solid Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study is concerned with the rate analysis from reported batch fluidized bed CLOU experimental data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ... Analysis of the CLOU Experiments for Combustion of Mexican Petcoke(4, 5) ... A 45–60 fold increase in reaction rate has been reported of the carbon residue in petcoke when reacted with a CuO based oxygen carrier in CLOU experiments, compared to the CLC process with an iron based oxygen carrier in the temperature range 950–985 °C. ...

Asad H. Sahir; Hong Yong Sohn; Henrik Leion; JoAnn S. Lighty

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

A new methodology for analyzing and predicting U.S. liquefied natural gas imports using neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Mexico we that that natural gas imports have remained fairly flat and in the future Mexico is predicted to become a net importer of natural gas from the U.S. This trend is due to the fact that the national oil company of Mexico, PEMEX, had about 60... percent of its revenue going to the Mexican government in 2003 5 . This trend is expected to continue into the future. With sixty percent of its $56.3 billion revenue going to the Mexican government, PEMEX is unable to meet its country?s demand...

Bolen, Matthew Scott

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 33773387, 2005 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/5/3377/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PPAHs) from motor vehicles in Mexico City. The emissions of other pollutants including carbon monoxide emissions. 1 Introduction Mexico City has become known for its air pollution prob- lem as a result in transportation activity and related pollutant emissions. In the 1990s, the Mexican government implemented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Strongly interacting dynamics beyond the standard model on a space–time lattice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fundamental scalars in nature, and in other systems where the Higgs mechanism is at work (e.g. superconductors) the Higgs boson is never a fundamental particle; (ii) the Mexican hat-shaped potential is put in the Lagrangian by hand; and...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Abstract A53: Causes and barriers associated with the Pap test among Latina farmworkers in Georgia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Causes and barriers associated with the Pap test among Latina farmworkers in Georgia John...and barriers related to use of the Pap test among Mexican farmworker women in South...10 years) who had not received a Pap test in over 2 years. In a previous study using...

John S. Luque; Jonathan Maupin; Yelena Tarasenko; Moya Alfonso; Lisa Watson; Claudia Reyes-Garcia

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Personal computers as a project management tool  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with project management experience related to application of business level personal computers to two design and construction projects. Projects include brine support facilities for two 50 MW geothermal power plants in the Imperial Valley of California adjacent to the Mexican border. The installed value of the facilities involved is approximately $40 million.

Levers, W.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

1 2 April 2002science scope M U L T I C U L T U R A L  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in our classrooms. An important part of our efforts has been directed at identifying elements of the pre. History tends to define primitive as those societies which were pre- numerate. However, many societies the Babylonians, Egyptians, Chinese, Greeks, Romans, and Mexicans developed their own measurement systems based

Talanquer, Vicente A.

303

Journal of Mammalogy, 93(4):11781194, 2012 Out of the tropics: a phylogeographic history of the long-tailed weasel,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

belt, and 1 clade in South America. Unlike other Mustela in North America, long-tailed weasels appear in North America, 2 distinct lineages in Mexico and Central America separated by the trans-Mexican volcanic to have originated in the tropical areas of Mexico and Central America prior to dispersing 1st

304

The Diet of Texas School Children.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tortillas 1 serving 1 serving 1 cup 4 1 serving 1 cup 4 I Nothing Peas Coffee Tortillas Egm. Tort~llas Milk 2 3 1 cup Orange Candy Figs 1 4 2 Tal )le 7. Diet record of 14-year-old of this i sponding kfast Mexican b 'a11 record...

Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Vitamin D and Cancer Risk among American Indians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...higher for men in New Mexico, liver cancer, is not...in both Alaska and New Mexico probably derive much of their vitamin D from solar UVB irradiance, with...New Mexican Indians, solar UVB doses are two to...white Americans in New Mexico are among the lowest...

William B. Grant

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Solar signals in the minimum extreme temperature records in the southern region of the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Minimum extreme temperature series from several meteorological stations of the Gulf of Mexico are spectrally analyzed using the Maximum Entropy Method. We obtained significant periodicities similar to those found in meteorological and solar activity phenomena. This indicates that probably the solar activity signals are present in the minimum extreme temperature records of this Mexican region.

D. Maravilla; B. Mendoza; E. Jáuregui

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

TGS plans return to Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TGS plans return to Mexico ... Hardly a day goes by without a new development relating to mining sulfur in Mexico (C&EN, Oct. 24, page 28), with the latest move being Texas Gulf Sulphurs plans to form a company with the Mexican government to explore for sulfur in that country. ...

1966-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 4, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silvestre Terrazas, born in Chihuahua in 1873, was a member of an old and dis- tinguished Mexican family- phere of strong conservatism. He began his career as secretary to the Bishop of Chihuahua in 1894; two Chihuahuaense. In 1899 he started El Correo de Chihuahua with, in his own words, "con- stancia y una fe grande

California at Berkeley, University of

309

The USAID/DOE Mexico Renewable Energy Program: Using technology to build new markets  

SciTech Connect

Under the Mexico Renewable Energy Program, managed by Sandia National Laboratories, sustainable markets for renewable energy technologies are developed through the implementation of pilot projects. Sandia provides technical assistance to several Mexican rural development organizations so they can gain the technical and institutional capability to appropriately utilize renewables within their ongoing programs. Activities in the area of water pumping have shown great replication potential, where the tremendous rural demand for water represents a potential renewable market of over {dollar_sign}2 billion. Thirty-six photovoltaic water pumping projects have been installed thus far in the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Sonora, Baja California Sur, and Quintana Roo, and 60 more will be implemented this year. The majority of these projects are in partnership with the Mexican Trust for Shared Risk (FIRCO), which has asked Sandia for assistance in extending the program nationwide. This replication is beginning in five new states, and will continue to grow. Sandia is keeping the U.S. renewable energy industry involved in the program through facilitating partnerships between U.S. and Mexican vendors, and through commercialization assistance with new systems technologies. The program is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the U.S. Agency for International Development. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Hanley, C.J. [Renewable Energy Office, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0704 (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low level jet development during a numerically simulated return flow event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the southern Plains of the United States, a second near the Mexican Plateau southwest of Brownsville, Texas, and a third over the western Gulf of Mexico. The evolution of the lower troposphere over the southern Plains is much like the conceptual model for a...

Igau, Richard Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Use of Low-Volatile Solid Fuels in a 100 kW Chemical-Looping Combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Swedish wood char and Mexican petcoke, both having low volatile content, were used as fuel. ... The carbon capture efficiency was high with wood char, but not as high with petcoke. ... Using petcoke as fuel, high gas conversion was achieved even when employing very high fuel power, 148 kW. ...

Carl Linderholm; Matthias Schmitz; Pavleta Knutsson; Malin Källén; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Influence of Limestone Addition in a 10 kWth Chemical-Looping Combustion Unit Operated with Petcoke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Influence of Limestone Addition in a 10 kWth Chemical-Looping Combustion Unit Operated with Petcoke ... The fuel fed was a petcoke, and the gasifying agent was steam. ... (14) To date, continuous testing with ilmenite as an oxygen carrier has been performed with a Mexican petcoke,(15, 16) South African coal,(17) and Colombian bituminous coal. ...

Ana Cuadrat; Carl Linderholm; Alberto Abad; Anders Lyngfelt; Juan Adánez

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

NOAA/NMFS Developments Tracked By Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Department of Energy to install a solar power heating and water heating system. The Grant is one of four River, westward, offshore from Louisiana into Texas, and southward to an area in the Gulf of Mexico where it was originally tagged off a Mexican beach. 34 FOUR NMFS LABS GET SOLAR GRANTS The Northeast

314

The USAID/DOE Mexico Renewable Energy Program: Using technology to build new markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under the Mexico Renewable Energy Program managed by Sandia National Laboratories sustainable markets for renewable energy technologies are developed through the implementation of pilot projects. Sandia provides technical assistance to several Mexican rural development organizations so they can gain the technical and institutional capability to appropriately utilize renewables within their ongoing programs. Activities in the area of water pumping have shown great replication potential where the tremendous rural demand for water represents a potential renewable market of over $2 billion. Thirty-six photovoltaic water pumping projects have been installed thus far in the Mexican states of Chihuahua Sonora Baja California Sur and Quintana Roo and 60 more will be implemented this year. The majority of these projects are in partnership with the Mexican Trust for Shared Risk (FIRCO) which has asked Sandia for assistance in extending the program nationwide. This replication is beginning in five new states and will continue to grow. Sandia is keeping the U.S. renewable energy industry involved in the program through facilitating partnerships between U.S. and Mexican vendors and through commercialization assistance with new systems technologies. The program is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Charles J. Hanley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Introduction Data Methodology Liquidity Hoarding in the Interbank Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Armantier & Copeland, 2012) · Or transactions from only a part of the market (eMid) · Secured lendingIntroduction Data Methodology Liquidity Hoarding in the Interbank Market: Evidence from Mexican Interbank Overnight Loan and Repo Transactions Marco J. van der Leij1 Seraf´in Mart´inez-Jaramillo2 Jos

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

316

Differences Between Lipopolysaccharide Compositions of Plant Pathogenic and Saprophytic Pseudomonas Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for elicitor activity on dark red kidney beans, a susceptible...tissue. When infiltrated into red Mexican leaves, the highest...Slusarenko, A. J., and R. K. S. Wood. 1981. Differential agglutination...of Phaseolius v'ulgaris cv. Red Mexi- can. Physiol. Plant...

A. J. Anderson

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

CHAMPAIGN-URBANA FOOD AND LIQUOR GUIDE 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(217) 352-7467. Excellent Mexican and Latin American- influenced food. Service can be a bit slowCHAMPAIGN-URBANA FOOD AND LIQUOR GUIDE 1. Introduction This is a short, incomplete, and personally. It is standard to tip 15-20% for reasonable service. A indicates a place that we like, and indicates a place we

Athreya, Jayadev

318

Potential Impacts of Mexico's Energy Reform on Texas' Transportation System 1 Testimony of Jolanda Prozzi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the monopoly of the oil company Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) and encourage foreign investment in Mexico's energy, the tax burden on Pemex, and Mexico's petroleum fund. The reform to the Mexican constitution releases the government's control over Pemex and attracts private investment in the energy industry. The government

319

Fish can encode order in their spatial map  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 October 2004 research-article Fish can encode order in their spatial map T...perceptual range. The blind Mexican cave fish, Astyanax fasciatus, depends on detecting...environment, it is not known how this fish links places (or the area over which the...

T. B. de Perera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Implications of new petrographic analysis for the Olmec “mother culture” model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Marcus, J. ( 2005 ) Excavations at San Jose Mogote 1: The Household Archaeology (Mus. Anthropol., Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor...F. V. ( 1967 ) Thoughts on the Meaning and Use of Pre-Hispanic Mexican Sellos (Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC). 34 Franco...

Kent V. Flannery; Andrew K. Balkansky; Gary M. Feinman; David C. Grove; Joyce Marcus; Elsa M. Redmond; Robert G. Reynolds; Robert J. Sharer; Charles S. Spencer; Jason Yaeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

News and Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...new institute. Dr. Wilder retired December 31 as head of the...The first industrial research unit in Latin America, the Mexican...and celestial mechanics. A retired Agriculture Department entomologist...Division, James Chamberlain. Crawford, died recently at 70. He...

1951-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

STUDENT HANDBOOK HANDBOOK INDEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEPE TAXCO STUDENT HANDBOOK HANDBOOK INDEX: Introduction I Personal Expectations A) Climate they encounter during their studies and travels. This is quite possible, but it does require an effort on the part of the foreigner. Most Mexicans are friendly and interact well with foreigners, but this does

Islas, León

323

La Voz Festival of the Americas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weenie Yellow Polka dot Bikini." The song is a list of quotations from FALL 1998 142 John about his travels to Mexico that include words about food that actually refer to erotic body parts in Mexican slang. At the conclusion of the song the video...

Milleret, Margo

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

New pipeline policy  

SciTech Connect

This article outlines regulations addressing the sale, transportation, storage, and distribution of natural gas in Mexico. The regulations were issued in November 1995 by the Comision Reguladora de Energia. The major policy decisions of the regulations are summarized. The current role of Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state owned oil and gas entity, which formerly monopolized the Mexican industry, is discussed.

Schaefgen, J.R. Jr.; Colucci, D.M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The physiology of mycorrhizal Lolium multiflorum in the phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and water systems (SEMARNAT, 2004). In Tabasco, Mexico which is one of the most important Mexican States for petroleum extraction and distribution, the extent of contaminated soil surface by oil spills is approximately 0.07% of the total area of the state...

Alarcon, Alejandro

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Mexico joins the venture: Joint Implementation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Joint Implementation (JI) and its pilot phase of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) are envisioned as an economic way of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper draws upon the Mexican experience with AIJ to identify Mexican concerns with AIJ/JI and proposed solutions to these. Three approved Mexican AIJ projects (Ilumex, Scolel Te, and Salicornia) are described in detail. The Ilurnex project promotes the use of compact fluorescent lamps in Mexican homes of the States of Jalisco and Nuevo Leon, to reduce electric demand. Scolel Te is a sustainable forest management project in Chiapas. Salicornia examines the potential for carbon sequestration with a Halophyte-based crop irrigated with saline waters in Sonora. These three projects are reviewed to clarify the issues and concerns that Mexico has with AIJ and JI and propose measures to deal with them. These initial Mexican AIJ projects show that there is a need for creation of standard project evaluation procedures, and criteria and institutions to oversee project design, selection, and implementation. Further JI development will be facilitated by national and international clarification of key issues such as additionality criteria, carbon-credit sharing, and valuation of non-GHG environmental and/or social benefits and impacts for AIJ projects. Mexico is concerned that JI funding could negatively impact official development assistance or that OECD countries will use JI to avoid taking significant GHG mitigation actions in their own countries. The lack of carbon credit trading in the AIJ stage must be removed to provide useful experience on how to share carbon credits. National or international guidelines are needed to ensure that a portion of the carbon credits is allocated to Mexico.

Imaz, M.; Gay, C.; Friedmann, R.; Goldberg, B.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Secretary Chu to Attend U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun Secretary Chu to Attend U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Sunday and Monday, December 5-6, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will attend the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun, Mexico. On Monday, Secretary Chu will participate in a conversation with Mexican Secretary of Energy Georgina Kessel about energy efficiency, the future of clean energy and our two countries' bilateral cooperation to address shared climate change challenges. The conversation will be moderated by U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Carlos Pascual and is part of the Green Solutions showcase hosted by the Mexican government. Later that day, Secretary Chu will speak at the U.S. Center to business leaders, government officials and

328

North America Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North American Energy Efficiency North American Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling North American Energy Working Group NORTH AMERICAN ENERGY WORKING GROUP The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and interconnections

329

MAC-GWHAT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWHAT GWHAT 1.1 Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0014-03-000 Document Number U0026800 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0026800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-1 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1 Ground Water Compliance Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

330

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose a simple graphic and statistical method for processing short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectivity spectra of alteration minerals, which classifies spectra according to their shape and absorption features, thus obtaining groups of spectra equivalent to mineral assemblages. It also permits selection of fewer samples for further mineralogical verification.

331

Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States - English Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDE TO FEDERAL GUIDE TO FEDERAL REGULATION OF SALES OF IMPORTED ELECTRICITY IN CANADA, MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group January 2005 1 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The NAEWG is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and

332

Microsoft Word - S03535_Oct2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan for the Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1530 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1530-2007 Revision 3 Office of Legacy Management Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat (UMTRCA Title I) Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

333

RegIntlElecTrade_Eng_final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North America North America Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group December 2002 2 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEW G) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and interconnections consistent with the goal of sustainable development, for the benefit of all.

334

ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Canonsburg, Pennsylvania,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, 2012 Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, 2012 Green River, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Green River, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site, 2012 Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site, 2012 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites February 2013 LMS/S09461 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed in this report,

335

Renewable energy market in Mexico: a research framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high potential growth for renewable energy technologies is available in Mexico. However, oil consumption has hindered the transition to a green economy. This paper analyses the Mexican stage and the factors influencing the renewable energy market using PESTL technique. A research framework for renewable energy in Mexico is proposed. Such framework involve the analysis of incentives to energy, the dissemination knowledge among market participants, the fostering of government-private-NGO partnering in projects deployment, the development of organisational capabilities, and the promotion of feasible technologies and uses. The comprehension of the Mexican stage will promote awareness of renewable energies need, which, in turn, allow the transition to a green economy. This paper concludes that only this transition will allow the country to achieve the economic, social and environmental benefits of such type of economy. The resulting framework from this study will offer new insights to corporate strategists and policy makers and help them increase the share of renewable energies.

Pável Reyes-Mercado; Rajagopal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supplement 23, Part 2, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Protozoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mansoni susceptible and resistant strains) (pericardium, mantle), in vitro killing of S. mansoni sporocysts by amoebae; whether amoebae contribute to snail resistance is un- known Acanthamoeba Willaert, E., 1974, Ann. Soc. Beige Med. Trop., v. 54 (4-5...-pathogenic Acanthamoeba cysts, transmission and scanning electron microscopy Acanthamoeba astronyxis Gullet, J.; et al., 1979, Am. J. Med., v. 67 (5), 891-896 Acanthamoeba astronyxis, Mexican woman, fatal case of disseminated granulomatous in- fection with skin...

Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Book Reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

poco apenas se reconocía a los dramaturgos que habían mantenido vivo el recuerdo de Tlatelolco. Por ejemplo, en un ensayo publicado en 1985, Dolly Young hace un recuento de las obras literarias que tratan el tema de Tlatelolco ("Mexican Literary... - and their generation - will always bear profound scars, but they have mended themselves, and they are acting for Mexico" {Biography of Power, 731). Los dramaturgos incluidos en esta antología responden en voz alta a la pregunta que planteó Rodolfo Usigli hace...

Editors

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Performance reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stage by Elizabeth C. Ramirez; A History of Hispanic Theatre in the United States: Origins to 1940 and Mexican American Theater: Legacy and Reality both by Nicolás Kanellos; The Dialogical Theatre: Dramatizations of the Conquest of Mexico... (La agonía de Manuela Sáez) de Gilda Salinas; Angeles de Ignacio Apolo; La fiesta de las suertes de Nicolás H. [sic]; Lupe-hombre de Medardo Treviño; Yo, el peor de los dragones de Benjamín Gavarre; Rosas azules de Joel López Arriaga; más una carta...

Editors

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

La recontextualización de Antígona en el teatro argentino y brasileño a partir de 1968  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primordial de esta categoría es que por medio de figuras de la mitología clásica los autores indagan y cuestionan la situación de su país. En estas obras las protagonistas viven en una realidad que corresponde a un momento histórico particular, ya sea en... retomado los mitos clásicos. Bert Edward Patrick investiga en su tesis doctoral, "Classical Mythology in Twentieth Century Mexican Theater," la influencia de la mitología clásica en obras de autores mexicanos de este siglo. Para Patrick, los dramaturgos...

Moreno, Iani del Rosario

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

It's not easy being green: stress and invalidation in identity formation of culturally-complex or mixed-race individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-skinned and Spanish, also was from indigenous Mexican heritage, much like the Peruvian mother. Their experience as ?culturally-complex? as defined in this context raises other historical issues of oppression and discrimination that might influence possible... are often deemed to be stuck between a rock and the hard place since they may be rejected and experience discrimination from both the dominant group and minority group in society (Shih & Sanchez, 2005). A Black/White individual may be labeled as Black...

Roberts Perez, Samaria Dalia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Accounting aspects of the Border Industrialization Program of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Essentially this program provides for the establishment of subsidiaries of U. S. firms in Mexico under special conditions. Some of the companies attracted to the border program are multi- nationals (companies having plants in two or more countries); how... subsidiary within 12. 5 miles of the international border. Immigration permits are available to U. S. technicians and management. U. S. organized labor has been opposed to U. S. industry's use oi' foreign labor. The Mexican program is more visible to them...

Gordon, Carol Ann Conklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cultural values represented by Hispanic and US superheroes: a text analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1972; Norton, 1990; Wilms, 1991). Therefore, appropriate materials are needed that are capable of rellecting and supporting minority students' values. Norton (1990) has stated that literature is recognized as a key tool for increasing cultural...). Res ct for Human Life Paz (1961) discussed Mexicans* indifference towards life and death. "Our songs, proverbs, fiestas and popular beliefs show very clearly that the reason death cannot frighten us is that 'life has cured us of fear...

Sanchez Castillo, Claudia del Carmen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Quantification of Carbon Savings from Improved Biomass Cookstove Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

England’s Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform indicates nuclear and wind energy in England would be 9 and 15 times more expensive than the Patsari’s ?US$8 per tCO2-e abated, respectively (24). ... Johnson, M.; Edwards, R.; Alatorre Frenk, C.; Masera, O. In-field greenhouse gas emissions from cookstoves in rural Mexican households Atmos. ... Berrueta, V. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Masera, O. R. Energy performance of wood-burning cookstoves in Michoacan, Mexico Renew. ...

Michael Johnson; Rufus Edwards; Adrián Ghilardi; Victor Berrueta; Dan Gillen; Claudio Alatorre Frenk; Omar Masera

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

The ejido: a survey of views  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were the main methods. The field work was carried out in Tamaulipas State, Mexico. Beginning in January, 1978, one and a half months were spent in visiting every official agency impinging on the ejido, conducting personal interviews with the general...: one considered the ejido to be the worst result of the Mexican Revolution, and the other considered the ejido necessary to ful- fill an important social function in rural Mexico. Thc governmental agency officials were found to be well aware...

Madero, Lydia

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Plant geography of coastal sand dune vegetation of the Tamaulipan Biotic Province  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with 140-160 cm mean annual rainfall and dark heavy mineral sand, 4) eastern Veracruz, Tabasco, and western Campeche, with 170-260 cm mean annual rainfall and tan quartz sand, 5) Laguna de Terminos, and the remaining three sectors for the Peninsula... in Veracruz or in Tabasco and Campeche, and 7) species common to the Caribbean and the Mexican Gulf Coast. Moreno-Casasola (1988) found these patterns of distribution mainly correlated with: first, variation in sand dune composition (light...

Baro de Jones, Deborah Maria

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Mexico's open door to cogeneration and independent power  

SciTech Connect

The Mexican Government recently reformed its laws governing the generation of electric energy. Notwithstanding its Constitutional monopoly on electric power service, the Mexican government authorized domestic and foreign firms to generate power for (1) private consumption, (2) for sale to the Commission Federal de Electricidad (CFE), and (3) for export. This restructuring of the generation of electric power in Mexico has far-reaching implications both for Mexican consumers and for firms desiring to tap the increasing demand for electric power in Mexico. To place this important legislative and political event in its proper historical context, Part 1 of this article provides a brief overview of the development of the electricity industry in Mexico over the past century. Part 2 of the article describes and analyzes the 1992 Amendment to the Law on the Public Service of Electric Power and its implementing regulations. Finally, Part 3 discusses the significance of the 1992 Amendment for American utility and independent power companies, especially in light of the passage by the US Congress of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

Mathis, J.P. (Hogan Hartson, Washington, DC (United States)); Escobedo, M.S. (Noriega y Escobedo, Mexico City (Mexico))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evolution of Irrigation Districts and Operating Institutions: Texas, Lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). From El Paso, the Rio Grande serves as the 1,200 mile boundary between the U.S. and the Republic of Mexico, with four Mexican States (i.e., Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas) having the river in common with the State of Texas... Location of the Rio Grande Basin. Source: U.S. Section, IBWC 2002. Legend Outline of Rio Grande Basin boundary Rio Grande River Tributaries 4 FIGURE 2. Detailed Map of the Rio Grande Basin. Source: Freese and Nichols. Legend...

Fernandez, Linda; Robinson, John R.C.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Ellis, John R.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Stubbs, Megan J.

348

Investigation of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Isotypes in an Ancestral Mucosal Immune Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enzymes including AID (the activation induced cytidine deaminase), and create nicks in the DNA. The two switch regions are brought together and the coding regions and DNA between the regions are deleted. For example, the B cell with a heavy chain VDJ...1 trout IgT 4 AAW66981.1 Fugu Takifugu rubripes H fugu IgH 2 BAD89297 Iberian ribbed newt Pleurodeles waltl M C1 newt IgM 4 CAE02685 X C1 newt IgX/P 4 CAL25718 Y C1 newt IgY 4 CAE02686 Mexican axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum M C1 axolotl Ig...

Du, Christina

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Response to Comment on “Environmental Implications on the Oxygenation of Gasoline with Ethanol in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motor vehicle population in the MAMC has a model-year distribution typical of developing countries:? Old cars (unequipped with any emissions control technology) make up a great portion of the total population. ... Recently, Mexico's economic stability and lower inflation rates have prompted motor vehicle dealers to lower their down payments and interest rates, thus making it feasible for low income people (e.g., those that own an old car) to buy a new one. ... We have reported recently that TWC performance in brand new vehicles deteriorates considerably after 60?000 km, either because of defective TWC materials or because of the high sulfur content of Mexican gasoline (8). ...

I. Schifter; M. Vera; L. Díaz; E. Guzmán; F. Ramos; E. López-Salinas

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

McPikus Interruptus Issue 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be our popular themes this year; ^ most of the stories visited them quite regularly ! For the Roger fans among you, he makes severalappearances. For the Sonny fans, we apologize in advance and protest inourown defence, "We can'twrite it a/A" Frank... like one of the martyrs. I don't know how long I was in that place. Nothing changed to give me a count of the days except I got weaker from hunger and a bad case of the Revenge. That made me think of Frank spending his whole Mexican vacation...

Multiple Contributors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Assessing the residential lighting efficiency opportunities in Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Lighting, primarily with incandescent bulbs, is the major end use of electricity in Mexican homes. The introduction of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) could significantly reduce electricity use in lighting. We describe a survey of lighting use in homes of Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico, that was conducted to provide information to determine the potential for CDLs. The results show that 1/6 of the incandescent bulbs can be replaced with CFLs if only those bulbs used more than 4 hours per day are targeted. We also provide insights on conducting similar surveys in other developing countries.

Friedmann,R.; DeBuen,O; Sathaye,J.; Gadgil,A.; Saucedo,R.; Rodriguez,G.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Emissions in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Subsecretaría de Ecología's Office was able to provide vehicle registration information for 10?654 vehicles. ... The groups consisted of all light-duty passenger vehicles, which included vans and sport utility vehicles; light-duty pickup trucks; Eco taxis (ecological taxis are taxis for hire that are required by the Mexican government to be post-1990 gasoline powered and are painted green and white to signify this); post 1990-VW sedans (including any Eco taxis, nicknamed Beetles in the United States); pre-1991 VW sedans (including any painted as if an Eco taxi); gasoline-powered micro-transit buses, diesel-powered transit buses, and trucks larger than pickup trucks. ...

Gary A. Bishop; Donald H. Stedman; Julián de la Garza Castro; Franciso J. Dávalos

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Population-Based Serologic Survey of Immunity to Tetanus in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NHANES III sample design: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans. Persons not included in one of these groups are included in estimates involving the total population. A participant's age was defined as his or her age at the time of the household interview. Educational level was... Vaccines are the most cost-effective public health intervention.1 Children2 and the elderly3,4 are at risk for insufficient immunization coverage. Much effort has been spent attempting to increase the coverage among children. All 50 states have adopted ...

Gergen P.J.; McQuillan G.M.; Kiely M.

1995-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Factors related to high school student behavior toward marijuana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 20 This school, chosen because it had a large number of Mexican- American students, was middle or lower-middle in socio-economic status. Slightly over 21 percent of the sample attended the predominantly Anglo school which was lower-middle... in the prescriptiveness of school norms. Whether or not a student, was classified as a marijuana "user" or abstainer" was determined by his response to the question, "Have you ever used marijuana?" Over 23 percent of the students answered "yes" to this question...

Fry, Patricia Ann Mumford

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, known as the Treaty of Tlatelolco, seeks to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) that will extend from the US-Mexican border to Antarctica`s territorial boundaries, including large areas of open ocean. Under the treaty, signatory states pledge not to test, use, produce, manufacture or acquire nuclear weapons; to use nuclear materials and facilities {open_quotes}exclusively for peaceful purposes;{close_quotes} and not to permit the stationing or development of nuclear weapons on their territories.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

NAFTA opportunities: Electrical equipment and power generation  

SciTech Connect

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides significant commercial opportunities in Mexico and Canada for the United States electric equipment and power generation industries, through increased goods and services exports to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and through new U.S. investment in electricity generation facilities in Mexico. Canada and Mexico are the United States' two largest export markets for electrical equipment with exports of $1.53 billion and $1.51 billion, respectively, in 1992. Canadian and Mexican markets represent approximately 47 percent of total U.S. exports of electric equipment. The report presents an economic analysis of the section.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Considerations for increasing unit 1 spent fuel pool capacity at the Laguna Verde station  

SciTech Connect

To increase the spent fuel storage capacity at the Laguna Verde Station in a safe and economical manner and assure a continuous operation of the first Mexican Nuclear Plant, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), the Nation's Utility, seeked alternatives considering the overall world situation, the safety and licensing aspects, as well as the economics and the extent of the nuclear program of Mexico. This paper describes the alternatives considered, their evaluation and how the decision taken by CFE in this field, provides the Laguna Verde Station with a maximum of 37 years storage capacity plus full core reserve.

Vera, A. (Comision Federal de Electricidad, Veracruz, Ver. (Mexico))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Barriers to clean development mechanism renewable energy projects in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mexico is not reaching its full potential to capture benefits from clean development mechanism (CDM) projects because of its limited market for independent power producers (IPPs) and the barriers imposed on these entities by the state-run electric utility that controls most of the country's generation and transmission. This state-run entity has pursued CDM revenues only in isolated cases where international financial assistance was given because it is bound by law to pursue the least-cost generation option for its customers. Recent changes in Mexican legislation that provide incentives for renewable energy development could open the marketplace for these types of projects.

Elizabeth Lokey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Renewable energy application progress in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows a general view of the renewable energy systems instaled in Mexico, since the early 70's up to the present date. Mention is made of the location, within the Mexican territory, of these systems, their power and the institutions that have participated in this program which are academic, federal government agencies, local government agencies as well as private companies. The installed systems are mainly: wind generators, flat and concentrator collectors, geothermal plants, biomass, solar ponds, photovoltaic systems and small hydrologic plants.

Y. Matsumoto; A. Urbano; A.M. Martinez; R. Asomoza

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Restructuring proposed for Mexico's Pemex  

SciTech Connect

Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari soon will send a legislative proposal to Congress that splits state owned Petroleos Mexicanos into four subsidiaries. This paper reports that Pemex functions will be divided into Pemex Exploration Production, Pemex Refining, Pemex Gas Basic Petrochemicals, and Pemex Secondary Chemicals. An earlier report the the company would be split into seven units. Each of the four new operating companies will be an independent business unit with a separate board of directors and its own staff and support functions.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Private sector cautious on Pemex reorganization  

SciTech Connect

Private sector interest in the privatization of the petrochemical subsidiaries of Mexico`s state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) will hinge on the government`s decisions on minority ownership, says Raul Millares, president of Aniq, the Mexican chemical industry association. The murkiest issues are how the subsidiaries will be operated and what rights minority owners will have. {open_quotes}The question is who is going to manage the subsidiaries on a day-to-day basis,{close_quotes} says Millares. {open_quotes}There is a lot of doubt as to whether private companies will be able to get the flexibility they need.{close_quotes}

Sissell, K.

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Vista and Pemex in LAB deal  

SciTech Connect

Vista Chemical (Houston) and Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex; Mexico City) have firmed up their long-negotiated plans for Pemex to supply feedstock for a linear alkylbenzene (LAB) plant that Vista will build in Mexico (CW, Sept. 16, 1992 p. 8). Specifically, the two companies have signed an agreement of understanding to pursue negotiations and finalize agreements. The plant would cost $250 million, produce 260 million-330 million lbs/year of LAB, and create about 200 permanent jobs. Final agreements, including a site selection, are expected to be completed by midyear. Vista expects startup in 1996, and is considering forming aj oint venture with a Mexican partner.

Morris, G.D.L.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

The preferred route for upgrading high metals residua: Hydrogen addition or carbon rejection?  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted for Petroleos Mexicanos {open_quotes}PEMEX,{close_quotes} which evaluated commercially proven technologies for conversion and upgrading of high metals Mexican residua. The study results are also applicable to other heavy, high metals residua, such as those from Venezuela. Specifically, the ebullated-bed H-Oil{reg_sign} Process (hydrogen addition), licensed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) and Texaco Development Corporation (TDC), was compared to Delayed Coking (carbon rejection). Both technologies have commercial installations in Mexico processing high metals residua. Commercial data on process yields, investment, and operating costs were used in the analysis to determine what factors govern the selection of one technology over the other.

Peer, E.D.; Wisdom, L.I. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation regarding alternative energy sources. A relatedin developing alternatives to oil as energy sources, it mayan energy crop and grow- ers’ most profitable alternative

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NEWSCRIPTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hurst group worked with food and beverage residues from spouted vessels (relatives of the teapot) found at the Mayan archeological site at Colha. ...

2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL’s Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. The 200 West Pump and Treat System design and construction teams utilized energy efficient and sustainable design elements, including recycled steal. This photo shows the system’s processing equipment. Approximately 539 tons, or 5 percent, of the steel used in construction was recycled.

368

Analysis of a solarimetric database for Mexico and comparison with the CSR model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis of the solar radiation database from the network of meteorological stations of the Mexican National Weather Service was carried out. The database includes global irradiance measurements from the oldest 136 stations distributed in the Mexican territory. The consistency of data acquisition from the launch of the stations until 2010 was checked, and visual inspection of graphs of daily irradiance data was carried out, for the first three years operation, to ensure quality and reliability of the data. The results indicate that less than half of the stations have an adequate regularity for data records. With a limited number of selected stations that passed the applied quality criteria, evaluation of hourly and daily global irradiations was carried out. These results were compared to satellite derived data for Mexico, based on NREL's CSR model. The results of the comparison show a good agreement between measured and modeled daily global solar irradiation with an average RMSE of 6.6%. Based on the selected stations, a daily irradiation mean of 5.5 kWh/m²/day is estimated for the country.

D. Riveros-Rosas; C.A. Arancibia-Bulnes; R. Bonifaz; M.A. Medina; R. Peón; M. Valdes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Contamination in marine turtle (Dermochelys coriaca) egg shells of Playon de Mexiquillo, Michoacan, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the decreasing population sizes of marine turtles around the world is growing. Potential contamination within habitats of marine turtles, and human activities, such as poaching, modification of nesting sites, and capture of adult turtles, may be responsible for their decreasing populations. Little is known about the baseline levels and physiological effects of environmental contaminants on marine turtle populations. Responding to this concern, the Mexican government has designated areas along the Mexican coastline to preserve marine turtle nesting habitats. {open_quotes}Playon de Mexiquillo{close_quotes}, Michocan, Mexico is one of the coastal preservation areas located near the mouth of Rio la Manzanilla which flows between Sierra Madre del Sur and the Pacific Ocean. Samples of seawater, sand, and marine turtle egg (Dermochelys Coriaca) shells were collected monthly from October, 1992-March, 1993. Contaminants investigated were oil and grease, and metals (cadmium, copper, zinc, nickel, and lead). Seawater samples were collected where the turtles lay eggs in the preservation area and sand samples were taken from the area surrounding the eggs. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Vazquez, G.F.; Reyes, M.C.; Fenandez, G. [Cd. Universitaria (Mexico)] [and others] [Cd. Universitaria (Mexico); and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Some considerations on the optimum size for geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

The main focus of this work is to show the maximum capacity that is possible from a geothermal turbine. The theorical analysis is made using the concept of the maximum length of the last wheel blades. The theoretical results are compared with the main manufacturers existing information on steam turbines for geothermal application. This work also shows some operational concepts and observations from the central plants installed in the Mexican geothermal fields. In Mexico, from approximately 1970 to present, 28 turbines for geothermal application have been acquired. These turbines have capacities ranging from 1.5 MW to 110 MW, with a total installed capacity of 753 MW. To expand the installed capacity, we would be required to improve the way turbines are selected for all new geothermal projects. Because of the diverse panorama of steam geothermal turbines that are offered at the present time, it is very important to know the maximum capacity that one could get for the established thermodynamic conditions of the steam in the Mexican fields, in order to exploit the resource in the most efficient, economical and functional manner.

Cadenas, C. [CFE Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia (Mexico)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Quantifying Pemex E and P benefits from foreign strategic associations  

SciTech Connect

The recent critique by the Heritage Foundation of the management of Mexico's petroleum sector deserves attention by oil industry observers of Mexico as well as government and academic analysts. The foundation argues that sweeping changes are needed-for Mexico's own good-in upstream and downstream policy. The following analysis presents one form of quantifying the upstream argument: the Mexican government stands to gain $5.7 billion/year in taxable revenue from state petroleum company Petroleos Mexicanos by 2000 from strategic associations with international petroleum companies. In addition, there are efficiency advantages that Pemex would gain by strategic associations with international petroleum companies. The ripple effects would include not only oil production and tax revenue increases from Pemex operations but also the advantages of new management skills, new sources of funding and technology, and lower operating and overhead costs in Pemex. It will not be possible, however, for the Mexican government to choose one or more strategic partners by quantitative methods alone. To the contrary, a significant measure of trust will be required.

Baker, G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Zonas costeras bajas en el Golfo de M\\'exico ante el incremento del nivel del mar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimate of the land area affected in the event of sea level rise of 0.6 m, 1 m and 2 m for Mexican sates with coasts along Gulf of Mexico. Likewise, the number of residents in vulnerable areas that would occur in the scenario of sea level rise of 1 m is estimated. To do so, terrain elevation data of NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is used, along with a proprietary algorithm that allows the reconstruction of the affected area. In order to estimate the land area digital image processing is used. These results are geo-referenced for comparison with human settlements in the regions of interest. Results show that the total affected area corresponds to 1.26% of Mexico national territorial extension and 3.18% of the Mexico total population. 174 settlements with 1000 inhabitants or more are expected to be affected. The Mexican state with the largest area affected is Tabasco with more than 21% of its territory, while the most vulnerable population will be Veracruz, with more than 1 mill...

Carbajal-Dominguez, Adrian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Oyster Industry of Eastern Mexico CLYDE L. MacKENZIE, Jr. and ARMANDO T. WAKIDA-KUSUNOKI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Tabasco, Mex. GULF OF MEXICO Laguna Pueblo Viejo Laguna Tamiahua Mexico City Laguna Term inos.-Mayan ruins at Comalcalco, Tabasco. Oyster shells were used in the cementing materials to bind temples and other structures. For example, the Mayan ruins at Comal calco in Tabasco are constructed

374

Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Third Quarter Report 1999  

SciTech Connect

The second quarter 1997 Quarterly Report of Natural Gas Imports and Exports featured a Quarterly Focus report on cross-border natural gas trade between the United States and Mexico. This Quarterly Focus article is a follow-up to the 1997 report. This report revisits and updates the status of some of the pipeline projects discussed in 1997, and examines a number of other planned cross-border pipeline facilities which were proposed subsequent to our 1997 report. A few of the existing and proposed pipelines are bidirectional and thus have the capability of serving either Mexico, or the United States, depending on market conditions and gas supply availability. These new projects, if completed, would greatly enhance the pipeline infrastructure on the U.S.-Mexico border and would increase gas pipeline throughput capacity for cross-border trade by more than 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. The Quarterly Focus is comprised of five sections. Section I includes the introduction as well as a brief historic overview of U.S./Mexican natural gas trade; a discussion of Mexico's energy regulatory structure; and a review of trade agreements and a 1992 legislative change which allows for her cross-border gas trade in North America. Section II looks at initiatives that have been taken by the Mexican Government since 1995to open its energy markets to greater competition and privatization. Section III reviews Mexican gas demand forecasts and looks at future opportunities for U.S. gas producers to supplement Mexico's indigenous supplies in order to meet the anticipated rapid growth in demand. Section IV examines the U.S.-Mexico natural gas trade in recent years. It also looks specifically at monthly import and export volumes and prices and identifies short-term trends in this trade. Finally, Section V reviews the existing and planned cross-border gas pipeline infrastructure. The section also specifically describes six planned pipelines intended to expand this pipeline network and their planned in-service dates.

none

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS Signed by Secretary Spencer Abraham January 2001-December 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS Joint Statement of ntent between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and The Ministry of Energy and Mines of the Republic ofPeru on Cooperation in the Field of Energy -Tab 1 Fifth Hemispheric Energy Ministers Meeting Mexico City, Mexico - March 9, 2001. Mexico Declaration - Energy: A Crucial Factor for Integration and Sustainable Development in the Hemisphere - Tab 2 Extension of the Agreement for Energy Cooperation between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and the Secretariat ofEnergy of the United Mexican States, and its Four Annexes - Tab3 Implementing Agreement between the Department ofEnergy of the United States ofAmerica and the

376

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 27430 of 31,917 results. 21 - 27430 of 31,917 results. Article Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today met with Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Gary Lunn and Mexican Secretary of Energy Fernando Canales Clariond to discuss... http://energy.gov/articles/secretary-bodman-hosts-energy-ministers-canada-and-mexico Article Energy Department Awards Half a Million Dollars to 12 Fellows Studying Nuclear Fuel Cycle WASHINGTON, DC - To help meet the growing demand for nuclear-educated scientists and engineers, and to build upon President Bush's American Competitiveness Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy... http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-awards-half-million-dollars-12-fellows-studying-nuclear-fuel-cycle

377

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-eared Owl Status Long-eared Owl Status Name: Joll Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is the long-eared owl endangered? I have mixed information. Replies: No, long-eared owls are not on the US endangered species list, either as endangered or threatened. The only owls on the list are both northern and Mexican spotted owls. The US list is on line at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html A species may be listed as endangered as a population within a state even if it is not on the US list. You could search for information for your state to see the status. If your location as noted below is California, long-eared owls are not endangered in California. J. Elliott Joll It's endangered. br> http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?q=326032

378

Secretary Chu to Join President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago Secretary Chu to Join President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel with President Obama to Mexico City, Mexico and Port of Spain, Trinidad this week to highlight the Administration's commitment to working with our partners in the region to address our shared energy, economic, security and climate challenges. On Thursday, April 16, Secretary Chu will accompany President Obama to Mexico City for bilateral talks with President Felipe Calderón and Mexican Energy Minister Georgina Kessel on the important partnership between the two countries on economic and security issues as well as on matters related to energy and climate change.

379

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

380

EM Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newsletters Newsletters EM Newsletters RSS August 27, 2013 James Shuler, manager of DOE's Packaging Certification Program, within EM's Office of Packaging and Transportation, discusses the radiofrequency identification technology he developed. At left is RFID Team Leader Yung Liu, with Argonne National Laboratory. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking Shipments WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's James Shuler felt honored being named a technology innovation award finalist for developing radiofrequency identification (RFID) technology to track and monitor radioactive material shipments. August 27, 2013 The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., June 3, 2009 - Cleanup of the nation's defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste has reached an important milestone. Today, the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico arrived safely at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the southeast corner of the state. "Shipping this waste to WIPP is important for our national cleanup mission, but this event is especially important for New Mexicans," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "It's great to see progress being made right here in our own state." WIPP's mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related

382

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 27, 2013 August 27, 2013 The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention RICHLAND, Wash. - A groundwater treatment system at the Hanford site is in the international spotlight and is being called a technological marvel. August 27, 2013 Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old chemical truck. Pictured, left to right, are Hanford Fire Lt. Robert Smith, Firefighter/Paramedic Kyle Harbert, Firefighter Don Blackburn and Capt. Sean Barajas. Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money

383

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The The Monument Valley Processing Site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site. These source materials and other site-related contamination were removed during surface remediation at the

384

Microsoft Word - Table 1 POEE-Trasporters Rev 8-27-12.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table 1 Table 1 Natural Gas Pipeline Points of Entry/Exit and Transporters U.S. Point of Entry/ Exit Corresponding Canadian/Mexican Point of Entry/Exit U.S. Transporter Foreign Transporter Alamo, Texas Reynosa, Tamaulipas Tennessee Gas Pipeline PEMEX Pipeline Babb, Montana Cardston, Alberta (Carway) EnCana Pipelines Ltd. Canadian-Montana Pipeline Company Baudette, Minnesota Rainy River, Ontario Centra Minnesota Pipelines Centra Transmission, Inc. Calais, Maine St. Stephen, New Brunswick Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline U.S. Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline Canada Brunswick Pipeline Calexico, California Mexicali, Baja California SoCalGas DGN Pipeline Champlain, New York Napierville, Quebec North Country Gas Pipeline TransCanada PipeLines, Ltd.

385

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San Diego’s Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison Just north of the U.S.-Mexican border, San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant processes up to 34 million gallons of water a day. Thanks to the city's ambitious solar energy program, the facility may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption. In early April, workers activated a 945-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) energy

386

HAWC Observatory captures first image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April » April » HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under

387

Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name REEEP-Mexico Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Geothermal, Transportation Topics Policies/deployment programs, Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.reeep.org/655/proje Country Mexico Central America References REEEP project database[1] REEEP has been working with Mexico to establish a Legal Framework for Renewable Energy in the State of Guanajuato, to develop low enthalpy geothermal projects for power generation and is working toward the creation of a cap and trade market for the Mexican auto industry. References ↑ "REEEP project database" Retrieved from

388

At LANL-sponsored networking forum, businesses make their pitch for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act work Recovery Act work At LANL-sponsored networking forum, businesses make their pitch for Recovery Act work One key goal of the Recovery Act is to provide jobs and opportunities for Northern New Mexicans. October 22, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa

389

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Monument Valley processing site is located on the The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore-processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site.

390

Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government August 24, 2011 - 11:55am Addthis Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government "Hispanics United in Strengthening America," this year's theme for the National Organization for Mexican American Rights, Inc. (NOMAR) Training Conference, speaks to recruiting, training, and engaging a diverse workforce to accomplish our country's goals. Bill Valdez, Acting Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, will be joining invited NOMAR conference participants at the Tropicana Las Vegas Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada to co-lead a general session on job outlook, Hispanic representation, and Federal employment. Elizabeth Montoya, Chief of Staff and Director of External Affairs at the

391

Restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick-find list Argonne | Continental | Mixed Menu | Burgers & Dogs | Pizza | Chicken | Seafood | Italian Mexican | Breakfast | Sandwiches | Asian | Other/Ethnic | BBQ | Brew Pubs | 24-Hour | Dinner/Movie updated 12/11/2013 Argonne Cafeteria (ANL access only) Bldg. 213 Argonne Guest House Bldg. 460 630-739-6000 401 Grill Bldg. 401 CONTINENTAL 2100 Blue (Renaissance Hotel) 2100 Spring Road, Oak Brook 630-573-2800 The Clubhouse Restaurant 298 Oak Brook Center, Oak Brook 630-472-9322 J. Alexander's 1410 W. 16th., Oak Brook 630-573-8180 The Flame 803 Joliet Rd., Countryside 708-352-3442 MIXED MENU Baker's Square 7409 Rt. 83, Hinsdale 630-986-9330 Baker's Square 2020 W. 75th St., Woodridge 630-241-0609 Bar Louie 619 E Boughton Rd #A, Bolingbrook 630-410-7100

392

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

393

Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Natural Gas Regulation » Frequently Asked Questions Services » Natural Gas Regulation » Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation Why do I need to have an authorization to import natural gas Do I have to get an authorization to export natural gas? Who is importing and exporting natural gas? What are the requested volumes of natural gas for import or export? What are the countries of origin for natural gas imported into the U.S. and destination of gas exported from the U.S.? What do I have to do to get an Authorization? Do I need to have an import authorization to use Canadian or Mexican natural gas in my factory? I don't know if I should request an import authorization or not. Who can I talk to about filing an application or whether I need to file an

394

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Mexico Central America References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "For more than ten years, the US Forest Service has collaborated with the Government of Mexico to provide forest management training and has fostered many opportunities to share the Mexican case study with international groups. The result has often been to inspire innovative incentives that serve multiple purposes: halting deforestation, improving both watershed

395

Director at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Sidney Gutierrez Director at Sandia National Laboratories Sidney Gutierrez Sidney Gutierrez Role: Director at Sandia National Laboratories Award: 2010 Notable New Mexican

396

Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA Programme Mexico-NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

397

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 2nd Quarter FY 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1999 June 1999 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Second Quarter FY 1999 June 1, 1999; Issue No. 19 continued on page 6 NEPA and Habitat Management Plan: Environmental Synergy By: Elizabeth Withers, NEPA Compliance Officer, Los Alamos Area Office, with John Stetson, Pacific Western Technologies, Ltd. On the day DOE issued the Draft EIS for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANL biologists discovered a nesting pair of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) – which had only recently been listed as threatened – in the canyons directly below the proposed site. Today, this nest site, at the edge

398

Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico Solar Decathlon 2011 Menu and Recipes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHADE SHADE TAPAS corn chips tacos nopales salad sopapillas virgin margaritas *allergens are listed on Team ASUNM's official recipe submission flavored water DINNER DESSERT BEVERAGES SIDES DINNER MENU pico de gallo & guacamole carne asada or black beans with your choice of flour tortillas or lettuce wrap; garnishes include sauteed peppers and onions, cotija cheese, sour cream, pico de gallo, and spanish rice prickly pear cactus with lime juice and olive oil topped with a cojita cheese garnish topped with honey and powdered sugar 10 october 2013 SHADE TAPAS southwestern bruschetta mexican crepes chilled corn salad prickly pear granita prickly pear arnold palmer *allergens are listed on Team ASUNM's official recipe submission flavored water DINNER DESSERT BEVERAGES SIDES DINNER MENU

399

Inflation from non-minimally coupled scalar field in loop quantum cosmology  

SciTech Connect

The FRW model with non-minimally coupled massive scalar field has been investigated in LQC framework. Considered form of the potential and coupling allows applications to Higgs driven inflation. Out of two frames used in the literature to describe such systems: Jordan and Einstein frame, the latter one is applied. Specifically, we explore the idea of the Einstein frame being the natural 'environment' for quantization and the Jordan picture having an emergent nature. The resulting dynamics qualitatively modifies the standard bounce paradigm in LQC in two ways: (i) the bounce point is no longer marked by critical matter energy density, (ii) the Planck scale physics features the ''mexican hat'' trajectory with two consecutive bounces and rapid expansion and recollapse between them. Furthermore, for physically viable coupling strength and initial data the subsequent inflation exceeds 60 e-foldings.

Artymowski, Micha?; Dapor, Andrea [Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Warszawski, ul. Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Paw?owski, Tomasz, E-mail: artymowski@fuw.edu.pl, E-mail: adapor@fuw.edu.pl, E-mail: tomasz.pawlowski@unab.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Av. República 220, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

BTFS: The Border Trade Facilitation System  

SciTech Connect

The author demonstrates the Border Trade Facilitation System (BTFS), an agent-based bilingual e-commerce system built to expedite the regulation, control, and execution of commercial trans-border shipments during the delivery phase. The system was built to serve maquila industries at the US/Mexican border. The BTFS uses foundation technology developed here at Sandia Laboratories' Advanced Information Systems Lab (AISL), including a distributed object substrate, a general-purpose agent development framework, dynamically generated agent-human interaction via the World-Wide Web, and a collaborative agent architecture. This technology is also the substrate for the Multi-Agent Simulation Management System (MASMAS) proposed for demonstration at this conference. The BTFS executes authenticated transactions among agents performing open trading over the Internet. With the BTFS in place, one could conduct secure international transactions from any site with an Internet connection and a web browser. The BTFS is currently being evaluated for commercialization.

Phillips, L.R.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Emissions from street vendor cooking devices (charcoal grilling). Final report, January 1998--March 1999  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses a joint US/Mexican program to establish a reliable emissions inventory for street vendor cooking devices (charcoal grilling), a significant source of air pollutants in the Mexicali-Imperial Valley area of Mexico. Emissions from these devices, prevalent in the streets of Mexicali, Mexico, were investigated experimentally by measuring levels of particulate matter, particle size distributions, volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, aldehydes, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, emitted when meat is cooked on a grill over a charcoal fire. To investigate the emission rate, both beef and chicken were tested. Furthermore, both meats were marinated with a mixture similar to that used by the street vendors. Some tests were conducted with non-marinated beef for comparison. Two blank runs were performed sampling charcoal fires without meat. Finally, a simple control device, normally used in an exhaust fan to trap grease over a kitchen stove, was evaluated for its effectiveness in reducing emissions.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mobile magnetic impurities in a Fermi superfluid: a route to designer molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A magnetic impurity in a fermionic superfluid hosts bound quasiparticle states known as Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states. We argue here that, if the impurity is mobile (i.e., has a finite mass), the impurity and its bound YSR quasiparticle move together as a midgap molecule, which has an unusual "Mexican-hat" dispersion that is tunable via the fermion density. We map out the impurity dispersion, which consists of an "atomic" branch (in which the impurity is dressed by quasiparticle pairs) and a "molecular" branch (in which the impurity binds a quasiparticle). We discuss the experimental realization and detection of midgap Shiba molecules, focusing on lithium-cesium mixtures, and comment on the prospects they offer for realizing exotic many-body states.

Sarang Gopalakrishnan; Colin V. Parker; Eugene Demler

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Physics of the Charm Quark  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief summary about the development of the charm quark physics in the area of experimental physics. The summary is centered in what is done by mexican physicists, particularly in the E791 and the FOCUS Experiment at FERMILAB. FOCUS (or E831) was designed to detect states of matter combining one or more charm quarks with light quarks (strange, up, down). The experiment created 10 times as many such particles as in previous experiments and investigated several topics on charm physics including high precision studies of charm semileptonic decays, studies of hadronic charm decays (branching ratios and Daltiz analyses), lifetime measurements of all charm particles, searches for mixing, CP/CPT violation, rare and forbidden decays, spectroscopy of excited charm mesons and baryons, charm production asymmetry measurements, light quark diffractive studies, QCD studies using charm pair events and searches for and upper limits on: charm pentaquarks, double charm baryons, DSJ(2632)

Carrillo Moreno, Salvador [Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico); Vazquez Valencia, Elsa Fabiola [CINVESTAV (Mexico); Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

Streit, G.E. [comp.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Allele and haplotype distribution for 16 Y-STRs (AmpFlSTR® Y-filer™ kit) in the state of Chihuahua at North Center of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The AmpFlSTR® Y-filer™ kit, including 16 Y-STRs was analyzed in 326 males from Chihuahua, at North Central, Mexico. Allele frequencies and gene diversity for each locus were estimated. Four allele duplications, namely DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391 and DYS439; and one allele null at DYS448 were observed in the sample. The haplotype diversity was 99.97 ± 0.3%. The AMOVA results, including a previous report from West of Mexico (Jalisco), showed that most of the genetic variability between these Mexican populations is attributable to intrapopulational differences (99.87%). This result supports a low-genetic differentiation between males from North and West regions of Mexico.

A.B. Gutiérrez-Alarcón; M. Moguel-Torres; A.K. León-Jiménez; G.E. Cuéllar-Nevárez; H. Rangel-Villalobos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Consumer preferences for green power in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mexico has an abundant supply of renewable energy resources but little is known about the consumers' preferences for green power consumption. This paper investigates households' preferences for adoption of green power technologies in Central Mexico. Using a structured questionnaire, we presented a green power purchase scenario to elicit consumers' buying intention. We estimate the buying intention for specific adoption of water solar boilers as it is a critical equipment to deploy in the study region. We find some evidence that buying intention is largely influenced by the affordability of equipment, even if such equipment's energy is not green. Equipment availability, relative advantage, and perceived value of utilisation were found to influence buying intention positively. Our results shed light on buying consumers' intentions and the current green power options, and offer practical insight into Mexican household preferences on how to support further deployments of green power.

Pável Reyes-Mercado; Rajagopal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Photovoltaic low power systems and their environmental impact:Yuma, Arizona, U.S.A. case study and projections for Mexicali, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents a proposal for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in homes located in Mexicali, Mexico. With exhibition of new insulation and different consumption characteristics. The photovoltaic low power system is proposed as a type of electrical supply that helps in reducing the environmental impact of generating energy by burning fossil fuels. A photovoltaic system installed in the city of Yuma, Arizona in the United States, which supplies the electrical needs to a building is selected as a reference for solar resource use. Energy use improvement and consumption costs are calculated, and the equivalent amounts of greenhouse gases, not generated since solar technologies were implemented are determined. Furthermore, comparisons of the solar potential between Yuma and Mexicali show that the Mexican city has a higher annual solar potential, so the applicability of this solar technology is too feasible in Mexicali.

Néstor Santillán Soto; O. Rafael García Cueto; Sara Ojeda Benítez; Alejandro Adolfo Lambert Arista

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Switching behaviour of consumers across options in the energy market: a comparative analysis in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyses how economic, behavioural, and service attributes influence households' decisions to switch among three energy options: LP gas, electricity, and renewable energy. While previous studies in switching behaviour have assessed economic, behavioural, and services-related attributes separately, this paper proposes an integrative model that includes these three factors together. Mexico has shale gas reserves in monopolistic hands which may face the entrance of new participants. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for switching behaviour in energy. Based on 161 surveys from Mexican households, the impact of 17 variables on switching decisions is measured with regression techniques. Findings suggest positive effects of high switching costs and low satisfaction level on switching intentions while consumption habits and social norms were found to produce mixed results on consumers' switching decisions. Some effects of inertial and locked-in behaviours explain the intriguing findings. Implications ranging from energy marketing for new entrants, to energy policy making, to further research are discussed.

Pável Reyes-Mercado; Rajagopal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy reform in Mexico. A new development model or modernization of statism?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyses the results of the reform to the Mexican energy sector from 1988 to 1994, the period during which former President Salinas de Gortari changed the energy policy strategy without modifying its objectives. Results were irregular since efforts were asymmetric, which generated new problems. Although the energy sector has opened up to private capital, the process has been far from spectacular. Even before NAFTA, the integration of this sector between Mexico and the USA was already under way; NAFTA accelerated this process and reduced Mexico's margin for manoeuvre in defining and formulating its own energy policy. Political and economic factors prevented Salinas from effecting a more aggressive liberalization; these factors, however, will be less significant during the Zedillo administration, which foreshadows the end of the statist modernism which has characterized this period.

Victor Rodríguez-Padilla; Rosío Vargas

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Renewable energy load assessment for Boquillas Del Carmen Coahuila, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the estimates that were made in 1992 of the potential load requirements for Boquillas del Carmen, a small Mexican village on the northern border of the state of Coahuila, Mexico near Big Bend National Park in southern Texas. The study was made to help determine the possibility that village might be electrified by solar or wind energy. Various estimates of are given of the potential load based on estimates ranging from basic use of lights, radio, television, and small household appliances to microwave ovens, refrigerators, and direct evaporative coolers. The low-energy consumption case was estimated to be at 23.0 kWh/month per residence per month, and the high-energy consumption case (with cooling) was 140.7 kWh/month per residence. On average, the typical residence is occupied by five individuals.

Foster, R. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The cultural parameters of lead poisoning: A medical anthropologist's view of intervention in environmental lead exposure  

SciTech Connect

This article identifies four culturally shaped sources of lead exposure in human societies: modern and historic technological sources; food habits; culturally defined health beliefs; and beauty practices. Examples of these potential sources of lead poisoning are presented from current cultures. They include the use of lead-glazed cooking pottery in Mexican-American households; folk medical use of lead in Hispanic, Arabic, South Asian, Chinese, and Hmong communities; as well as the use of lead as a cosmetic in the Near East, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Four interacting cultural conditions that create barriers to the reduction of lead exposure and lead poisoning are identified and discussed. These are knowledge deficiencies, communication resistance, cultural reinterpretations, and incongruity of explanatory models.

Trotter, R.T. II (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Present status and prospects of nuclear power in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Mexico decided to build its first nuclear power plant at the end of 1972. Actual construction in Laguna Verde started in early 1977 and after several changes in the structure of the project, CFE has taken full responsibility for engineering and construction since 1981 of the first nuclear power project. The first unit is in the process of commissioning and operation planned for 1987. As far as the prospects of nuclear power in Mexico, although it is obvious that has to have a very important role in the energy future of the country, the international situation has had an influence on the Mexican scene, and has led to a relatively strong opposition on the part of ecologists and political opponents.

Eibenschutz, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Condensate system modelling in real time for a training power plant simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the basis of the models of the condensate water and the air cooled condenser are presented. The models are part of a full scope simulator of a 450 MW combined cycle power plant. The simulator is executed in real time and is intended to be a support for the training of the operators of the Comisión Federal de Electricidad (the Mexican utility company). The simulator is presently in the final acceptance tests stage and is programmed to be in commercial operation in 2010. Here, are included a summary of the modelling methodology used to develop the referred models and the mathematical fundaments used to obtain the main equations. The tendencies of selected variables during a transient are displayed and analysed in order to probe the validity of the new generic models.

Yadira Mendoza-Alegría; Edgardo J. Roldán-Villasana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Current state of wind energy in Mexico, achievements and perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mexican government has made a serious commitment to include wind energy in its energy policy. It aims at reducing the dependence on fossil fuels for the generation of electricity and thus cut down the emissions of environmentally harmful gases. The generation of electric energy from renewable sources, apart from hydraulic and geothermal ones, is still limited despite the potential available throughout the territory. However, wind energy has joined the energy basket as one of the viable alternatives in the short and medium term. The objective of the Infrastructure National Program of the Federal Government for 2012 is to achieve that 5% of the electricity generated will come from the wind. To offer an up-to-date view this article reviews the state of wind energy in México, the achievements, perspectives and current limitations for its future development.

Yoreley Cancino-Solórzano; Antonio J. Gutiérrez-Trashorras; Jorge Xiberta-Bernat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image April 30, 2013 An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. Although only 10 percent of the observatory is constructed, the team has made its first astrophysical image-a shadow in the detected directions of cosmic rays caused by the Moon. Full-time operations at HAWC will begin this summer with one third of the observatory, making HAWC the most sensitive, wide field of view, continuously operating gamma-

418

GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA Programme NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

419

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents estimates of the undisturbed formation temperatures in a geothermal exploration well drilled in the Ceboruco area in the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. The method used assumes

420

Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico May 4, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today met with Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Gary Lunn and Mexican Secretary of Energy Fernando Canales Clariond to discuss further integration of North American energy markets. The energy leaders addressed energy security and prosperity through investments in science and technology research, enhanced natural gas markets, and the expanded use of alternative energy sources among the three countries. "Canada and Mexico are the top energy suppliers to the U.S. accounting for 30% of U.S. crude oil imports. Our nations have a long tradition of close cooperation that provides a base for economic and energy security,"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

422

1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico`s DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mexico City air quality research initiative: An overview and some statistical aspects  

SciTech Connect

The Mexican Petroleum Institute (Institute Mexicano del Petroleo, IMP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are in the first year of a three-year jointly funded project to examine the air quality in Mexico City and to provide techniques to evaluate the impact of proposed mitigation options. The technical tasks include modeling and simulation; monitoring and characterization; and strategic evaluation. Extensive measurements of the atmosphere, climate, and meteorology are being made as part of the study. This presentation provides an overview of the total project plan, reports on the current status of the technical tasks, describes the data collection methods, presents examples of the data analysis and graphics, and suggest roles for statistical analysis in this and similar environmental studies. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Waller, R.A.; Streit, G.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Guzman, F. (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Oil's role in free trade agreement crux of Mexico's petroleum sector dilemma  

SciTech Connect

Mexico's president Salinas' efforts at privatization have not yet touched Mexico's most valuable industry, oil. That remains under control of state owned Petroleos Mexicanos. Pemex and Mexico's huge oil union have come under increasing criticism for alleged abuses of power. In addition, controversy rages as to the true extent of Mexican oil resources and whether Pemex has the wherewithal to meet domestic demand and sustain oil exports. Critics also contend opening Mexico's oil sector to foreign participation would introduce new efficiencies and cost cutting measures in the cash strapped state oil industry. This paper reports that at the center of the controversy is the proposed Free Trade Agreement among Mexico, the U.S., and Canada, pushed strongly by Salinas. Oil's role in the FTA may prove the pact's main sticking point.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tseltal clause structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the syntax of clausal structure in Tseltal (Mayan) with a particular focus on agreement phenomena. The first domain of investigation is the External Possession Construction, in which the clausal ...

Shklovsky, Kirill

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

KU Today, December 11, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Students perform for Broadway Holiday Revue More: photos | videos KU IN THE NEWS Science Daily (December 11, 2012) Most ancient evidence of insect camoflage Yahoo! News (December 10, 2012) Mayan apocalypse dooms medical research Native...

427

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

428

Corn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Corn Nature Bulletin No. 118 May 31, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CORN Corn, or maize, has never been found growing wild. Columbus found it being grown by the Carib Indians and called it " Mahiz". The Aztecs told Cortez it was a gift from their gods, but the Mayas and the Incas already had been growing corn for thousands of years. Teosinte, a coarse native Mexican grass, appears to be its closest relative and its origin was probably in Central or South America. Our first colonists planted seed obtained from the Indians and, "corn" being the English word for all grain, called this strange new plant "Indian corn". Without man' s help, corn soon would disappear. Each year the seed must be carefully selected, carefully planted, and the soil kept cultivated to remove competition from other plants. Modern scientific breeding has produced varieties remarkable for their rapid growth, uniform size and heavy yield.

429

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

430

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

431

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 « National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » « National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 « National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » « National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » International Day of Democracy 3:45PM EDT African American Federal Executive Association, Inc. 9th Annual Training Workshop 9:00AM to 5:00PM EDT Equal Opportunity Publications' STEM Diversity Career Expo 9:45AM EDT International Day of Peace 3:45PM EDT Mexican Independence Day 3:45PM EDT Constitution / Citizenship Day 3:45PM EDT

432

Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

Keller, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Subsidence and uplift at Heber Geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Heber Geothermal field is in the Imperial Valley near the City of Heber, California, about 3 1/2 miles north of the Mexican border. The field is at the southern end of a network of irrigated agricultural fields extending across the valley floor. The Heber geothermal system is circular, producing water of moderate temperature (360{degrees}F) and low-salinity (13,000-14,000 ppm TDS). In cross section, the geothermal system resembles a lopsided mushroom. The system has three major permeability units: capping clays form 500 to 1800 feet; a high-matrix-permeability, deltaic-sandstone outflow reservoir from 1,800 to 5,500 feet; and feeder faults and fractures in indurated sediments below 5,500 feet. The deltaic sandstones were deposited by the ancestral Colorado River. As both power plants continue operating in Heber field, the need persists to monitor subsidence and uplift. The field`s subsidence bowl is not expected to expand significantly, but some small changes are expected due to pressure changes caused by production for the SIGC binary power plant. The three SIGC injection wells, located between the production areas for the two power plants, will be managed for adequate reservoir pressure support.

Boardman, T.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Final report of the Mexico City 1991 lidar measurements campaign  

SciTech Connect

Over the last two decades, Mexico City, like many large industrial and populous urban areas, has developed a serious air pollution problem, especially during the winter months when there are frequent temperature inversions and weak winds. The deterioration in air quality is the result of several factors. The basin within which Mexico City lies is Mexico`s center of political, administrative and economic activity, generating 34% of the cross domestic product and 42% of the industrial revenue, and supporting a population which is rapidly approaching the 20 minion mark. The basin is surrounded by mountains on three sides which inhibit rapid dispersal of pollutants. Emissions from the transportation fleet (more than 3 million vehicles) are one of the primary pollution sources, and are mostly uncontrolled. Catalytic converters are just now being introduced into the fleet. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is an international collaborative project between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute dedicated to the investigation of the air quality problem in Mexico City. The main objective of the project is to identify and assess the cost and benefits of major options being proposed to improve the air quality.

Quick, C.R. Jr.; Archuleta, F.L.; Hof, D.E.; Karl, R.R. Jr.; Tiee, J.J.; Eichinger, W.E.; Holtkamp, D.B.; Tellier, L.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Behavioral and phylogenetic differentiation in a potential cryptic species complex, the canyon treefrog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection of genetic and behavioral diversity within morphologically similar species has led to the discovery of cryptic species complexes. We tested the hypothesis that the canyon treefrog (Hyla arenicolor) may consist of cryptic species by examining mate-attraction signals among highly divergent lineages defined by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Unexpectedly calls exhibited little variation among the three U.S. lineages despite large mtDNA sequence divergences. We re-analyzed intraspecific and interspecific phylogenetic relationships by sequencing both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers among populations and a closely related but morphologically and behaviorally different species the Arizona treefrog (H. wrightorum). Discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear datasets suggests multiple instances of introgression of H. wrightorum's mitochondrial genome into populations of H. arenicolor. Furthermore intraspecific population structure based on nuclear markers shows better congruence with patterns of call variation than population structure based on the mitochondrial dataset. Although the U.S. lineages do not appear to represent cryptic species Mexican lineages do show biologically relevant call differences as assessed through female preference tests. Our results suggest that call variation can indicate genetic structure of populations; however a multilocus approach should be used in defining genetic structure as using only mtDNA may lead to erroneous conclusions.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Sustainable fuelwood use in rural Mexico. Volume 1: Current patterns of resource use  

SciTech Connect

The present report summarizes the results of the first phase of a project of cooperation between the Mexican National Commission for Energy Conservation (CONAE) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) on sustainable biofuel use in rural Mexico. This first phase has been devoted to (i) conducting an in-depth review of the status of fuelwood use in rural and peri-urban areas of Mexico, (ii) providing improved estimates of biomass energy use, (iii) assessing the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of fuelwood use, and (iv) identifying preliminary potential lines of action to improve the patterns of biomass energy use in Mexico; in particular, identifying those interventions that, by improving living conditions for rural inhabitants, can result in global benefits (such as the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions). A comprehensive review of the existing documentation of biofuel use in rural and peri-urban Mexico was conducted. Reports from official, academic, and non-governmental organizations were gathered and analyzed. A computerized rural energy database was created by re-processing a national rural energy survey. Because of the paucity of information about biofuel use in small rural industries, most of the analysis is devoted to the household sector.

Masera, O.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural Analog Studies at Pena Blanca, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The significance of the Pena Blanca uranium deposits in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico as potential natural analogs for a nuclear waste repository in unsaturated welded tuff was first recognized in the 1980s. In the 1970s, the Pena Blanca region was a major target of uranium exploration and exploitation by the Mexican government. Since then the Nopal I uranium deposit has been studied extensively by researchers in the U.S., Mexico, and Europe. The Nopal I deposit represents an environment similar to that of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain in many ways. Both are located in semi-arid regions. Both are located in Tertiary rhyolitic tuffs overlying carbonate rocks that have been subjected to basin and range-style tectonic deformation. Both are located in a chemically oxidizing, unsaturated zone 200 m or more above the water table. The alteration of uraninite to secondary minerals at Nopal I may be similar to the alteration of uranium fuel rods in this type of setting. Investigations at Nopal I and in the surrounding Sierra Pena Blanca have included detailed outcrop mapping, hydrologic and isotopic studies of flow and transport, studies of mineral alteration, modeling, and performance assessment.

A.M. Simmons

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hot springs, geochemistry, and regional heat flow of northcentral Mexico  

SciTech Connect

To date we have found, sampled and performed chemical analyses on 21 hot springs (T > 30/sup 0/C), 4 hot wells (T > 30/sup 0/C) and 15 warm springs (T = 25 to 30/sup 0/C) from the states of Chihuahua, Coahuila and Sonora, Mexico. Also in order to establish background chemistry, an additional 250 cold wells and springs (T = 12 to 25/sup 0/C) were sampled and analyzed and several hundred water analyses from the several thousand provided by various Mexican agencies were included. The technique of silica geothermometry was used to estimate the regional heat flow of northcentral Mexico. Both the traditional heat flow and the silica heat flow values are generally high and show considerable scatter as is typical of areas having Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic and tectonic activity. Specific areas of high heat flow (> 2.5 HFU) include the Presidio and Los Muertos Bolsons, the Cuidad Chihuahua-Chuatemoc area, the Delicias area, and the area south of the San Bernardino Bolson of southeast Arizona. Areas of lower heat flow (2.0 to 2.5 HFU) include the Jimenez-Camargo region and the area between the Los Muertos and Presidio Bolsons.

Swanberg, C.A.; Marvin, P.R.; Salazar S., L.; Gutierrez, C.G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Spatial analysis techniques applied to uranium prospecting in Chihuahua State, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To estimate the distribution of uranium minerals in Chihuahua the advanced statistical model "Maximun Entropy Method" (MaxEnt) was applied. A distinguishing feature of this method is that it can fit more complex models in case of small datasets (x and y data) as is the location of uranium ores in the State of Chihuahua. For georeferencing uranium ores a database from the United States Geological Survey and workgroup of experts in Mexico was used. The main contribution of this paper is the proposal of maximum entropy techniques to obtain the mineral's potential distribution. For this model were used 24 environmental layers like topography gravimetry climate (worldclim) soil properties and others that were useful to project the uranium's distribution across the study area. For the validation of the places predicted by the model comparisons were done with other research of the Mexican Service of Geological Survey with direct exploration of specific areas and by talks with former exploration workers of the enterprise "Uranio de Mexico". Results. New uranium areas predicted by the model were validated finding some relationship between the model predictions and geological faults. Conclusions. Modeling by spatial analysis provides additional information to the energy and mineral resources sectors.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Estimation of rotor angles of synchronous machines using artificial neural networks and local PMU-based quantities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates a possibility for estimating rotor angles in the time frame of transient (angle) stability of electric power systems, for use in real-time. The proposed dynamic state estimation technique is based on the use of voltage and current phasors obtained from a phasor measurement unit supposed to be installed on the extra-high voltage side of the substation of a power plant, together with a multilayer perceptron trained off-line from simulations. We demonstrate that an intuitive approach to directly map phasor measurement inputs to the neural network to generator rotor angle does not offer satisfactory results. We found out that a good way to approach the angle estimation problem is to use two neural networks in order to estimate the sin ( ? ) and cos ( ? ) of the angle and recover the latter from these values by simple post-processing. Simulation results on a part of the Mexican interconnected system show that the approach could yield satisfactory accuracy for real-time monitoring and control of transient instability.

Alberto Del Angel; Pierre Geurts; Damien Ernst; Mevludin Glavic; Louis Wehenkel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Natural history and karyology of the Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seventeen specimens of the rare Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti, are now known from Belize, Guatemala, and the Mexican states of Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Yucatán. We herein report a second specimen of O. hatti, from Belize, extending the known geographic range of the species 95 km to the southeast in the country. This is the first location at which O. hatti has been taken sympatrically with the Central American vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti. We also report data on three additional specimens of O. hatti from Campeche. Nyctomys and Otonyctomys share similar habits and habitat requirements, and might compete where they overlap. However, the distribution of O. hatti corresponds closely to that of other Yucatán endemics, and the distinct distributions of the two genera probably reflects biogeographic history and different habitat requirements, rather than result from direct competition. The karyotype of O. hatti is 2n = 50, FN = 58. Although superficially similar, it differs in important respects with the karyotypes reported for N. sumichrasti....Resumen--Diescisiete especímenes del ratón Otonyctomys hatti, especie rara de Yucatán, son ahora conocidos de Belice, Guatemala y los Estados de Campeche, Quintana Roo y Yucatán. Aquí, informamos de un segundo especímen de O. hatti de Belice...

Genoways, Hugh H.; Timm, Robert M.; Engstrom, Mark D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Oxygen Release and Oxidation Rates of MgAl2O4-Supported CuO Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The choice of wood char was made after comparing the oxygen concentration in the reactor’s exit stream, using different solid fuels and taking advantage of the high reactivity of the wood char, compared to other available fuels (e.g., coal or petcoke). ... The required solids inventory in the fuel reactor obtained here is lower than a previously reported investigation for a 40 wt?% CuO on ZrO2 support using petcoke as fuel (120–200 kg MWth–1)(34) and a recent study of continuous operation using a spray-dried 60 wt?% CuO on MgAl2O4 support (235 kg MWth–1 at 960 °C),(22) but is in close agreement with the values obtained by Adánez-Rubio et al.(48) for the spray-dried 60 wt?% CuO on MgAl2O4 support (39 kg MWth–1 at 930 °C). ... data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ...

Mehdi Arjmand; Martin Keller; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

A documented analysis of renewable energy related research and development in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research and development of renewable energy sources in Mexico has recently started to be considered as a form of contributing to solve the environmental problems caused by the irrational use of fossil fuels to meet the human and industrial energy requirements. The major areas of renewable energy research in Mexico are solar thermal energy, photovoltaic energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, materials for renewable energy, energy planning and economy and lately new programs such as hydrogen energy, fuel cells, etc. In Mexico, there are many important institutions such as universities, research centers and industries working on research, development and analysis of renewable energy sources. The industrial involvement is comparatively less in this kind of research. In this work we present results from a documented, statistical and analytical research carried out on the renewable energy related research and development activities in various important Mexican research and development institutions. Many factors affecting the complete understanding of the research and development of renewable energy sources are presented in this paper.

Ana Mar??a Ram??rez; P.J Sebastian; S.A Gamboa; M.A Rivera; O Cuevas; J Campos

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Symposium in the field of geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Mexico and the US are nations with abundant sources of geothermal energy, and both countries have progressed rapidly in developing their more accessible resources. For example, Mexico has developed over 600 MWe at Cerro Prieto, while US developers have brought in over 2000 MWe at the Geysers. These successes, however, are only a prologue to an exciting future. All forms of energy face technical and economic barriers that must be overcome if the resources are to play a significant role in satisfying national energy needs. Geothermal energy--except for the very highest grade resources--face a number of barriers, which must be surmounted through research and development. Sharing a common interest in solving the problems that impede the rapid utilization of geothermal energy, Mexico and the US agreed to exchange information and participate in joint research. An excellent example of this close and continuing collaboration is the geothermal research program conducted under the auspices of the 3-year agreement signed on April 7, 1986 by the US DOE and the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The major objectives of this bilateral agreement are: (1) to achieve a thorough understanding of the nature of geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary and fractured igneous rocks; (2) to investigate how the geothermal resources of both nations can best be explored and utilized; and (3) to exchange information on geothermal topics of mutual interest.

Ramirez, Miguel; Mock, John E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Climate Change Vulnerability and Resilience: Current Status and Trends for Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Climate change alters different localities on the planet in different ways. The impact on each region depends mainly on the degree of vulnerability that natural ecosystems and human-made infrastructure have to changes in climate and extreme meteorological events, as well as on the coping and adaptation capacity towards new environmental conditions. This study assesses the current resilience of Mexico and Mexican states to such changes, as well as how this resilience will look in the future. In recent studies (Moss et al. 2000, Brenkert and Malone 2005, Malone and Brenket 2008, Ibarrarán et al. 2007), the Vulnerability-Resilience Indicators Model (VRIM) is used to integrate a set of proxy variables that determine the resilience of a region to climate change. Resilience, or the ability of a region to respond to climate variations and natural events that result from climate change, is given by its adaptation and coping capacity and its sensitivity. On the one hand, the sensitivity of a region to climate change is assessed, emphasizing its infrastructure, food security, water resources, and the health of the population and regional ecosystems. On the other hand, coping and adaptation capacity is based on the availability of human resources, economic capacity and environmental capacity.

Ibarraran , Maria E.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Brenkert, Antoinette L.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Organization of the electric power sector in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dominant pattern of electricity development as a vertically integrated business is undergoing a major transformation. Organizational change has become essential as multiple forces related to regulation, environment and technology, and economic and political change have acquired global significance. Responses to this process include the introduction of more competition and utility reform, energy-efficient technological innovations and conservation programmes, and growing environmental concern. Less developed countries are also increasingly affected, especially those with large public utilities and privatization-oriented governments. This paper analyses the Mexican case within the global context of electricity transformation and utility reform. A model of utility reform is proposed for Mexico's electricity industry that takes advantage of regional strengths and potentials within the existing organization. This model represents an alternative to the electricity privatization proposals in Mexico, while going much further in pursuing decentralization and flexibility. The model implies new political-regulatory state activities and skills, and wider coordination with regional and local authorities and consumer organisations.

Raúl Monteforte

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thermal and Hydraulic Design of a Solar Collector Field for a Primary School Pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The methodology and results of the thermal and hydraulic design for a solar heating field of an elementary school's semi-olympic pool is presented. Improved flat solar collectors with copper tube and aluminum fins were used. From own experiences, many Mexican solar fields do not operate correctly because of their poor flow balance (irrigation), may be due to lack of attention given to this aspect. That's why the research of this work focuses on studying the behavior of the pressure drop in a hydraulic arrangement, particularly of this facility, in which all collector batteries are connected in parallel. Previously two solar collectors were sent to a specialized laboratory for certification tests, obtaining the optimum water flow value for maximum thermal efficiency. The results show an optimum range between 4 and 11 L/min. On the other hand, the development of a thermal model based on a temporal energy balance, allowed us to determine that the optimum solar heating area is around 338 m2, using 195 flat-coated solar collectors, with copper tube and aluminum fin. For this heating system a water volume/solar collection area relation, called REVA, of 1.45m3/m2 was obtained. Referred to the hydraulic design and using the program EPANET 2.0 it was found that in the proposed arrangement, 192 solar collectors were irrigated with the optimal range and only 2 solar collectors were below the lower range at 3 L/min.

Rubén Dorantes; Georgina García; Carlos Salazar; Heber Oviedo; Humberto González; Raúl Alanis; Edgar Salazar; Ignacio R. Martín-Dominguez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Detection of point sources on two-dimensional images based on peaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article considers the detection of point sources in two dimensional astronomical images. The detection scheme we propose is based on peak statistics. We discuss the example of the detection of far galaxies in Cosmic Microwave Background experiments throughout the paper, although the method we present is totally general and can be used in many other fields of data analysis. We assume sources with a Gaussian profile --that is a fair approximation of the profile of a point source convolved with the detector beam in microwave experiments-- on a background modeled by a homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field characterized by a scale-free power spectrum. Point sources are enhanced with respect to the background by means of linear filters. After filtering, we identify local maxima and apply our detection scheme, a Neyman-Pearson detector that defines our region of acceptance based on the a priori pdf of the sources and the ratio of number densities. We study the different performances of some linear filters that have been used in this context in the literature: the Mexican Hat wavelet, the matched filter and the scale-adaptive filter. We consider as well an extension to two dimensions of the biparametric scale adaptive filter (BSAF). The BSAF depends on two parameters which are determined by maximizing the number density of real detections while fixing the number density of spurious detections. For our detection criterion the BSAF outperforms the other filters in the interesting case of white noise.

M. Lopez-Caniego; D. Herranz; J. L. Sanz; R. B. Barreiro

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector EnergyEfficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexicoand China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector)program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designingenergy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years ofpursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced fewresults, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 tofocus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum.Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leadingto an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federallevel. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China wassuccessfully initiated and led at the central government level withstrategic support from international experts. The very different successtrajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons fordesigning country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives.Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasinginitiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiencyperformance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsementlabeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simplepilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosenproducts), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasingprograms are likely to be more successful where there is high-levelpolitical endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supportedby a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led)purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to settheir own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks ofcities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasingofficials.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris,Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Design and Implementation of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL) is a comprehensive multicenter community based cohort study of Hispanics/Latinos in the United States. Methods The Study rationale, objectives, design, and implementation are described in this report. Results The HCHS/SOL will recruit 16,000 men and women who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino, 18 to 74 years of age, from a random sample of households in defined communities in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. The sites were selected so that the overall sample would consist of at least 2000 persons in each of the following origin designations: Mexican, Puerto Rican and Dominican, Cuban, and Central and South American. The study includes research in the prevalence of and risk factors for heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders, kidney and liver function, diabetes, cognitive function, dental conditions, and hearing disorders. Conclusions The HCHS/SOL will (1) characterize the health status and disease burden in the largest minority population in the United States; (2) describe the positive and negative consequences of immigration and acculturation of Hispanics/Latinos to the mainstream United States life-styles, environment and health care opportunities; and (3) identify likely causal factors of many diseases in a population with diverse environmental exposures, genetic backgrounds, and early life experiences.

Paul D. Sorlie; Larissa M. Avilés-Santa; Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller; Robert C. Kaplan; Martha L. Daviglus; Aida L. Giachello; Neil Schneiderman; Leopoldo Raij; Gregory Talavera; Matthew Allison; Lisa LaVange; Lloyd E. Chambless; Gerardo Heiss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Mexico hopes its economy will soon be cooking with gas  

SciTech Connect

For the last 60 years, the logo of Mexico`s energy sector could easily have been a `No trespassing` sign. Everything from finding, storing, and transporting oil and gas to siting, financing, and operating powerplants has been handled by only two state-owned entities and controlled out of a handful of offices in Mexico City. Decentralization is changing the ground rules and playing field for all of corporate Mexico. But it`s hard to imagine any Mexican company being affected more than Pemex - and not just because of its size. Analysts believe that the company wants to spend more money looking for new oil and gas reserves, both on- and off-shore. But to justify a larger investment in exploration, the company needs a larger domestic market, and that will require an expanded gas pipeline system. Gas is the focus because Pemex already knows that industrial demand for it will soon skyrocket: Last year, CFE issued new regulations that call for all of its oil-burning powerplants to switch to natural gas by 1998 to help reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}.

Reyser, J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of U.S. organizations sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

456

Chapter 12 - Global Food and Nutrition: World Food, Health and the Environment: Practical Applications for Nutrition, Food Science and Culinary Professionals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter examines global cuisines that influence foods and beverages, nutrition, and health, including African-American, Asian, Hispanic and Mediterranean, and other influential cuisines like Cajun, Caribbean, Eastern Indian European and Native American. It includes African-American foods, celebrations, nutrition and health disparities, soul food, Cajun and Creole cuisines, diet planning, recipe modifications, and the African Diet Pyramid. Then there is the Mediterranean diet history, nutrition and health, covering Mediterranean cuisine, diet planning, recipe adjustments, and the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid; Hispanic nutrition and health; traditional Cuban, Mexican-American and Puerto Rican diets and cuisines; recipe and meal modifications; and the Latin American Diet Pyramid. Next it examines traditional Asian diets, nutrition and health, including East Asian (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese), South Asian (Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka), and Southeast Asian (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam) cuisines; micronutrient deficiencies; diet modernization, and the Asian Diet Pyramid. The chapter also discusses ethnic cooking and baking equipment, fusion cooking (Pan-Asian, Tex-Mex and California cuisines), the China Project, and food security and insecurity. Keywords bamboo steamer; cast-iron cookware; Chinese tea culture; crock pot; food deserts, food security, fusion cooking; globalization; Mediterranean diet; retro-acculturation; rice cooker; scratch cooking; slow cooker; tagine; Tex-Mex cuisine

Jacqueline B. Marcus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Spotlight on Mexico. The domino effect: crude price changes since December 1982  

SciTech Connect

While world crude prices continue their downward slide, the world is watching Mexico to see how it follows the trend. If the cut to be announced is too deep, petro-dollars will be sacrificed; if the cut is too modest, share of market may suffer. Just as Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state oil company, was the means for overextension in borrowing and for wrong-headed administration, at this moment PEMEX is becoming the means for Mexico's restoration. While Mexico confronts its worst financial crisis since the revolution, PEMEX confronts its most difficult challenge since nationalization of the oil industry in 1938. To stop the compromising flood of petro-dollars out of PEMEX, the national oil company has been made subordinate to the Ministry of Energy, Mines, and State Industries. What Mexico is doing about the PEMEX crisis may be promotive of Mexican nationalism and international bankers' security at the same time. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for February 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. 5 figures, 7 tables.

Not Available

1983-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

458

Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

An Investigation into the Validity of Some Metrics for Automatically Evaluating Natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of computer-generated weather forecasts. Our results suggest that, at least in this domain, metrics mayAn Investigation into the Validity of Some Metrics for Automatically Evaluating Natural Language interest in using automatically computed corpus-based evaluation metrics to evaluate Natural Language

460

The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain-ing and curious happening in astrology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain- ing and curious happening recordings of lunar and solar eclipses. 2 #12;The Dresden Codex was for the Mayans a way to predict eclipses likely that Martin Meinshausen proposed that this data was related to the timing of series of solar

Little, John B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Prevalencia de variantes de alto riesgo de alfa-1 antitripsina en población mestiza mexicana y su relación con los valores de la función pulmonar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ResumenIntroducción La enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC) se caracteriza por dificultad para respirar. El factor genético mejor documentado es la deficiencia de alfa-1 antitripsina (A1AT). La A1AT está codificada por el gen SERPINA1. Se considera que las variantes PiZ (rs28929474) y PiS (rs17580) causan una deficiencia grave de A1AT y que están relacionadas con un alto riesgo de desarrollar EPOC. En este estudio se busca identificar si los polimorfismos genéticos rs28929474 y rs17580 conllevan a la predisposición a la EPOC y su relación con los valores de función pulmonar en la población mestiza mexicana. Métodos Para el estudio actual se incluyeron 558 fumadores, de los cuales 279 padecían EPOC y 279 no (fumadores sin EPOC [FSE]). Se genotiparon las variantes PiS y PiZ por discriminación alélica. Se evaluó la comparación entre poblaciones independientes y los valores de función pulmonar mediante la prueba de Kruskal-Wallis. Además, se realizó un análisis de regresión logística bivariada. Resultados Los pacientes con EPOC en estadio i y iv presentaron diferencias significativas en cuanto a las frecuencias de ambos genotipos heterocigotocigotos en comparación con los FSE. Para PiS, los sujetos con el genotipo heterocigotocigoto AT presentaron una reducción del cociente FEV1/FVC en comparación con los sujetos con el genotipo homocigoto AA (p = 0,037). Se detectó una relación significativa entre el valor FEV1/FVC y el genotipo AA para PiS (OR = 0,982; coeficiente = –0,019; IC 95% = 0,966-0,997). Conclusiones Los alelos con riesgo de deficiencia de A1AT que causan EPOC son poco frecuentes entre la población mestiza mexicana. Aunque en nuestra población de estudio no tienen relación directa con la predisposición genética a la enfermedad, estos alelos de riesgo se asocian a peores niveles de función pulmonar. Es importante describir con qué frecuencia aparecen estas variantes genéticas de riesgo en otras poblaciones latinoamericanas. AbstractIntroduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by restricted airflow. The best-documented genetic factor is alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. The PiZ (rs28929474) and PiS (rs17580) variants are believed to cause severe AAT deficiency and are linked to a high risk of developing COPD. This study sought to identify whether genetic polymorphisms rs28929474 and rs17580 are associated with COPD susceptibility and lung function values in a Mexican mestizo population. Methods In this study, 558 smokers were included, of whom 279 had COPD and 279 did not (smokers without COPD - SWC). The PiS and PiZ variants were genotyped by allelic discrimination. Independent populations and lung function values were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A bivariate logistic regression analysis was also conducted. Results Stage I and iv COPD patients showed significant differences in the frequencies of both heterozygous genotypes compared to SWC. For PiS, individuals with the heterozygous genotype AT demonstrated a decreased FEV1/FVC ratio compared to subjects with the homozygous genotype AA (P = 0.037). A significant association was found between the FEV1/FVC ratio and genotype AA for PiS (OR = 0.982, ? coefficient = –0.019, 95% CI = 0.966-0.997). Conclusions COPD-causing AAT deficiency risk alleles exist at a very low frequency among Mexican mestizo population. Although they are not directly linked in our study population with disease susceptibility, these risk alleles are associated with poorer lung function measurements. It is important to characterize how often these genetic risk variants occur in other Latin American populations.

Gloria Pérez-Rubio; Luis Octavio Jiménez-Valverde; Alejandra Ramírez-Venegas; Ángel Camarena; Raúl H. Sansores; Fernando Flores-Trujillo; Juan M. Reséndiz-Hernández; Ramcés Falfán-Valencia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Vitamin D Status Is a Biological Determinant of Health Disparities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background In human beings, dark skin requires more exposure to ultraviolet light to synthesize the same amount of vitamin D as lighter skin. It is has been repeatedly shown that at the latitude of the United States there are vitamin D disparities related to skin color. Although inadequate vitamin D status and health disparities have been associated with many of the same diseases, neither nutrition policy nor public health policy in the United States currently recognizes any role at all for vitamin D as a determinant of health disparities. Objective This study investigated the relationship between health, skin color, and vitamin D nutriture in the US population. Design The design is cross-sectional, correlational, and can be generalized to the population of the United States. Participants We used data from 12,505 (unweighted) subjects (3,402 non-Hispanic blacks, 3,143 Mexican Americans, and 5,960 non-Hispanic whites), aged 13 years or older, from the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. Main outcome measure Self-rated health, a repeatedly validated indicator of objective health status, was used as a continuous measure of health. Statistical analyses performed Using software appropriate for the complex survey design of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the study consisted of six regression models, one predicting vitamin D status and five predicting self-rated health. Results Controlling for the covariates sex, interview language, country of birth, tobacco use, age, body mass index, and leisure exercise as well as the socioeconomic variables education and family income, remaining disparities in self-rated health are greatly reduced or eliminated by controlling for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Conclusions We found that socioeconomic factors are the strongest determinant of skin-color based health disparities in the US population, but that it may not be possible to eliminate health disparities in the United States without eliminating the skin-color–related disparities in vitamin D nutriture.

Tom Weishaar; Joyce Marcley Vergili

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray intensity changes, preceding the cyclone appearances around Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently it has been suggested that there exist specific changes in the cosmic ray intensity and some solar and geomagnetic parameters during the days, preceding the hurricane appearances over the North Atlantic Ocean. To understand better these phenomena, data for all hurricanes born not only over the Atlantic but also over the Pacific waters in the last 55 years that hit the Mexican borders were elaborated. As basic hurricane parameters the maximum rotational velocity and the estimated total energy were used. To avoid any interference all hurricanes, overlapping the preceding ones with more than 20 days were not included. Then the behavior of the cosmic ray (CR) intensity, the sunspot (SS) numbers, and the geomagnetic parameters (AP) and (KP) in 35 days prior and 20 days after the cyclone start were investigated. The CR, SS, AP and KP showed much more intensive disturbances in the periods preceding and following the hurricane appearance. For SS this disturbance gradually increase with the hurricane strength. A characteristic peak in the CR intensity appears before the hurricane start. But its place varies between 5 and 20 days before that start. Specific changes were observed in the SS. For major hurricanes they begins sometimes more than 20 days in advance. The AP and the KP show series of bursts, spread over the whole period of 30 preceding days. The obtained results from the performed correlational analysis are enough interesting to motivate a further statistical analysis with more precise techniques: in particular a common periodicity of 30 years found in the number of tropical storms landing into Mexico, the averaged rotational wind velocity and the ACE must be studied in connection with the solar Hale cycle. Using coherence wavelet spectral analysis we present a comparative study between one terrestrial and one cosmophysical phenomena that presumable influence hurricanes development: African dust outbreaks versus cosmic rays for all North Atlantic tropical cyclones. It is shown that the cosmophysical influence cannot be considered as a negligible effect.

J. Pérez-Peraza; S. Kavlakov; V. Velasco; A. Gallegos-Cruz; E. Azpra-Romero; O. Delgado-Delgado; F. Villicaña-Cruz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Phanerozoic tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin regions (Mexico, Texas, New Mexico) using Landsat imagery, subsurface and outcrop data  

SciTech Connect

Integrating regional Landsat imagery, outcrop field studies, and subsurface data has resulted in a more comprehensive understanding and delineation of the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos region. Landsat imagery were acquired and registered to the existing 1:25000 scale maps and mosaiced to create a regional view of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin region. The imagery were used to extrapolate and map key stratigraphic and tectonic elements after calibration from documented outcrop and subsurface data. The interpretations aided in the extrapolation of scattered control information and were critical in the complete reconstruction of the geologic history of the area. The Trans-Pecos Phanerozoic history comprises five tectono-depositional phases, and these have controlled the shape of the modem landscape: (1) Late Proterozoic rifting (Gondwana from Laurentia), and development of the Early-Middle Paleozoic Tobosa basin; (2) Pennsylvanian collision (South and North Americas), and differentiation of the Tobosa basin into the Midland, Delaware, Orogrande, and Pedregosa basins separated by basement blocks: Central Basin Platform, Diablo Platform, Burro-Florida Platform; (3) Middle Mesozoic transtensional rifting (Mexico from North America), and Late Jurassic failed rifting of the Mexican Chihuahua and Coahuila Troughs west and south of the Diablo Platform; (4) Late Mesozoic Laramide collision (Mexico and Texas), and development of the Chihuahua fold/thrust belt limited by the western margin of the Diablo Platform; (5) Late Cenozoic North American basin and Range rifting, and development of Rio Grande grabens, block-faulted mountains, and volcanics. The Tobosa basin was a passive-margin interior sag; its continental margin was south of the Marathons.

Markello, J.R.; Sarg, J.F. [Mobil Technology Corporation, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Characterization of ambient particulate matter in the Paso del Norte region  

SciTech Connect

Air pollution in the Paso del Norte region, where West Texas abuts the southern boundary of New Mexico and the northern boundary of Chihuahua, Mexico is a common concern to the residents on both sides of the border. Parts of the region fail to meet the US and Mexican Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, ozone, and carbon monoxide. The regional air pollution problem is complicated due to arid climate, complex terrain topography, frequently occurring temperature inversions, extensive unpaved urban areas, an aging and poorly maintained vehicle fleet, and a number of other uncontrolled anthropogenic emission sources. The issue is further complicated by concerns arising from recent scientific evidence of the health effects associated with exposures to fine particulate matter. A study designed to address particulate matter (PM) air pollution problems in the region is currently undertaken by researchers from member universities of the Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy and several governmental agencies. The study attempts to (1) characterize the fine fraction of PM; (2) identify and characterize the major regional emission sources; (3) apportion the fine fraction of PM to the source emissions; and (4) establish a regional technological information clearinghouse. The short-term goal of this research is to initiate a research program to characterize, identify, and quantify the sources and nature of the PM in the region. The long-term goal of this study is to establish regional research capabilities to continue air quality monitoring, evaluation, modeling, and control after the implementation of the study. A scoping study to collect regional PM was conducted in December 1998.

Li, W.W.; Currey, R.M.; Valenzuela, V.H.; Meuzelaar, H.L.C.; Sheya, S.A.; Anderson, J.R.; Banerjee, S.; Griffin, J.B.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Steam turbine path evaluation during maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The deterioration of a turbine (Steam & Gas) flow path affects the efficiency of the turbine. The most critical factors which affect the efficiency of turbines are: wearing out of the trailing edges of the blades by solid particle erosion, deposits, material loss due to corrosion (also sand blast) which increases the flow area, increases in blade surface roughness, etc. Wearing out of the seals caused by shaft vibrations or rapid start-up leads to significant leakage losses. Some of these effects can be estimated with some precision during operation of the turbine, but an exact evaluation can be carried out during a maintenance applying a special fluid flow analysis program. Such a program has been developed and then adapted to achieve this goal. During maintenance the complete geometry of the steam path is measured (blades lengths, widths, angles, clearances, etc.) in the condition encountered before any corrections. Then the similar measurement is undertaken after, for example, clearance corrections, blade replacements, cleaning of the blades, etc. Using the program first of all the design data is calculated. Then the actual data is fed into the program and compared to the design data. Thus the effect of the blade surface roughness, increased seal clearances, flow area increase, solid particle damage to the trailing edge and so on for each particular stage is calculated. The effect is expressed in [kW] as a deviation from the design points. This data can be helpful during online evaluation of the turbine performance. This evaluation helps the management of the plant in undertaking the correct decision concerning the date of the next major maintenance and replacement part procurement. Many turbines in the Mexican utility have been evaluated in such a manner. Some examples are presented.

Kubiak, J.; Angel, F. del; Carnero, A.; Campos, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixo, Morelos (Mexico)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF MEXICO, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Mexico, GTRI first made contact in 2005. The project then lost momentum and stalled. At the same time, GTRI’s cooperation with the Republic of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRI’s interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Mexico and to facilitate this cooperation, they offered to invite their Mexican counterparts to Colombia to observe its successful cooperation with GTRI. Shortly after that visit, the Government of Mexico agreed to move forward and requested that the cooperative efforts in Mexico be performed in a tripartite manner, leveraging the skills, experience, and resources of the Colombians. As a result, 22 of Mexico’s largest radioactive sites have had security upgrades in place within 18 months of cooperation.

Butler, Nicholas; Watson, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Maternal employment, acculturation, and time spent in food-related behaviors among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Evidence from the American Time Use Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Employment is a major factor underlying im/migration patterns. Unfortunately, lower diet quality and higher rates of obesity appear to be unintended consequences of moving to the US. Changes in food preparation practices may be a factor underlying dietary acculturation. Hispanic women have identified work-related time constraints as barriers to meal preparation and frequent family meals. However, the relationships between employment, acculturation, and food-related time use in Hispanic families have received relatively little attention. We used cross-sectional data collected from Hispanic mothers (ages 18–65) with at least one child Hispanic origin group, sociodemographic and household characteristics. Working an eight-hour day was associated with spending 38 fewer minutes in food preparation (?38.0?±?SE 4.8, p?Mexican–Americans, whereas time spent in food-preparations did not differ by place of birth among Puerto Ricans. Acculturation did not appear to modify the relationship between hours worked and time spent in food preparation or family dinner. Mothers who worked late hours spent less time eating the evening meal with their families (?9.8?±?SE 1.3). Although an eight-hour workday was associated with a significant reduction in food preparation time, an unexpected result is that, for working mothers, additional time spent in paid work is not associated with the duration of family dinner later that day.

Sarah A. Sliwa; Aviva Must; Flavia Peréa; Christina Economos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Cost Benefit Energy Analysis of the Building Envelope Systems with Ener-Habitat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the last decade, housing construction in Mexico has increased dramatically, despite the economic and financial crises, it is one of the main drivers of the Mexican economy; the government has supported programs to develop social housing in order to assist low-income families. This type of initiatives has allowed low-income people to own a place to live, but it has also promoted the spread of housing developments with house models of similar characteristics in the very diverse geographical and climatic zones of Mexico. Even though some of the dwellings have few differences depending on the region they belong to, they do not reflect climatic adaptations. The correct selection of the envelope materials is one of the first and most effective passive strategy that must be considered in the design of a housing. However, just selecting the materials by knowing their thermal properties is not enough to make an appropriate decision about the construction system. For this reason, we need a tool like Ener-Habitat, which allows a quick assessment of thermal and energy performance of a building system consisting of several layers, through the time-dependent calculation of heat transfer, suitable for high thermal mass materials, such as those generally used in Mexico and the climates of Mexico with high solar radiation and large temperature swing during the day. The study propose a method to analyze the cost and energy benefit of building systems, and as example analyzes some walls building systems, in a hot-dry climate city of Mexico, during the air conditioning season. This tool allows, at early stages of architectural design, quick assessments for decision taking on the building systems choice, in relation with better energy performance. Ener-Habitat was created by researchers from six academic institutions in Mexico and was funded by the National Council for Science and Technology and the Ministry of Energy of Mexico.

Jose Manuel Ochoa; Irene Marincic; Maria Guadalupe Alpuche; Enrique Alejandro Duarte; Ileana Gonzalez; Guadalupe Huelz; Guillermo Barrios

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Generation and analysis of the 2005 land cover map for Mexico using 250 m MODIS data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land cover plays a key role in global to regional monitoring and modeling because it affects and is being affected by climate change and thus became one of the essential variables for climate change studies. National and international organizations require timely and accurate land cover information for reporting and management actions. The North American Land Change Monitoring System (NALCMS) is an international cooperation of organizations and entities of Canada, the United States, and Mexico to map land cover change of North America's changing environment. This paper presents the methodology to derive the land cover map of Mexico for the year 2005 which was integrated in the NALCMS continental map. Based on a time series of 250 m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data and an extensive sample data base the complexity of the Mexican landscape required a specific approach to reflect land cover heterogeneity. To estimate the proportion of each land cover class for every pixel several decision tree classifications were combined to obtain class membership maps which were finally converted to a discrete map accompanied by a confidence estimate. The map yielded an overall accuracy of 82.5% (Kappa of 0.79) for pixels with at least 50% map confidence (71.3% of the data). An additional assessment with 780 randomly stratified samples and primary and alternative calls in the reference data to account for ambiguity indicated 83.4% overall accuracy (Kappa of 0.80). A high agreement of 83.6% for all pixels and 92.6% for pixels with a map confidence of more than 50% was found for the comparison between the land cover maps of 2005 and 2006. Further wall-to-wall comparisons to related land cover maps resulted in 56.6% agreement with the MODIS land cover product and a congruence of 49.5 with Globcover.

René R. Colditz; Gerardo López Saldaña; Pedro Maeda; Jesús Argumedo Espinoza; Carmen Meneses Tovar; Arturo Victoria Hernández; Carlos Zermeño Benítez; Isabel Cruz López; Rainer Ressl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Questions of Indigeneity and the (Re)-Emergent Ch'orti' Maya of Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Conversely, some argue that states such as Mexico and El Salvador have created more inclusive definitions of indigenousQ4 to manage potentially unruly, impoverished populations (Hale 2005, 2006b; Speed 2005; Mart?´nez Novo 2006; Tilley 2006). A strict social... their natural resources; and representation in Congress (Anderson 2007:393–394). Thus, while the state was accepting international investments for indigenous and eco-tourism, including support for the multinational Ruta Maya (Mayan Trail) project, it found...

Metz, Brent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Paleomagnetic and paleointensity study of Oligocene volcanic rocks from Chihuahua (northern Mexico)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed rock-magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity study was carried out on Oligocene volcanic formations from Chihuahua (northern Mexico) in order to obtain some decisive constraints for the tectonic evolution of the southern Cordilleran Orogenic Belt of North America and for the geomagnetic field strength during Oligocene time. Age of the volcanic units lies between 33 and 25 Ma according to available radiometric data. Rock-magnetic experiments reveal that remanence is carried in most cases by Ti-poor titanomagnetite, resulting of oxy-exsolution of original titanomagnetite during the initial flow cooling. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivities point to ‘small’ pseudo-single domain magnetic grains for these (titano)magnetites. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most cases. Nine sites yield reverse polarity magnetization, three are normally magnetized and one unit shows intermediate polarity magnetization. An evidence of strong lightning-produced magnetization overprint was detected for one site. Combining all paleomagnetic data currently available for northern Mexico, we obtained a well-defined Eocene–Oligocene mean paleomagnetic direction with I=48.5°, D=337.1°, k=20, ?95=6.8°, N=24, which deviates counterclockwise from the expected direction estimated from the North American apparent polar wander path. This suggests a vertical-axis tectonic counterclockwise rotation of about 16° relative to stable North America. Transition from Laramide compression to Basin and Range extension occurred during Oligocene, around 32–30 Ma. Tectonic rotation may then reflect east–northeast extension in the mid- to late-Cenozoic. Twenty-three samples were pre-selected for Thellier palaeointensity experiments because of their low viscosity index, stable remanent magnetization and reasonably reversible continuous thermomagnetic curves. Only 12 samples, coming from three individual basaltic lava flows, yielded reliable paleointensity estimates with the flow-mean virtual dipole moments (VDM) ranging from 3.96 to 4.65×1022 Am2. Combination of Mexican data with the available comparable quality Oligocene paleointensity results yield a mean VDM of 4×1022 Am2, which is comparable or slightly higher than the mean \\{VDMs\\} calculated for the Mesozoic low field period, but significantly lower than present day value. This low intensity may correlate with the relatively high paleosecular variation rate invoked around 30 Ma by several authors.

A Goguitchaichvili; L.M Alva-Valdivia; J Urrutia-Fucugauchi; C Zesati; C Caballero

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Investigation of different manganese ores as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) for solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct capture of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. In this work, six different manganese ores are investigated as oxygen carriers for CLC application. The chemical-looping characteristics of the oxygen carriers were evaluated in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed reactor in the temperature range of 900–970 °C during alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions. Three of the manganese ores showed a small oxygen release in inert environment between 850 and 950 °C. During reactivity tests, the gas yield with methane increased with the temperature and complete conversion of 50% CO in H2 was obtained for all of the ores. The rates of char gasification of two fuels, namely Mexican petroleum coke and Swedish wood char, were compared for the different manganese ores at 970 °C and with 50% H2O in N2 as fluidizing gas. Ilmenite and a manufactured Mn-oxide oxygen carrier consisting of Mn3O4 and MgO-stabilized ZrO2 as support were also included for comparison. The char gasification rate and the gas conversion were higher with the manganese ores and the Mn-oxide oxygen carrier compared to ilmenite. However, the higher reactivity of the manganese ores with H2 and the ensuing decrease in H2 inhibition for manganese ores is not sufficient to explain their higher rate of char gasification. Surface analysis of partially gasified petcoke particles in the presence of manganese ores showed formation of cavities and channels as well as a uniform distribution of potassium and sodium elements. The rate of char gasification also increased with the concentration of potassium and sodium impurities in the manganese ores. Thus the results suggest that the increased rate of char conversion for manganese ores is due to alkali-catalyzed steam gasification. The increase in rate of char gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of these materials suggests that manganese ores could be interesting materials for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework  

SciTech Connect

A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Parametric analysis of total costs and energy efficiency of 2G enzymatic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an analysis of total costs (TPC) and energy efficiency of enzymatic ethanol production. The analysis is parametrized with respect to plant capacity and polysaccharides content (pc) of lignocellulosic feedstock. The feedstock is based on wheat straw whose price is proportional to its pc ranging from new straw with high pc and high cost to agro-wastes with limited pc but lower cost. The plant flowsheet was built using a conventional biochemical platform with co-saccharification and fermentation (SHF) technologies. A parametric analysis of TPC as a function of plant capacity (100–2100 ton DB/day) and pc (i.e. feedstock price) (80% (75 USD/ton DB)–35% (6 USD/ton DB)) was performed with Net Present Value (NPV) techniques. Current data from Mexican economics and the agro-industrial sector were used as an illustrative case. A quasi-linear section of the TCP surface was identified delimited by (300–1100 ton DB/day) and (80–55% pc) with increments no larger than 21% of the minimum TPC obtained (0.99 USD/l etOH for 2100 ton DB/day and 80% pc). Major cost contributions are detailed and quantified for boundary cases of this surface. Energy consumption and production were also calculated for all the plant capacity and feedstock pc cases, taking into consideration the Maximum Energy Recovery (MER) obtained from a Pinch analysis. The end-use energy index eer was less than 0.82 for all cases, thus stressing the need to use process equipment with lower energy requirements. TPC are compared against previously published results for SHF technology between 500 and 2100 ton DB/day plant capacities. These values were updated and normalized with respect to feedstock and enzyme costs employed in this work. Differences among TPC and recently published normalized results are within a ±5% range, thus confirming the dependence of TPC from feedstock and enzyme prices, regardless of flowsheet technology and economic conditions.

A. Sanchez; V. Sevilla-Güitrón; G. Magaña; L. Gutierrez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Inference of strata separation and gas emission paths in longwall overburden using continuous wavelet transform of well logs and geostatistical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prediction of potential methane emission pathways from various sources into active mine workings or sealed gobs from longwall overburden is important for controlling methane and for improving mining safety. The aim of this paper is to infer strata separation intervals and thus gas emission pathways from standard well log data. The proposed technique was applied to well logs acquired through the Mary Lee/Blue Creek coal seam of the Upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, using well logs from a series of boreholes aligned along a nearly linear profile. For this purpose, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) of digitized gamma well logs was performed by using Mexican hat and Morlet, as the mother wavelets, to identify potential discontinuities in the signal. Pointwise Hölder exponents (PHE) of gamma logs were also computed using the generalized quadratic variations (GQV) method to identify the location and strength of singularities of well log signals as a complementary analysis. \\{PHEs\\} and wavelet coefficients were analyzed to find the locations of singularities along the logs. Using the well logs in this study, locations of predicted singularities were used as indicators in single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) to generate equi-probable realizations of potential strata separation intervals. Horizontal and vertical variograms of realizations were then analyzed and compared with those of indicator data and training image (TI) data using the Kruskal–Wallis test. A sum of squared differences was employed to select the most probable realization representing the locations of potential strata separations and methane flow paths. Results indicated that singularities located in well log signals reliably correlated with strata transitions or discontinuities within the strata. Geostatistical simulation of these discontinuities provided information about the location and extents of the continuous channels that may form during mining. If there is a gas source within their zone of influence, paths may develop and allow methane movement towards sealed or active gobs under pressure differentials. Knowledge gained from this research will better prepare mine operations for potential methane inflows, thus improving mine safety.

C. Özgen Karacan; Ricardo A. Olea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Title Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-60144 Year of Publication 2006 Authors McGrory, Laura Van Wie, Philip Coleman, David Fridley, Jeffrey P. Harris, and Edgar Villasenor Franco Conference Name 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2006 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Abstract The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexico and China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing energy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years of pursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced few results, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 to focus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum. Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leading to an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federal level. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China was successfully initiated and led at the central government level with strategic support from international experts. The very different success trajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons for designing country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives. Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasing initiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiency performance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsement labeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simple pilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosen products), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasing programs are likely to be more successful where there is high-level political endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supported by a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led) purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to set their own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks of cities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasing officials.

478

Geology and hydrogeochemistry of the Jungapeo CO2-rich thermal springs, State of Michoacán, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the first geothermal assessment of the Jungapeo CO2-rich mineral springs, which are located in the eastern part of Michoacán State (central Mexico) at the southern limit of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. All but one of the > 10 springs occur at the lower contact of the distal olivine-bearing basaltic andesite lavas of the Tuxpan shield, a 0.49- to 0.60-Ma-old cluster of monogenetic scoria cones and lava flows. The Tuxpan shield has a maximum radius of 6 km and was constructed on top of a folded and faulted Cretaceous basement consisting largely of marine limestones, marls, and shales. The mineral waters are characterized by moderate temperatures (28 to 32 °C), mild acidity (pH from 5.5 to 6.5), relatively high discharge rates, effervescence of CO2 gas, clarity at emergence and abundant subsequent precipitation of hydrous iron, silica oxides, and carbonates around pool margins and issuing streamlets. Chemical and isotopic (deuterium, oxygen, and tritium) analyses of water and gas samples obtained during the period 1991–1997 indicate that the springs are largely composed of meteoric water from a local source with relatively short residence times (water ages of 7 to 25 years). Spring waters are chemically characterized by moderate SiO2, Ca + Mg nearly equal to Na + K, high HCO3, moderate to low Cl, low F and SO4, high B, moderate Li, while Br and As are low. In contrast, Fe + Mn is exceptionally high. Thus, the Jungapeo waters cannot be regarded as high-temperature geothermal fluids. Instead, they resemble soda spring waters similar to other low-to-medium temperature soda waters in the world. Gas samples are extremely rich in CO2 with no detectable geothermal H2S or H2 and very low contents of CH4 and NH3, indicating the gases are not derived from a high-temperature resource. Carbon-13 analyses of CO2 show a narrow range (? 6.7‰ and ? 7.2‰) that falls within the range for MORB CO2. Thus, most CO2 seems to originate from the mantle but some CO2 could originate from thermal degradation of organic remains in underlying Cretaceous rocks. 3/4He ratios range from about 2 to 3 Rc/Ra, indicating that a small mantle/magmatic He component is present in the gases. In conclusion, the mineral waters are the surface expression of a low-temperature geothermal system of limited size that originates from the combined effects of a high regional heat flow and (possibly) the remnant heat released from subjacent basaltic andesite magma bodies that constitute the root zone of the Tuxpan shield.

Claus Siebe; Fraser Goff; María Aurora Armienta; Dale Counce; Robert Poreda; Steve Chipera

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSAs national security mission. To enable LANL to continue this enduring responsibility requires that NNSA maintain the capabilities and capacities required in support of its national mission assignments at LANL. To carry out its Congressionally assigned mission requirements, NNSA must maintain a safe and reliable infrastructure at LANL. Upgrades to the various utility services at LANL have been ongoing together with routine maintenance activities over the years. However, the replacement of a certain portion of natural gas service transmission pipeline is now necessary as this delivery system element has been operating well beyond its original design life for the past 20 to 30 years and components of the line are suffering from normal stresses, strains, and general failures. The Proposed Action is to grant an easement to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) to construct, operate, and maintain approximately 15,000 feet (4,500 meters) of 12-inch (in.) (30-centimeter [cm]) coated steel natural gas transmission mainline on NNSA-administered land within LANL along Los Alamos Canyon. The new gas line would begin at the existing valve setting located at the bottom of Los Alamos Canyon near the Los Alamos County water well pump house and adjacent to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) PNM gas transmission mainline. The new gas line (owned by PNM) would then cross the streambed and continue east in a new easement obtained by PNM from the NNSA, paralleling the existing electrical power line along the bottom of the canyon. The gas line would then turn northeast near State Road (SR) 4 and be connected to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) coated steel gas transmission mainline, located within the right-of-way (ROW) of SR 502. The Proposed Action would also involve crossing a streambed twice. PNM would bore under the streambed for pipe installation. PNM would also construct and maintain a service road along the pipeline easement. In addition, when construction is complete, the easement would be reseeded. Portions of the Proposed Action are located within potential roosting and nesting habitat for the Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida), a Federally protected threatened species. Surveys over the last seven years have identified no owls within this area. The Proposed Action would be conducted according to the provisions of the LANL Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan. Effects would not be adverse to either individuals or potential critical habitat for protected species. Cultural resources within the vicinity of the proposed easement would be avoided with the exception of an historic trail. However, the original trail has been affected by previous activities and no longer has sufficient historical value to be eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Minimal undisturbed areas would be involved in the Proposed Action. Most of the proposed easement follows an established ROW for the existing electrical power line. There are several potentially contaminated areas within Los Alamos Canyon; however, these areas would be avoided, where possible, or, if avoidance isn't possible or practicable under the Proposed Action, the contaminated areas would be sampled and remediated in accordance with New Mexico Environment Department requirements before construction.

N /A

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

480

Groundwater responses to controlled water releases in the limitrophe region of the Colorado River: Implications for management and restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably affected the exchange of surface water between the Colorado River and its floodplains. However, the way in which both have impacted groundwater–surface water interactions is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a hydrologic analysis of the 2009–2010 winter flows released into the limitrophe region of the Colorado River in order to characterize the surface flows along this dry reach and, for the first time, study the impact of winter flows on the groundwater conditions in the area. The study used existing data on groundwater levels that was collected from regional piezometers on both sides of the limitrophe every five years from 1980 to 2005. Regional flow direction from NE to SW was observed in all years. A groundwater depression cone in the southwest part of the limitrophe was identified from 1980 to 1995. A general rise of groundwater levels was observed from 2000 to 2005 on both sides of the limitrophe, but during the same time period, a depression cone formed along the border between Arizona and Sonora, in the Mesa Arenosa on the Mexican side of the border. In order to identify the water table evolution within the limitrophe riparian zone, nine sets of piezometers were constructed in an arrangement perpendicular to the main river channel. Water table levels were measured automatically every 30 min and were also manually measured periodically. Nine geohydrological cross sections were constructed using the topographic relief from LIDAR elevation points and depth to groundwater measurements during water discharges in the Colorado River channel at Morelos dam. Groundwater seepage from irrigation canals, irrigation returns, and river discharge flows were identified and the depth to groundwater and its influence on riparian vegetation was analyzed. A strong correlation between flow discharge (up to 60.49 hm3 from November 2009 to April 2010) and groundwater elevation (average elevation change of 1.62 m on January 22, 2010) in time and space was found. The percentage of water retained in the main river channel decreased from 100% in the first discharge event (December 12–13, 2009) to 36% after the last discharge event (April 9–17, 2010), due to remaining moisture in the unsaturated soil. The total volume of water retained, infiltrated, and evaporated, was 60% (36.6 × 106 m3) of the total water discharged. The delay time of the groundwater front during a discharge event was on average 6:30, 20:06, and 28:53 h from section 1 to section 2, 1–3, and 1–4 respectively. This historical study provides insight into how floods affect the groundwater system, which is the foundation for aquatic and riparian biodiversity. This issue is of increasing relevance given growing international interest in rehabilitating the riparian and aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River delta through intentional flood releases.

Jorge Ramírez-Hernández; Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta; Mauricio Peregrina-Llanes; Alejandra Calvo-Fonseca; Edgar Carrera-Villa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mexican mayan mexican" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

U.S.-MEXICO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; BILATERAL TECHNICAL EXCHANGES FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE BORDER REGION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a strong commitment to transfer the results of its science and technology programs to the private sector. The intent is to apply innovative and sometimes advanced technologies to address needs while simultaneously stimulating new commercial business opportunities. Such focused “technology transfer” was evident in the late 1990s as the results of DOE investments in environmental management technology development led to new tools for characterizing and remediating contaminated sites as well as handling and minimizing the generation of hazardous wastes. The Department’s Office of Environmental Management was attempting to reduce the cost, accelerate the schedule, and improve the efficacy of clean-up efforts in the nuclear weapons complex. It recognized that resulting technologies had broader world market applications and that their commercialization would further reduce costs and facilitate deployment of improved technology at DOE sites. DOE’s Albuquerque Operations Office (now part of the National Nuclear Security Administration) began in 1995 to build the foundation for a technology exchange program with Mexico. Initial sponsorship for this work was provided by the Department’s Office of Environmental Management. As part of this effort, Applied Sciences Laboratory, Inc. (ASL) was contracted by the DOE Albuquerque office to identify Mexico’s priority environmental management needs, identify and evaluate DOE-sponsored technologies as potential solutions for those needs, and coordinate these opportunities with decision makers from Mexico’s federal government. That work led to an improved understanding of many key environmental challenges that Mexico faces and the many opportunities to apply DOE’s technologies to help resolve them. The above results constituted, in large part, the foundation for an initial DOE-funded program to apply the Department’s technology base to help address some of Mexico’s challenging environmental issues. The results also brought focus to the potential contributions that DOE’s science and technology could make for solving the many difficult, multi-generational problems faced by hundreds of bi-national communities along the 2,000-mile shared border of the United States and Mexico. Efforts to address these U.S.-Mexico border issues were initially sponsored by the DOE’s Albuquerque and Carlsbad offices. In subsequent years, the U.S. Congress directed appropriations to DOE’s Carlsbad office to address public health, safety and security issues prevalent within U.S.-Mexico border communities. With ASL’s assistance, DOE’s Albuquerque office developed contacts and formed partnerships with interested U.S and Mexican government, academic, and commercial organizations. Border industries, industrial effluents, and public health conditions were evaluated and documented. Relevant technologies were then matched to environmental problem sets along the border. Several technologies that were identified and subsequently supported by this effort are now operational in a number of U.S.-Mexico border communities, several communities within Mexico’s interior states, and in other parts of Latin America. As a result, some serious public health threats within these communities caused by exposure to toxic airborne pollutants have been reduced. During this time, DOE’s Carlsbad office hosted a bilateral conference to establish a cross-border consensus on what should be done on the basis of these earlier investigative efforts. Participating border region stakeholders set an agenda for technical collaborations. This agenda was supported by several Members of Congress who provided appropriations and directed DOE’s Carlsbad office to initiate technology demonstration projects. During the following two years, more than 12 private-sector and DOE-sponsored technologies were demonstrated in partnership with numerous border community stakeholders. All technologies were well received and their effectiveness at addressing health, safety and security issues w

Jimenez, Richard, D., Dr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

483

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

484

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

485

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

486

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

487

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

488

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

489

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

490

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

491

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

492

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

493

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

494

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

495

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.